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The Fifth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry
A Story of Citizen Soldiers, Civil War Politics and Southwest Ohio

Timothy M. Burke

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Contents
Chapter page

Preface I II III IV V VI VII Beginnings Camp Dennison Goin’ South April 6th The Warriors The Bane of Politics The Long March East Afterward End Notes Bibliography Appendix:

3 8 32 44 54 66 85 103 130 137 148 151

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Preface
On February 6, 1862, 22-year-old John Sebastian Fries mustered into the ranks of the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. The illiterate son of German immigrants, he followed his brother into the rapidly expanding Union army. Tall by the standards of the day at 5’10” with sandy colored hair, gray eyes and a light complexion, he came from a family that farmed the hills and valleys of a small rural community on the outskirts of Cincinnati called Petersburg. A few weeks later his regiment steamed down the Ohio and would be among the first to arrive at an isolated spot on the Tennessee River known as Pittsburgh Landing. It was the beginning of a journey for young Fries and the other members his regiment that would last three long years. John Fries, my great-great grandfather was the starting point in the creation of this book. Fries like many other enlisted men was illiterate, meaning the only evidence of his service were sketchy military records providing his physical description and monthly roll call reports. Nothing else about his personal war experiences exists. But an overpowering desire to know more about his experiences propelled me on an academic odyssey of sorts that sent me deep into the stacks of several libraries, into the archives of the Ohio Historical Society, and to hike the Shiloh battlefield where he fought more than 140 years ago. While I found out virtually nothing about him I discovered the fascinating story of the men whom he accompanied to war, the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. Largely recruited from the counties surrounding Cincinnati, his regiment was assembled by two Hamilton County residents, Colonel William Henry Harrison Taylor and Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Tinsley Heath. Taylor, the son-in-law and nephew of former President William Henry Harrison was born and raised in the old South. His executive officer, Heath, was a young attorney who went on to a stellar career in law. The history of the regiment they recruited in the summer of 1861 has been assembled here for the first time from letters, records, newspaper accounts and other primary sources. But, my telling of the Fifth Ohio’s story goes beyond the typical regimental history. It also attempts to demonstrate my belief that the Fifth Ohio was a reflection of the attitudes and beliefs of the communities from which it was created.

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5 The Fifth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry spent endless days and nights in the saddle wearing out both men and mounts. A few violent battles like Shiloh, Corinth and Davis’ Mill, punctuated the mostly dull service that sent them on a wearisome journey from the banks of the mighty Mississippi across the South to the Carolinas. Their story did not include climatic battles that accounted for a dramatic loss of life like Pickett’s Charge or the stone wall at Fredericksburg, yet of the almost 1,000 enlistees 155 never returned home and 232 received early discharges for some disability. Countless others spent time in field hospitals suffering from dysentery, typhus and other deadly diseases or recovering from traumatic wounds. These numbers pale when compared to the casualty rate of other regiments and so never drew attention beyond the towns and farm country from which they were drawn. As the last old men of the regiment died in the early 1900’s and members of their immediate families followed them to their graves, the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry faded away into the mists of the past. The Fifth Ohio’s story was the story of dozens of other regiments, groups of men with little or no military experience transformed into regiments of professional soldiers. The early chapters of this book examine the regiment’s formation and training as it was sent into the field in 1862 unprepared, ill armed, and poorly led for a campaign in the Tennessee River Valley that included one of bloodiest affairs of the war, the Battle of Shiloh. In the chapters that follow it becomes a story of the internal political strife that divided the regiment, sometimes compromising its effectiveness. Partly a power struggle for command of the Fifth Ohio this divisive tension also was an ideological dispute over the slavery issue with party overtones. Some members of the regiment supported the abolitionism of an activist Republican Party while others tolerated slavery, identifying with the Democratic Party and its emphasis on an agrarian economy and narrow interpretation of the Constitution. The Democrats believed the Constitution left slavery under state jurisdiction and criticized President Abraham Lincoln’s emancipation policy. This difference in ideals among the regiment’s leadership was exposed when it entered the South in the winter of 1862 causing tensions that peaked in the spring of 1863. The same divisions also affected the communities from which the men had been drawn creating a political climate fraught with distrust and anger. In effect the Fifth Ohio as a

6 regiment of citizen soldiers was reflective of the attitudes and political tensions that both united and divided their home communities throughout the war. Even in the face of these shortcomings the Fifth Ohio managed to survive and become a well-armed veteran unit skilled in the art of war. By the summer of 1863 the year and a half spent in the field had hardened them into experienced horse soldiers. With better arms, more experienced leaders, and with unit politics no longer a distraction a new chapter in the regiment’s story opened as it joined Sherman’s thrust into the heart of the Confederacy. Though dwindling in numbers the Fifth Ohio Cavalry became an effective hard riding cavalry regiment regularly leading one of Sherman’s “flying columns” knifing through Georgia and the Carolinas. By the war’s end this collection of farmers, shop keepers and skilled artisans had even won the honor of escorting their victorious general in the surrender of the last major Confederate army in the field.

7 On Friday April 12, 1861 telegraph lines hummed with news of the firing on Ft. Sumter. The next day, stunned people across the North read that the long tense standoff in Charleston’s harbor had exploded into war. In Cincinnati the earliest dispatches describing the attack were contradictory, and soon dismissed as excited exaggeration. By the following day however, the Cincinnati Gazette reported the news dailies had “convinced all the first blow had been struck”. Throughout the day crowds congregated on the city’s streets in front of newspaper offices, restlessly awaiting the posting of updates on bulletin boards before the next editions rolled off the presses. “The newspaper offices were thronged as we never seen them thronged”, noted the Gazette.1 Early in the day, a premature report of Ft. Sumter’s surrender caused a cloud of gloom to descend upon the city, but when it was discovered that Major Robert Anderson, the commander of Ft. Sumter, had refused to surrender, the Times a paper that leaned heavily toward the Republican Party reported that cheering erupted from the crowd in front of its offices, but not from Democrats gathered outside the Cincinnati Enquirer. By evening, the “Star Spangled Banner” reverberated through downtown streets, and flags appeared draped from windows as impromptu demonstrations of patriotism broke out on street corners. The cloud of gloom dissolved, and the streets echoed with the words “its war” spoken gravely but not without excitement as war fever spread across the city and nation.2 The surrender of Ft. Sumter two days later on Sunday April 14, and a call for volunteers by the newly elected President Abraham Lincoln, prompted Ohio’s Governor William Dennison to alert the citizens of his state. “Your patriotism points to you the path of duty in this crisis. You need no appeal from me to testify your loyalty to the General Government (Federal Government). The Constitution must be maintained, the Union must be preserved, and the laws must be enforced.” The response was spectacular. Overnight it seemed the ranks of existing militia units filled and new companies and even entire regiments were created.3

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I
Beginnings

The Fifth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry was formed by men united in their desire to end an “unlawful rebellion”. Beyond this point there was little uniformity of opinion about the war or its aims. Drawn from Cincinnati and the small towns and rural areas surrounding it, those who led and filled its ranks were a diverse lot. Though most were farmers almost every segment of society was represented- attorneys, shopkeepers, urban laborers, rich and poor, both immigrant and native born. Their opinions ranged from long time abolitionists like Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Tinsley Heath and Major Elbridge Ricker to those who saw abolitionism as a threat to the nation like Captain William Jessup. For all, the shots fired at Ft. Sumter rung out like the proverbial fire bell in the night Thomas Jefferson had predicted decades before. The news of Ft. Sumter had a startling effect on Thomas Heath. The 27 year old attorney’s wedding was only months away but he closed his law practice in downtown Cincinnati and announced he intended to go to war, despite having no military training. He was of average height at best and wore his hair in a typical style of the day—parted to one side, long in the back but off his ears. His hair, along with a bushy beard that was almost wiry and a long drooping mustache framed a rather plain looking face. But over the course of the next four years he would distinguish himself as a capable soldier and leader—eventually reaching the rank of Brigadier General.4 Heath, not surprisingly came from a family with deep roots in America with both maternal and paternal ancestors having fought for independence during the Revolution. His father known throughout the state of Ohio as an ardent abolitionist, held a set of beliefs that would have an important impact on young Thomas’ life. The Reverend Uriah and Anne Heath raised Thomas in Xenia, Ohio. During his childhood he developed a love of the outdoors, reveling and excelling in swimming, hunting, and riding. In his early years Thomas’ experimentation with carpentry, blacksmithing and harness making was typical of the curiosity and willingness to take on challenges he displayed later in life. 5

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Thomas T. Heath

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

10 The Heaths placed a high value on learning and taught Thomas to read the Bible before age five. He proved to be an outstanding student throughout his school years. The Reverend Heath saw to it that his son received an excellent education and sent him to Ohio Wesleyan College. There he studied Hebrew, Latin and Greek and developed a keen interest in the study of law. His father had hoped he would become a man of the cloth but Thomas settled upon law instead and enrolled at the Cincinnati Law College from which he graduated in 1858. He spent the next year in Europe studying and observing the courts of London, Paris, Edinburgh and Dublin before returning to Cincinnati where he became a law partner of Thomas Ware.6 By the time the crisis came, Heath was moving in a circle of prominent Cincinnatians. Though young and not a native of the city he had ties to Ware, the newly elected city solicitor, and Bellamy Storer one of the city’s oldest and most respected judges for whom he clerked as a law student. Consequently, he was made part of a committee sent to Washington D.C. to represent Cincinnati. The committee’s task was to win the acceptance of three Cincinnati regiments into the swelling ranks of the federal army.7 By May Lincoln realized that he had seriously underestimated the manpower needed to put down the rebellion in calling out only 75,000 volunteers for a 90-day term of service. On May 3rd the President expanded the size of the Regular Army by 42,000 and called for 3 years of service from the state volunteers. By the end of May Heath had sought the help of William Henry Harrison Taylor in creating a volunteer cavalry regiment. He wanted Taylor’s experience as a cavalry officer in the Virginia militia, even though it was minimal. Taylor was a Virginian by birth but had lived in Ohio since 1836 and was prominent enough in the Cincinnati area to attract recruits at a time when there was intense competition among the newly forming regiments in the recruitment of volunteers. William Henry Harrison Taylor was a member of one of America’s most storied political families among who was a signer of the Declaration of Independence and two Presidents of the United States. He looked the part, with a lean aristocratic build often associated with one in command. He had a square jaw, a meticulously trimmed mustache which he squared at the corners of his mouth and hair which was still thick for someone near fifty which he wore half way over his ear. Now at age 48, Taylor, a farmer and the former Postmaster of Cincinnati, faced the

11 daunting task of raising and training a regiment of volunteer cavalry destined to become the Fifth Ohio. 8 Like most of the other newly minted colonels in the rapidly expanding Union Army he was not a professional soldier. His only military experience had come with the peacetime militia of the antebellum period known more for drilling on the parade field than for true martial skills. There is little doubt that many believed his greatest qualification was kinship to General William Henry Harrison, the hero of Tippecanoe and later President of the United States.9 Taylor was born to Lucy Harrison Singleton III, Harrison’s niece, and Thomas Taylor on November 28, 1813 the second oldest of four children with his sister Lucy being the oldest and brother’s George and Richard ten and thirteen years his junior. He was raised in Virginia at Berkley, the sprawling ancestral plantation of generations of the Harrison family. On June 16, 1836 he married General Harrison’s daughter, Anna Tuthill Harrison in North Bend, Ohio, a small village located about 15 miles west of Cincinnati. It had served as the General’s home since 1814. The young couple initially resided at Berkley but when Taylor was recruited to become a substitute Clerk of Courts in Cincinnati for General Harrison, who decided to run for the Presidency in 1836, they too settled in North Bend. The General’s defeat in the November election marked the beginning of his second campaign ultimately leading to his victory in 1840 and the appointment of the 27year-old Taylor to the position of Postmaster of Cincinnati.10 Harrison’s death only 31 days after his inauguration brought important changes for Taylor, though he would remain postmaster until June of 1845 when the newly elected James K. Polk replaced him with one of his own Democratic supporters. He and Anna moved into the General Harrison’s residence at North Bend to help care for Mrs. Harrison who was often ill, and unable to supervise the work on the family’s large land holdings. The spacious Harrison homestead was a clapboard building that stood 300 yards back from the Ohio River on a large hill occupying a bend with a sweeping view of the river. While the 16-room home could not be called stately it was comfortable enough with its wainscoted walls, cavernous kitchen and living room to mark it as the residence of a gentleman.

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Colonel William Henry Harrison Taylor

Courtesy of the U.S. Military History Institute

13 This could be misleading because even though General Harrison had been a prominent figure in the area for more than three decades he had been cash strapped in the later years of his life as the result of family circumstances. By 1844 Taylor had proven himself as a successful farmer and was selected to address the Hamilton County Agricultural Society, an organization his father-in-law had helped found. In 1858 disaster struck when the house burned to the ground leaving William Taylor and his family, which had grown to 10 children as well as the General’s widow, homeless, but for the kindness of Anna Taylor’s brother-in-law who took them into his home.
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On the heels of this family crisis came the news of a national crisis at Ft. Sumter and what must have been a crisis of conscience. He was faced with a decision which would be agonizing for a father of 10 children who also heard the call of duty as the greatgrandson of a signer of the Declaration of Independence, Benjamin Harrison III, and the nephew and son-in-law of a former President. The difficulty of the decision must have been compounded by the fact he was a son of the old South. Born to an old Virginia family he lived among the plantation aristocracy for the first 23 years of his life and now he faced going to war against that very society. It was a decision made even more anguishing by the fact his younger brothers George and Richard committed to defending that society and would become members of the 14th Virginia Infantry. Under the circumstances, everything about William Henry Harrison Taylor, his heritage, his successful leadership skills, and his experience in the militia, limited as it was, marked him as a gentleman expected to lead troops whether he lived on either side of the Mason-Dixon Line at a time when both armies were growing beyond imagination and in desperate need of leaders. The partnership Heath and Taylor forged to recruit a cavalry regiment was a gamble. Neither Governor Dennison of Ohio nor the War Department had authorized the regiment so there was no guarantee it would be accepted into federal service. Ohio in fact, had been called upon by the War Department to provide 10,153 troops and responded by providing almost 13,000, forcing officials to turn away thousands of others since the federal government would not financially compensate the states for the excess troops.12

14 The Lincoln Administration used a system employed in all previous American wars. Regiments would be organized and identified with the states from which they came and received a numeral based on the order of creation. Hence the First Ohio Volunteer Cavalry was the first cavalry regiment authorized from Ohio. Most regiments arose entirely from one locality. The governor had the authority to appoint at least the highestranking officers, the colonels and lieutenant–colonels, but often the men of the regiment had elected these officers first, after which the governor awarded the official commission. At other times it was the prominent men who organized and recruited the regiments who were rewarded for their efforts with command. More often than not political considerations affected authorization to organize regiments. Heath like Governor Dennison was a member of the Republican Party. However, the state of Ohio and the Department of War rejected Heath’s and Taylor’s overtures not once or twice but three times. Heath angrily wrote to Major General Catharinus P. Buckingham, the Adjutant General of Ohio, explaining that after spending more than $1000 of their own money they did “not feel inclined to indulge [their] military proclivities any further,” adding should their “humble services be needed” in the future they would “draw [their] swords,” in defense of the Republic.13 The rejection was related to the type of regiment Heath and Taylor was organizing not their political ties. The War Department had decided to rely on the cavalry component of the Regular Army, a meager six regiments of less then 6,000 men, and a handful of volunteer regiments that had been forced into the army by political circumstances. Chief among the reasons the War Department did want to accept volunteer cavalry was the belief the war would be over long before horsemen could be properly trained for service. Across both the North and South many believed the war would be of very short duration. The federal army traditionally expected to spend a minimum of one to three years of training to create a proficient cavalry trooper. This position on training was the result of the Army’s adoption of the European cavalry tradition. Cavalry had not been an important part of the American military until operations began against Native Americans on the wide-open plains of the West in the 1840s. In 1841 Philip Kearny and a group of colleagues were sent to the French Royal School of Cavalry and later adopted the French Cavalry manual with some variations, as that of the United States.14

15 Other factors contributed to the War Department’s coolness toward cavalry. General Winfield Scott, the ranking officer in the United States Army in early 1861, expected the war to focus on Virginia. He incorrectly believed the geography of his home state was simply too cut up with fences and other obstacles to make operations with large bodies of cavalry practical. Equipping a cavalry regiment for the field was also expensive with a cost of an estimated $500,000 to $600,000, and a higher payroll for such specialized personnel as blacksmiths and saddlers. Quite simply it was far cheaper to put an infantry regiment into the field.15 The rejection of Heath’s and Taylor’s regiment at that point in the war typified the experience of many Northerners desiring to lead cavalry. After the third rejection they wrote General Buckingham of their disgust, which Governor Dennison answered with a telegram requesting they come to Columbus with their muster rolls to “consult” with him. Taylor and Heath wrote General Buckingham “we only wished a promise from him (Dennison) that, if ready in 10 days, we should be accepted.” 16 The regiment, Heath noted, had already lost a number of men to “other organizations” presumably infantry regiments that had been or would be shortly accepted. While Governor Dennison seemed interested, he would only imply their services would someday be needed. Heath pressed Buckingham that if they truly would be needed, “why not let us fill a regiment.” He left little doubt about how desperate they were to serve, writing “We are willing out of our own pockets to furnish funds for recruiting.” But, he made it clear they would not pay for the transportation and subsistence of their regiment, a practice not unheard of in the early months of the war. Still no acceptance came, and it seemed their dream of glory on the battlefield was at an end, until events unfolding in the East changed everything.17 A few days after the exchange of letters between Heath and the Governor 35,000 troops, a mix of regulars and volunteers under the command of Major General Irvin McDowell, departed their camps outside of Washington D.C. Largely untrained and commanded by inexperienced officers, they were taking part in the first attempt at capturing Richmond, Virginia, the capital of the Confederacy. Many in the North were anxious to end the rebellion as quickly as possible and few anticipated the result. By the 21st of July this Union force, the largest army ever assembled on American soil clashed with Confederate forces bent on shielding Richmond. During the days prior to

16 this battle McDowell’s troops had moved sluggishly toward the Confederate capital, more a result of inexperience than cautious and conscientious planning. On the day of the battle, their pace had been made even slower by sightseers, including members of Congress who had come out to watch the spectacle of battle unfold. Some had gone as far as packing picnic lunches to pass and enjoy the afternoon while watching the fighting. The American public had little experience with war, the last occurring more than a decade earlier on Mexican soil, involving relatively few Americans. On the whole the nation was unprepared for the bloodletting that would take place at Bull Run and supporters of the Union were exceedingly confident in the size and ability of the army to decisively defeat the Confederacy quickly and easily. Northerners were shocked when McDowell’s army was sent reeling in retreat back to Washington. For some it was hard to imagine the nation’s capital in potential peril. The defeat sent a shockwave through the North affecting not only public opinion but also attitudes of the President, War Department and Congress, resulting in a quick reevaluation of the measures needed to crush the rebellion. The next day Lincoln asked the states for 500,000 volunteers. After months of working to win the Governor’s approval and failing, Heath and Taylor decided on another approach. They took their case to Major General John C. Freemont, the commander of the Western Department headquartered in St. Louis. Freemont also had the authority to grant commissions and to authorize regiments. At the end of August Taylor made the journey to his headquarters and met with success. The disaster at Bull Run opened up the floodgates as regiment after regiment was authorized and mustered into service. It was to that debacle the 5th Ohio owed its existence. The Cincinnati Enquirer reported in the August 25th edition, “We are glad to learn that the organization of this dashing regiment is rapidly progressing,” under its newly appointed Colonel, W.H.H. Taylor. Taylor, the Enquirer noted had cabled Captain J.G. Curtis from St. Louis, “The Camp is located in Cincinnati. Go on with recruiting as fast as possible.”18 By the end of 1861 the 5th Ohio was one of eighty-two cavalry regiments that had been authorized and mustered into federal service. Competition for men and resources among the new regiments was intense. Charles Hayes was one of the first men mustered into the 5th Ohio Cavalry, and he appeared every inch the cavalry trooper. He was large in

17 a sturdy sense, square shouldered, with a thick neatly trimmed mustache that extended into a full beard, looking like someone Hollywood would cast to lead a cavalry column. The 30-year-old Hayes was held in high regard by his neighbor and future commander William Henry Harrison Taylor who offered him the rank of captain almost immediately after the regiment was authorized19 Taylor knew Hayes as a farmer from near-by Elizabethtown on the Ohio-Indiana border making the two practically neighbors. Born on March 5, 1831 he grew up on an Elizabethtown farm where he developed a reputation as a man of intelligence and solid character, the resourceful sort of person society would have characterized as very capable and the kind of man one might consider following into battle. He had no military experience and did not appear very worldly neither of which was a concern to the farmers of Western Hamilton County who were to largely make up his command. In September of 1861 he departed his home on a beautiful white horse for Camp Dick Corwin just east of Cincinnati, leaving behind Josephine his wife of three years and their young son, Charles. His recruiting and that of the rest of the officers must have continued at a harried pace as they also faced the pressures of training and equipping more than a 1000 men, all volunteers and all new to the military life, and none who knew or could imagine what lay ahead. The new troops continued to arrive first at Camp Corwin and later Camp Dennison right up to the day they departed for the field at the end of February 1862. Assigned to command Company D, he primarily recruited from neighboring villages and townships on the western side of Hamilton County. These were men who largely knew him as a friend, neighbor or relative. Relying upon the willingness of citizen soldiers to follow men from their community whom they respected and held in high esteem was a system the nation has relied upon since its inception. Now it was a pattern being repeated across Hamilton County and the entire country, both the North and South.20

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Cincinnati and the Western Hamilton County communities

19 Men like John Sebastian Fries, were typical of those filling the ranks of the 5th Ohio. While he did not leave anything behind clearly indicating why he volunteered, we can certainly speculate why he went to war based on the attitudes of the city’s German community. German immigrants had started to arrive in Cincinnati at the beginning of the 19th century and constituted 28% of the city’s population by 1840. By the late 1840’s a new wave of German immigrants were coming to the area fleeing the instability and violence of a revolution that rocked the Austrian Empire in 1848. They deeply appreciated the stability and freedom of their new nation and were very disturbed by the increasing tensions between North and South now threatening to shatter the tranquility and prosperity of Cincinnati. At the same time they generally despised slavery and when war finally did come, they answered Lincoln’s call to arms in surprisingly large numbers. Their motive has been largely described as an act of gratitude or loyalty to their adopted nation but they had no difficulty striking a blow against the hated institution of slavery which they had accepted as a fact of life in America, that is, until 1861. Within a week of the attack on Ft. Sumter more than 1,000 German immigrants had volunteered their services for what would become known as the Ninth Ohio Infantry Regiment with thousands of others volunteering for other newly forming military companies and regiments.21 Other members of the Fifth Ohio made their reasons for volunteering quite clear, like William Jessup, a student at Miami University who joined the regiment on the 26th of August 1861. At age 20, Jessup left his family’s farm in Harrison Township to fight in the Union army for the next 3 and one half years. In a series of letters to his family, Jessup implied he volunteered out of a sense of duty to the nation, not, he indicated to abolish slavery, a factor that became important later in the war. 22 Others were more pragmatic about their reasons for serving such as Thomas W. Fanning. Fanning wrote of himself “doing a confectionary business here in Cincinnati I found, would not be as productive in the winter as was necessary to a person of family, and being anxious to do something for my country, I was induced to join the 5th Ohio Cavalry”. T.W. Fanning as he styled himself, penned this in a little known book about his experiences with the 5th Ohio, The Adventures of a Volunteer, by a Non-Commissioned Officer. The book, though poorly written, sheds some light on the attitudes and

20 experiences of enlisted men during the year and a half he was with the regiment from September 1861 through December of 1863 when he was discharged on a surgeon’s certificate.23 In most cases, the average enlisted man left little or nothing behind in writing about their wartime experiences. Whatever their thoughts were about the great conflict were taken to the grave or faded away with each successive generation of their family. What remains are scraps of information found in records, often meaningless and dry when viewed as isolated details. These discreet facts collected in dusty leather bound volumes are of little interest to most people. But when these scraps are artfully blended together and given context, much the way a painting is matted and framed, what emerges is a compelling story to which the eye is drawn. Men like private Henry Runck, age 18 of Delhi Township, Company L and William Rybolt, age 23 of Green Township, Company B are colorless. But when you consider that both the townships in which these young men resided, were rural farming communities, and that half of the Union troops were the sons of farmers who were on average 25 years old, and again on average stood 5’8” inches tall weighing in at a whopping 143 pounds they suddenly become more interesting. Add the insights of T. W. Fanning, the musing of William Jessup from his letters home, to the thoughts of Charles Hayes and a host of others, officers and enlisted alike, and now you have an interesting story.24 With communities like Cincinnati and the surrounding rural areas rallying to the Union cause as they did, it was not unusual for regiments to contain multiple members of the same family; brothers, cousins, uncles, father-son combinations like Colonel Taylor and Lieutenant John T. Taylor, his son though the younger Taylor who would later leave the regiment to serve as aid to on the staff of General William Tecumseh Sherman. But the most notable example of a family’s service in the Fifth Cavalry was that of the sprawling Hayes family that spilled across Whitewater and Harrison Townships and over the state border into Indiana. Ten members of the extended Hayes family were on the muster rolls of the regiment, not to mention numerous relatives of different sur names like the Guards and Millers. The Hayes family had come to the western side of the county in the 1790’s and by the time of the Civil War could be found farming rich bottomlands along the Ohio and Great Miami Rivers. By the time the War began in early 1861 more

21 than 60 years had passed and several generations of the family were born since their arrival in Hamilton County. The 10 Hayes who served in the regiment ranged from 39 to 18 years of age though the younger members did not join the regiment until 1865. Their lives were tied to countless others in the regiment by marriage or friendship like Isaac Scott. The 19-year-old Scott enlisted with friends Silas and Joseph Hayes, also 19, on September 11 and served with them until their enlistments were up in late 1864, regularly writing home to another friend, 15 year old Van Hayes.25 Their lives were not only bound by family but in all the ways communities are bound together. The man that treated their maladies and delivered their children, Dr. Charles Thorton, now would tend to their wounds on the battlefield as the regimental surgeon. Sam Wamsley, shoed their horses and made their farm implements as their blacksmith back at home, now he would lead them as a second lieutenant in company D, commanded by Charles Hayes, a neighbor. Sam Cooper and Christopher Riehle sold them groceries, now they would ride side by side with their customers into some of the most decisive battles of the Civil War. This was the American way of making war. A community of its own free will was making the ultimate commitment in support of a cause by pledging their very lives in support of it.26 They worshipped in the same Presbyterian and evangelical congregations that dotted the landscape on the western side of the county. Many were probably baptized or married by men like the Rev. Christopher Flinchpaugh who traveled a circuit on horseback, that was almost 400 miles in length and which required him to preach thirty two times every four weeks. He baptized them in the waters of the Great Miami River and the numerous creeks that cut through the area like Rapid Run, Muddy and Taylor Creeks, and shaped their ideas about right and wrong and the moral dilemmas of the day. Sermons were preached in both English and German, an indication of the heavy German influence present throughout the Greater Cincinnati area. There also was a growing Catholic presence due to the influx of German and Irish immigrants though it tended to be concentrated within the city itself. Those Catholics that lived in the outlying townships like Delhi were served by missionaries until 1841 by priests like the Rev. John Martin Henni from the Over-the-Rhine, a thriving German neighborhood in Cincinnati, who ministered to the 150 mostly German Catholics who would constitute the parish of Our

