Boyer, Yvonne Marie, PhD (LLD

)
Yvonne was born and raised in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan and is Métis registered
with the Métis Nation of Saskatchewan. She is the great grand daughter of Narcisse
Boyer an American Michif who was a member of the Turtle Mountain Chippewa Cree
Band in North Dakota. She is also a descendant of Alexis Lesperance the leader of the La
Loche boat Brigade and a Louis Riel supporter during the Resistance of 1869-70.
With a background in nursing she began her law career in 1991, studying at the
University of Saskatchewan’s Legal Studies for Native People. She subsequently entered
the law program at Dalhousie University and finished her LLB at the University of
Saskatchewan. Yvonne has nearly twenty years of experience practicing law and
currently owns a general law practice which blends mainstream law with Indigenous law.
Yvonne is a member of the Law Society of Saskatchewan and the Law Society of Upper
Canada. She is a former General Counsel to the Native Women's Association of Canada
and a former Commissioner with the Canadian Human Rights Commission. She spent
several years working at the Aboriginal Healing Foundation and its ‘sister’ organization,
the National Aboriginal Health Organization.
In 2014 Yvonne was chosen as one of 8 people in Canada to be a holographic
narrator in the Turning Points for Humanity Gallery. On the 4th floor at the Canadian
Museum for Human Rights in Winnipeg, she introduces museum visitors to the theme of
Indigenous Rights and invites them to learn more through short videos that include
missing and murdered Aboriginal women in Canada, and the displacement of Indigenous
groups from their traditional lands.
Yvonne currently holds the Canada Research Chair in Aboriginal Health and
Wellness at Brandon University. She is an adjunct professor in the Faculty of Nursing at
the University of Ottawa. Yvonne received her Bachelor of Laws from the University of
Saskatchewan (96), received her Master of Laws (02) and Doctor of Laws (11) from the
University of Ottawa. In 2013 she completed a Post-Doctoral Fellowship with the
Indigenous People’s Health Research Centre at the University of Regina. She has
published extensively on the topics of Aboriginal and treaty rights.

Select Bibliography
Y.M. Boyer (2014), Moving Aboriginal Health Forward: Discarding Canada’s Legal
Barriers (Purich Publishing, 2014).
Y.M. Boyer, M. Kampouris, Trafficking of Aboriginal Women and Girls, Public
Safety Canada (2014).
Y.M. Boyer (2009), Gail Valaskakis, Madeline Deon Stout, Eric Guimond eds. “First
Nations Women’s Health and the Law” in First Nations Women’s Contributions to
Community Development and Cultural Continuity. (Indian and Northern Affairs
Canada: Ottawa).
Y.M. Boyer (2005), Wanda D. McCaslin ed. “Community Based Justice Initiatives of
the Saskatoon Tribal Council” in Justice As Healing: Indigenous Ways Writings

1

on Community Peacemaking and Restorative Justice (Living Justice Press:
Minneapolis).
Y.M. Boyer, “Using the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous
Peoples to Advance and Protect the Inherent rights of First Nation, Metis and
Inuit Peoples” In The Internationalization of Indigenous Rights: UNDRIP in the
Canadian Context, edited by Terry Mitchell. CIGI Special Report. Waterloo,
ON: CIGI (2014).
Y.M. Boyer, “Comparative Analysis of Canadian Law, Aboriginal Law and
European Civil Law Jurisdictions” Australian Indigenous Law Review, 2010,
Vol. 14, No. 2.
Y.M. Boyer, “First Nation, Métis and Inuit Women’s Health – A Constitutional
Analysis” Discussion Paper Series #4, National Aboriginal Health Organization
and the Native Law Centre of Canada (March 2006).
Y.M. Boyer, “The International Right to Health for Indigenous Peoples in Canada”
Discussion Paper Series #3, National Aboriginal Health Organization and the
Native Law Centre of Canada (October 2004).
Y.M. Boyer, “Aboriginal Health – The Crown’s Fiduciary Obligations” Discussion
Paper Series #2, National Aboriginal Health Organization and the Native Law
Centre of Canada (May 2004).
Y.M. Boyer, “Aboriginal Health – A Constitutional Rights Analysis” Discussion
Paper Series #1, National Aboriginal Health Organization and the Native Law
Centre of Canada (June 2003).

Compiled by Lawrence Barkwell
Coordinator of Metis Heritage and History Research
Louis Riel Institute

2

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