22 Lady of Victory. With each passing decade more of these German immigrants pushed out of Cincinnati’s Over-the-Rhine and migrate to the county’s rural areas.27 Just as the members of a unit went to war united by common experiences and relationships at home, they also brought with them political and social animosities that could prove to be divisive during the war. By the mid 1840’s religion, immigration and the slavery had become the sources of growing political tensions in the country. The growing number of Catholic immigrants was enough to enflame old prejudices and fears among native-born Protestants against the new arrivals. The fear being, that Catholics would have greater loyalty to their church hierarchy than to their new nation. The specter of papal power led to the formation of secret clubs along the Eastern seaboard popularly called the Know-Nothings, who claimed Catholic votes were controlled by their priests. In an unconnected set of circumstances, the Whig Party one of the two major political organizations in the nation, was beginning to unravel over the expansion of slavery and by the middle of the 1850’s disintegrated after the party’s informal division into a northern and southern wing. The void was filled by the Know-Nothings who formally organized as the American Party which was more closely tied to anti-immigrant feelings and less so to anti-Catholic rhetoric. The Greater Cincinnati area was not immune to “know-nothingism” causing tension that finally erupted into a riot on the day city elections were held in November 1855. The German population of the city barricaded themselves into the Over-the–Rhine district and returned fire on the armed, torched lit crowd of Know-Nothings that came to “clean out little Germany”. The morning after the riot the barricades were gone and the influence of “know-nothingism” began to fade away, with the riot as the high water mark of the local movement. Nationally the influence of the American Party was also beginning to wane though it had never been recognized as a major party, meaning a near equal of the rival Democrats.28 Nationally in the mean time, another political party was born in 1854 around the issue of opposing slavery’s expansion into the western territories, the Republican Party. Slavery was the issue that caused the most serious division in and around Cincinnati for decades, making the nativism of the Know-Nothings appear as a mere distraction. It had been explosive enough to destroy one political party, the Whigs, powerful enough to create another, the Republicans, and poisonous enough to eventually divide the

23 Democratic Party into northern and southern wings. It also caused political fissures in some northern communities like Hamilton County, fissures that did not grow into the deadly fault the Mason-Dixon Line became, but fissures that did not just disappear with the coming of the war. Nationally, the election of 1860 made the growing chasm between North and South unbridgeable. From the time of his election in November of 1860 through the opening days of hostilities in April of 1861 Lincoln made clear his position on slavery. In his inaugural address he vowed not to interfere with the institution of slavery in States where it existed. “I believe I have no lawful right to do so, and I have no inclination to do so,” he declared. He also questioned the political will of the states remaining in the Union to carry on a war to destroy the “peculiar institution”. Lincoln understood he might potentially drive the four remaining slave states that had not seceded, directly into the Confederacy. Essentially he believed that if the war was made a crusade to end slavery, it would undermine any mandate he had from the Northern public to forcibly end the rebellion. First and foremost in the weeks and months after the attack on Ft. Sumter, Lincoln made it solely a war to preserve the Union, thereby assuring widespread support. Abolitionists of course were disappointed and continued to push the Lincoln Administration on the issue. Secretary of the Treasury Salmon P. Chase, a Cincinnatian, did so within the cabinet. Locally men like Elbridge G. Ricker had been committed to ending slavery for years. Ricker was almost Lincolnesqe in appearance, with a long angular face that was thin -almost raw-boned. His hair was dark and he wore a short beard that extended from his sideburns in the style of the Amish with no mustache. His uniform seemed to hang on his slender frame. As the newly appointed commander of the 3rd Battalion of the Fifth Ohio Cavalry he wore the rank of major on his shoulder boards. At 43 he was one of the older members of the regiment having been promoted early on from the rank of captain, commanding Company A which he had helped recruit from Clermont County just east of Cincinnati. In fact he had helped recruit and organize a sizable contingent from Clermont County making up much of companies A, L and M.29

24

Elbridge Ricker

Courtesy of the U.S. Military History Institute

25 Like other senior officers in the regiment he had been a successful farmer who had gained prominence in local politics having been elected to the state legislature in 1855 as the Republican candidate. Ricker had long been involved with the abolitionist movement as well as the local temperance effort and the township board of education. As many leading abolitionists of the day he was of old New England stock and could trace his lineage back to the Mayflower. In 1814 his grandparents left Maine and settled in Clermont County and it was there that he was born in 1828. His parents sent him to the “best schools in Southern Ohio” but he made farming his career establishing a noteworthy reputation for growing grapes and berries.30 His active involvement in the Methodist Episcopal Church since 1833 and his commitment to several important social reform movements marked him as a very serious and intensely upright figure among his neighbors. It was however, his desire to see slavery abolished that seemed the most significant of his interests. When the Republican Party was founded in Rippon, Wisconsin in 1854 around opposing the expansion of slavery, Elbridge Ricker was one of the founding figures of the Party in Ohio. Not all would be pleased with his commitment to abolitionism at home in Clermont County or within the ranks of the Fifth Ohio.31 Up and down the Ohio River slavery divided many communities from which the Fifth Ohio was drawn. In Cincinnati slavery had been a volcanic issue throughout the Antebellum Period. The city had a well-deserved reputation as an important stop on the Underground Railroad but also as a flash point when abolitionists made their opinions too public. The city had prospered as crossroads for Northern and Southern commerce and there were too many associated with commerce that would not abide by public behavior that might mar the city’s reputation in the South. By 1836 the public discussion of abolitionism in and around Cincinnati had become a sensitive issue. In the spring of that year an abolitionist newspaper, the Philanthropist, went into print in Cincinnati. In a matter of months the pressroom was ransacked and the editor James G. Birney, a former Alabama slave holder turned abolitionist, threatened. A week later a mob destroyed his office throwing the press into the street. Fortunately Birney, who would later run for presidency on the Liberty Party ticket, was not home when the mob came to his residence. Lest one thinks this indicates there just was not any support for abolitionism at

26 the time, it was reported the Philanthropist had 1,700 subscribers. At one point in 1842 another newspaper, Anti-Abolitionist, was printing a list of those in the Cincinnati area known to be abolitionist, and urging Southerners and those who were supporters of slavery to avoid business with them. Among those on the list were attorneys, ministers, grocers, printers, shoemakers, tanners, and the famous like Salmon P. Chase, and many who time would forget.32 On the outskirts of Cincinnati in the tiny village of Cleves that bordered North Bend, the home of Colonel Taylor, abolition was just as divisive. In the spring of 1843 the Liberty Party of Hamilton County, a nationally organized though small abolition party, called for a meeting to freely discuss abolition at the village’s Presbyterian church. Thomas Morris, Samuel Lewis and Jonathan Blanchard, all distinguished members of the abolitionist movement in Southern Ohio were to come from Cincinnati to address the meeting. To ensure this would not offend the congregation they had sought and received permission to have the meeting from the trustees and elders of the church, after which the planned meeting became public knowledge.33 On March 7, the day the convention was scheduled, Mr. Lewis, Blanchard and Morris accompanied by students from Lane Seminary, an institution with strong anti-slavery leanings, arrived in Cleves only to be confronted by a mob. At the front of the crowd were relatives of the late President William Henry Harrison; his Son-in-laws Judge Short, Dr. McHugh Thorton, as well as John Scott Harrison, the son of the former President and a prosperous farmer. (W.H.H. Taylor the youngest of President Harrison’s son-in-laws and later the commanding officer of the Fifth Ohio was not present) John Scott Harrison explained that he was there on “behalf of a committee appointed by a meeting of citizens of Miami Township,” which encompassed both Cleves and North Bend. He made it clear they “took umbrage at the project of an anti-slavery meeting so near their homes and expressed in the strongest terms against the sitting of the convention.” After threats by less prominent members of the mob, a debate ensued between Harrison and Samuel Lewis who had developed a reputation for being such a fierce critic of slavery that he had been kicked out of the Democratic Party.34 The debate might best be described as over free speech more so than slavery. Harrison insisted that only 1 out of every 7 citizens in Miami Township favored “their incendiary

27 doctrines” and on those grounds “did not wish their peace disturbed.” He inferred that he could not be responsible for the crowd’s actions if the planned church meeting were to take place. Lewis answered that threats of physical violence made no difference and lamented that an open discussion could not take place in America just because he and his companions apparently held unpopular opinions. With tensions high at this point, Reverend Jonathan Blanchard, a Presbyterian minister, proposed a simple vote of all those present to determine whether the meeting would take place. Those in support of the meeting were requested to step to the right and those against to the left. To the chagrin of Harrison more stepped to the right at which point he left remarking he had done his duty leaving behind in the words of Lewis a rather “forlorn looking set” armed mostly with clubs and an old rusty musket. Lewis noted that an elderly woman who had sided with the abolitionists remarked, she “heard tell of the separation of the sheep from the goats, but [I] never expected to live to see it.” His description of those who had shown up to disrupt the meeting was less than complimentary calling them mostly boys and half men, and inferring they were from a less admirable class of people than Harrison.35 To prevent violence the Presbyterian minister of a church in Berea invited the speakers to hold the convention in his church, about a mile from Cleves and for the next two days the abolitionists met at the Berea church. Later under the cover of darkness a pro-slavery mob smashed the windows of the church, and not being satisfied with that “mobbed the house of the pastor, and threw his buggy in the canal.”36 The discord over slavery in Southwest Ohio was inevitable, a consequence of geography, patterns of migration and the arrival of overseas immigrants. In the early days of Ohio’s settlement many of the first residents had crossed the Ohio River from Kentucky and Virginia both slave states, giving the Southwest corner of the state a decidedly pro-slavery perspective though the Northwest Ordinance banned slavery itself. By the mid 1800’s Cincinnati had accumulated a considerable German population and was the recipient of an appreciable migration of families from the Northeast, neither of which was particularly friendly toward slavery. The result was a complicated mix of attitudes with respect to the “peculiar institution” in which the simple labels of proslavery and abolitionists were not adequate. It would be easy to assume John Scott Harrison was pro-slavery based on the incident in Cleves but he was not. Harrison served

28 two terms in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1853-1857 where he became widely respected for his anti-slavery views, opposing all measures that would have permitted the extension of slavery while denouncing the Kansas-Nebraska Bill in his only speech on the floor of the House. His behavior in the two decades before the Civil War was representative of the ambiguity and complexity of attitudes found throughout Hamilton County with respect to slavery. Further up river to the east of Cincinnati in Clermont and Brown counties, near the home of Major Ricker, an even more volatile situation existed. In the small Ohio River towns like Ripley, Ohio, very active and at times aggressive Underground Railroad networks developed led by men like the Reverend John Rankin. By the mid 1830’s the situation in Brown county was described as “nothing less than a war” replete with mob violence, arson, posses, lawsuits and stories of great escapes.37 By 1847 Levi Coffin had moved to Cincinnati and become so effective in helping African-Americans escape slavery he was renowned as the President of the Underground Railroad making Cincinnati even more important to the abolitionists movement. He was among the many well known abolitionists facing physical and economic peril as a result of their beliefs. Many others worked with complete anonymity, especially African – Americans who faced particularly grave risks helping others to escape. With the area so divided on slavery many who actively involved in the Underground Railroad kept their activities secret for legal, economic and safety reasons. A successful operator on the Railroad was in part one who succeeded in keeping their activities secret, especially in areas where anti-abolitionist sentiments were high making of documenting involvement difficult, if not impossible in some cases. This might explain the dearth of identified Underground Railroad sites along the Ohio River in the western half of Hamilton County if indeed only 1 out of 7 people in the area were in favor of abolitionism as Harrison insisted. While local lore and circumstantial evidence suggests the involvement of various individuals and sites such as the Warder family, it has not been proven. Ann Warder and her husband Dr. John Aston Warder lived a few miles east of the Cleves Presbyterian Church on a North Bend farm overlooking the Ohio River. The location of their home on a substantial farm above the river, the fact Warders were Quakers and that Ann Warder made frequent carriage trips between Springfield and

29 Richmond, Indiana, both known as active stations on the railroad certainly creates a strong circumstantial case for their involvement. Another possibility worth noting was the existence of a Shaker community to the northwest of Cleves known as Whitewater Village. The Shakers were a religious group that had splintered from Quaker orthodoxy over theological issues. They like the Quakers often worked to end the moral injustice of slavery. The Whitewater community totaled almost 150 in number by 1850 and was economically successful, but because their ideas were viewed as too radical they were disliked by neighboring farmers and at times faced outright persecution. The size of the community, its social isolation and the fact they were already viewed unfavorably again creates a circumstantial case for involvement with the Underground Railroad.38 The diversity of attitudes with regard to slavery and abolition that had developed up and down the river to either side of Cincinnati during the antebellum period did not disappear with the outbreak of war. Men like Major Ricker and Lieutenant Colonel Heath found themselves bound by the common ideals of the Republican Party. Both men had been tied to the abolitionist movement long before the birth of the Party and believed the struggle should transcend the battle to end slavery to also include winning better treatment and rights for African Americans. Heath’s commitment to the cause of ending slavery is clearly spelled out in an eloquent letter sent to John Brown, the most radical abolitionists of the day, wounded and imprisoned awaiting trial and ultimately execution in the Charlestown, Virginia jail in November of 1859. Brown had led a failed assault on the federal arsenal at Harper’s Ferry with the intent of triggering a slave rebellion that would spread across the South. Heath practicing law in Cincinnati at the time wrote:

Honored Sir,-- I have never met you – yet community of interest in freedom’s cause makes us fellow soldiers – and the ties of humanity constitute us brethren… My senior friend you have fought the good fight – kept the faith – probably soon will have finished your course – and will in that day receive the crown from the Lord, The righteous Judge—Keep your Heart Right.!

Sire, the sword you have unsheathed – that flaming blade shall flash and turn every way until the end! In Heaven you will experience much joy over the deeds done in the flesh – over victory In spirit only we know each other – but this all—everything—then with the devoutest prayer that if not to meet here, we shall meet in the great throng who have gone up through great tribulation, Let me remain

30
Your Junior Brother, Thomas T. Heath

The attack killed six civilians and wounded nine more in addition to the death of one marine, part of the makeshift force led by Colonel Robert E. Lee sent to dislodge Brown and his followers, 10 of who were killed. Brown’s actions were roundly condemned by newspapers across the country including the North reflecting the attitudes of most American citizens about the incident. Thomas Heath’s views on Brown and abolition in 1859 were radical even by northern standards. In time it would become apparent that not everyone in the regiment approved of Heath’s and Ricker’s positions on abolition and that some were openly offended by it. Among those who had no sympathy for abolitionism was young Lieutenant William Jessup who was not alone in his dislike for abolitionist. Many in the Fifth Ohio and Union army in general blamed the war on them.39 Jessup and many others did not have any affection for slavery. In the years before the war they did not approve of the institution but at the same time they disapproved of efforts to destroy it. They saw abolitionists as malcontents -- troublemakers bent on creating disorder and chaos. They viewed their writings and conventions as dangerous inflammatory actions that were tearing the nation apart and dividing communities. And when war finally came, they blamed the abolitionist as well as the pro-slavery firebrands of the South whom they believed had been baited into secession. Now they bitterly believed, it was up to them to clean up the mess the irresponsible abolitionist and Southern fire-eaters had created by restoring the Union. In this they supported Lincoln, a fact that was not lost upon the President, and they eagerly volunteered out of loyalty to that Union to fight to restore it. Men like Jessup fought valiantly for 4 years to achieve that goal, but they did it while cursing their Republican leaders. Within the Fifth Ohio these sentiments were not limited to Jessup.40 Men like Ricker and Heath were committed to saving the Union but also to the higher purpose of destroying a moral blight that had plagued their nation since its inception. At the same time Jessup and other Democrats in the Fifth Ohio were committed to Union and nothing else and while they vehemently disagreed with Lincoln they did as good

31 soldiers are expected. They took their orders from the duly elected government of the people and fought with distinction to the end of the war, for they realized what the common soldier on the victorious side has known from time immemorial, the surest way home was victory. So as the members of the Fifth Ohio arrived at Camp Dennison united in their resolve to restore the Union, they also brought attitudes reflective of the ideals that divided their communities.

32 At the beginning of 1861 the United States Army consisted of less than 16,000 men deployed across the entire nation. Of its 1,108 officers, 387 resigned or were dismissed because of their loyalties to the Southern cause leaving the nation’s officer corps decimated. By the War’s end 2.8 million men had worn the blue uniform of the United States Army, requiring astronomical growth beginning the day Ft. Sumter was attacked. Lincoln’s first plea for 75,000 volunteers was followed by successively larger calls throughout the war and finally by a controversial draft during the final two years of the war. With the burden of recruiting, training and equipping these troops initially falling on the states, Ohio like most, struggled not with finding volunteers but with providing them the necessities to fight a war. Things like arms, saddles, and tents were in short supply, as were the leadership skills to train and lead men in battle.

II
Camp Dennison

The road to war for the men and officers of the regiment was a long and challenging march. Though anxious to see battle, it was fully six months before they departed Cincinnati for operations in the South. The difficulties Colonels Taylor and Heath faced did not end with the regiment’s acceptance into federal ranks. Shortly after Major General John Fremont agreed to accept the Ohioans into federal service they were informed the unit’s designation had to be changed. Originally identified by Fremont as the Second Ohio Volunteer Cavalry it was now the Fifth Ohio. Governor Dennison it seems had without warning accepted three other cavalry regiments into federal service after Taylor and Heath had given up hope of

33 winning his approval and gone to Fremont. This was just a minor bump in the road to preparing more than 1000 raw recruits for action.41 The organization and training of the regiment began at Camp Dick Corwin located just to the east of Cincinnati along the Ohio River on October 23, 1861, and it proved to be no simple task. The overwhelming number of men had no military experience with the exception of a few older volunteers some of whom had only drilled with the peacetime militia. Even that experience was of little importance since the militia system had fallen into disuse by the 1840’s. Dr. Reese Kendall, a physician living in Western Hamilton County, wrote in his 1905 Pioneer Annals of Greene Township that he remembered the last muster day in the western part of Hamilton County as occurring in a large field owned by Isaac Carson in 1843, almost 18 years before the war. He commented that when he was a boy the militia troops “ never looked very martial or ferocious, for nearly all carried sticks or cornstalks” instead of muskets, a practice so common place that the Western states were often described contemptuously as having the cornstalk militias.42 Among the troops, as in most regiments, were a relative handful of men who did have significant military experiences, like William D. Goforth. Goforth of Green Township had been offered the rank and pay of major because of prior military service. He was also one of the few with who had seen combat. Serving under General Winfield Scott in the war with Mexico from 1846-1848 he is strangely reported as having held the rank of ensign, a naval rank that is the equivalent of a lieutenant in the army. He may have served with a naval artillery unit assigned to guns used in breaching the walls of Mexico City where he was also reported as having planted the national colors. Goforth inexplicably turned down the rank and instead opted to serve as a noncommissioned officer. Another veteran of the War with Mexico was Captain John Crawford. The 42-year-old Crawford had seen service in Mexico as part of a unit known as Captain Duncan’s Independent Company, a small cavalry unit recruited and mustered into service in Cincinnati. He was instrumental in recruiting much of Company H of the Fifth Ohio according to T. W. Fanning who was recruited by Crawford and became a devotee of the man. When Crawford was not given command of the new company, Fanning and 45 others followed him to Lexington Kentucky where they tried to join another regiment with their “former Captain”. Colonel Taylor however, insisted they return, which they did

34 a few days later after being “ordered to do so by some prominent persons in Frankfort [Ky.],” Fanning noted. After returning they were placed under the command of Captain Chester Poor, a Cincinnati merchant, who remained in command of Company H for a short time before resigning in late February.43 Fanning offers no explanation of why Crawford was “displaced” but it could be presumed he had not been elected captain of the newly organized company. Typically volunteer regiments early in the war permitted their companies to elect their own captains and lieutenants. Occasionally these elections were contested and so it could not always be expected that the man who originally recruited the company would win, particularly if the unit was a composite of several groups recruited by different people. This made a regiment or company susceptible to “electioneering” which was not a desirable situation, but it was the tradition of a nation that relied on an army of citizen soldiers. It was a time when men expected to follow leaders they knew and trusted though it often resulted in incompetent officers. Good politicians did not always make competent military leaders. Americans of this era were an independent lot with most being farmers who answered only to Mother Nature. The government and law were far less intrusive in people’s lives and many of society’s institutions that required conformity were relatively new like public schools and corporations. All of this meant the rigid structure and discipline of the military was sharply foreign to the volunteers of the Fifth Ohio and the Union army in general. It was made even more difficult by the fact those giving the orders were not professional soldiers and were quite likely one’s own neighbor. The behavior displayed by the members of Company H was not unusual in the early days of the war. They saw no problem with exercising the God given right possessed by every American to come and go as they pleased. After all they believed, they were only volunteers, and could follow whom ever they chose. On November 5, the Regiment was ordered to move from Camp Corwin to Camp Dennison about 15 miles to the east of Cincinnati on the banks of the Little Miami River. The newly established Dennison consisted of more than 500 acres of land along the Little Miami Railroad, allowing quick access to Cincinnati. Over the next four years more than 75,000 men would pass through it making it one of the most important training facilities in the North. Built to accommodate up to 12 regiments it teemed with activity as new

35 regiments trained and prepared to be sent south while the wounded and ill were treated in its 2300 bed hospital, one of the best and largest in the Union.

36

The Fifth Ohio’s men were initially placed in tents but in a matter of weeks were housed in small shanties built by camp carpenters just in time for the unpredictable Cincinnati winter. They lived a comfortable existence compared to the conditions many troops in the Union and Confederate armies would be facing later in the war, including themselves. There was according to Fanning “plenty to eat, drink and wear” but there were several things he elusively points out, that Camp Dennison lacked causing “French furloughs” to be taken to the city, sometimes without permission and with the result being a trip to the guard-house upon return. A readily available supply of liquor and women was something the army always frowned upon. He pointed out however, the transgressors “were shortly unloosed by the Colonel (Taylor) who was very kind to his men, and hated very much to see them remain any length of time inside prison doors.”44 While at Camp Dennison much of the discipline “devolved” to Lieutenant- Colonel Heath, and Heath it seemed could be quite the disciplinarian. Drinking was one of the typical problems he faced. In a monograph written long after the war ended, he told story of the “Bully Butcher Boy”, a young Irish soldier, who continually broke out of camp and returned “with a load[s] of whiskey from the distillery at Milford” and proceeded to make trouble. After several incidents of this type, Lieutenant Colonel Heath had the Bully Butcher Boy “initiated into the mysteries of the Buck and Gag”. This consisted of the offender being placed in a sitting position with their knees pulled to their chin and arms wrapped around their shins and lashed tightly together with a rope along with a gag being placed in the mouth. The period of time an offending party was left in this position varied according to the disciplining officer and the nature of the offense. Another common punishment for drunks was lashing them to a wooden horse eight to nine feet of the ground with their mouths gagged for several hours at a time while being exposed to the elements and the derision of the regiment. Other favorite punishments of the cavalry and artillery were burying dead horses or cleaning up around the picket ropes where hundreds of animals might be tied.45 Much of the instruction and training fell upon the shoulders of Heath, and Major Freidrich Scherrer. Fanning referred to Scherrer as their “expert in all things military,” a claim not unfounded as the Major was listed in an 1860 Cincinnati business directory as

37 an instructor of the martial disciplines. A number of the German immigrants living in Cincinnati were veterans of military service in Europe, with some fighting in the Revolutions of 1848. Scherrer was probably one of them. At age 49 commanding the First Battalion, he trained the troopers of the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry in one of the skills that had become unique to the cavalry, the use of the saber. The kind of basic knowledge and skills necessary for training cavalry troopers in the North was in short supply making Scherrer’s contribution’s to the regiment invaluable in light of the fact the regiment’s senior officers though serious, were largely untrained amateurs. Fanning‘s references to the Major always paid homage to his military knowledge, a valuable commodity in the early years of the war.46 The training of a cavalry trooper included all the skills possessed by infantryman in addition to learning how to skillfully handle and care for a horse as well as how to fight on the animal, all of which took time and experienced instructors. While many of the troopers came from farming families much of their experience with horses was related to plowing fields or handling a team and wagon. The little riding experience they had did not involve much maneuvering and certainly was not the long distance riding that might include the endless miles and hours in the saddle that challenged a man’s ability to properly care for and handle his horse. A good cavalry trooper would spend several hours every day caring for his horse and equipment which took time and practice to learn. Additionally there was a need for training in the use of firearms and tactics as well as learning to live in the field and the more than thirty bugle calls used to communicate everything from the tasks of daily camp life to commands on the battlefield. Conventional wisdom had been that it took several years to properly train a cavalry trooper in all of these tasks, now it was being done in a matter of months.47 Throughout the months of October, November, and December the drilling and equipping of the regiment at Camp Dennison seemed to continue satisfactorily but the men were growing tired of camp life and increasingly frustrated with the ineptness of the large bureaucracy into which the army had grown. These sentiments seemed to creep into a letter from Isaac Scott, now a newly appointed corporal, to a friend Moses Hayes.
“I take my pen in hand to write you a few lines. I am well, and hope that these few lines will find you enjoying the same health. The boys are well and fat. This evening the news came that we would start in the

38
morning for Louisville. We went to work and cooked 2 days rations and stripped our blankets on the saddles. About 8 o’clock the order was countermanded…

We have not got paid yet nor got our arms. There is 2 or 3 companies that said they will not go ‘til they get their pay. There are a few in our company [that] says [they will] stay out but I guess that they will all have to go as soon as the order comes. There was double guards put on and pickets outside with loaded guns.

The doubling and arming of the guards was not done out of fear of a Confederate raid but to prevent desertion. On the 9th of December, Colonel Taylor sent out a party after the regiment’s first deserters. This was not a problem unique to the Fifth Ohio Cavalry. By the end of the war more than 268,000 men had deserted the Union army.48 In early December a letter sent to the Eaton Register, a small town newspaper serving Preble County, took aim at the regiment’s officers.

…It is earnestly hoped by the men that Gov. Dennison will do at least one righteous act and examine the qualifications of the officers in the Reg. Both military and moral, as many now holding positions are totally incompetent to command on account of the want of military knowledge as well as their profane and dissipated habits… The noble horses presented to Capt. Smith’s Co. by the people of Preble [ County ] are exposed to the inclemency of the weather and I believe half of these animals will die if we remain situated long as we are now. The men generally are treated by the incompetent and dissipated officers of the 5th Reg. more like brutes than men and no sympathy is shown by them for either horses or men. We who were equals with them at home are now tyrannized over and treated with contempt, whilst many of these gold lace gentlemen occupy their time in gratifying their beastly and ungentlemanly habits, instead of contributing to the wants and comforts of the men. I must however state that Capt. J.C. Smith and Lts. Swerer and Marker are honorable exceptions. I am sure that they will make their mark if they ever have an opportunity and that they will return home beloved and respected by their men.

The letter published anonymously on December 5th was answered just two days later by a committee of the regiment’s officers consisting of Lieutenant Colonel Heath, Captains Joseph Smith and Phineas Minor, both of whom commanded companies consisting of men from Preble County. Clearly unhappy with the anonymous allegations, they addressed each charge and demanded to know the identity of their accuser.
…Knowing Darke and Preble Counties have given 200 of their best sons to the regiment we feel that we can appreciate the fear and anxiety such charges unrefuted will carry. As to the charge of incompetency

39
from want of military knowledge, we say that we have as many if not more officers who have seen service in the cavalry than any other regiment. The senior Major, Maj. Scherrer, is a veteran of 26 years of experience as an accomplished soldier. Major Ricker, the 2nd major Is also a well drilled cavalry officer while the Colonel and the rest of the staff officers are now well schooled in tactics. Several of the field officers have seen service in cavalry or infantry. It is not yet six weeks since we received our saddles and the weather in that time has been inclement, we have had but little opportunity to drill, yet feel our regiment will compare favorably. As to the immorality charge of profane and dissipated habits… we freely testify that we have never known a more upright and gentlemanly set of men. What individual idiosyncrasies they possess, that some of them use profane language and some of them are now teetotalers, have never , to our knowledge affected their standing as men; and we have never seen an individual case of drunkenness in any officer; nor has any charge of that kind been officially laid.

As to the third charge, if there has been any case of brutality on the part of an officer in the treatment of his men, it has never been known to the regiment and no official complaint has been preferred. The chairman of this meeting has not been absent from camp more than 16 days since he entered camp on Sept. 19 and has served on nearly all court martials in camp. The Articles of War are read to every man and the Colonel is always approachable. That the regiment has moved from a comfortable camp to this place is no fault of the officers. The ground first selected for camp was found to be too low and we were moved through the exertions of our regimental officers. Our tents are infinitely better adapted to live in, floored as they are, than the shanties built when camp was first laid out. The lumber we had at Camp Dick Corwin was insufficient to build stables for our horses and no order had been issued by General Buell to build stables for us. Therefore our horses have had to stand on pickets exposed to weather and the ground has become very muddy underneath them. Through the exertions of our Colonel and without legal permission, we have lumber to floor our tents and sheds to cook in; and having Sibley stoves for our tents when it is not stormy weather. We are living as well as a soldier can live. We desire and demand you to furnish us with the original letter and correct name of the author.

Friction within regiments over the quality of leadership was typical during the early years of the war. Often the complaints made against officers were warranted though in these earlier years the grumbling was just as often a consequence of the unrealistic expectations of novice soldiers experiencing military life for the first time.49 The securing of arms was a problem that Whitelaw Reid in his authoritative Ohio In The War attributed to the resignation of General Fremont. It was Fremont who had authorized the regiment when Governor Dennison would not, after which the General had repeatedly run afoul of the Lincoln Administration and had been forced to resign. The

40 result was confusion over whether the state or federal government was responsible for procuring arms for the new unit. Regimental Adjutant John Harrison though, persisted in trying to acquire weapons from the Ohio Adjutant General, prompting a shipping clerk in the Adjutant General’s office to admiringly call Harrison “one of the most persistent beggars [he] ever experienced.” When arms finally did arrive they proved to be less than adequate in every sense—in numbers, durability and reliability. The 1,164 men of the regiment were provided 900 sabers, 419 Joslyn revolvers and 120 “second hand” Sharp’s carbines. The minimum armament of a cavalry trooper in the early years of the war was a saber and a pistol. By the end of the war it was standard for each Union cavalry trooper to also have a carbine of some type meaning the Fifth was dangerously under armed. There also were problems with quality of their weaponry. An inspection conducted by Major Ricker found 221 of the sabers as unfit primarily due to the quality of the steel blades. Once in the field the poor reputation of the Joslyn revolver was confirmed by Fanning who claimed that he and others found the pistols, were “nearly all worthless.” On New Year’s Eve 1861 a frustrated Corporal Scott wrote a friend back at home in Elizabethtown, “We have not got all our arms yet. The 2nd regiment has got their arms.” This was more than four months after the regiment was authorized and recruited.50 The shortages went beyond weapons. Uniforms seemed to be a particularly vexing problem, requiring Major Ricker to travel more than 100 miles to the state capital of Columbus to acquire pantaloons. When uniforms finally arrived at the end of December, Colonel Taylor was so unhappy with exorbitant cost he refused to sign for the items.51 During this time Lieutenant-Colonel Heath and Major Hayes traveled to Chicago to inquire about the possibility of being included in an expedition planned for the Southwest. It was an operation that never materialized and the two returned to Cincinnati still hoping for an assignment. The boredom of camp life was beginning to take a toll on discipline leading Colonel Taylor to order the officers “to see that the men behave properly at all times”. While Taylor seemed to be cracking down on loose discipline there apparently were those who felt he was not providing the necessary leadership by example, prompting him to write “ Insinuations have been thrown out that I issue an order one day and violate it myself the next. I advise you to look to the orders which have

41 been issued and live up to them. They will be enforced hereafter and all infractions noticed and punished.”52 By the middle of January the men seemed as bored as ever. Corporal Scott wrote

……We have got our sabers, but not our carbines. We expect them soon . There is two companies ordered to Warsaw Kentucky. If they go, we will be one of them. Our winter quarters is finished but what do you think? The 77th Regiment was in them before the carpenters got out, but however, if we go we will not need them. The 2nd Regiment is under orders to Ft. Leavenworth under loan. It was supposed that we would go too, but it is hard to believe everything. We have made up our minds not to believe that until we start. The boys are all well and full of fun. Sergeant Bowles bought a pair of boots with long legs to them, which someone used for a thunder mug. He suspicioned Ragio, or Squires. The weather has been very disagreeable for a few days. The mud is about 10” deep here on an average. There was a court martial held here a few days ago for writing a letter to a newspaper about the regiment. The sentence was 6 days on hard labor with a ball and chain to his leg. I liked to forget the best of all. The paymaster is to be here soon. No more at present. So goodbye………53

Heath in his typical fashion took the initiative and wrote directly to the Secretary of War Edwin Stanton seeking an assignment for the Fifth Ohio. Stanton apparently was so impressed by the appeal he read it aloud to a full room and directed that orders be issued to the anxious regiment. From its earliest origins Heath had been the driving force behind the unit. Though only the executive officer his importance to the regiment was already evident. On October 31st, 1861 Colonel Taylor wrote Governor Dennison “Colonel Heath will confer with you on all our matters and whatever he may do will meet with my approval.” This meant Taylor either had tremendous confidence in his younger subordinate or was simply happy to be relieved of the responsibility. Either way he was carrying on official communications with the Governor, which was no lowly task, and it was now solely his responsibility. In the coming months he would find himself shouldering even more responsibility-- not just for training and discipline but command responsibility.54 Colonel Taylor had been given command of the Fifth Ohio in lieu of Heath because the older man had military experience, a decision that the authors of at least one respected biographical encyclopedia published in 1877 questioned. Heath they suggested was “clearly entitled to the command”. The authors seemed to insinuate Taylor’s experience

42 was exaggerated commenting he was reported to have once “set a squadron in the field” in the days that are known as’ “before the war”. While over the next six months he remained popular with the troops he was eclipsed in importance by Heath and remained commander of the regiment only in name. At the beginning of February preparations for a departure South began in earnest as the carbines were issued, only 12 per company, and target practice began. Taylor also ordered his company commanders to supervise the sharpening of sabers and to take a count of those still without weapons or horses. By the 19th of February the regiment was preparing to accept 16 wagons, surely a sign they would be ordered into the field soon.55 On February 26, 1862 a dispatch was read to the men at a regimental dress parade that sent a wave of excitement through the ranks. Rousing Cheers rose from the field, probably accompanied by backslapping and self-congratulation. The day had finally come. The War Department had ordered the regiment to Paducah Kentucky to join General Halleck’s command. Now they would have their chance, a chance to test their mettle against Johnny Reb.

43 For the Union the War in the East was not going well. The initial thrust at Richmond ended in the embarrassment that became known as Bull Run and subsequently there was little good news. The Union forces around Washington were growing quickly as they were trained and organized into what became known as the Army of the Potomac led by a new commander, Major General George McClellan. But powerful people in Washington were growing impatient with McClellan’s failure to use this enormous new army. In the West efforts were being made to assure Kentucky stayed within the Union fold, and to take control of the Mississippi River thereby cleaving the Confederacy in half and allowing the use of the mighty river’s tributaries like the Tennessee as natural highways into the heart of Dixie. Major General Ulysses S. Grant, unknown at the beginning of the war, was developing a reputation as an aggressive leader. He successfully captured the strategically important Ft. Donelson and Ft. Henry and now was moving down the Tennessee River Valley with his Army of the Tennessee soon to be joined by Major General Don Carlos Buell’s Army of the Ohio Confederate General Albert Sydney Johnston was convinced the Union objective was Corinth, Mississippi known as “the crossroads of the Confederacy” with two critical railroads intersecting there, the Memphis & Charleston running east to west and the Mobile & Ohio running North and South. He had begun to mass 45,000 troops there to shield the town and the critical railroads from the coming Yankee invasion. His best hope was to strike first before Buell’s Army of the Ohio could link up with Grant’s troops.

Grant’s 50,000 men landed and camped at two places on the Tennessee River as they waited for the arrival of Buell’s army, Crump’s Landing and Pittsburg Landing, the second being a mere 21 miles northwest of Corinth to which it was conveniently connected by road.

44

III
Goin’ South

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On the 28th of February the friends and families of the regiment gathered at Cincinnati’s bustling public landing as horses and equipment were loaded on to seven steamers that would take them down the Ohio. They were there to bid farewell to their men for an unknown period of time though many were naïve enough to think the war would be of short duration. Thomas W. Fanning, now wearing sergeant’s stripes, optimistically believed it would end “at farthest in a month or two”.56 The small fleet carried them first to Paducah, Kentucky where they joined Brigadier General William Tecumseh Sherman’s Fifth Division. Sherman, a cigar chomping West Point graduate with a penchant for sarcasm, had left the Army in 1853. The 41-year-old Sherman had offered his services to the Secretary of War shortly after the attack on Ft. Sumter and was immediately offered a colonelcy. In August of 1861 he was promoted to Brigadier General and later given command of the Fifth Division made up primarily of Ohio troops stationed at Paducah. Sherman had no false illusions about what it would take to win the war, which created a public stir after commenting it would require some 200,000 troops alone to subdue Kentucky. Many hearing of Sherman’s comment dismissed it as outlandish, confidently believing the Confederacy would meet a quick end. Starting on March 6th his troops began departing on 17 steamers to join Ulysses S. Grant at the newly captured Ft. Henry on the Tennessee River, thus beginning a long association with the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. The fleet made a two-day stop over at

45 Ft. Henry where they moved baggage and horses to other boats before steaming on to Danville. There the horses were exercised before sailing deeper into the heart of Dixie.57 The 12 days spent on the boats were largely uneventful and likely anti-climatic after their long anticipated departure. They busied themselves molding bullets and making cartridges after being unable to draw either from supplies at Ft. Henry for their “patently worthless pistols.” Outside of breaks to load supplies and exercise their animals they

had only stopped to burn a rail trestle that crossed the Tennessee River near Danville, which they discovered, had already been destroyed by Union gunboats. This venture also led to the arrest of a doctor that lived nearby whom Fanning believed was guilty of treason. He happily explained “they imprisoned him on board a gunboat until they could send him off to some U.S. prison”, noting that “one rebel capture,” made him feel good enough to write an account of it to the Cincinnati Times. The only other excitement was the appearance of Confederate scouts tracking their progress from shore. Following Sherman’s division was the rest of Grant’s army, on some 60 ships strung out on the Tennessee River between Ft. Henry and Savannah, Tennessee. Robert Major, a 27 year old sergeant in Company F, wrote in his journal, “It was a grand looking sight to see the river covered with boats as far as you could see.”58 On March 10th the Third Battalion was detached from the rest of the regiment at Savannah, while the First and Second Battalions continued up the river. In these early years of the war the cavalry rarely operated as large independent units. More often than not a regiment was parceled out by companies or battalions and attached to infantry brigades or divisions for a variety of purposes. Sometimes the detached cavalrymen were utilized as pickets or scouts and sometimes as escorts for division and brigade commanders. Over the next month the Third Battalion found itself attached to General Lew Wallace’s division carrying out one set of operations, while the First and Second Battalions remained attached to Sherman’s division carrying out similar assignments. Colonel Taylor’s regiment, now split between two commands, found itself playing a central role in General Halleck’s push up the Tennessee River, spearheading two separate raids to cut the major east-west and north-south rail lines on which Confederate forces depended.

46 After the departure of the Third Battalion, the First and Second consisting of approximately 400 men, continued south up the Tennessee River with Sherman to an area near Eastport, Mississippi where on March 14th they disembarked under the command of Major Elbridge Ricker. They had been dispatched in a pouring rain to burn a Memphis & Charleston railroad bridge estimated to be 19 miles away and to disperse a rebel force thought to be occupying nearby Burnsville. The Fifth Ohio was to be followed by the rest of Sherman’s Division making this no small affair. Their dismal ride starting at 11:30 P.M. was carried out in the dead of night through an unfamiliar landscape and heavy rains. Ricker reported, “the incessant rains had so swollen the creeks on our line of march that we were compelled to make a circuit of some miles to evade the high water.” Yet they pushed on determined to reach their objective. Finally at 4 A.M. after narrowly escaping the drowning of several men and the loss of all their axes and picks while swimming one of the creeks, Ricker and his officers determined proceeding any further would be foolish. Returning some 13 hours after the ordeal began, they rendezvoused with Sherman back at the steamers, who quickly loaded Ricker’s men and steamed back down the river59 The First and Second Battalions were taken back north to Pittsburgh Landing where several divisions now collectively known as the Army of the Tennessee were assembling for an eventual thrust toward Corinth. Located in Hardin County, Tennessee, Pittsburgh Landing was one of the few spots troops could be disembarked and was thought to be the perfect location for Grant’s troops to await General Buell’s Army of the Ohio rushing to join them. Hardin County was a heavily wooded, isolated place covered by small family farms on which corn was the primary crop meaning few slaves and plenty of Union sympathy.60 Frustrated by the failure of his first attempt at severing the Memphis & Charleston line, Sherman planned a second raid. On the clear frosty night of March 17th, the First and Second Battalions were sent to the west under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Heath to determine whether the rest of the division could make a surprise dash at the rail line, and if possible to continue on and strike at the Memphis & Charleston line by themselves.

47

48 After riding approximately 5 miles, near the Shiloh Chapel, a small Methodist meeting house near Pittsburgh Landing, they clashed with the Second Alabama Cavalry under the command of Colonel James Clanton. After pushing the pickets of the Second Alabama back and taking several prisoners, Heath ordered a withdrawal to prevent a general engagement that Sherman wanted to avoid. Any hope of surprise was thwarted and the raid was abandoned. 61 The Third Battalion was engaged in similar operations from Crump’s Landing, 8 miles north of Grant’s troops, under the command of Major Charles Hayes. Hayes was given the task of destroying a rail bridge on the Mobile & Ohio line. Early on March 13th the Third Battalion departed for the trestle located to the west of their camp at Crump’s Landing on a 10 hour ride that took them just north of Purdy. After finding the trestle, his men proceeded to destroy the 150 foot span so thoroughly, he believed that the entire structure would have to be taken down and completely rebuilt. His men also tore up track to either side of the span, bent the rails and tossed them in the creek, convinced the Mobile & Ohio would be shut down for sometime. Hayes’ assessment though, was overly optimistic. Confederate General Braxton Bragg reported the damage repaired and the line open the next day.62 The following day General Lew Wallace, the division commander, ordered Hayes to scout the location of a large enemy encampment rumored to be uncomfortably close. It was thought to be somewhere in the vicinity of the bridge the Ohioans had destroyed the previous day. While they found the camp, it was unoccupied, but a civilian reported that between 5,000 and 8,000 Confederate infantry and cavalry had fallen back in the direction of Purdy.63 At this point though, the real threat to the thousands of Union troops concentrated around Pittsburgh and Crump’s Landings was disease. As early as March 17th, Sergeant Fanning was reporting that living conditions on the steamers had become unhealthy enough to force General Wallace’s troops to pitch tents along the shore, but it was the drinking water that became the most serious problem. “A great many of our soldiers have taken the diarrhea which was at first seemingly of a mild type, but has become fatal in some instances,” he noted, a condition he wryly called “Tennessee looseness.” It wasn’t long before these conditions became costly for the regiment. On March 21st, 21 year old

49 Private Asa Campbell (Company K) died, followed by Lieutenant James Porter (Company G), age 28 on March 22 and 43 year old Private Jacob Whitesell (Company K) on March 31st. Fanning described the scene along the banks of the Tennessee River.

The men here continue to suffer from diarrhea and fever, and are dying quite fast---poor fellows. We have not a sufficient force of doctors to attend them and no regular hospitals. Stores for the sick are likewise very scarce. If all the army is similarly fixed then our wonder will cease at so many fatal terminations to diseases, which under ordinary circumstances are of easy cure. We should be supplied by every loyal State with a corps of nurses and such other necessaries as the sick require. It will be a sad hour to many a poor fellow who falls wounded on the field, unless we are supplied with these desirable articles.

Before the war was over disease would kill more men in both the Union and Confederate armies than battle.64 The three weeks of service in Tennessee was taking its toll. In addition to the poor sanitary conditions, fatigue and unpredictable springtime weather were also affecting the health of many troopers. The men were worn out having participated in no fewer than 10 missions in addition to a day’s normal duties. William Jessup wrote home:

We are busy all the time. I know all the country between here , Corinth and for many a mile either side. We just returned from a scout on the Corinth Road. We captured 3 rebels. We started last night about 12 o’clock. I will give you an example of how they use the cavalry in Southern Tennessee. On the last day of March we reconnoitered to prepare for a three day tramp which we accordingly did, and went as far as the Tennessee River. That evening we slept on the ground and in the morning we went on board a steamboat, started up the river and landed at a place called Chickasaw which had been fortified, returned the next morning, and went on brigade review which took the principle part of the next day. Went on a scout at 12 o’clock that night, returned a few minutes ago at twelve [this afternoon]. This is very near the way we have to go all the time. I expect we will have a hard fight at Corinth within a few days.

Fanning expressed similar sentiments writing “Our boys are on picket duty every night, and are pretty severely tasked having camp duty to perform,” beginning at 5 a.m. this typically consisted of caring for their horses, cleaning equipment and endless hours of tedious drilling to which most novice soldiers were subjected.65

50 During much of this period Colonel Taylor was ill and often unable to take the field with his troops leaving Heath as de facto commander, though he too would fall ill. Major Ricker had also been laid low by a combination of fatigue and chronic diarrhea but stubbornly continued to lead scouting parties all through the Shiloh campaign. Even the chronicler of these events, Fanning himself, was temporarily relieved from duty because of illness. He began his April 4th journal entry “On account of illness my journal skips over the intervening week, nothing worthy of record has transpired, except a few slight skirmishes in which we have been partially engaged.” The next line in his journal could not have been more prophetic. He wrote, “The recent boldness of the enemy seems to predict a warm future for us, and a strong determination on the part of the foe to contest our further advances into the interior.”66 From March 30th until April 5th the First and Second Battalions serving as a screening and reconnaissance element for General Sherman’s Division consistently made contact with Confederate troops . One historian has judged Sherman as “negligent” in light of valuable intelligence provided by the 5th Ohio, and lucky not to lose his command.67 On March 30, Major Ricker and his 2nd Battalion were dispatched by

Colonel Taylor to Monterey, approximately 7 to 8 miles to the southwest of their encampment. Their mission to raid a home occupied by Confederate scouts proved unsuccessful yet yielded information that 200 to 300 enemy riders had been in Monterey. An attempted pursuit ended in failure but it became clear considerable activity had taken place between their camp and Monterey. It was evidence that could have been of great significance had Sherman and other generals chosen to pay it heed, with Monterey lying between Pittsburgh Landing and Corinth, where Johnston was known to be assembling his forces.68 On March 31st Lieutenant Charles Murray leading a patrol of Company I troopers ran into Confederate cavalry. With most of his men armed with nothing but sabers, Murray successfully conducted a fighting retreat which resulted in the death of 40 year old Private William Ledwell, as well as the capture of 21 year old Private John Pelley and 20 year old Sergeant. Ebenezer T. Cook. Lieutenant Murray saw the outcome of the skirmish as a result of his company’s poor armament writing in his report, “every engagement of our cavalry with theirs, under our present poorly armed condition must

51 prove disastrous. Our men are brave. They ask for good arms; they deserve them. They say, ‘Give us good weapons and we will fight to the death.”69 On April 2 Colonel Taylor along with elements of the Fifty Fourth Ohio Infantry chased Confederate pickets from their posts only six miles south of the new federal camps around the Shiloh Church. The next day on April 3rd, Taylor led another column out to chase off pickets near where the previous day’s operation had taken place. Upon his return to camp the Colonel reported back to General Sherman that he had “learned that at Monterey the rebels have three regiments of infantry, one of cavalry and a battery of artillery.” His report went on, “They are also in force with cavalry on the other side of Lick Creek.” Curiously the report of such large bodies of troops only six to seven miles from his encampment did not seem to disturb Sherman.70 At approximately 2:30 P.M. on the 4th, Major Ricker led the Second Battalion down the Monterey Road toward Corinth as he had a dozen times before, this time to investigate the disappearance of pickets from the Seventh Ohio Infantry from their station. They had run into Confederate pickets on that road in the past, so Ricker anticipating that possibility had sent two platoons from companies A and L to scout ahead. Shortly thereafter the crack of gunfire confirmed his caution. Two companies of infantry from the Seventy Second Ohio Infantry who also had been dispatched to search for the missing pickets were being attacked by the First Alabama Cavalry. When Ricker arrived on the scene he discovered the men of the Seventy Second in a stand of fallen timber holding their ground against the Confederate cavalry. Ricker formed his line to either side of the road and sent skirmishers some 40 yards to the front with orders to “crowd the Johnnies”. When the Confederate patrol did not withdraw the Major ordered his men to draw sabers and prepare to charge. When the bugle sounded, the 300 men drawn from companies A, L, and M, surged forward almost a half mile to a bluff overlooking a stream. Here, they discovered, about 100 yards down the slope, a Confederate line-of-battle that brought them to a sudden halt. There the Confederates taunted them “to come out and fight.” Ed Aultman, a private in Company L, described what followed;

52
One of our skirmishers, a Dutchman, charged down the slope, saber in hand, hallooing, “Surrender, you damn rebels!” The Johnnies appeared amused and in good humor. He was permitted to ride through their line-ofbattle, over the creek, and up the west slope, facing north and east , covered with Johnnies as far as the eyes could see. There was artillery parked, ambulances, officers’ tents, arms stacked, men making fires, lounging around, ….. none paying attention to the 300 Yanks than if we had not been there. The Dutchman was in among their fires, guns and coffee, we looking to see him killed. We never heard from him again. We stayed there and looked for not less than 10 minutes. Not a gun was fired on either side. No one appeared scared particularly. All seemed entranced by the vision of the Confederate army. Finally away to our left we began to hear the carbines crack. The Major had seen more than he wanted, and for fear they would cut off our retreat on the road, the bugle sounded the rally. Our senses returned and we were as keen to get out as we were to go in. The Johnnies did not crowd us on our return, so we went back at leisure. 71

During their orderly retreat the Federals managed to take 9 prisoners. About a mile southwest of the Shiloh Chapel they met Sherman leading two infantry regiments marching toward the crack of musketry. When Ricker and other officers consulted with Sherman, he dismissed the presence of the enemy in such large numbers as nothing more than a reconnaissance in force and seemed to ridicule the suggestion they posed a significant danger to Grant’s army. Aultman claimed Sherman told the major “not to report such worn out granny tales,” which angered the men in the battalion who believed Sherman had made them out to be “cowards and liars.”72 The next day the Fifth Ohio was transferred from Sherman’s division to General Hurlbut’s division near the rear. Sherman justified the decision because of the regiment’s lack of arms, indicating they should not go into action with only sabers and unreliable revolvers. In an analysis of the Fifth Ohio’s activities writer Jay Jorgensen saw this as a fatal mistake. The Fourth Illinois Cavalry was brought forward to replace the Fifth but they were unfamiliar with the roads and terrain that the Ohioans had patrolled for more than three weeks. Mr. Jorgensen notes further, the timing of the move on April the 5th left no cavalry out in front of Sherman’s division as Confederate forces moved forward from Corinth to position themselves for the assault. Would the Fifth’s presence in Sherman’s front have made a difference the next day? Possibly it would have, but not if Generals

53 Sherman and Grant, both with West Point training, failed to appropriately evaluate the intelligence brought to them.73 On Saturday April 5,1862, Sergeant Robert Major noted in his journal, that they “received orders to strike tents and leave Sherman’s Division. We were to take the road back to Pittsburgh Landing and report to General J.A. Hurlbut, which displeased us but turned out to be one of the most gracious blessings of Providence.”74 By 7 P. M. Corporal Fanning was writing in his journal, “Some of our scouts report the enemy approaching our lines in force; but it is generally disbelieved and security prevails In our whole army. The tattoo beats the hour of retiring to rest, and we will all seek repose of home and happiness.”75 Even in light of their poor armament and the wave of illness which struck soon after their arrival, the Fifth Ohio had performed quite ably as the eyes and ears of both Sherman’s and Wallace’s divisions. Not bad for a regiment who’s leadership consisted of a former postmaster, an attorney and several farmers, and who’s ranks were filled by men who less than 8 months before had no notion of war or the ways of the military.

54

By early April Grant had amassed 45,000 troops around Pittsburg Landing along with General Lew Wallace’s Division a few miles to the north at Crump’s Landing. He had been ordered to wait at Pittsburg Landing for General Buell’s 37,000 troops, then making their way from newly captured Nashville. The sprawling Federal camp spread over a fairly flat 9 square miles of high ground that rose from the river to the east, bounded by Lick Creek to the south and Owl and Snake Creeks to the north. Both Grant and Sherman were pleased with the location and felt secure enough to dispense with building fortifications. Neither believed the Army of the Tennessee to be in imminent danger. To the southwest Johnston now had almost 45,000 Confederate troops concentrated in and around Corinth in what became known as the Army of the Mississippi. Aware of Buell’s movement toward the Tennessee River Valley he intended to strike at Pittsburg Landing before the two Union forces could unite and gain the advantage. Surprise would be critical.

IV
April 6th

“The sun never rose on a more beautiful morning than that of Sunday, April sixth,” wrote Whitelaw Reid, a war correspondent of the Cincinnati Gazette at Crump’s Landing. He continued, “By sunrise I was roused by the cry ‘They’re fighting above.’ Volleys of musketry could sure enough be distinguished, and occasionally the sullen boom of artillery came echoing down stream. Momentarily the volume of sound increased, till it became evident it was no skirmish that was in progress, and that a considerable portion of

55 the army must already be engaged.” Reid wasted no time in getting to Pittsburgh Landing, jumping on board a steamer bound for the site of the fighting.76 The Third Battalion of the Fifth Ohio Cavalry was also at Crump’s Landing. At 7 A.M. Sergeant Fanning noted in his journal:

The scouts were right for the enemy have approached this morning, and have attacked our right or center at Pittsburgh Landing five miles above here. We see the smoke of battle, and have heard the roar of artillery and the crack of musketry almost continuous for the last hour. Our boys here are urged to a hasty breakfast as the order to advance may be heard at any moment. There is great excitement and strong anxiety to take part in the fight, manifested by the troops, who will move on with alacrity the moment the command is given to do so. May they win honor to themselves and glory to the country---we solemnly pray the Ruler of all things. The firing is now warmer than ever, [with] report following report in rapid succession, and the fight seems gradually tending toward us here. 77

Grant’s five divisions were camped in two rough lines surrounding Pittsburgh Landing on the River’s west bank. The outermost line of camps consisted of Major General John A. McClernand’s division to the north with General Sherman’s division to McClernand’s southeast near the Shiloh Church and Brigadier General Benjamin M. Prentiss’ division headquartered slightly to the southeast of the church. General William H. L. Wallace was encamped at Pittsburg Landing with General Hurlbut to whom the First and Second Battalions of the Fifth Ohio was now attached headquarter in an open field to the south of the landing. It was the outer ring of camps that first felt the fury of the rolling surprise attack. With the regiment laggered at Wicker Field, a pasture near General Hurlbut’s headquarters, they were three and half miles from the initial Confederate onslaught slamming into Sherman’s camps, a fate they also would have suffered had they still been attached to Sherman’s Division. Like most Union troops at Pittsburgh Landing the Fifth Ohio was drowsily easing into the routine of a Sunday morning. Some like Corporal Isaac Scott were eating breakfast when they heard firing in the distance, but were unconcerned. He wrote “We thought that it was only a little skirmish”.78

56

57 Heath however took the initiative of ordering Major Scherer’s First Battalion to saddle up and not awaiting orders reported to division headquarters. General Hurlbut was concerned enough to send a detachment from the Fifth Ohio to investigate what was happening to the southeast of his camps and it wasn’t long before requests for help arrived from both Sherman and Prentiss.79 Hurlbut moved quickly marching his men from their camps southward down the Hamburg-Savannah road to a large empty cotton field bounded to the north by a small peach orchard and a split rail fence that stretched its width. He moved his troops across the field and deployed them along its southern edge, which was fronted by another road running east to west across from which was a hardwood forest of deciduous trees barely coated in the green of spring’s small emerging leaves. As Hurlbut deployed his men a steady stream of refugees from Prentiss’s shredded division passed through the ranks of his regiments. About 9 a.m. the gray clad Mississippi and Alabaman regiments of General Braxton Bragg’s Second Division emerged from the woods with covering canon fire in support. However they did not press forward with an assault on Hurlbut’s newly formed line delayed by a shortage of ammunition and concern they might accidentally fire on the friendly troops advancing from both the right and left of their position. There also was some concern from the Confederate command that Hurlbut’s troops were in fact, massing for a counter assault. About 10 a.m. Hurlbut took advantage of this pause to withdraw his men from their forward position to a more secure site across the cotton field and behind the split rail fence that ran along the field’s northern edge. There, Hurlbut placed Heath with the Fifth Ohio’s First Battalion directly behind the infantry of the First Brigade. Positioned on the far left of this line, Heath was instructed to observe Colonel James Clanton’s Second Alabama Cavalry, clearly visible to their front.80 Early in the afternoon Colonel Taylor brought up the Second Battalion and assumed command of the regiment, which had been taking artillery fire but nonetheless stood firm. Corporal Scott recalled, “The shells and balls flew thick around our heads. I couldn’t think what it put me in mind of, Captain Wamsley said that it put him in mind of a swarm of bees flying around his head.”81

58 Not all the Union troops displayed such coolness under fire. The Thirteenth Ohio Battery deserted their guns as the first Confederate artillery rounds fell around them. The forward position of the deserted field pieces placed them at risk of capture leading Major Ricker to order Lieutenant Elijah Penn and 12 men from Company L to accompany him in a wild dash to disable them. The small party rode almost 300 yards through heavy fire to the guns, before finding they had already been spiked in an equally gallant ride made earlier by a neighboring battery.82 By 2 p.m. Hurlbut’s position was untenable. His men had been under fire for almost five hours under a hot midday sun, staving off one infantry charge after another. Though Hurlbut’s men had fought heroically; the continuous assaults were taking their toll. Now a determined assault by almost 5000 men of General John C. Breckinridge‘s command, made up mostly of Tennesseans and Mississippians, began across the cotton field some 300 hundred yards away. With bayonets mounted the Confederate troops surged toward the Union battle line at the double quick intent on sweeping around the Union left flank. The Thirty Second Illinois followed by the Third Iowa loosened two devastating volleys, stopping the assault. At this point the Fifth Ohio just to the rear of the Iowans was given the order to charge. With Heath leading the left, Major Scherer the center and Colonel Taylor the right, the regiment tore across the field helping turn the Confederate offensive into a headlong retreat. Lieutenant Jessup of Company D described what followed:
“we charged around a battery and doing so saved the 3rd Regiment’s Infantry [3rd Iowa], for the Rebels were pressing upon the Infantry, four regiments deep and would undoubtedly have soon destroyed them had it not been for our timely arrival. When we were in sight they delivered their fire and fell back under cover of the timber which gave the infantry time to rally and the artillery time to be moved from its perilous position to a more safe and effective one.”

It was a charge it should be noted, in which the troopers were armed only with sabers and their “worthless” Joslyn pistols. Private John W. Christman writing home confirmed Jessup’s observation noting that the First and Second Battalions had “saved 2 regiments of infantry from being cut to pieces.” If the flank of Hurlbut’s retreating infantry had been turned, the result might have been disastrous for his division and perhaps the entirety of the Union line.83

59 As recall echoed across the smoke shrouded battlefield, a headcount revealed casualties were surprisingly low, only one killed, 26 year old Private Thomas Murray of Company G, and several wounded including Sergeant William Goforth, one of the veterans of the War with Mexico. Goforth carrying the regimental colors into the battle was thrown from his horse against a tree, resulting in a crippling injury and his subsequent discharge on a surgeon’s certificate. Illness forced Colonel Taylor to “retire” from the battlefield later in the afternoon, returning command to the capable hands of Heath.84 Meanwhile six miles to the north at Crump’s Landing, the Third Battalion as part of General Lew Wallace’s Division, received orders about 8:30 a.m. to move south into the fray. Wallace spent the balance of the day and evening making a confused circuitous march from Crump’s Landing to the battlefield. His arrival at 7:15 p.m., almost 11 hours after his departure ultimately would cost Wallace his command. Corporal Fanning remaining behind in the infirmary, wrote:

“The firing has never slackened since we heard it first this morning, and it is now as I write one continuous roar without cessation or interval approaching here slowly and surely…Gen. Grant passed up to the scene of conflict half an hour since on his flagship Tigress. Wonder where he has been during the hours of battle this morning? We thought previously that a commanding General’s place was with his own troops, or so close to them that, in ease of even a picket fight taking place he could in a few moments know the whole particulars and determine accordingly.

By 11 a.m. some Union troops who had fled the battle had made it as far as Crump’s Landing. Fanning noted that “these men who fled from the battle are mostly bareheaded, barefooted, and without arms of any kind; they having lost them in swimming Snake Creek, which is between here and where they escaped from—near Shiloh Church.” By 2 p.m., about the time the First and Second Battalions had made their charge, things appeared to be almost hopeless to those down river at Crump’s Landing. According to Corporal Fanning:

…these fleeing cowards…positively assert that all our troops are nearly cut to pieces, and therefore incapable of much longer withstanding the terrific assaults of so large a force of the enemy. Some of them assure us that they are the last and only living members of their regiments which were so well filled lately;

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and all positively declare themselves completely taken by surprise while engaged at breakfast, and only escaping capture by flying when their ammunition was all expended.

At 4 p.m. Fanning observed that the fight seemed to have shifted to the river:

Now our two gunboats the Tyler and Lexington seem also to have become engaged: they have been firing for one hour. So the rebels must have driven us from our camps towards them and the River at Pittsburgh Landing. Can it be possible that they have done so nearly whipped us? …The wounded are now coming in here in quantities.85

Back at Pittsburgh Landing, Hurlbut’s division had been pulled into a new defensive line patched together by Grant stretching from Owl Creek to the River. Heath had been ordered by Hurlbut to take his First and Second Battalions to the rear. The General believed cavalry to be of no use at this point in the battle. However, this did not end the Fifth Ohio’s service for the day as General Hurlbut would later report. Dismissed by Hurlbut, they were put to use by Grant, who was probably delighted to discover two unused cavalry battalions that were familiar with the terrain. The General used them for a variety of challenging and dangerous tasks that continuously brought them under fire until late into the evening. Grant in fact, had used a detachment from the 5th Ohio as his personal escort throughout the entire day. That force included the 65-year-old father of Captain Andrew Hickenlooper who commanded a battery of artillery from Cincinnati. Hoping to be near his son the elder Hickenlooper enlisted as a private in the Fifth Ohio without his son’s knowledge until a chance meeting on the battlefield that day.86 As darkness fell and a heavy rain began to pelt his troops, General Pierre Gustav Beauregard, the commander of Confederate forces after General Johnston had died on the battlefield, ordered the offensive halted, believing his exhausted troops could easily achieve victory the next day. About midnight the men of the First and Second Battalions of the Fifth Ohio wearily stood by their horses and devoured a meal of hardtack and raw ham in a drenching rain pondering what the next day would bring.87 Before dawn the First and Second Battalions were once again in the saddle and directly at the service of Grant. They spent the most of the day held in reserve near Pittsburgh Landing while Buell’s army, which had begun arriving early the previous

61 evening along with General Lew Wallace’s division, launched a morning offensive while Major Hayes and the Third Battalion protected wagons bringing forward provisions. Fighting raged throughout the day over ground still scared and littered with bodies from the opening of the battle on Sunday. Exhausted Confederate troops fought hard but the addition of thousands of fresh Union soldiers simply overwhelmed them.88 About 4 p.m. the regiment was ordered forward, and near the Shiloh Chapel it charged the enemy’s rear near where the preceding day’s fighting had begun. Corporal Scott later wrote home that, “We drove them back further than they drove us on Sunday.” Scornfully, he added that Confederate troops “hollered ‘Bull Run’ at us,” and held a drunken dance in the Fifth Ohio’s abandoned camp the previous night. At about 11 p.m. the regiment unsaddled “to lay down hungry and wet [and] without blankets,” Sergeant Major wrote, almost 40 hours after the great battle opened.89 On Tuesday morning Grant sent Sherman to pursue the Confederates with all the cavalry in the command and a large body of infantry. After marching almost eight miles one of Sherman’s columns led by the Seventy Seventh Ohio Infantry, walked into an ambush set by Colonel Nathan Bedford Forrest, described by some as the South’s greatest horse soldier. A vicious volley sent the surprised infantrymen into a headlong retreat that collided with the Fourth Illinois Cavalry as it arrived on the scene, which too was sent reeling in retreat, but not before loosening a volley into the confusing melee to their front. The commander of the Seventy Seventh Ohio later complained the Illinoisans, carelessly had fired and killed many federals, something he believed the Fifth Ohio Cavalry would not have done. Following the Fourth Illinois, the Fifth Ohio and Eleventh Illinois Cavalry arrived in time to charge Forrest’s cavalry, sending them on a six-mile retreat and allowing for the capture numerous prisoners including a field hospital. Sergeant Fanning reported they were unsuccessful in actually engaging the rebel cavalry with their pursuit stopped by a burning bridge. “We went far beyond where we were ordered to go, much against the will of the Commander of the Eleventh Illinois [Cavalry], which was with us,” he wrote, continuing, “but Major Hayes of ours [battalion] was determined on a fight, and promotion if possible; and so all had to go and do as he thought best. We liked it well enough, although we unexpectedly returned without battle.”90

62 The next day, Wednesday April 9th, Fanning rode across the battlefield and described the carnage of the previous three days:

The battlefield is some four or five miles in length and in many parts beyond a mile in width. This is nearly all covered with dead, the Rebels being as much as five to one. There are articles of many kinds such as carbines, guns, ammunition, horse, wagons and artillery laying all around the field, some of which have been picked up by many of our own men of small regiments, and taken by various quartermasters. The unfaltering heroism of a great many of our Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky, Iowa and Michigan boys was very great yesterday, and their losses very severe for which we trust their country will do them honor; and remember that they fought the same ground over several times, against majorities of the enemy, who enthusiastic as they often are, were finally compelled to retreat (as large dogs do from small ones frequently,) and left everything they were possessed of in the hands of their foes. The field was well covered with bodies lying dead all over it. In digging graves there was frequently over one hundred bodies placed in one hole, principally rebels; their dead being at least three to one of ours. There was scarcely a place upon the whole field upon which many dead were not lying and our men digging their graves; in one which nearly two hundred bodies were placed ere it was covered up. Near this, on the limb of a large tree was a portion of the leg of an artillerist which was taken down by ropes and placed in the cover so necessary for it. This was close to the place General Grant sat upon his horse about 4 o’clock P.M. on Sunday evening, and where Captain Carson our scout, was killed, and several others wounded; and to the left of where Sherman, had his head not been lowered, would also have received a fatal wound. There was scarcely a tree about here which had not from one to twenty shot holes placed in it, mostly canon balls and largely of shot.

The nation was stunned. Few in either North or South had expected bloodshed on the scale of April 6th and 7th and none certainly had ever seen it. Almost 20,000 men had fallen on the blood-drenched fields around the small Methodist meetinghouse known as Shiloh. Lieutenant Colonel Heath also walked the field of battle, surveying the aftermath. He was drawn to the body of a smiling Union soldier whom he did not know. Upon examining the young man’s jacket he discovered a Bible inscribed with the soldier’s name and letters bearing an address in Minnesota. Later he wrote the parent’s of the dead soldier:

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You have doubtless wept over your dead boy. No human sympathy could assuage your grief. Yet He who guides and governs the universe of man and matter, I doubt not, has thrown around you, ever lasting arms, and supported your faint bereft, and bleeding hearts. After awhile when time shall have healed the wounds that war has inflicted, it will be a heritage of glory for you to reflect that your boy died in the cause of human rights and to save the life of a great nation; and you can with righteous pride boast that he fell in the thickest fighting, with dead rebels all around him, his face to the foe, and in the very forefront of the battle, He died a young hero and martyr in the holy cause of freedom, and Elijah riding up the heavens in a chariot of fire had not a prouder entrance to the Celestial City than your boy. Let your hearts rejoice that there is one more waiting to welcome you to the “shining shores”.91

Relative to the losses experienced by other regiments at Shiloh, the losses of the Fifth Ohio were light with only two dead and five wounded. Quite simply it was not a cavalry battle but one fought primarily by infantry regiments and artillery batteries drawn up in heavy battle lines. The thickly forested terrain was not very suitable for maneuvering companies or regiments of horse. Contrary to most histories, the Fifth Ohio did play an important role in the battle though never acting as an intact regiment with its battalions, companies, and detachments spread across the battlefield fulfilling multiple missions. Shortly after the battle, Lieutenant Colonel Heath received a visit from a member of the regiment he called the “Bully Butcher Boy”. While being punished for his transgressions back at Camp Dennison with the “Buck and Gag”, the young Irishman had in a drunken rage and with much accompanying profanity, threatened kill the Colonel. Heath wrote of his post battle meeting with the young man:

“Pat” saluted me, asked if he could have a few words, and on being told to speak on, he said ‘Little Colonel, you remember when you bucked and gagged me in the guard house at Camp Dennison, and I threatened to empty your saddle in the first battle?’ ‘Yes I remember it.’ ‘Well, I intended to do it; I was mad at your strict discipline. I came now to tell you that on Sunday and Monday I saw that without obedience to orders, we would have been killed or captured. I saw that you were right, and I was all wrong; and I came to ask your pardon for my language and violations of orders, and to pledge my life that you will never have any more trouble with me. I will obey every order, be a good soldier, and give neither you or my company officers any cause of complaint. Try me.’ “I could but reply”, ‘I will.’

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Heath found that he could rely on “Pat” throughout the remainder of the war. Heath’s discipline probably also helps to explain the Fifth’s low casualty rate at Shiloh.92 Though the casualty rate was low, illness compounded by exhaustion and the poor state of medical care resulted in nine deaths during April. The effects these deaths had on morale cannot be underestimated. They were not strangers after all, who had been drafted and thrown together by the circumstances of war. The succession of deaths left behind neighbors and relatives in the unit like Arthur Wansbrough who enlisted on the same day and served in the same company as his deceased brother George. Disease and infection was every bit as dangerous as the Confederate army. The death rate, wounds, and injuries drained the Fifth’s manpower. Recruiting trips back to Ohio by the regiment’s officers became a necessity ensuring a stream of recruits from the same counties the Fifth Ohio was originally drawn. While the regiment never reached its original size, its strength remained stable. Word of the great battle along the banks of the Tennessee River reached home just a few days after its end. Papers like the Cincinnati Gazette carried headline’s that screamed “The Terrible Battle in Tennessee”. With no fewer than six regiments from Greater Cincinnati present at Shiloh, the reports of casualties in unprecedented proportions set off panic and a frenzy of activity. General Halleck wired Grant that preparations were being made in Cincinnati for 10,000 sick and wounded. When it became clear the army was woefully unprepared to handle the number of wounded and ill, the entire city quickly mobilized to help.93 There were calls for doctors and nurses, collections of supplies and money, and the leasing of steamers. The Western Sanitary Commission and the Honorable Mayor George Hatch of Cincinnati became central in the effort. The Lincoln Administration set up the Sanitary Commission in the early days of the war, with a Cincinnati branch organized in the fall of 1861. The authority of the organization was somewhat vague but it became involved in the purchase and distribution of supplies collected from as many as 40 ladies aid societies spread throughout Hamilton County. It also provided treatment through volunteer nurses and doctors on vessels that plied the western waterways and was

65 instrumental in the creation of eight hospitals in Cincinnati and Covington, Kentucky. It was announced the steamers Tycoon and Monarch were leased and stocked with cots and blankets by the Commission while the Mayor of Cincinnati moved forward with plans to charter the Lancaster No.4 to bring wounded back to Cincinnati. Governor Tod of Ohio okayed the charter of the Magnolia by Mayor Hatch who was also given the authority by the Federal Government to charter the Superior for the same purpose.94 Large crowds descended upon Cincinnati by train hoping for passage to the battlefield on the departing hospital ships. Driven by desperation they hoped to search the war torn ground and field hospitals themselves for their fathers, sons or brothers but were forbidden to board the steamers. On the 15th of April, ships full of wounded began arriving in the city and when the Gazette and other papers began printing lists of the injured, crowds of women and children gathered at the public landing to await their arrival. Less than a week after the battle Cincinnati was flooded with the sick and wounded from the Tennessee River Valley as steamer after steamer arrived from Pittsburgh Landing. On April 17th the War Eagle arrived at Cincinnati’s Public Landing with 325 sick and wounded followed by the Lancaster, Magnolia and Tycoon with 700 more men. On the 21st the Superior disembarked 300 sick and wounded with the Marengo bringing 160 on the 24th and the Louisiana with 271 on the 25th. On the 29th the Glendale arrived with an additional 250 the City of Memphis arrived on May 2nd with 250 sick and wounded and the Tycoon on the 3rd with 210. The D.A. January arrived on May 6th with 310 more sick and wounded followed by the three vessels making a second trip to Cincinnati, the Glendale with 300, and the Silver Moon with 206 and Superior with 400. Ships were still arriving as late May 14th when another 220 men were disembarked from the Lancaster No.4.95 The hard lessons of war had been learned in the spring of 1862. Any grand illusions of glory had been shattered. War was a deadly business that left many friends, neighbors, and relatives dead or disabled. It was clear the Confederates were fighting a war with deadly earnest and it would not be a six-month affair, a lesson of which the entire nation was becoming aware.

66 The painfully slow advance on Corinth in the months after Shiloh began on May 4, 1862. General Halleck, temporarily in command of all the troops in Tennessee, ever mindful of the surprise at Shiloh moved with a deliberate caution toward the strategic rail center with intention of isolating and then destroying the Confederate forces collecting there. Cavalry operations to cut the rail links that supplied Corinth were conducted throughout the following month while other troops moved into position to lay siege to the embattled city. By June of 1862 the fall of Memphis had shifted the Union’s attention to Vicksburg as the key to controlling the Mississippi River. With Ulysses S. Grant once again commanding an army in the field, operations were increasingly directed at isolating and taking the city perched high on the bluffs above the river.

V
The Warriors

The battlefield experiences of 1862 hardened the bodies and the hearts of farm boys and old men alike into those of warriors. From the day they landed on the banks of the Tennessee through autumn of 1863 when they departed the river valley on Sherman’s long march east they were regularly engaged in battle, whether the great killing fields of Shiloh or the nameless skirmishes that occurred on at least a weekly basis. It was these experiences that changed them individually and transformed them collectively from volunteers into a professional army.

67 It was raids like one described by Sgt. Fanning, carried out shortly after Shiloh that toughed them in body and spirit. Launched from their camp at Pittsburgh Landing, the First and Second Battalions rode for Purdy to destroy a railroad bridge in rains that fell in furious torrents. Many of the men were without overcoats or blankets, yet rode as Fanning described through “impenetrable blackness until we could not discern an object three feet ahead of us.” “Consider,” he continues, “two thousand men galloping along a narrow road, now wading through a black swamp, and once or twice almost swimming a swiftly running creek, and all in the darkest night that any of the two thousand men ever saw.” Their party had left camp at 2 P. M. with elements of the Fourth Illinois Cavalry and after almost 10 hours of riding halted about midnight to feed their horses in the driving rain, and to rest in the mud. Finally about 5 A.M. they were given the order to advance on Purdy. The Confederate force occupying the town, to the disappointment of the Fifth Ohio, had fled just before their arrival. Yet the raid was a success with the bridge linking Purdy and Corinth destroyed. Actions like this were typical of their service. Not much glory, little attention, and incredibly grueling but very necessary as the great concentration of Union forces around Pittsburg Landing collectively moved toward Corinth.96 A few days after Shiloh, Corporal Scott wrote home that the First and Second Battalions, still attached to Hurlbut’s division, along with the Tenth Infantry and a battery of artillery had been “ordered out” with three days rations. “The troops are moving out on every road toward Corinth,” he noted. Scott predicted that before his letter reached home they would “hear of a big battle in this vicinity.” But he explained rumors were rampant, “you can hear anything you want in camp.” Then taking a stab at humor recalled one of the boys hearing “that if there was a big dew, that they were going to take gunboats across to Corinth.”97 Meanwhile the Third Battalion was detached from Lew Wallace’s division and placed in the rear with General Jefferson Davis. This according to Sergeant Fanning was to allow for their proper arming. For the most part the Regiment was still armed with nothing but sabers and a handful of carbines per each company. This was the second time an element of the Fifth Ohio was moved due to deficiency in arms. Fanning saw the first step toward rectifying the situation as an order to turn in their defective Joslyn pistols to

68 the quartermaster, which he interpreted as meaning new Colt revolvers that he believed to be “the best weapon of the kind for army use.”98 Now encamped about a mile and a half from Pittsburg Landing the Third Battalion heard rumor of the enemy evacuating Corinth and falling back on Jackson; Still only rumor Fanning wondered why they were not closely pursuing them. The plain and simple fact was the Army of the Tennessee had been hurt badly and was still recovering. This combined with cautious nature of General Halleck, now in overall command, would explain why it took a month to move the army the 25 miles to the outskirts of Corinth. About this time a familiar face showed up in camp, the affable Captain John Crawford. Other disgruntled officers had forced Crawford, the former commanding officer of Company H, out of the Regiment back at Camp Dennison. Now he had arrived by steamer on the banks of the Tennessee River, “determined to serve his country as a volunteer and sharpshooter for as long as possible,” wrote Fanning. Warmly accepted by friends and commended by Fanning for “his kindness and gentlemanly qualities.” It seems his only offense was his popularity with the men of Company H, which apparently was seen as a threatening by some officers. Nonetheless, Crawford proved himself a very capable soldier. He was in fact so capable as a scout and sharpshooter that General Sherman offered him a position on his staff. Crawford though, respectfully turned him down according to Fanning, because he did not want to leave the Fifth.99 Continuing his correspondence with the Cincinnati Times Fanning described their situation further.

Messrs. Editors:
….We have just endured a four days of almost continuous rain, and are nearly drowned out. The God of battle intending to wash out the stain of human blood from the bosom of the earth, has sent upon us for our sins; and so taking it, we weathered the “pelting of the pitiless storm” like Frazans: “Shine out, bright sun.

We, the third battalion, expect to rejoin the other two battalions after receiving our new arms, which will be very gratifying to the whole regiment; as in that case we will be under the eye of Colonel Taylor, and be battling in the van once more. Major Hayes our battalion commander, is much liked by his men, and sees to their comfort as much as possible; he is very anxious to be again on duty, and leading his men against the

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foe. There is no discount on Major Hayes. The boys are all well again, or as Pat Dinigan says, “They could ait a cart-horse and pull his load.” They join me in sending their best respects to the Times [Cincinnati].100

Illness had not only thinned the enlisted rank, it had also taken a serious toll on the regiment’s leadership. Unknown to Fanning, Colonel Taylor who had been ill virtually throughout the entire campaign had now been certified as “unfit for duty,” by the assistant regimental surgeon who noted Taylor would “not be fit for duty for at least another 20 days.” Major Hayes and Major Ricker had also fallen ill in the days after Shiloh but none appeared to be as sick as Lieutenant Colonel Heath. Heath’s condition was so bad he was ordered home on medical leave by the Division Surgeon, followed a few days later by Colonel Taylor. It was a situation that ultimately would lead to dissention within the regiment.101 On the 30th of April the Third Battalion departed for Corinth. To their great disappointment they left without new Colt revolvers. The old Joslyns had been returned with no explanation of when they might be adequately armed. Fanning noted that, “General Davis has ordered our Major to send an account of our arms and ammunition to him immediately, as we are to move on very soon.” He added sarcastically, “The Major reports fifteen rounds of cartridges for each saber, we not having firearms to shoot cartridges from. Bully for the sabers.”102 They moved cautiously toward Corinth stopping at Bethel some ten miles from Shiloh, slowed partially by the bad weather that continued to vex Union forces in West Tennessee. Sergeant Fanning noted the roads were “horrid” as the result of two days of rain. “There is great destruction of U.S. property along the route, of wagons, harness, mules and horse,” he wrote “and horrid smells from half buried bodies of dead animals. The putrefying bodies of horses still remain above ground and bring many cases of fever.” 103 Outside of Corinth the Confederates forces had been “formed in double lines of battle” prepared to repel the growing Union force. On the 5th of May the Third Battalion moved forward to take up a position along the growing line of entrenchments. It was here that Captain Crawford reinforced his reputation with the men. Third Battalion watched him on one occasion play a game of cat and mouse with a red shirted rebel sniper who made a dangerous nuisance of himself with what Fanning described as “a sort of mule cannon

70 which discharged shots of about one pound.” About 1700 yards from the Confederate works the sniper had halted the battalion’s progress from a position inside a farmhouse. Crawford made two attempts to move on him but was seen each time and fired upon. Crawford’s third attempt to move was successful allowing the Captain to “tree” the sniper who stepped out from cover to fire once again and was “belled” and in Fanning’s words, “rolled and tumbled along the ground like a circus performer.” Crawford’s actions also caught the attention of General Davis who commanded the division to which the battalion was now attached. Davis used the Captain as a scout for the placement of the division’s guns to rake Corinth’s defenses.104 Outside of Corinth, the First and Second Battalions joined the Union forces on the siege lines. On May 24th the First and Second Battalions received their long awaited Colt revolvers with Third Battalion issued theirs a short time later. This still left the entire regiment at a critical disadvantage with only a few carbines, necessary for engaging an enemy at longer ranges. This was especially important in scenarios that put the cavalrymen in fixed positions facing enemy infantrymen, armed with muskets or carbines, as now was the case outside of Corinth. 105 On the night of May 29th, Fanning reported they heard a tremendous amount of noise “on the railroad…. as though the enemy was moving off in large numbers.” At six o’clock the next morning Fanning heard explosions and saw a large plum of smoke rising above the city. Amazingly, the large Confederate force defending Corinth slipped off under the cover of darkness before an assault was launched. It was an opportunity missed, with General Beauregard’s entire army escaping to fight another day. It caused quite a stir among the men of the Fifth Ohio with the troopers debating the question of which was the bigger surprise, the attack at Shiloh or the escape from Corinth, both embarrassments in the eyes of the Fifth Ohio’s privates. The First and Second Battalions still attached to Hurlbut’s division immediately departed in pursuit of the escaping Confederate forces while the Third Battalion remained in Corinth.106 Once again Captain Crawford distinguished himself as something more than the average soldier saving a bridge over the Tuscumbia River after the retreating Confederate forces attempted to burn it. “He was shot at several times by guerillas who failed to hit him,” and later took “six of the scamps,” prisoner according to Fanning. Crawford then

71 used a long pole tied to a bucket to dip water out of the river “to save the already blazing bridge.” Nevertheless this courageous and resourceful officer fell victim to the petty jealousies of other officers and was finally asked to leave the camp, as he held no official commission in the regiment. The Fifth’s loss however, proved to be the Army of the Tennessee’s gain when Major General Halleck himself made Crawford the Captain of Scouting Parties for the entire Fourth Division. The regiment also lost an original member, Thomas Fanning, a chronicler of many of these events. Fanning fell seriously ill and was given a furlough to recover at home in Cincinnati, a furlough that ultimately would result in his discharge.107 After the fall of Corinth, the Union turned its attention to Memphis in its ongoing campaign to control the Mississippi River .The First and Second Battalions were turned in a new direction and given a new objective. Ahead were long days of hard riding, serving as the advance guard for the Forth Division bound for Memphis. The march to Memphis was anything but direct, with diversions to Grand Junction, Bolivar, Holly Springs and La Grange resulting in countless skirmishes, some of which consisted of no more than a few carelessly aimed shots. The city of Memphis in fact was taken on the 6th of June, long before their arrival. The Union forces in the West still under the command of the cautious Major General Halleck were put to work consolidating their gains over the next several months. Undertaking no major offensive operations they rebuilt rail lines established supply depots and attempted to eliminate the threat of the irregular Confederate forces operating in West Tennessee and Northern Mississippi.108 Back in Ohio Thomas Heath prepared to return to the regiment. He had spent several weeks at home bed ridden, apparently so ill he was unable to even sit up. On June 18, 1862 sufficiently well, he departed for Tennessee. Heath wrote that he finally caught up with the regiment on July 6 and “instantly took command” as the Division marched from LaGrange, Tennessee to Memphis. It was there that he was handed a copy of Special Field Order 157 mustering him out of the service. The basis of the action he wrote was “on my being absent without leave by my regimental commander.” A stunned Heath angrily wrote, “I have been deprived of command and disgraced to some extent without investigation or trial on the report of a regimental commander, who was present when I was ordered home, and who earnestly advised it.” He was not about to passively accept

72 the consequences of Special Field Order 157 and in characteristic fashion flew into action to fight it.109 Long smoldering tensions were ignited by these circumstances. In a letter he fired off to Secretary of War William Stanton Heath explained his illness had been so serious that Major Denby, the Fourth Division Surgeon had ordered him sent “immediately to Ohio,” adding he would forward “the leave of absence afterward in a few days,” a decision Heath claimed was supported by Colonel Taylor. In his letter to the Secretary of War, Heath related that after his arrival in Ohio “my application for leave came back not granted,” prompting his departure for Tennessee.110 By the end of July he had gathered documentation from the involved parties with the intention of proving he had been ordered home, and departed to lay the evidence before Major General Halleck. Governor David Tod of Ohio, who was also sent copies of the evidence, attempted to salvage the situation by offering Heath the command of a newly Ohio cavalry regiment but the Lieutenant Colonel turned down this compromise threatening to press his case with legal council if necessary.111 It was clear that Heath blamed Colonel Taylor for his current circumstances, though he never used Taylor’s name but referred to him only as his “regimental commander” with the quotation marks clearly present each time as a mark of disdain. It would seem this was not a simple bureaucratic paper work snafu, but a political trap created by circumstances of which Colonel Taylor seemingly took advantage. From the beginning the two men were bound together by a common objective, the desire to organize a cavalry regiment and little else, something neither could do on their own in the spring and summer of 1861. It was a simple relationship of convenience. During the early months of the regiment’s existence, Fanning felt compelled to praise Colonel Taylor’s concern for his troops. It would seem the Colonel was popular with his men but these references were made before their arrival on the banks of the Tennessee River. Once the Fifth landed and operations began, Taylor was seldom mentioned by Fanning except to note he was not in the field due to illness. Heath on the other hand never elicited much attention from Fanning and was treated rather impartially when mentioned. Lieutenant Jessup though clearly did not like Heath, referring to him at one point as a “brainless jackass” in a letter to his parents after Heath prevented him from

73 departing on a leave that had previously been granted. While Jessup never offered an opinion of Colonel Taylor in any of his letters, he always referred to the Colonel, whom he had known from home, in a respectful manner.112 The animosity that developed between the two men and the two factions that developed around them appears to have grown at least somewhat, over differing views on the purpose of the war. One faction it seems was committed to the cause of abolitionism, while the other was openly opposed to it, considering the war an effort strictly to save the Union. When it appeared in July of 1862 the regiment would need a new commanding officer with Taylor again on an extended leave and Heath apparently cashiered because of the colonel’s political maneuverings, Lieutenant Jessup wrote his parents; “We will have an avowed abolition major over us as soon as there are any promotions and then you can look for me at home because I will not serve under an abolitionist.” Jessup was anticipating the promotion of Elbridge Ricker, long committed to the cause of abolitionism, to the rank of lieutenant colonel and possibly being given command of the Fifth Ohio Cavalry.113 In field many in the regiment were growing frustrated with what appeared to be meaningless marches and countermarches across the West Tennessee countryside, prompting Captain Jessup to write home:
We have been in this place about two weeks. It is a very desolate looking place. The place and all that is in it, is not worth five hundred dollars. I can see no use in holding such little worthless places. We should try and get the armies together. Until we do this we will accomplish nothing. We had a terrible march in getting to this place. We camped almost every night in a swamp or a cane brake. It made me sick and I have not been fit for duty since our arrival. I am getting almost discouraged with the way things are going on and I think it is enough to dishearten the most hopeful, but it is useless to “kick against the pricks.” All we have to do is obey orders and keep our mouths shut. There is some talk of our being ordered to Kentucky. But I am afraid it is all talk, and no order. We would like to hear from Colonel Taylor. We have not heard from him since he left. We heard that he has four hundred recruits for our regiment but we know nothing. Lieutenant Penny will probably be home before long. He is disabled and will get discharged without doubt. You need say nothing of this as I do not know that he wishes it known. I hope you will write soon for I have heard nothing from home for a month and am very anxious. I think some of you might write me once a week whether you get a letter from me that often or not. Be sure I will write as often as convenient. Tell Dan to write me often. It will improve his writing and do me an infinite amount of good. We have been menaced by Villepignes’s army while we have been here but he has not had the courage to

74
attack us. We went out once to fight him but he skedaddled and we were cheated out of a fight. We don’t hear so much about guerillas as we did I believe they have all gone home or joined some regular organization. I hear that Jeff Davis has ordered them all into the army. I saw eight yesterday going to their homes. They say they are tired of war. We still continue to be the poorest armed cavalry in the service and every effort on the part of our officers to get us arms seems to no avail. We have nothing but pistols and sabers and not near all have them. It is a disgrace on the State of Ohio. We have done more service poorly armed as we are than any other cavalry in this branch of the army and are entitled to good arms. If promises would arm us we would have had arms six months ago. We will believe nothing until we see the arms in our possession. The other cavalry when they pass our boys ask—where are your arms? We tell them we have none. They say they would be damned if they would go out and do duty where others do.114

The log book of Company F makes it clear just how grueling the ride to Memphis had been with a partial listing of 264 miles traveled during the months of July and August, not including several skirmishes and scouting missions which conservatively increase the distances ridden to over 300 miles, under conditions that left the men discouraged and their mounts worn out. Their arrival in Memphis, now in Union hands, meant much needed rest and new Burnside carbines, the firearms for which they had waited for almost a year. Dependent on revolvers, swords and on less than ten carbines per company since their departure from Camp Dennison they were for the first time properly armed. Colonel Lyle T. Dickey of the Seventh Illinois Cavalry noted the Fifth Ohio “until very lately [had] been illy armed, have proven themselves with good arms in their hands as effective in the face of the enemy as their most noted companions in the field.” The delivery of these new arms couldn’t have come at a better time with all three battalions at one time or another engaging in heavy fighting during the months that followed, the type of fighting in which the carbines made all the difference. Company F would spend two weeks in Memphis before riding 140 miles back in the direction they had come.115 In early August Corporal Scott wrote home to friend Mose Hayes about rumors that Colonel Taylor had resigned. “He is here yet,” Scott wrote, and “with the Lieutenant Colonel thrown out for staying home over his time,” Scott surmised Major Hayes would be promoted. In September Colonel Taylor informed the regiment of his plan to resign and forwarded his resignation to General Halleck. Now the command situation was more in question than ever. Ricker and Hayes both claimed to be the most senior officer in the

75 Fifth Ohio with the executive officers slot open and the command slot soon to be vacant. Lieutenant Chester Hanson a close friend of Colonel Taylor’s wrote Major Hayes who was in Corinth, “the Colonel positively demands that you come immediately.” Hanson explained:

We had some trouble with Ricker who claims the colonecy as Captain Wamsley and a few other officers discovered to him that you were his senior having the oldest commission as captain. He swears he will not stand for anyone overstepping him, [and] that your commission as captain, as well as some others were improperly obtained. He tried brow beating the Colonel and played hell generally. Now for God’s sake come at once. I still hold a first lieutenant’s commission but I am going home if Ricker is promoted. If you come I am at your service. They [the Second Battalion] have left [companies] A, L and C under Ricker for Holley Springs. [Companies]B, D, and M are escorting him to Memphis. [The] Colonel, Doc Thorton, Dick and myself are living in good style when we met General Grant. We expect you by the Wednesday train. The Colonel’s decision to resign after extended absences resulting from illness and injury may also have been caused by the declining health of Anna Taylor his wife, who still had several young daughters at home with her. Jessup believed there would be a “great row” in the regiment because of Colonel Taylor’s resignation. “We will have to have a new Colonel and the majority are in favor of Major Hayes but Major Ricker contends he outranks Major Hayes,” he wrote. Jessup contended that Ricker’s claim had no basis as both men were commissioned as majors on the same date. “Major Hayes is the man entitled to the position and if he don’t get it we will know the reason.”116 While the unit suffered through political turmoil, troops in West Tennessee could not help but wonder what was happening at home. A rumor was circulating that Cincinnati had fallen to Braxton Bragg who came crashing through northern Tennessee into central Kentucky throwing the entire state into turmoil including neighboring Cincinnati.117

76

Back Home
While the capture of Cincinnati was only rumor, the area faced the very real threat of a Confederate offensive. The 45,000 man army that had escaped from Corinth now under the command of Braxton Bragg had made its way to Tupelo, Mississippi. Left with little maneuver opportunities in west Tennessee or Mississippi and facing combined Union forces of more than 128,000 troops, Bragg moved east to Chattanooga. A smaller Confederate force operating in eastern Tennessee of about 14,000 troops under MajorGeneral Edmund Kirby-Smith already occupied Knoxville to the northeast of Chattanooga creating an open line of march into the critical border state of Kentucky. The two generals conferred and agreed on a joint movement led by Kirby-Smith strengthened with reinforcements from Bragg. With few Union troops in the way, KirbySmith moved rapidly into central Kentucky. The cities of Richmond and Lexington fell followed by Kentucky’s capital, Frankfurt. With Lexington a mere 100 miles south of Cincinnati, the city hurriedly prepared to defend itself. General Lew Wallace, under whom the Fifth Ohio’s Third Battalion had once served, was given responsibility for the city’s defenses. Wallace’s performance at Shiloh ultimately led to the loss of his command in Tennessee and a transfer northward. With very few troops in the immediate vicinity, men were rushed from wherever they could be spared; inexperienced regiments at Camp Dennison not yet armed, a brigade from as far away as Corinth, Tennessee, independent companies and battalions from all over Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana, and thousands of volunteers from the city and surrounding area that armed and organized themselves into companies that collectively became known as the Squirrel Hunters. Wallace placed the city under martial law, which included closing all commercial business and the drafting of able-bodied men. With almost 72,000 men placed in fortifications in and around the city also encompassing both Covington and Newport, Kentucky directly across the river, Cincinnati braced itself for what appeared to be inevitable attack by troops under Kirby-Smith now headquartered in Lexington,

77 Kentucky. By September 10, skirmishes were taking place at Camp Mitchell just South of Covington, the outer edge of the area’s defenses, but on the 11th Kirby-Smith ordered the troops to fall back. It was decided not to press on against Cincinnati in the face of what appeared to be a tremendous disparity in numbers until Bragg with the balance of his troops could take Louisville. For the next several weeks General Kirby-Smith withdrew his forces back toward Lexington and the threat to Cincinnati receded but fears of a thrust aimed at Louisville grew. 118 By the fall of 1862 cracks had begun to appear in the substantial political unity that had characterized the North in the early days of the war. After nearly a year and a half of fighting it was clear there had been very little progress. Democrats who had formerly remained silent or even had been supporters of Lincoln’s administration were beginning to speak out against it. For some it was plain and simple war weariness while others were growing unhappy with a number of policies traditionally opposed by Democrats. There were also those for whom the war was creating economic hardships. The Annual Statement of the Commerce of Cincinnati for the commercial year ending August 31, 1862, declared that the war “deranged and crippled our commerce sadly, and seriously injured many departments of the industry of our city.”119 As the fall elections loomed a number of Democratic candidates were beginning to openly express an antiwar bias with some demanding an immediate cessation of hostilities. In Ohio this disenchantment was reflected in the election of 14 Democrats to the state’s 19 congressional seats in the U.S. House, among them Alexander K. Long. Long had been elected to represent the Second Congressional District that included much of Cincinnati and the western half of Hamilton County.120 Long was born in Greenville, Pennsylvania in 1816 but moved to Hamilton County in 1837. He settled in rural Green Township the just to the west of Cincinnati, where he taught school and studied law. The red haired Long described by contemporaries as “comely” married Miss Cynthia Sammons, another Green Township resident in 1842, the same year he was admitted to the bar and began practicing law in local “justice of the peace courts.” In 1848, the 36-year old Long was elected to the Ohio General Assembly where he served one term as a Democrat ending in 1850. By 1860 he had moved to Cincinnati and made an unsuccessful run at the Second Congressional seat in the U.S.

78 House and then returned to the practice of law. There is little doubt men in the Fifth Ohio and their families knew Long. His public life as a teacher, attorney and politician more than likely made him an acquaintance or friend of many including Colonel Taylor, Major Hayes and Captain Jessup, all of whom lived in the vicinity of Long’s residence.121 In the aftermath of Long’s 1860 congressional loss to Republican John Gurley, the secession and resulting war, he gravitated to the states’ rights doctrine that had been used to justify secession by the Southern states. Long believed that any federal attempt to abolish slavery was a direct attack on the state’s responsibility to protect private property. Consequently he came out strongly against abolition, fearing other property rights and eventually civil liberties would also come under assault by the growing power of the federal government. On the 22nd of September the tensions inside of the Union over slavery reached new heights. On that date Lincoln threatened to free all slaves in those areas still in rebellion on January 1, 1863, some three months in the future. It was a powerful threat and likely a contributing factor in the election of Long. On the heels of this came the initiation of a draft to meet Ohio’s quota for troops affecting some of the rural townships comprising the Second Congressional District. The Gazette reported in its October 2nd edition that 15 men were drafted from Crosby Township, 42 from Colerain and 24 from Delhi Township the next day. The election of Long aided by these controversial policies and the support of prominent local citizens like John Scott Harrison, a Brother-in-law of Colonel Taylor, were representative of the growing unhappiness with the war at home. Known collectively as the Peace Democrats or as the Copperheads, a term that became more common as the war went on, though they were not all of one mind as to why the war should be ended. For some it was a convenient political issue used to run against Republicans in places like Southwestern Ohio, Indiana and Illinois. For others it was an abiding dislike of abolitionism or a commitment to a states’ rights philosophy, and for some it was the awful and unexpected toll of war. Their political fate would wax and wane with the fortunes of war, a war that would continue to go badly for the Union through the remainder of 1862 and well into1863.122 Back in West Tennessee, Confederate forces under Generals Earl Van Doren and Sterling Price had been given the task of confronting Grant’s forces while Bragg and Kirby-Smith carried out operations in Kentucky. Van Doren and Price remained

79 interested in Corinth because of its importance as a strategic rail junction and a Union supply depot. The Third Battalion now under the command of Captain Joseph Smith found itself on the flanks of that city’s formidable earthworks when Van Doren’s 22,000 troops assaulted its defenses on the 3rd of October. 123 The 28 year old Smith, the commanding officer of Company E, had taken over the battalion when Major Hayes was summoned north to Memphis to temporarily assume command of the regiment, this do to the absence of both Heath and Taylor. He continued in this role for most of the next year though not formally promoted to the rank of major until March of 1863.124 In the morning hours of Friday, October 3rd one portion of his command, Company I, was detailed to serve as an escort for Brigadier-General Thomas Davies. The remainder of the Battalion, consisting of Companies E, H and K, was sent down the Purdy-Corinth Road to “scout all approaches from the enemy’s left flank” and to protect communications with Bethel. In the darkness of the early morning hours the Third Battalion began scouting the enemy’s movements before fighting began at daybreak. Captain Smith reported they remained in position for the balance of the day “without molestation” making frequent reports to division commander Colonel John Mizner. Overall however, Union fortunes had not fared so well. By nightfall the Confederate assault had taken the first ring of the city’s defenses and threatened to push inside Corinth itself. Fighting was renewed at daybreak the next morning and continued into the early afternoon as the unusually warm temperatures sapped the already exhausted combatants. By 9 o’clock the Third Battalion found itself in a dangerous situation cut off from Union lines. Over the next several hours the battalion fought two skirmishes as Smith desperately maneuvered his command back toward the city. Finally at 2 p.m. after repeated assaults had been blunted in part with fresh troops sent from General Hurlbut in Bolivar, the Confederate commander Van Doren, realizing the hopelessness of their situation, broke off contact, and prepared to withdraw. Two hours later Captain Smith managed to reach Corinth with 3 prisoners in tow. His tired troopers were ordered to “prepare 5 days rations” and given a short night’s rest with orders to report for duty at 5 a.m. the next morning.125

80 Before dawn the Third Battalion was again mounted and on the move leading General John McPherson’s column in pursuit of Van Doren’s beleaguered troops. At Chewalla they clashed in a sharp exchange with the enemy’s rear guard leaving Captain Norris R. Norton of Company K wounded so severely he was given a medical discharge a few weeks later. After taking three prisoners the battalion was forced to retire after engaging two field guns, thus ending the first night of pursuit on the banks of the Tuscumbia River. For the next two days they remained the lead element of McPherson’s column, skirmishing repeatedly with the enemy’s rear guard. On the fourth day of the pursuit they were placed at the rear of the column to rest their exhausted mounts where they remained until returning to Corinth on the 12th of October.126 When it became obvious Van Doren and Price were moving jointly against Corinth, General Hurlbut marched south from Bolivar in time to take part in the pursuit. As they approached the Hatchie River Hurlbut’s column was lead by the First and Second Battalions of the Fifth Ohio under acting commander, Major Charles Hayes. Hayes wrote his brother about what followed.

We are again back here in our old camp after an absence of four days in which we had a hard march and a sharp fight, repulsing and driving the enemy from the field with great slaughter. Our loss was heavy, some six hundred killed and wounded in an engagement of seven hours. The losses of the rebs was equal or greater than ours. The 5th OVC did her duty nobly opening the fight in the morning and closed it in the afternoon. Lost 5 men mortally wounded, since died, and 3 severely and slightly wounded. We got off very cheap considering that we really were engaged for two days with superior numbers. We encountered the advance guard of the enemy’s cavalry on Saturday at about Eleven o’clock and skirmished with them and drove them before us all the rest of the day. They took advantage of every swamp and thicket to ambush and fight us under cover but they was unable to stand the bold tempetuosity of our boys and was forced to skedaddle every time. On Sunday morning they held a strong position on the heights at Mattamora protected by a ditch 2 miles long and 10 feet wide, by 4 [feet] deep, with an embankment on our side with earth from the ditch, which by the way was not made by them but was a plantation drain though none the easier to cross on that account. And we did not propose to accommodate them by closing it under their fire but made a detour to their flank and after a brisk skirmish of an hour drove them, which was soon after accomplished by our artillery. Then followed one of the grandest scenes it was ever my fortune to witness, the enemy advancing in their lines of battle in solid columns with colors flying and drums beating while our batteries poured shell and grape into them. At less than six hundred yards their solid shot [was] flying harmlessly over our heads. They did little damage on this side of the creek, though we took one of their

81
batteries at the point of the bayonet. But after that they were driven from the bridge and took positions of the heights commanding the bridge and road leading to it, over which we had to pass. They moved us terribly for a while, but the boys went forward with a yell and a rush and we soon had the key to the position in [our] possession and soon after won, the rebs in full retreat with 5th OVC in hot pursuit. We followed them about three miles fighting their rear guard all the way. From the quantity of stuff thrown along the road they must have thrown away everything but their arms and a great many of them [also] as we picked up two or three thousand Enfield French rifles on the road.

You can tell everyone that I came through without a scratch and am all right…

For the regiment the Battle of the Hatchie near the Davis’ Bridge proved to be the most costly battle of the war thus far, with five dead and three wounded.127 Third Battalion remained on detached duty as it had been since early fall, and continued to do so for most of the next year, functioning as an independent command, very capably led by Joseph Smith. After its action at Corinth the Third Battalion was sent to Glendale where it was assigned to protect the Mobile and Ohio rail line. In early December it was made part of an expedition sent up the Tennessee River under the Command of Colonel Thomas C. Sweeney in pursuit of Confederate cavalry reported to be operating along the Memphis and Charleston line and to take any hogsheads of cotton it might find. Outside of Cherokee Station, Alabama the battalion took part in a running battle that ended near Tuscumbia resulting in the capture of 70 enlisted men and 3 officers.128 The rest of the Regiment remained dispersed across the Mississippi and Tennessee countryside in places like Bolivar, Glendale, on the banks of the Tallahatchie River, at Camp Davis near Corinth, and in La Grange. Once again they were assigned to protect the bridges, depots and miles and miles of rail lines critical to Grant’s ongoing operations that increasingly were focused on the city of Vicksburg. It was not an easy assignment with the lingering threat of bushwhacking guerrillas and of the regular Confederate forces led by Generals Van Dorn and Price. October of 1862 brought unusually cold weather and the concern of an attack, according to Corporal Scott, who wrote home from Bolivar Tennessee:

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We have had snow here one inch deep, and several frosts. We have been expecting attack for some time. Old Price was to eat dinner with us last Sunday but I guess he thought it was too cold for butternuts to lay out of doors without tents or blankets. If he had come, he would have found it warm as well as cold. There is a heap of talk here about the war soon coming to an end. Last week there was several offering bets 2 to 1 that it can’t last till New Year’s and there was several bets made. I don’t think there is any chance of it being over more than there was a year ago, but you can’t tell what Old Abe’s Abolition Proclamation is going to do.

While the Union had made some progress in the western theater, the war in the East was still going badly. The belief the war was coming to an end was completely unwarranted and could only be attributed to the kind of naiveté that made some believe the war would be a 90 day struggle at its outset.129 General Van Doren’s army remained a significant danger to the troops garrisoning those places through the winter and spring of 1862, capturing to the great embarrassment of Grant, his major supply depot at Holly Springs without a fight on December 20th. Its commander, Colonel Robert C. Murphy was relieved of his command and sent north in disgrace. The following day, Fifth Ohio troopers from companies B and M found themselves in a desperate fight with Van Doren’s troops at Davis’s Mill. A force of only 250 men under the command of Colonel William H. Morgan including members of the Twenty Fifth Indiana Infantry faced Van Doren’s force of 3500. Morgan ingeniously fortified an old sawmill with bales of cotton layered with old railroad crossties which he linked into other nearby strong points including an adjacent Indian mound. Colonel Morgan also took advantage of the fact his position to the south was bounded by a swamp almost a half-mile wide. The only way across this soft ground was a corduroy road on which he trained a single cannon, an ancient six ponder he loaded with grape shot. Along his makeshift parapets to either side of the road he stationed sharpshooters who could lay down effective fire along the entire approach. As the assaulting troops began to file down the approach they came under a withering hail of fire that filled “the swamp on both sides of the road with dead men and horses.” Colonel Morgan’s sharpshooters also proved particularly effective in emptying the saddles of Confederate officers, throwing the assault into chaos. Remarkably at the end of the two hour battle, Van Doren’s men were driven off leaving behind 22 dead, 30 wounded and another 20 as prisoners. Reportedly

83 the fighting was so intense some of the cavalry troopers fired over 200 rounds “without changing positions,” an impressive feat winning the praise of Grant and promotion for Colonel Morgan to Brigadier General in the days after the battle. It would also have been a nearly impossible without the still relatively new carbines they had received in Memphis. 130 Other parts of the Regiment were not as lucky. On the 18th of December a disaster of major proportions befell the Fifth Ohio near Lexington, Tennessee. General Nathan Bedford Forrest was reported to be moving toward the Tennessee River near Jackson. The Forty Third and Sixty Third Illinois Infantry Regiments, under Colonel Adolph Engelmann, were ordered out to intercept him. Engelmann additionally was ordered to “take command of all the United States Cavalry that [he] might find.” In the early morning hours of the 18th about three and a half miles outside of Jackson, Engelmann came across “parts of the Eleventh Illinois, Fifth Ohio, and one company of the Second West Tennessee” cavalry regiments under the command of Colonel Robert Ingersoll. The Fifth Ohio contingent consisted of 200 troops that “were raw recruits, never having been under fire and never drilled,” noted Colonel Ingersoll. They were troops recently recruited in Southwestern Ohio to fill out the declining rolls of the Fifth Cavalry. These troops were placed under the command of Engelmann who proceeded to send out his newly acquired cavalry in the search for Forrest. Shortly after dawn a battalion of the Eleventh Illinois Cavalry made contact with enemy pickets whom they succeeded in driving back to the main body, which appeared to be in regimental strength. Ingersoll, commanding the cavalry, reported his men “fell slowly back, fighting all the way,” in what he described as “fine order, and holding at bay a much superior force.” After repositioning his troops Colonel Ingersoll realized “the enemy was pouring in on all directions,” and made two desperate charges to prevent a sizable portion of his command from being flanked by an enemy in regimental strength on both his right and left. He reported, “Twice the enemy was repulsed, but coming in overpowering numbers the third attempt proved successful.” 131 When Major Hayes and Colonel Taylor both at LaGrange, received word their new recruits had been sent out as part of the expedition searching for Forrest, they immediately boarded a train bound for Jackson to join them. Hayes wrote to his brother

84 they had “arrived in time to learn of the disaster but too late to ward it off.” They discovered 124 of Ingersoll’s command had been captured including 51 troopers of the Fifth Ohio, among them the most senior officer present, 29 year Adjutant James C. Harrison, who had sent the message to Hayes and Taylor. Hayes angrily wrote, “This adds another to the long list of disasters brought by officers in high places who have nothing to recommend them but influential friends.” He was none to happy with Ingersoll who in his words “led them headlong into a nest of the enemy and surrendered himself and left the boys to their fate.”132 The inexperienced recruits stood no chance and should never have been order to take part in the expedition, a situation made worse by the presence of Nathan Bedford Forrest, the most capable of the Confederate cavalrymen. So ended 1862; a year of hard lessons, lessons that transformed them from a loosely disciplined body of civilians raised in a society that highly valued independence and equality into a cavalry regiment of professionals, hardened by the rigors of campaigning in a hostile land. They had seen and experienced the kind bloody carnage at Shiloh that few Americans of any generation had seen. They had ridden past the point of exhaustion, slept and eaten in the rain and snow and ungodly Southern heat, and experienced the personal anguish of losing friends, family and neighbors. They were also becoming the lean tough veteran troopers who would bring the Union victory.

85 On January 1, 1863 with the war going badly in the East and having only moderate success in the West Lincoln followed through with the threat made the previous September and legally ended slavery in areas under Confederate control. Now in addition to being a war to save the Union, it was a war to end slavery. While this won the support of abolitionists across the North and contributed to keeping Great Britain out of the war, it added to the growing antiwar sentiment, especially among narrow constitutionalists like Clement Vallandigham and Alexander Long. Additionally casualties continued to mount with bloody defeats at places like Fredericksburg, Virginia in December of 1862. While the manpower shortage was addressed with the federally mandated draft of all able-bodied males between the ages of 20 and 45, provisions allowing the hiring of a replacement created resentment among the poor who resented the rich man’s exemption and their forced service.

VI
The Bane of Politics
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Winston Churchill once remarked, “Politics are almost as exciting as war, and quite as dangerous. In war you can only be killed once, but in politics many times.” The Civil War was the ultimate blend of both, creating a kind of high drama that could at the same time thrill and evoke disgust at the blatant pursuit of power. In the White House, in the ranks of Lincoln’s generals and all the way down to the company level, political squabbling was often the norm. The Union army was made up of citizen soldiers, a curious blend of neighbors, family members, native born and immigrant, Democrat and Republican, led by politicians with a leavening of professional soldiers all of whom brought their friendships, jealousies and political baggage, which sometimes made for an explosive state of affairs. The Fifth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry was no exception.

86 Since the spring of 1862, the Fifth Ohio experienced a power struggle among its leadership, which was also reflective of growing social and political divisions at home and across the North. The regiment’s experience was not unique but emblematic of struggles going on within Lincoln’s army throughout the war. The volatile relations that developed among its officers can, in part, be traced to mechanisms used for selecting and promoting its leaders, decisions that ultimately were in the hands of politicians back in Ohio. Signs that serious problems were on the horizon began appearing as early as the regiment’s days at Camp Dennison but these were problems of the common garden variety that could be solved by the unit’s own leadership. It’s no coincidence that the serious problems began to appear as the Fifth took to the field for the first time in the spring of 1862. This is when relations degenerated from cases of petty jealousies into a full-blown power struggle for control of the regiment. It was a situation aggravated by mounting frustration in the North over the military stalemate and growing dissatisfaction with Lincoln’s Administration. The stresses of combat now made decision-making and therefore leadership a question of life and death. What followed was the slow division of the regiment into factions that hurled accusations and planted insinuations of incompetence, political favoritism, and ideological betrayal, all while facing a deadly enemy on the battlefield. During the long months when the regiment’s top leadership was absent, a noticeable decline in discipline and morale took place. This leadership vacuum was extended when Colonel Taylor was detached from the regiment to preside over a court martial taking place in Memphis upon his return from medical leave. The Fifth Ohio was without a colonel for almost four months, while the regiment was spread across the Tennessee countryside with little semblance of unified authority. Temporarily Major Hayes held command of the regiment but neither he nor Major Ricker was promoted in rank creating tension between the two men and the factions forming around them. Taylor’s attempt at securing a surgeon’s certificate while on court martial duty which would allow a permanent return to civilian life failed. During this time the Fifth Ohio’s companies and battalions continued in their scouting and picket roles protecting bridges, supply depots and rail lines critical to Grant’s Mississippi campaign. Clearly it was not a desirable situation regardless of who had command authority. 133

87 It appeared some harmony would be restored when Heath was finally called back to duty in mid-January. His dismissal from the army was reversed after an investigation of his allegations, putting an end to the competing claims for command. But serious damage had already been done to the Fifth Ohio’s morale and discipline. Lieutenant Colonel Heath returned to a regiment whose efficiency had been seriously compromised, and now faced the challenge of fixing the damage. His prescription was described as imposing “rigorous discipline, weeding out incompetent officers and educating the noncommissioned officers and men”. But while the Fifth Ohio was whipped back into fighting shape, the discord within the Regiment did not disappear. Colonel Taylor’s future appeared to be addressed when he was appointed the Chief of Cavalry for Thirteenth Corps at the end of 1862. But it also created a wave of vacancies in the chain of command meaning promotions and more conflict.134 Only 11 days after Heath’s return to the Regiment he was charged with conduct unbecoming of an officer. On the 31st of January Captain Irving Halsey, Company C presented his resignation to Heath on the grounds that severe rheumatism prevented him from performing his duties on horseback and sought to resign for this medical reasons. Heath responded.

Captain Halsey has permitted a large company to run down so that he reports only ten men for duty. He has lost all command over his men. They have no respect for him and he is incapable of enforcing it to bring our Regiment to the proper state of discipline and for the general good of the service I earnestly recommend the acceptance of his resignation. His place can be readily filled by a competent and valorous officer.

Heath’s blunt endorsement of the resignation led to a charge that his statements were false and that the Lieutenant Colonel knew the allegations were “wholly false, malicious and slanderous.”135 The Court Martial proceedings began on the 26th of February, 1863 and continued for the next week and half, during which the division among the regiment’s officers was clearly evident as was the poor state of discipline and morale. The prosecution’s strategy was to use Major Hayes and Lieutenant Jessup as witnesses in proving that Company C was capable of producing more than 10 troopers for duty, and to bear witness to Captain

88 Halsey’s competence as an officer. When the Judge Advocate, the person who presides over a court martial, asked whether Halsey was a good disciplinarian, Hayes responded, “Yes sir, I regard him as a good officer in that particularism.” In response to a similar question, Hayes answered, “I have never heard of his character assailed by any officer of this regiment.” When pressed to explain why so few men were often available for duty from Company C, the Major answered, “Well there was no one good reason for it. One was the scarcity of horses, another was that Company C always had a greater number of men detailed as orderlies than any other company.”136 Lieutenant Colonel Heath, an accomplished attorney before the war, took the unusual step of representing himself during the court martial. He set out to prove his statements about Halsey and Company C were true by demonstrating Halsey was incompetent and, that the condition of Company C deteriorated as a consequence of that incompetence. Heath went about the task methodically, first questioning Hayes about the actual number of troops Halsey made available during the 20 day period in January after he took command of the regiment. When the Major could not give definitive answers Heath made sure the court martial board understood Major Hayes commanded the Third Battalion, not the Second Battalion to which Company C belonged, the implication being Hayes was could not be considered the authoritative source on Company C’s condition or Halsey’s performance. The questioning of Lieutenant Jessup, the next prosecution witness proceeded in the same manner. Both Jessup and Hayes were part of the anti-Heath faction particularly taking a dislike to the Lieutenant Colonel’s views on abolition.137 Heath called on Major Ricker and Captain John Henry as witnesses for the defense. Both were critical of Halsey. Ricker, the commander of the Second Battalion, clearly felt the Company C should have had more men available for duty and firmly affixed blame for that problem on Captain Halsey. Ricker believed Halsey had not ensured the company’s horses were cared for properly, a prime responsibility of any cavalry officer, making it impossible to mount perfectly healthy troopers who were available for duty. Ricker added that he had spoken to Halsey several times about the care of the company’s horses testifying, “My contention for a good company commander is one that keeps his company in the best condition and the largest number of men mounted for duty. Captain Halsey has failed in this respect.” He went on to testify that Halsey had not always

89 “promptly carried out orders” and most disturbingly that he had completely disappeared for eight days on a road march from December 20 through the 28th of 1862, feeling his presence on the expedition wasn’t necessary, since the Company C was fielding only six men. Ricker had in fact recommended that Halsey’s resignation be accepted when Lieutenant Colonel Heath had sought the Major’s input on the matter shortly after the resignation was submitted. Ricker had responded that; “The most troublesome in his case is that his company have lost confidence in him on the battlefield; that after having observed him frequently under fire, I am satisfied that his men had a right to come to such a conclusion.”138 Captain John Henry of Company M the other defense witness testified that he often found his company encamped next to Halsey’s Company C. This Heath tried to prove, gave Captain Henry insight on the daily interactions of Halsey with his men. Heath asked if he had witnessed “evidence of disrespect for Captain Halsey as a company commander,” to which Captain Henry replied he had. Henry went on to describe what happened on the night of January 6, 1863 as the Second Battalion prepared to make a march from Moscow to Collinsville. Henry noted only five or possibly six men turned out for the march and that Halsey’s response was to go “from tent to tent where his men were sleeping or resting. The manner in ordering them out was as near as I can recollect [was] ‘Well boys can’t you come out tonight.’ The answer to which was in one instance, ‘No I’ll be God damned if I’ll go.’ In that style he went from tent to tent and was answered in a somewhat similar manner.” Captain Henry soon to become a major concluded his testimony by answering that he believed Captain Halsey had forfeited the respect of the enlisted men in his command and with that assertion Lieutenant Colonel Heath closed his defense and the court adjourned for deliberations.139 The next day February 7, 1863 the Court was called into session and the Judge Advocate General read the verdict of not guilty on all counts. Heath’s defense painted a picture of a company, if not an entire regiment, in disarray, a picture that at least the nine officers on the court martial detail deemed accurate. It was a regiment in which a company commander missing for eight days, essentially absent without leave, faced no repercussions. Equally as damning was testimony that seemed to indicate how little

90 regard the men of Company C had for their commanding officer. The wide dispersal of the regiment, the power vacuum and the resulting political infighting of the previous ten months had created a mess. Even after the trial concluded there were still questions about who commanded the Fifth Ohio though Heath had been reinstated as the regiment’s Lieutenant Colonel. Colonel Taylor, still on detached duty, did not believe Heath had the authority he now assumed and tried to block a series of promotions recommended by the Lieutenant Colonel. Less than a week after the trial, Taylor still in Memphis, sent orders to Heath.

You are hereby ordered to read the enclosed “Roster” at the head of the Regiment, and notify all officials who refuse to be governed by it, that they will be held responsible for disobedience of orders, and any officer or soldier who assumes any authority not vested in him by this roster will be held responsible and dealt with accordingly. And you are hereby notified that all communications to the Governor of Ohio must be sent through my hand for approval or otherwise. Twice Heath refused to read Taylor’s enclosed roster (January 1, 1863 and February 2nd). He responded to Taylor’s demands stating that the regimental organization “had been neglected” and that he had “reduced the regiment from chaos to good order” with the promotion nominations he sent to the Governor of Ohio. Taylor was clearly unhappy with the contact Heath had initiated with Governor David Tod regarding the appointment of officers to the regiment. Many personnel matters were the responsibility of the state, falling within the venue of the Governor’s office, thus giving Governor Tod the final word on all appointments. Heath had appealed his removal from the Fifth Ohio back in August directly to the Governor, and now was directly cabling Governor Tod about new appointments, signing each communication Thomas T. Heath, Lieutenant Colonel commanding Fifth O.V.C. Much to the dismay of Taylor’s faction, the appointments ultimately were made as Heath suggested.140 The retribution was swift. Heath was charged with refusing to obey orders, using disrespectful language and acting outside of proper channels. A court martial began in Memphis on February 16, 1863. Taylor testified that he still commanded the regiment

91 though he was absent on detached duty with Heath as acting commander. The court disagreed with this point and found Heath not guilty on all the charges.141 By March of 1863 in a letter to Major Ricker, who was at home recovering from illness, Heath let it be known that while his faction had the upper hand, the rift inside of the regiment was deeper than ever, writing “We are floating along annoyed in every possible way, often disgusted, but still triumphant in every case thus far, and now are simply waiting to hear from Governor Tod.” Both sides were waiting to hear about promotions awaiting the Governor’s approval, and both sides were trying to influence the outcome. Tod, a dedicated Democrat before the War, had been elected as a Unionist in the election of 1861. Though a strong supporter of the Union he was not enthralled with emancipation, the official policy as of January 1, 1863. He also had alienated some supporters by handing out appointments to many Republicans. Lieutenant William Dempster, formerly of Company D, but now a member of General Hurlbut’s staff, had gone to see the Governor on behalf of Taylor’s faction. Heath wrote to Ricker “they crow a good deal that when he [Dempester] comes back they will settle our hash ---but”, he wrote, “we suppose you have seen Governor Tod and do not expect Dempster nor anybody else to prejudice our case,” an assumption made with Ricker back at home in Ohio. Heath wrote that, “General [James] Veatch without my asking, put a quietus on Taylor, who threatened to come out here to quarter, and I am running the thing along as best I can. All his clique are bitter as hell”. He concluded his letter: “I do not know what new trap they may spring on us, but we will try to keep our end up, and when I send for you, you must come, for I am determined to break up this unwholesome state of things.”142 The same letter also mentioned the resignation of Captain Philip Trounstine, whose family operated a tailor shop producing fine men’s clothing in Cincinnati. Commanding Company B largely made up men from Cincinnati proper, Trounstine had resigned March 3, 1863 in protest over an order issued by General Grant expelling Jews “as a class” from the Department covering West Tennessee and Northern Mississippi. In a letter written to Major Hayes who was temporarily in command, the Captain made clear his feelings:

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… the sense of Religious duty, I owe to the religion of my Forefathers, were both deeply hurt and wounded in consequence of the late order of General Grant … I can no longer, bear the taunts and malice, of those to whom my religious opinions are known , brought on by the effect that, that order has instilled into their minds. I herewith respectfully tender you my immediate and unconditional resignation. 143

Eventually Major Ricker’s illness also brought his resignation. Heath and supporters inside the Regiment sent the Cincinnati Commercial a resolution recognizing Ricker’s contributions.

Resolved, that in the resignation of Major Ricker, we have lost an estimable companion, a true and devoted friend, and a gallant soldier, and as such, his resignation is a serious loss to his brother officers… while we lament the loss of Major Ricker as an amiable companion, we testify to his constancy in duty while in camp, and his courage on the field of battle, where he was ever among the foremost, and when in the face of the enemy always met their dire with undaunted heroism… our sincere desire and prayer is that Major Ricker may soon be where he long ago ought to have been, at the head of a Regiment of gallant men, where we feel assured he will strike a heavy blow for freedoms cause, and for which he is fully qualified by all that constitutes the Soldier, Gentleman and Christian.144

By April of 1863 there had been drastic turnover in the Regiment’s leadership and tensions were so great that Charles Hayes wrote that “So many changes have taken place and some difficulties have occurred which makes my presence absolutely necessary here at present and for sometimes to come…Many of the old officers in the Regiment swear they will resign and leave the service forever and beg me to go with them. They justly claim that we are personally insulted by the recent course of the Governor in commissioning many men that have been promoted to higher positions in our Regiment. But I don’t propose to throw the Regiment away in that way.”145 By the end of March the First and Second Battalions had been assembled from across Western Tennessee and sent to Memphis. From there they mounted scouting and raiding expeditions like one that departed on April 18 with 265 men primarily from the First Battalion led by Hayes. On April 19th they linked up with several regiments under the command of Colonel George Bryant of the Twelfth Wisconsin Infantry Regiment bound for Coldwater, Mississippi. On the second day out, the men of Major Hayes’ command, acting as the advanced guard, came into contact with the enemy on the banks of the

93 Coldwater River at Perry’s Ferry and drove them across the stream. Further down the road the main body found itself under attack from the rear, though it proved to be of little consequence. Meanwhile Colonel Bryant received an urgent message from Hayes requesting help. Major Hayes communicated that he was badly wounded and feared that his men would soon be out of ammunition. Bryant immediately dispatched a battery and two infantry regiments to aid the Fifth’s troopers some four miles up the road. When they arrived they found the Ohioans still holding the Ferry and immediately swung two field guns into action, sending shells screaming into a thicket on the opposite side of the river. The covering fire allowed Major’s men to withdraw to the ammunition wagon. These were opening shots in a series of fights spread over the next two days. While Colonel Bryant reported the expedition a success resulting in the capture of 80 prisoners, a large number of good cavalry horses and a substantial number of arms, Major Hayes had been mortally wounded. He had successfully pushed the Confederates across the river and was rallying his men when he was struck in the pelvis and thigh by a minnie ball. Colonel Bryant reported “all was done for him that was possible, but the wound was of such a nature that anything but smoothing his passage to the grave was useless.” “He is entitled to all the praise that an able, dashing and brave officer can receive from his companions, his loss was a severe one to the service,” wrote Colonel Bryant, and so it was, especially to the Fifth Ohio volunteer Cavalry.146

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The body of Charles Hayes was sent home to Elizabethtown where an outdoor funeral was held at the home of his brother Moses. More than a thousand people followed the hearse and the Major’s white horse draped with the American flag bearing his “empty saddle, guns and sword”. A memorial written by Colonel Taylor praised Hayes as a cavalry officer “quick to decide and prompt to execute,” an attribute that was often missing in the inexperienced Union officer corps in the early years of the war. Taylor added that, “he made some of the most brilliant charges of the whole war. Always ready

94 to seek the enemy, he was generally successful. Reckless of his own person, he was careful of his men, and possessed the confidence and respect of those under him as well as those above him.” Such high praise was well deserved having been recognized for gallant action by such high ranking officers as Major Generals Hurlbut and Charles Smith on more than one occasion.147 Disaffection with the war at home in the Southwestern corner of Ohio continued to grow. War critics were becoming bolder like Clement Vallandigham who had openly criticized Lincoln since the beginning of the war. Vallandigham was a long time Democrat who often has been inaccurately labeled a pro-southern traitor. He had been elected to represent Ohio’s Third Congressional District which covered Montgomery, Butler and Preble Counties located to the north of Cincinnati in 1858 and 1860 but lost in his bid for re-election in 1862. By 1863 his public stance on the war resulted in punishment by a military tribunal that amounted to exile from the Union. He had been described more accurately as a “constitutionalist and a conservative” who insisted the federal government did not have the constitutional authority to take action against slavery, including limiting its expansion. He considered himself devoted to the interests of the West and agriculture, not to the South. But his strict constructionist views on the interpretation of the Constitution wed him to state’s rights and therefore as an involuntary ally of the South. This being said, Vallandigham also hated abolition. He believed it destroyed the delicate relationship that existed between the various sections of the country but at the same time felt slavery wrong, and in his own words “a moral, social and political evil,” though the Constitution gave it “tacit approval”. He like many other whites, including abolitionists, was a racist that believed African-Americans should not be given political or social equality. Vallandigham’s views appealed to a segment of the Democratic Party in the North, particularly to those that became known as the “Butternut Democracy” or Copperheads many of whom had roots originally in the South. Vallandigham blamed the war on the abolitionists and pushed for an end to hostilities and a return to the prewar Union. As the war continued Lincoln’s Administration increasingly drew fire from common folk like William Jessup Sr., Captain Jessup’s father. Squire Jessup, as he was known, was a

95 devoted Democrat who owned a considerable amount of acreage in Harrison Township outside of Cincinnati. In May of 1863 he wrote his son:

C.L. Vallandigham was arrested at his residence in Dayton, Oh, freed by a court martial and sent beyond the lines of our army in Tennessee. There appears to be much feeling expressed all over the whole North against the arbitrary arrest and banishment of Mr. V. What will it result in I can’t say. I hope for a peaceable and legal termination of the affair. There appears to be much feeling and hatred between the Democratic Party and Abolition party here. What it will end in I cannot tell, no doubt it would end as all party strife and excitement has heretofore…….The full true policy of this chartered or constitutional government is full free and courteous discussion upon all measures proposed or adopted, if meritorious they will stand, if not they will fall like all fallacies fall. Distrust arises from concealment and abridgement of discussion. The great forbearance of the people under misrule and oppression is evidence of patriotism and devotion to government but no evidence of the abandonment of principle, but when to far pressed like the volcano they will sweep every fountain of corruption and purge every avenue. Let the oppressors beware lest they are overwhelmed in the vortex.148

Vallandigham was well known in the area, with his old congressional district lying just to the north of the Squire’s home. More people were war weary by 1863 than when Alexander Long was elected in 1862, and more were willing to criticize the actions of Lincoln’s Administration as unconstitutional. “I shall go to Columbus on the 11th” Squire Jessup declared in a letter to his son “to our Great Democratic Convention and mass meeting. It promises to be a great outpouring of old true patriots…I think there is nothing contraband of war or peace in it. “ While representing only a faction of the Democratic Party the Peace Democrats as they called themselves, advocated a peace at any price stance, a position taken by Vallandigham who was making a run at the governorship of Ohio in abstentia. In late July Jessup senior wrote his son.

…Vallandigham has issued an address to the people of Ohio excepting the nomination and defining his position. He adheres rigidly to the Constitution and strict obedience to the laws, both state and national, if bad repeal them, or render them null by the courts. He believes the true national policy of the government is to adjust all great national differences by just and equitable compromises and in good faith. He also maintains the sovereignty of all the states with their rights unimpaired by acts of the general government. He advocates economy in our war expense with a vigorous position promotion of officers for meritorious

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conduct, while he is opposed to the system of military (trials for) civilians for criticism upon the policy of the government or war from speakers or the press, also the suppression of the writ of habeas corpus when war does not exist. Finally he holds the same time honored doctrine of Jefferson, Madison and Jackson and he will be elected by the people of the state by a great majority and if the majority is not overcome by the vote of the soldier he will be the next Governor of Ohio.149

The old Squire was not alone. Captain Jessup and others in the regiment seemed to reflect his thinking. “ Unfortunately”, the Captain wrote of their 4th of July celebration, “someone reported that a large force of Rebs were advancing on this place and we were in consequence thereof was [not] allowed to leave camp except the scouting parties sent out on all roads leading from this place. And we spent the day in camp drinking lemonades with sticks in them. Before night some of us were very enthusiastic and you may bet there was some electioneering done. You would have been surprised and amused to hear me spout for old Val.” One can only imagine the level of political tension in camp that Fourth of July with a fervent Republican and abolitionist in command. “He [Vallandigham] will most certainly get a larger majority in this regiment,” Jessup continued in the letter to his brother, “I hope to hear of his having been recalled from his exile to his native state. We will give him as a big a lift as possible…My company is O.K. on the question.” But many others in the regiment were not.150 Down south, Squire Jessup’s son and the rest of the Fifth Ohio were still patrolling and making raids in Northern Mississippi and West Tennessee. In mid June Captain Jessup was part of column of three hundred men bound for Commerce, Mississippi. Made up of detachments from the Fifth Ohio, First Missouri and Second Illinois, it was led by the newly promoted Major John Henry of the of the Fifth Ohio Cavalry. Shortly after departing camp on the morning of the June 19th William Jessup noted, “We had not gone more than half a mile when the enemy opened upon us with artillery.” Major Henry immediately turned the column to the left, and moved about a quarter of a mile before entering a field. The detachment from the First Missouri was posted at the entrance to the field while the rest of the column was formed up for battle. While this was happening they came under fire from the timberline on their right that instantly killed one man and wounded another. “We were ordered not to fire,” Jessup noted, “as the fog was so dense that it was impossible to tell whether the firing was from the enemy or our own

97 men.” To avoid the fire they moved to the northern end of the field and formed two lines fronting in that direction while Jessup was ordered to take a detachment and move a short distance west to secure their flank. They remained in position until the fog burned off allowing them to actually locate the enemy. At this point Major Henry again repositioned his men shifting the Illinois and Missouri cavalry into a line of battle facing east with the Fifth Ohio formed into a second line also facing east about 600 yards to the rear in a dense thicket. Jessup reported he had “scarcely formed the second line when the enemy charged the front line with overwhelming numbers and drove them directly through my line breaking it almost entirely.” In the ensuing chaos Captain Jessup managed to form a new makeshift line with what remained of the Fifth Ohio troopers, about 50 in number and opened fire. This held for a short time before it too was overwhelmed. Confederate cavalry moved all around them as they conducted a fighting retreat over a few miles to a wheat field where the command rallied. This time they charged and drove the oncoming Confederate cavalry about a mile before they ran into the enemy’s main body. Jessup wrote his younger brother that “they called us bad names and asked us to surrender but we could not see that it that way.” He recalled, “I was surrounded six times but got out without a scratch although at this time I thought every minute would be my last. One longhaired, gaunt hungry, vicious looking specimen more valorous than his comrades rushed into our column and reining his horse against mine demanded me to surrender in the following style, ‘surrender you damned blue bellied Yankee son of a bitch.’ I soon saw his pistol was empty and conclude I would not be taken by such a brigand”. Jessup then clubbed his opponent with the butt of his pistol and knocked him to the ground. In the intense and confused close combat, Jessup recalled firing at dozen rounds, “not one of them from more than twelve yards, and most of them less. I saw quite a number bite the dust but I could not tell whether I shot them or someone else,” he remembered. Once more they succeeded in shooting their way out of the confused melee retreating to a bridge over Hurricane Creek. As the remainder of the command rode across the bridge it collapsed forcing those who were willing to swim the creek while others, including Major John Henry, were trapped and forced to surrender. The Fifth Ohio lost some 50 men in the encounter. Major Henry would spend the next 15 months in Libby Prison. Jessup with about one hundred remaining men continued riding until they came across another large

98 Union column. The commanding officer, a colonel, ordered Jessup and the others to return to camp ending the battle.151 Later Jessup under a flag of truce was sent to confer with the Confederates about prisoners and the wounded. He wrote of the encounter, “I…had the opportunity of conversing with the rebs on an equal footing. They seem to be all assured that they are able to vindicate themselves as a free and separate government. I was well treated by them.”152 In July the Third Battalion rejoined the rest of the regiment after almost 18 months of detached service. Since its first expedition up the Tennessee River back in December, the battalion been part of two more similar expeditions aimed at guerrilla bands and Confederate cavalry raiders. Its last action as a detached element, the Third Battalion joined the Ninth Illinois Mounted Infantry on a scouting expedition bound for Pontotoc, Mississippi on the 17th of June. The Ninth Illinois was transported by train with the Third Battalion escorting on horseback. Just outside of Ripley on the 19th they twice encountered and skirmished with small enemy patrols. They pushed on through the night riding through densely vegetated bayous that slowed their progress. Early on the morning of the 20th they were attacked by a force estimated at 600 by Major Joseph Smith, the battalion commander. The rear guard commanded by Lieutenant Joseph Overturf succeeded in holding back the assault, giving Major Smith time to form up the entire Battalion and come to the support of Overturf’s rear guard. Smith was unable to mount a charge because of the thick foliage that gave their dismounted enemy a further advantage. Even in face of these disadvantages Smith’s men succeeded in pushing back the forward elements of the attack. Meanwhile the Ninth Illinois Infantry was able to dismount from the train and form a line to which Smith’s men fell back. Twice more the Confederates launched an assault causing the Union line to fall back and establish new positions before the attack was broken off for good after almost two hours of fighting. Nine members of the Third Battalion were wounded including Major Smith. When the Third Battalion’s history as an independent command came to an end it had “engaged in 47 skirmishes and actions, great and small,” capturing in excess of 300 prisoners and an equal number of horses while arduously riding more than 1500 miles. Its

99 losses sadly, were not insignificant, amounting to 14 wounded and 25 killed or captured.153

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A shock was delivered to Squire Jessup and all the residents of Southern Ohio in the form of John Hunt Morgan. In one of the most daring raids of the war Morgan dashed across the Ohio River from Northern Kentucky into Southern Indiana and then into Southwestern Ohio on July 13, 1863. Morgan’s sudden thrust into Ohio and Indiana was designed to draw away potential threats to General Braxton Bragg’s army retreating to Chattanooga, Tennessee from Tullahoma, an event which prompted a long letter from the Squire to his son.

… I was at Harrison when Morgan entered the town. First about eight pickets came up Main Street from near Goldys upon a slow walk until they came within fifty rods of the town when they put their horses into a full gallop and reached the center of the town and halted old Dick Simmons and his lady, half a block of Minors Hotel. As they met him he was driving a fine horse in a spring wagon. One of the pickets ordered the old gentleman to get out of the wagon and strip his horse. The surprise and consternation of the old man deprived him of utterance and he stood for a few moments looking like a paralyzed man, but recovering, he said he was away from home, and the old lady was almost frightened to death, he wished them to let him go with his team. After some reflections by the soldiers, they told the old man to get his wagon and go. The old man drove up the street to near the foot of the hill when he was met by horse scouts and without ceremony the horse was taken from the wagon and the old folks left to trudge home. They immediately after entering the town placed pickets on all roads leading from town letting no one go out but letting all who chose to come. They then proceeded to regale themselves and forage in houses as best they could. They took charge of the post office, placed a sentinel at the door, and sent a messenger for Post master Clark for his key. The post master did not come but his key did. As I was in town for a letter and approached the door and called for the contents of box no. 17 which made some amusement for the proxy post master. Another delegation visited N. Leonard’s and Simmon’s stores and helped themselves to boots hats, clothing and goods both fancy and common. Mr. Leonard says to the amount of at least six thousand dollars, and cash to the amount of $ 4,200 and they visited Davidson’s with the same success in goods but no money. All the clothing shops were stripped of their wares. The saloons and whiskey shops were guarded to keep soldiers from drinking too much. The shoe makers disgorged, and the dear ladies fried their delicate fingers in preparing food and drink for the free booters with their most gracious smiles an

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eulogies for their intrepidity and heroic courage, the gents with military courtesy with hat in hand responded to the eager inquiries for places and distances with unmistakable accuracy and dispatch the call for maps of Ohio were brought at the bidding without a murmur and every facility rendered to make their departure as sudden as their entrance, all of which Morgan and his men embraced with a will.

They then with escort passed Calvin’s on their way to N. Baltimore. They fed some of their horses at the Baptist meeting house at dusk they then crossed the [Great] Miami River near N. Baltimore and burned the bridge, as I will send you a file of papers that will furnish his whole route, I will confine myself to some details here.

By a law organizing the militia of the state, about the Fourth of July there were a number of military companies formed and a cavalry co. [was] formed at Elizabeth Town. They were mostly unarmed but hearing that Morgan had left Harrison formed company and marched into Harrison. They arrived about the time the advance pickets of General Hobson’s army arrived at the burned bridge over the Whitewater. They were mistaken for stragglers from Morgan’s forces while hunting the ford.

This valiant company of home guards , I believed commanded by Peter Higgins ( P. Guard) concluded they would go near the river and reconnoiter and ascertain whether they were really Morgan’s men or Hobson’s. Away they galloped toward the burned bridge. Hancock (Cilly) Higgins (Guard) and Logans heading the company. When they came within proper range of Hobson’s forces they were mistaken for Morgan’s rear and before they knew what they were about, received heavy fire from Hobson’s forces. There were none killed or visibly wounded but such horse racing on their old plugs you never saw, some on our side of the canal and some on the other screaming for dear life that fifteen thousand more of Morgan’s men were coming to Harrison, and they had been fired upon and each men believed all were killed but himself and he had several balls shot through his hat and clothes, some felt the warm blood flowing and coagulating about their person. Their speed was continued until pursuit by the hindmost was known not to be. When the next morning, it was found that they had been only fired over by Hobson’s command, then without a white flag gathered wounded and missing and upon careful examination by their surgeon ( who by the way was the worst wounded) and found that soap and warm rain water was the best prescription and half a score of washer women with tubs and suds were detailed for the purpose, and by noon the companies were in as good condition as ever, and each eager for the fight and all demoralization had left with Morgan’s departure. There were many too ridiculous things that are facts in the neighborhood to put on paper during this great event. I was with Morgan’s army from the time it entered Harrison until they left, and until Hobson’s forces came in. As one picket left the others came in with the precision as though the whole were under command of one general, this may be the strategy but I can not see it, so with my limited military experience and knowledge. Now for the farce some seven or eight days after the departure of the armies, the neighbors began to look for their horse[s]. There was as many left generally as taken, but

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they were crippled, sore backed and etc. with all manner of infirmity. General Burnside issued an order as among other things loyal men who Morgan had taken horses from and left horses in their place, might keep them by receipting to the grand government against any demand for horses Morgan took. A Lieutenant Nash with ten or fifteen privates were detailed to collect the horses. I had one horse taken by Morgan and one by Hobson’s forces an one left by each. I took the horse the Union forces left and surrendered him to the Lieutenant and not wishing to have any bother about my horse concluded I would keep the one Morgan left. I told the Lieutenant I would keep the horse and receipt. He told me to call the next morning and he would attend to my case. I prepared affidavits, after pronouncing them correct he asked me what kind of Democrat I was, to which I replied that I was in favor of the Constitution of the United States, the laws and the union as it was. After a short pause, he inquired if I endorsed Vallandigham. I replied I did. He then said you can not make any exchange of horses. Agreeable to my convictions I asked him if politics entered into this arrangement. He made no answer but said the government considered Mr. Vallandigham disloyal and of course all who endorsed him was so considered. I left the contemptible pup and will lose my horses and win my head, but will never disavow a principle. I think right that perhaps this is too lengthy it is mainly literally true and not colored (You will please substitute other names for those of the E town guards). We are all well and have had good rain and thank God ask no favors of those who are not willing to give them. It will take the bayonet to those who prevent the election of Vallandigham and with that resort, God save the just, no stone will be left unturned, keep the faith steady, and be quiet, we will win and save the country.154

On the 26th of July John Morgan’s raid came to an end with his capture along with the remainder of his force, about 400 in number, near West Point in Columbiana County, Ohio. His ride into Indiana and Ohio threw the region into a panic that did not subside for some months and most importantly tied up General Ambrose Burnside’s Army of the Ohio, slowing its march into East Tennessee. Further west the surrender of Vicksburg on July 3, 1863 insured that the Union had complete control of the Mississippi River cutting the Confederacy in half. While the War was no longer a stalemate it was far from over. With the coming of autumn the regiment was preparing to build winter quarters at Camp Davis, Mississippi about 8 miles from Corinth. Reunited for the first time in months wholesale changes in the regiment’s leadership had taken place. Major Scherer (First Battalion) and Major Ricker ( Second Battalion) had resigned, Colonel Taylor had moved on to a new position, and Major Hayes( Third Battalion ) had died in action .That left only Heath. A young, enthusiastic idealist, Heath had prevailed in the power struggle for control of the regiment, a tribute to

102 his political skills, connections, and the passion with which he seemed to attack every endeavor. Colonel Taylor on the other hand, one who had dabbled in politics long before the war, lost. At 50 years of age and in failing health he resigned in July of 1863 with a medical certificate that cited rheumatism of the spinal cord and kidney problems so severe he had no hope of carrying out his duties. With new leadership, better arms, and a year and a half of combat experience the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry was about to embark on a new odyssey as a military crisis unfolded in Chattanooga.155

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In September of 1863 a series of battles unfolded in central Tennessee resulting in Union General William Rosecrans and his Army of the Cumberland being bottled up in Chattanooga, a rail center in Southern Tennessee. General Grant was given the assignment of freeing the Army of the Cumberland. The battles that followed cleared a pathway into the heart of the Confederacy of which William Tecumseh Sherman would take advantage.

VII
The Long March East
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In September of 1863 Captain Jessup wrote to his father about his growing unease with the military scenario unfolding further east in southern Tennessee and his disgust over the state of political affairs within the Regiment.
... We have orders to build winter quarters which seem to favor our staying here all winter, although there is a rumor in camp that we are going to reinforce Rosecrans with a force now being organized at Memphis. The last report from the army is very discouraging. I hope it is not as bad as reported. It is now too late for anything more to be done in the way of electioneering [Ohio Governors race]. All that can be done has been done. I am in hopes that our side will have a majority in this Regiment. From all appearances I can say that we will get half anyhow. If our papers had the circulation that the abolitionists forced theirs to have, we would have beaten them badly. But we have not had a fair chance. Every branch of the politic business is in the hands of the opposition and they allow just what pleases them to come here. I have been disgusted with the weakness and duplicity exhibited by some men in this army, men who when they first came out were good sound Democrats and loudest in their protestations against the abolitionists and are now just as much on the other side. I have no faith in such men but they are fit satellites for the renegade Brough. I am afraid

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that our cause is hopeless for the present but there will be time when men will see the baleful effect of their passive submission to the unconstitutional edicts of those in power.

... I just learned from the Adjutant that we were about to leave this place, destination unknown. I have orders to draw shelter tents for the men and a large quantity of ammunition. I believe a raid is premeditated though what region I cannot tell.

Thos. T. Heath has received his commission as Colonel of the Reg., with a very flattering letter from Governor Tod asking him to send on his appointments for Lt. Colonel and Majors. Who will be the successful candidates is unable for me to determine but his political friends no doubt will be the chosen ones, without regard [for] military knowledge. I will write again as soon as I learn where we are going…

Clearly disappointed with fellow Democrats, he was not optimistic about the upcoming gubernatorial elections. The rumor about the regiment’s imminent departure for Chattanooga proved to be true. On October 17, 1863 the Fifth Ohio broke camp and boarded trains bound for the city as part of Brigadier General Joseph Osterhaus’ division leading Sherman’s Fifteenth Corps. 156 Three days into the new campaign pickets from the Fifth Ohio riding ahead of the division’s column clashed with rebel scouts near Dickson’s Station on the Memphis & Charleston line. The pickets from Captain Benjamin W. Thompson’s Company H successfully pushed the enemy back several miles to some “open fields at Barton’s Station” where they met a larger body of more than 400 cavalry troopers formed up into battle lines commanded by Nathan Bedford Forrest. The two companies making up the regiment’s advance guard charged with sabers drawn in a direct frontal assault later described by Osterhaus as “brilliant” though unsuccessful in forcing the Confederates to yield a “very strong position”. Osterhaus next ordered the rest of the Fifth Ohio, the Third U.S. Cavalry, and a section of artillery to the front of the column. With artillery in support, the new attack drove “the rebels from every inch of the first and second positions they had fallen back on,” the General reported. Captain Jessup wrote to his father.

... We heard the firing and came up on the gallop. When we had come up almost to the scene of action, the first and third Battalions filed off into the fields and left the road clear for the Old Second. The command to draw sabers was given and immediately a hundred and fifty glittering blades leaped from their scabbards

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(Co. D). The charge was sounded, and the next instant we were dashing on the stubborn enemy, but they could not withstand the shock, and, delivering an irregular volley at us, they fled in confusion. We overtook some of the hindmost and compelled them to surrender, not however until some of them received some ugly saber wounds.

I did not stop for those that surrendered but kept on in pursuit of those that still resisted. One fellow in particular I was anxious to take: he had several times turned in his saddle and fired his pistol at me and some of the balls had whistled uncomfortably close. My horse was so much encumbered with my blankets that he could not make as good a time as I could have wished. The consequence was that the race proved to be a long one. Before I was aware of my danger I was upon a line of the enemy about two hundred strong, their guns at a “ready”. I looked around to see what backing I had and saw but six men in sight. I immediately made a retrograde movement, not however until they had delivered their fire. They did not hurt any of us, but hit several horses and shot a hole through my Orderly Sergeant’s (James Miller) canteen. I never before was in such danger as on this occasion.

They had succeeded in “scattering the enemy completely” but at the cost of one dead and three wounded. The regiment also won the praises of General Sherman, who used words like “gloriously” and “handsomely” to describe their performance.157 As dusk fell the tired regiment encamped near Caney Creek without bothering to unsaddle their horses. They grew suspicious however, of an unusual amount of movement being made under the cover of darkness and posted an extraordinarily large perimeter guard. Early in the evening their suspicions were confirmed when they were hit by a series of sharp deadly attacks killing privates John Green (Company H) , George Lutz (Company A), and corporal Charles W. Robinson . General Osterhaus responded by sending Colonel Heath both infantry and artillery and ordering the Fifth Ohio to fall back from its advanced position to the safety of the division’s perimeter near Cherokee Station.158 At daybreak the first of several new heavier assaults began against the division. The Fifth Ohio and the Third U.S. Cavalry were placed on the right flank of a line with three infantry regiments and the First Missouri Horse Artillery. When the guns of the First Missouri opened, a rebel line of several thousand was forced to retreat not once but twice, the second time closely pursued by Union infantry. The infantry’s pursuit in conjunction

106 with a flanking movement on the right by the cavalry began an exhausting five-mile chase finally brought to an end with the onset of darkness.159 Over the next four days the Confederate army was reinforced as it reoccupied Barton Station. Under orders from Sherman to move quickly and lightly, Osterhaus broke camp at 3 a.m. on October 26th with the Fifth Ohio again in the lead. An hour and a half later they arrived on the outskirts of the station and easily drove off the enemy pickets. The Confederate forces had established themselves on a steep ridge above the rail line partially hidden by a cemetery and masked by timber. Osterhaus estimated that between 800 and 1,000 yards separated the opposing lines. He placed his cavalry, the Fifth Ohio and Third U.S. on both flanks of his First Infantry Brigade, while holding the Second Infantry Brigade in reserve. As the first rays of light fell on Barton Station artillery rounds began to rain down on the Union forces signaling an attack. The General responded by ordering Heath to check an advance being made on their right by “a large column of cavalry” using the Fifth Ohio and two infantry battalions. Colonel Heath was further instructed to attempt to flank his opponent’s line if the opportunity presented itself. Heavier guns, 20 pound Parrots, were brought up to the center of the Union line to support the Colonel’s mission. As the Fifth Ohio began to push the Confederate cavalry on the right it was closely followed by lighter 12 pound howitzers of the First Missouri Artillery whose guns had not been able to reach the Confederates on the high ridge almost 1000 yards from the original Union position. The Confederate guns now came under an intense cross fire from the 12 pounders on the right, advancing behind the Fifth Ohio, and the 20 pound Parrots in the center forcing a hasty retreat.160 Fighting as they withdrew, the Confederate retreat continued toward the town of Tuscumbia. Approximately 200 Confederate cavalry acting as the rear guard slowed the advancing Fifth Ohio. Four miles from Tuscumbia the Confederate force crossed Little Bear Creek under covering fire from a high plateau on the opposite bank of the creek.161 As Osterhaus following closely behind the Fifth deployed his forces to ford the creek, the intense Confederate artillery fire continued to shower down upon them. With his advance stymied by the Confederate guns Osterhaus also found his left flank under a brigade-sized assault led by Nathan Bedford Forrest, but a furious fusillade from the

107 Third Missouri and accompanying barrage of artillery quickly ended Forrest’s effort. By this point darkness had fallen and both sides broke off contact for the night.162 On the morning of the 27th the Second Division of the Fifteenth Corps crossed Little Bear Creek further up stream with the intention of launching a coordinated attack along with Osterhaus on the enemy’s left. Brisk firing to the General’s right announced the arrival of the Second Division and he ordered the 20 pound Parrott guns into action. When the Confederate left began to crumble, General Osterhaus sent the Fifth Ohio to drive them from their position. By 11 a.m. the Regiment with the support of 6 pound field pieces had pushed into Tuscumbia achieving the division’s objective.163 On the 29th the Regiment returned to Cherokee, and for the next three days pushed on toward Chickasaw Landing on the Tennessee River “over exceedingly bad roads,” with Confederate cavalry constantly shadowing them. The column however, was not molested, which General Osterhaus attributed to the work of the Fifth Ohio. Robert Major now a Lieutenant in Company F wrote home of the experience:

It was the intention of General Sherman to open the Memphis and Charleston Road [rail] all way to Decatur where it crosses the Tennessee River, but they had it so completely destroyed from Cherokee to beyond Tuscumbia that it was improbable to have it repaired in any kind of time. They had the ties burned and the iron so bent up that [their] the whole mounted force was engaged in destroying and burning up the road. Here we abandoned the railroad and came across to Chickasaw on the Tennessee River 15 miles from Cherokee and crossed on a boat, and we made a land march of it. Altogether we drove in all the stock in the country as we went along; cattle, sheep and hogs, and slaughtered them at night so we had plenty of fresh meat on the march. But salt was the scarcest article. We also took all the horses and mules we could find in the country. When the old planters heard we were coming they took all their goods, horses and mules and hid them, but we got most of them. They had some hid in curious places.164

Undoubtedly the past two and a half weeks left the men and horses worn out. November continued much as October ended with the Fifth Ohio often leading the Fifteenth Corps as they continued to push on toward Chattanooga. Lieutenant Major wrote;
We passed through Pulaski, Fayetteville, Florence and Stephenson, coming here [Bridgeport] and to several other small towns. It was a hard march on the horses but we had pretty weather, and it was a good thing

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fore we have no tents along with us, and we have to take it as it comes every night at the root of a tree. We have been in the saddle every day for the last 5 weeks and sometimes the greater part of the night165

The condition of horses in fact was a major concern and had been for all the Union commands in the West since mid 1862. Stephen Starr in his authoritative study, The Union Cavalry in the Civil War, noted that cavalry regiments formed in the early months of the war generally were given decent mounts. But as the war continued the quality and quantity of the horses available was always questionable. The Fifth Ohio certainly was not immune to the problem. As early as December of 1862 Company C was reporting its troopers were in good health but could only mount half the company due to a shortage of healthy horses. This remained a problem as the regiment marched eastward pushing horses beyond exhaustion with inadequate forage or grain and too often proper care. The remedy, though inadequate, was the seizure of horses from nearby farms. While this action was officially approved, the troopers were urged not to take the animals of “good Union men” and to leave families with at least one horse. It certainly was not a means of winning the hearts and minds of Southerners who also suffered the seizure of food and livestock for which they were supposed to be compensated. By the end of December 1863 the regiment had lost a staggering 700 horses since the new campaign had begun in October.166 By the 23rd of November the regiment was on the outskirts of Chattanooga. The city had been under siege since mid September when troops under Major General Braxton Bragg occupied the high ground east of the city on Missionary Ridge and south of it on Lookout Mountain. Bragg’s arrival was made possible in part by Morgan’s raid through Ohio and Indiana. Bragg’s troops were able to control access to the city cutting off supplies to its Union defenders. In response to this dire situation Lincoln ordered reinforcements to be sent from the east in the form of 20,000 men under the command of General Joe Hooker along with Sherman’s troops marching in from the west, among who was the Fifth Ohio, marching from western Tennessee and northern Mississippi. In addition Grant was placed in overall command not just of this region but the entire Western Theater.

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By the 27th of October Grant had succeeded in opening up a supply line for the city but still was awaiting the arrival of reinforcements to permanently break Bragg’s stranglehold on Chattanooga. On November 20th the regiment moved back across the Tennessee River at Bridgeport as Sherman’s forces began to arrive on the outskirts of Chattanooga and maneuver into position for an assault on Missionary Ridge. On the 23rd General George Thomas initiated the offensive with an assault on Orchard Knob just to the west of Missionary Ridge with Hooker’s assault beginning on Lookout Mountain the next day, followed by Sherman’s attack on Missionary Ridge on the 25th from a position just to the north of their objective. During the three days of battle the Fifth Ohio performed a number of support roles. Various detachments were used as couriers and escorts while large portions of the command guarded supply trains as the great battles unfolded. During the afternoon

110 hours of the 25th Bragg’s army was amazingly routed from seemingly impregnable position high above Chattanooga opening the door to Northern Georgia. A few days later on November 28, the Fifth Ohio was given a new assignment; to join General Sherman who had been dispatched to relieve the Union forces under siege in Knoxville. This meant a grueling ride to catch Sherman had who departed two days earlier. When they finally caught up with him the Third Battalion still under the command of Major Joseph Smith was detached to a cavalry brigade and ordered to ride ahead and “cut its way through to Knoxville.” The rest of the regiment was given the unenviable task of foraging corn for the troops and finding mills to grind it.167 Major Smith and the Third Battalion were attached to Colonel Eli Long’s Brigade. Long had been instructed by one of Sherman’s aides “to select the best material of his command” and to “push into Knoxville at whatever cost of life and horse flesh” letting General Ambrose Burnside, presently in control of the city, know that help was on the way. Covering approximately 40 miles over treacherous roads in less than 24 hours they reached Burnside on the morning of December 4. Their daring ride however, proved to be unnecessary. The Confederate commander, Major General James Longstreet, realizing Union forces were converging on Knoxville from several directions called off the siege and retreated toward Virginia. 168 Colonel Long stayed in Knoxville only two days. Departing on December the 6th Third Battalion was part of an expedition sent to intercept trains carrying Longstreet’s troops. It meant a demanding ride across the Tellico Plains from December 6th to the11th that ultimately ended in failure with the expedition missing the trains. Colonel Heath who had followed with the rest of the regiment reached Knoxville a few days later before being ordered to Athens which they reached on December 28, 1863. The preceding two months of campaigning covering almost 700 miles of riding again took a severe toll on their horses with “many abandoned as unserviceable”.169 Cut off from news early in the campaign, Jessup wrote his father from Bridgeport, Alabama.

We are on detached service and cannot get our mail, and I do not get any letters… The news from the front is very good. I think our campaigning in this Department is [done] for this winter. I heard the cannonading very distinctly yesterday. I have heard no particulars. The commissary has orders to process 36,000 rations

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for prisoners. From this I would infer that we have a large number of prisoners. Five hundred passed through here yesterday. They were captured on Lookout Mountain. They say that Bragg will not stand quiet. They did not learn until within a few days that Grant was at Chattanooga. They are afraid of him.170

Lieutenant Robert Major of Company F, watching those captured at Lookout Mountain marching to Bridgeport, observed the prisoner were “ miserable looking lot of human beings …a great many of them had scarcely a shoe to their foot” and appeared not to have been fed well for months. The tenor of the war news in the West had certainly changed since the campaign began, with Confederate forces reeling in retreat and both Chattanooga and Knoxville in Union hands.171 Through most of a bitterly cold January the regiment was responsible for keeping open communications between the two cities. During the remainder of the spring and winter of 1864 the Fifth Ohio was headquartered at Huntsville, Alabama with little to do besides building defenses and actively patrolling the area. Stationed at the Sledge Plantation Captain Jessup (along with the rest of Company D) wrote home on January 30, 1864.

…I still have charge of the men at this post. We are getting on finely, but little duty to perform and plenty to eat. I would not care if we should remain the balance of our time at this place providing we prosper as well as we do now. I have plenty of company from morning until night. Citizens are coming in asking questions, advice, favors etc. I am busy all the time. I have done more talking since I came to this place than I have done in a year before. I talk on all subjects and most [about] labor, peace and war. All wish to see the war end as speedily as possible. There are a great many of good Union men in this neighborhood, and a few fire eating Rebs that wish for peace without a separation.

Quite a number of the wealthiest planters have deserted their plantations, as is the case with the one we now occupy. They have left some of their stock and negroes here. I have given some of the corn so abandoned to the poor who were so molested that they were unable to raise any last year. I have supplied about 12 families in this way. In regard to veterans none in my company have as yet reenlisted but I think the majority will. Officers do not reenlist. I expect another will feel much relieved by this information. I have not seen a paper since the 15th. I do not know what is going on. It seems impossible for me to keep posted. I hear only one side of the question, and do not believe that.

…. I had word that I would be attacked tonight by a large force but the one shot fired on the picket did not amount to anything. I am prepared for them if they do come…

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The bored troopers busied themselves trying to keep warm and suitably fed using foraging to augment their meager rations. Though foraging was not encouraged, it was permitted with the approval of their officers.172

In Huntsville Lieutenant Major wrote:
I arrived at this place a few days ago with part of the Company. I was detached for over a month on duty in the country but the balance of the Company has been here for sometime. This is the nicest town I have seen in the South except for Memphis and it is fine country all around here. It was a beautiful rich country before the war commenced. The inhabitants are sick of war and would give anything for peace, but I don’t want it to cease until the last rebel is drove into the Gulf of Mexico. They brought on this war and now they are reaping the benefits of it. We are suffering and they will have to suffer.

Not all agreed with Major’s sentiments about finishing the war to its bitter end, especially at home in Southwestern Ohio.173 _____________________________________________________________

Back Home
John Brough was elected the Governor of Ohio with 60% of the vote, to Clement Vallandigham’s 39.4%. The twin victories at Gettysburg and Vicksburg in July of 1863 clearly turned the war in favor of the Union hurting Vallandigham who was running on a peace platform. Captain Jessup had miscalculated the support for Vallandigham in the ranks of the Union Army. While he may not have expected his candidate to win, he surely believed Clement Vallandigham would have faired better with the troops with Brough taking 19 out of 20 votes cast by Ohio soldiers, a total of some 41,467 votes to Vallandigham’s 2,288.174 Back in the Southwest corner of Ohio the race was much closer. Vallandigham won 57% of the vote in Butler County and 50% of the vote in Montgomery County, areas he had formerly represented in Congress. In the more heavily populated Hamilton County he took just over 40% of the vote. The collapse of the region’s economy followed by unexpected defeats and the endless stream of broken bodies returning up river over the previous two and a half years had cooled enthusiasm for the war. The Lincoln

113 Administration surely breathed a sigh of relief with one of its most populous states now securely under the leadership of a governor who strongly backed the war effort. John Brough was a Democratic, but a Democratic in 1863 that chose to take a strong stand against the growing peace movement within his party. In the 1864 presidential election he again demonstrated his commitment to the Union by backing Lincoln against his own party’s candidate, George McClellan, who was running on a peace platform. 175 With little to do while at the Sledge Plantation from February through April of 1864, William Jessup like many others lived for news from home to fill the long, dark winter months, news which his Father dutifully supplied. “We are well,” Squire Jessup wrote his son, immediately turning to politics and the state of the economy. Farm labor it seemed, was in short supply, a consequence no doubt of the war and with spring in the offing, the elder Jessup worried there was little that would remedy the situation, even “high wages” he complained, though the same war time demands that pushed labor costs higher also made the produce they were growing more valuable. Corn, oats, barley, wheat all were bringing prices so high that there appeared to be a “revolution in all our business transactions,” he wrote .The Squire reminded his son that April elections were not far off and that the Republican Party was already “actively organizing for the fight,” referring to the November Presidential Election. He bitterly wrote “you see how easy it is for a party to perpetuate themselves in power if they have no scruples in violating the Constitution and election laws.” Jessup senior, predicted a bleak future for the nation’s economy, believing a mounting debt would have ominous consequences. There would be taxes “so heavy….that it will be impossible for the great mass of people to support themselves and families and pay it.” Ultimately he believed this would lead to a repudiation of the national debt and the beginning “of a new era in the history of our government.” His father closed with news of various neighbors including the death of Mrs. Harrison, the widow of the President and the mother-in-law of their old colonel, W.H.H. Taylor. Still stationed at the Sledge Plantation another letter arrived for Captain Jessup from his father at the end of April. Squire Jessup repeated a rumor that Confederate generals Foust, Buckner and Breckinridge would “march a heavy force into Kentucky and attack Louisville and Cincinnati. This rumor caused some stir with the state authorities,” he wrote. “The Governors of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois and Pennsylvania have been in

114 consultation with the President upon the defense of these points.” Their concern prompted widespread discussion about the necessity for raising a significant number of six month volunteers, as many as 200,000 for defensive purposes. Jessup felt such considerations were impossible. “The war has assumed such magnitude as to baffle even the skill, enterprise and resources of the North,” he wrote, while also recounting the fate of Alexander Long, their Congressman. Long, the former teacher and attorney elected to represent the Second Congressional District had addressed the House in early April of 1864. The Cincinnati Gazette described “a great, portly, resolute looking figure, with ultra-florid face and good natured features, and a profusion of curly hair,” taking the floor of the House on April 8, 1864.
…I speak today for the preservation of the Government, and although for the first time within these walls, I propose to indulge in that freedom of speech…so freely exercised by other gentlemen for the past four months, and which is admissible under the rules in the present condition of the House: but for what I may say…I alone will be responsible…I intend to proclaim in the deliberate convictions of my judgment in this fearful hour of the country’s peril.

Long went on to accuse the Lincoln administration of provoking the war with the attempt to deliver badly needed supplies to Ft. Sumter in the spring of 1861. Lincoln, he charged, knew fighting would result, which he believed was the President’s intention. It was a choice “to coerce the states back into the Union”. This clearly clashed with Long’s belief in the States’ Rights Doctrine which viewed the Constitution as a compact from which the states could voluntarily withdraw. Later in the speech Long’s intentions became clear. “Can the Union be restored by war? I answer most unhesitatingly and deliberately, No, never; war is final, eternal separation.” He called the war “unconstitutional” which he noted could “only be carried out in an unconstitutional manner.” His lengthy speech advocated an immediate peace and acceptance of the Confederacy’s separation, which sent the House into convulsions.176 On the House floor, future President James A. Garfield, who had recently led troops in the field, “compared him to Benedict Arnold”. The next day in a resolution proposing his expulsion from Congress he was accused of giving “aid, countenance, and encouragement to persons engaged in armed hostility to the United States”. For the next

115 two weeks in newspapers and in floor debate Alexander Long was demonized, or defended for freely and bravely speaking his mind. When the resolution to expel Long failed, a new resolution to censure him was proposed and passed. Long received support from Democrats and Republicans alike, not for his sentiments about the constitutionality of the war but his right to freely express his political beliefs or in Squire Jessup words, “for offensive opinions expressed in cautious and proper language,” about the war. It was an episode the older Jessup labeled “one week of abolitionist ventilation,” though it should be understood he equated abolitionism with anyone belonging to the Republican Party. “The whole country [is] condemning their action as foolish and tyrannical,” he wrote. The Squire summed up what he believed about the war and the future of the country in the final paragraph of his letter.

Upon what base the government will hereafter be organized is a question of time and foreign interventions. Should the war cease and friendly relations between the two sections be manifested? The organization of the North might be upon democratic principles and constitutional government but should the South be subjugated, their property confiscated and the province held and the laws enforced by military power, then farewell to republican government on the continent of America for all times to come and [ in ] its place first anarchy and military despotism. The tenth of history will hold good in this as in the downfall of republics, God save us from this awful calamity. The greatest evil that could befall the North would be the subjugation of the South to hold as a conquered province. [It] would entail a strong central military power and a military dictator, fixing stamp acts, excise laws and income taxes, labor [will] be oppressed and degraded, and capital protected…

The senior Jessup’s sentiments paralleled the views of Alexander Long given in defense of his purportedly treasonous statement. Jessup was personally familiar with the Congressman, living a relatively short distance from where Long had been a country teacher and a loyal member of the Democratic Party. Even in light of his political views Squire Jessup in closing his letter counseled, “Be careful of your health, do your duty.” In May Sherman began his four month campaign to take Atlanta, which had become an important manufacturing center for the Confederacy. Initially the cavalry was used to protect the vital rail lines that linked his armies to supplies coming from Nashville some

116 136 miles to the west. In addition to these duties Sherman used his cavalry in their traditional role as flankers and scouts for infantry columns. Though regularly engaged in skirmishes, much to their dismay, they were used sparingly in heavy fighting during the early stages of the campaign, and given in historian Stephen Starr’s words “a purely auxiliary role”.177 On the 22nd of June 1864 the Fifth Ohio took up its position as the lead element of the Third Division on a three week road march that took it to Cartersville, Georgia. The remaining days of July and August were spent scouting and protecting rail lines around Cartersville from constant attacks by Confederate cavalry resulting in almost 650 miles of riding. The riding and forage conditions had again been so bad that many horses were rendered useless. With remounts unavailable several hundred Fifth Ohio troopers suddenly became infantrymen while others were mounted on substandard mules. The regiment remained in Cartersville through October during which time the three year enlistments of many of its original members came to an end.178 While the rest of the regiment remained in Cartersville engaged in the daily drudgery of patrolling a subdued though hostile land, Companies D and C under the command of Captain Jessup were detached to serve as the bodyguard of Major General John Logan, the new commander of the Fifteenth Corps. Logan and his Fifteenth Corps along with the Seventeenth Corps were sent south around Atlanta to sever the city’s one remaining lifeline, the Macon & Western Railroad, by striking at Jonesboro. On August 31, 1864, 24,000 Confederate troops were suddenly thrown at the two Union Corps in a battle that ultimately determined the fate of the big city. As General Logan’s bodyguard, the men of Company’s D and C ranged across the battlefield watching the fighting unfold over a two day period in the Flint River Valley. Dug in behind breastworks and gun emplacement that were literally thrown up over night, Union troops stubbornly repulsed repeated Confederate assaults. Sergeant Jacob Gilberg of Company D, recalled hearing General Peter Osterhaus confidently tell Logan during breakfast in a thick German accent “Youst Ggift me time to drink my Goffee und I will mak’em hell schmell.” Not more than an hour later the first shell screamed over the Union position plunging harmlessly into the river signaling the first round of assaults. Volley after volley echoed across the valley as the first charge exploded from the

117 protection of nearby woods. Years later Sergeant Gilberg admiringly described Osterhaus “walking back and forth in his shirt sleeves, suspenders down like a wood chopper at work giving direction, first here, then there; now to a gunner, now to a rifleman, admonishing the men not to shoot in the air for most of the men were loath to get their heads very far above the works, as there was a hail of bullets sweeping the line.” Acting as orderlies and messengers, the Fifth Ohio men were constantly exposed to deadly fire as they rode up and down the lines accompanying Logan and delivering his orders. Gilberg wrote:

… When out of the hail of bullets I would gasp of relief, thankful to have escaped that trip. I would have a few moments of respite in the river bottom; could get a cool drink of water that was so priceless to a thirsty man, linger around for a few moments,” and “then nerve myself for another ride into the storm of shot. As I would near the battle line I would pull down the rim of my hat as though to shield my face from bullets.”
179

Gilberg’s assignment for that day allowed him the relatively unique experience of seeing the deadly and chaotic fighting as he traveled across a great deal of the battlefield. He described ammunition wagons stopped from making their critical deliveries as their teams were mowed down and watching large numbers of wounded brought to field hospitals. “I saw piles of arms and legs outside of the field tent and heard the cries, groans, prayers and even their cursings,” he wrote.180 The next day perched in a tree on a hill overlooking the valley, he watched the Fourteenth Corps join the Fifteenth and Seventeenth as they now switched to the offensive. The Fourteenth joined the line of battle materializing “from the shelter of the woods, flags flying, guns gleaming in the sun light,” he wrote. He continued, “The crack of guns became audible and soon grew into a continual crash. In a short time they were enveloped in smoke [so] that all we could see was a flash now and then. The fighting was stubborn for some time but the enemy had to give back, and the battle rolled on and soon the woods hid the lines from view.” In time he described hearing “long hearty cheers” as the enemy retreated and he was back again “in the saddle.”181 While the battle was fought Confederate commander General John Bell Hood evacuated Atlanta, which Sherman occupied the next day, September 2nd. In Atlanta

118 Sherman planned the next phase of the war while his exhausted army rested and prepared for the march to the sea. Back in Cartersville many in the Fifth Ohio were eagerly anticipating their return home. The three year men who had enlisted in the late summer and fall of 1861 were now faced with a decision, re-enlist for what could be the final stages of the war or happily depart the regiment after three long years of service. Their service was a much longer period than most had anticipated would be necessary, so through the fall of 1864 what started as trickle of men deciding to return home, turned into a flood with several hundred mustering out at Columbus, Ohio on the 29th of November 1864. By the end of the year, 449 of the original 1,064 men that had departed Cincinnati for Tennessee in the winter of 1862 had mustered out. This combined with the more than 240 men granted surgeon’s certificates before 1865 for wounds, ailments or injuries, represented a substantial turnover in the makeup of the Fifth Ohio. Those leaving included men of every rank including Lieutenant Colonel John Henry, two battalion commanders, six company commanders holding the rank of captain, along with dozens of men that held a rank no higher than private through all three years. But many longtime members decided to stay including Colonel Heath and Corporal Isaac Scott who reenlisted, along with Sergeant Gilberg another original member of company D.182 Captain Jessup still on detached duty with General Logan received a letter from Heath who remained with the rest of the regiment at Cartersville.

I acknowledge your note sent just as you left Joneseboro and though late I congratulate you on your part in a brilliant campaign. We are worked to death and have done almost the entire work of a division. We are marched in long quarters and do everything within the last four days. I have hauled in about two hundred thousand dollars worth of cotton. Eager to get home? I am informed we will all be kept until the 1st [ of] November. I have done all I could to get the date fixed as early as that but do not know that it has any effect. Will you be prevailed upon to remain in the service another term? I think you would do well to do so and would be glad if you would. Please drop me a line.

119
The authorities at Columbus have addressed me in complimentary terms urging me to try to prevail on the officers to remain. And I lay the case before you feeling that your intelligence and patriotism will direct you alright.

Come up and visit us when you can. I have long since lost all hope of ever getting near you, or of doing anything with command but the hardest work, the drudgery, and that too with apparently less credit than other cavalry get, who have not done one tenth the service this regiment has, but we have not hitherto complained, and it is too late to begin now. Present my kind regards to your officers and men.

The tone is surprisingly cordial for a professional association that could best be described as tense. Heath seemed desperate to keep Jessup whom he must have held in high regard as an experienced and professional officer with three years in the field. The colonel was in a very difficult position with more than half his company commanders having fulfilled their terms of service. Hence the letter must have been one among many sent to out to his most experienced men.183 On November 7th the Fifth Ohio departed Cartersville without those who would be mustering out in Columbus on the 29th of the month. It was very nearly a new regiment with many fresh recruits filling its ranks like 18 year old Van Hayes, a brother and cousin to the other members of the Hayes family that had been part of the Fifth Ohio since its inception. In other cases veterans who had previously mustered out rejoined, like 42 year old John Probst who had left the army on November 9, 1864. In February of 1865 he rejoined for one more year of service. The regiment however, was officered by men who were long time members, with six new captains promoted from first lieutenants, new majors who had been captains and a new lieutenant colonel. Even with massive reorganization the leadership was far more experienced and prepared for the rigors of war than the Fifth Ohio was at its birth in 1861.184 Upon its arrival in Atlanta the regiment was made part of General Judson Kilpatrick’s Third Cavalry Division .The egotistical Kilpatrick was known as an aggressive cavalryman with a reputation for recklessness having seen extensive service in the East with the Army of the Potomac. By the time they reached Atlanta it was “little better than a smoking ruin”, much of the city that had been burned to the ground as would many Southern towns and cities in the coming months. After spending only a day there,

120 Heath’s command began the infamous march to the sea as part of Sherman’s army. Made up of more than 60,000 troops, Sherman’s force cut a swath of destruction up to sixty miles wide from Atlanta to the city of Savannah on the east coast. They tore up rail lines, burned crops, destroyed bridges and towns and anything else that might be of use to the Confederacy in waging war. It was the kind of total warfare North America had never known. On November the 24th the Fifth Ohio departed Atlanta riding to the northeast toward Augusta often acting as Kilpatrick’s advanced guard.185 Late on the evening of November 27th Kilpatrick’s command was the target of a surprise attack on their camp near Buck Head Creek by Major General Joe Wheeler. The First Brigade buckled and was put to flight with the Fifth Ohio ordered to the rear to prepare positions for the brigade to pass through during the withdrawal. Barricades of old rails were hastily thrown up near a bridge crossing the creek and a section of howitzers attached to the regiment were setup to cover the retreat. The howitzers firing canister kept Wheeler’s men at bay until the entire Union force had crossed. Captain Jessup in command of 20 Company D troopers then “daringly burned and completely destroyed the bridge,” while under intense fire. After nearly two hours the regiment still covering the First Brigade’s retreat, was forced to withdrawal from its position when it was almost flanked by Wheeler’s forces fording the creek further upstream. Major General Joseph Wheeler would continue to be a more than worthy opponent through the remainder of the war. A West Point graduate, he became one of the youngest generals in the Confederate Army at age 26 in 1861 and in the view of Robert E. Lee one of the best cavalrymen in the South, reaching the rank of Lieutenant General by the war’s end. They withdrew some two and a half miles down the road while Companies E and C under Captain Alexander Rossman, “skillfully and gallantly” kept the enemy in check. Engaged in a running fight the Fifth Ohio made its way to new barricades thrown up on the grounds of the Reynold’s plantation and took up positions to repel Wheeler’s pursuing troops. Sergeant Gilberg recalled “they came at a trot and then at a gallop,” until the artillery drove them back. He noted, “not a shot was fired from our carbines. All we did was witness the demoralizing work of the shells and cheer.”186 Four days later [Dec. 2nd] General Kilpatrick’s column came into contact with a force of almost 1000 Confederates near Rocky Creek Church. Colonel Heath was given the

121 assignment of clearing the General’s left flank. With a single battalion of the Fifth Ohio supported by the six companies of the Third Kentucky Cavalry, Heath charged the enemy’s position allowing the advance to continue. On December 4 they had reached the outskirts of Waynesboro where General Kilpatrick hurled his division at Confederate troops in prepared positions, once again under the command of Wheeler. While the first assault failed, the second breached the barricades pushing back the Confederate infantry who found themselves in serious peril. At this critical moment with the outcome of the battle hanging in the balance, Wheeler counterattacked with his cavalry to save his dismounted force. Kilpatrick and Colonel Heath along with the Fifth Ohio held in reserve watched with growing alarm from a bluff above the action realizing it was now the Union force that was in serious trouble. Kilpatrick ordered the Fifth to move forward. In a column of fours it trotted down the hill meeting only token resistance. After breaching a fence, Heath put the regiment in a line of battle and took the initiative to charge the exposed flank of the Confederate horsemen. As several hundred Union cavalrymen crashed into the Confederate counteroffensive, its momentum was broken and Wheeler ordered a general withdrawal. Heath’s split second decision had saved the day leaving Waynesboro in Union hands. As Heath pressed the attack, artillery fire seemed to be growing in intensity and when one of the shot fell near him he understood what was happening. “Wheeling his horse he rode up the hill [toward the 10th Wisconsin Battery], waving his sword and shouting; elevate those guns. Your shots are falling among my men.” The Colonel felt his regiment had been denied the opportunity to take a “good list of prisoners” by friendly artillery fire that diverted their close pursuit of the fleeing enemy. General Kilpatrick, it was reported, observing the day’s events was “sitting on his horse [was] in high glee.” Pointing toward the rapidly retreating enemy he said, “Well, Joe Wheeler has got a good licking this time. I always could lick him. I whipped him at West Point, have licked him here and could do it again.” As a young cadet Kilpatrick’s political views as a passionate Unionist and abolitionist were known to have precipitated several fights with fellow Southern cadets at West Point. Heath’s actions were later rewarded with a promotion to Brevet Brigadier General, winning the praise of Kilpatrick and Sherman for his action.187

122 Later that day the regiment was order out to destroy a railroad trestle about five miles outside of Waynesboro. Colonel Heath reported it was “accomplished in a thorough manner” tearing up 79 iron rails which were heated and bent making them permanently unusable. As the march across Georgia continued the regiment spent 15 consecutive hours on picket duty covering the crossing of a swamp near the Ebenezer Chapel on the 8th of December. About midnight they were “shelled furiously”, but stubbornly refused to retire until ordered to withdraw.188 On December 11th as the Fifth Ohio neared the Atlantic and took up a position near Silk Hope, Colonel Heath received orders from Kilpatrick to “accompany him on an expedition to open communications with the fleet.” The next day they moved south and after riding and walking their horses all night the column noticed water to their right. They rode to “a fine plantation” on St. Catherine’s Sound about 10 o’clock and established a camp where Heath ordered two howitzers set up. A number of shots were fired and after short period of time a boat appeared filled with sailors sent from Admiral David Porter. The Colonel and two officers from Major-General Oliver Howard’s staff [the Corps commander] were rowed some twelve to fifteen miles in a gum-tree canoe to the bark Fernandina where they were provided a cutter and crew to take them to Admiral Porter’s flagship with dispatches from General Howard.189 Late in the afternoon Colonel Heath returned and the cavalry troopers began anxiously waiting for boats bearing rations to arrive. Sergeant Gilberg recalled that for days they had little to eat except rice, which he noted was in abundance in coastal Georgia. They had survived by foraging since departing Atlanta almost a month earlier and now would be supplied by the fleet. 190 On December the 10th the offensive reached Savannah and the city fell 11 days later. There the Fifth Ohio rested and refitted for next the three weeks while more veterans mustered out, including Captain William Jessup, who now after more than three long years returned home to Harrison, Ohio. While in Savannah, a critical choice was made by Grant and Sherman about the next move to be made by Sherman’s army. Rather than take the army by sea to join Grant in Virginia it was decided they would march northward through the Carolinas to join him. This had been the position advocated by Sherman who explained, “We are not only fighting hostile armies, but a hostile people, and must make

123 old and young, rich and poor, feel the hard hand of war,” and make them feel the hard hand of war they did.191 The Fifth, still part of Kilpatrick’s Division, departed on their final campaign of the war but without Colonel Heath, now holding the rank of brigadier general. The new general was sent with dispatches to Washington D.C. on board the steamer North Star. Major George H. Rader, one of the original members of the regiment assumed command.192 On January 28th the regiment broke camp and marched north covering 90 miles in just four days. As the march continued through Robertsville, Allendale, and Blackville it proved to be uneventful until they reached Williston, South Carolina. Called out in support of the other cavalry regiments in their brigade, the Fifth Kentucky and First Alabama, pursuing a large Confederate force, two battalions of the Fifth Ohio were ordered to slowly move forward while a third was assigned to protect the baggage train and caissons. Their excitement proved to be short lived when it became clear the enemy had slipped away. After the brief but sharp confrontation the Confederate cavalry brigade making the attack had been thoroughly routed leaving the ground littered with guns and haversacks.193 The Fifth Ohio was now part of a force assigned to make a feint toward Augusta, Georgia to draw attention away from Columbia, South Carolina, Sherman’s real objective. They spent the next two days, the 9th and 10th of February, destroying sections of the Augusta and Charleston Railroads and on the 11th were assigned the task of securing the extreme right of their column while the Second Brigade went out to reconnoiter in the direction of Augusta. Subsequently when the Second Brigade met resistance and began a withdrawal the Fifth threw up barricades and prepared to assist in covering its retreat. The Fifth Ohio along with the rest of the Third Cavalry Brigade remained in their positions for another day but no attack came. When the march resumed northward, Sherman’s success became visible to all about midnight on the 17th when the nighttime sky was lit up by the burning city of Columbia some 14 miles to the east. It seemed now there was nothing that would stop them. Their worst enemy however, was the horrendous weather that slowed them, turning roads into a sea of mud and widening creeks into rivers. 194

124 By March they were part of an offensive pushing for Fayetteville, North Carolina, also the destination they discovered, of Confederate General Wade Hampton, whose cavalry force had opposed Sherman since Atlanta. An over confident General Kilpatrick now foolishly decided to try and intercept Hampton by sending each of the three cavalry brigades making up his division down “three widely separated roads”. He accompanied the Third Brigade to which the Fifth Ohio was assigned, gambling his risky maneuver would allow him to intercept Hampton whom he did not regard as a serious threat. On the evening of March 3rd, the regiment was briefly surprised by a small force from the command of their old nemesis Joe Wheeler. After the initial shock the men recovered and easily drove off the attack. This assault was of little consequence when compared with what lay ahead.195 Hampton was well aware of the disposition of Kilpatrick’s troops, and chose to strike first. With a force slightly larger than Kilpatrick’s Third Brigade, he struck on the morning of March 10th just as morning reveille was blowing. Hampton’s men swept through the camp at Monroe’s Cross-Roads overrunning much of it. Those not cut down or captured by the surprise charge escaped into a nearby swamp including the beleaguered Kilpatrick who, Stephen Starr reported, was wearing a nothing but a nightshirt. The brigade and division headquarters, along with the wagons and artillery were all immediately captured. With nearly two-thirds of the camp in Confederate hands a Lieutenant Stetson stealthily creped to his section of artillery unlimbered one of his guns and successfully got off canister rounds into the attackers, beginning a makeshift counteroffensive. Fighting desperately from behind trees they won back ground in the words of Major Rader, “inch by inch”. A small group of company grade officers rallied their men around Stetson’s gun laying down such an intense fire they fought off three successive charges to capture the field piece which was spewing both grape shot and canister. The enemy was finally forced to retire after the “most terrific hand –to-hand encounters I ever witnessed,” noted Rader in his report. Among those whom he singled out for praise was Captain Joseph Overturf of the Fifth Ohio, Captain Hinds of the 1st Alabama and Captain Glore of the Fifth Kentucky, who’s efforts prevented the probable destruction of the entire command (Third Brigade). He also gave special mention to

125 Corporal Mahlon Hayes (Fifth Ohio) who “shot a rebel color bearer, tore the colors from the standard, and presented them” to the Major Rader.196 The engagement had been costly and embarrassing for both sides. Kilpatrick’s force counted only 18 dead and 70 wounded but listed 170 men missing, presumably captured, a number it would seem, at odds with the claims by Hampton that his forces had taken almost 500 Federals prisoner. It was a particularly costly for the Fifth Ohio, which counted only 3 dead and 14 wounded, but 50 missing, presumed to be captured. That dark bloody day at Monroe’s Cross Roads was just one more of the hundreds of the dark bloody days that faded into the past to be forgotten, a battle not large or important enough to be memorialized but certainly more than an inconsequential skirmish.197 After a brief rest and burying the dead, the brigade continued the march into North Carolina capturing Fayetteville on the 15th as they pushed on toward Raleigh, the state capital. On March 16th near Averasborough between Cape Fear and the Black River, Kilpatrick’s cavalry fought in their last serious action of the war. A large Confederate force under the command of General Hardee attempted to slow the offensive that would take them through Bentonville, Goldsboro, and into Raleigh. The Fifth Ohio was placed on the extreme left of the line of battle with the 5th Kentucky and 1st Alabama to the rear in support, and the Third Battalion under Captain Overturf thrown out in advance of the battle line as skirmishers. Overturf succeeded in pushing the enemy skirmishers into their breastworks with heavy fire as they advanced to within 200 yards of the Confederate lines. Before the assault began the entire cavalry brigade was replaced with infantry from the Twentieth Army Corps who had just arrived on the battlefield. Kept in reserve through the remainder of the battle the Fifth Ohio did not see any more action as Hardee’s troops were forced to retreat.198 At Bentonville, Confederate General Joe Johnston made a last ditch effort to stop Sherman’s offensive with a force cobbled together from a half dozen small commands in the region. What unfolded was a savage battle that played out between the 19th and 21st of March. Held in reserve, the Fifth Ohio’s participation was limited to watching tenacious Confederate attacks on the Federal lines that stubbornly held. On the third day of battle however, mounting Federal numbers and a successful surprise assault on Johnston’s rear, forced a withdrawal from the battlefield. Any chance of saving Raleigh was now gone.199

126 Three days after the battle ended the Fifth Ohio along with the rest of the brigade went into camp for two weeks of rest and recovery time. After a campaign that lasted fifty-five days covering more than 700 miles they were given a sorely needed rest. It was not just the distance and time of the campaign that made it exhausting, but also the conditions under which the march had been taken. They had crossed seven major rivers and “an innumerable number of smaller streams and swamps that under ordinary circumstances would be considered impassable,” according to their brigade commander. They also had drawn only five days of rations from the commissary requiring them to live off the countryside to meet the needs of men and animals.”200 On April 7th they were ordered to move on Raleigh and on the 10th the march began with the Fifth Ohio in the lead. Over the next several days skirmishing took place on the outskirts of the city but no serious resistance was encountered as the regiment led Union forces into Raleigh itself. Sergeant Gilberg of Company D recalled the regiment’s entry into Raleigh:
I was the No. 1 of the first four of Company D, 5th Ohio Cavalry and that morning we were in the lead of the column. We had expected to jump General Wheeler’s command, but mile after mile was passed, and we got no sight of man nor horse. Finally as we topped a slight elevation, the city of Raleigh lay before us about a mile off.

We rode forward with carbines held ready. As we came near a movement was seen in a street on the outskirts of the capital. For a few moments we thought it was the advance of the johnnies. Upon getting nearer we saw vehicles approaching with a white flag in the foremost buggy. I was about a quarter of a mile from them, when a bugle in our rear sounded, “Column, halt!” Gen. Kilpatrick and staff, followed by his 40 scouts---we boys called them the “Forty Thieves”—came galloping by us on our right flank. The flag of truce had halted, and Kilpatrick rode up to the truce party and stopped.

Now I wish to quote a few words of the conversation as given me after by Lieutenant Jim Miller of my company, who was on staff duty with Gen. Kilpatrick that day. When asked by the General what was wanted, the reply came from the Mayor of the city; “We wish to surrender the city and ask protection from vandalism.” They had in mind the burning of Columbia, S.C.

127
They stated further that they had to beg General Wheeler almost on their knees not to give battle near the city. “We told the Generals Johnston and Wheeler’, continued the mayor, “that to fight here will cause destruction of our city. You have had all of South Carolina and this far in our own state to oppose and stop the Yankee advance and could not now in justice to us, move outside our city and give us a chance to save our property.” This they finally had done.

General Kilpatrick accepted their offer of surrender and promised to place guards at every house until a proper provost guard could be established.

We the entered the city and took possession. There was no haste or rush---the column moved at a walk. The orders were for every Captain to detail men to the right and left at every house.

I rode in the fenced yard of the first house dismounted, and led my horse to the back yard, where I watered him at the well and fastened him. Then I returned to the front and stood guard till late afternoon, when I was relieved by infantry. When the 5th Ohio Cavalry had been installed, the 5th Kentucky Cavalry and 1st Alabama Cavalry took the detail, until the entire city was under guard. This left the 13th Pennsylvania Cav. and accordingly they were ordered by Gen. Kilpatrick to go thru the city and reconnoiter the enemy. They didn’t have to go far---a volley of shots greeted them and a scrap was soon on. The 13th Pennsylvania was not strong enough to drive them off, so Kilpatrick ordered the 8th Indiana Cavalry. They came on at a gallop by fours and, deployed right and left, and we went after them on a rush sending the Johnny cavalry back at a full run. This was about the last exchange of shots between Johnston’s and Sherman’s armies.201

On the day Raleigh fell, one event symbolically brought the long war to an end for the homesick men of the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. A lone member of the regiment scaled the statehouse dome and cut away the Confederate battle flag from its lightening rod, and raised the Stars and Stripes in its place. On the 9th of April Robert E. Lee formally surrendered his forces at Appomattox. Joe Johnston’s surrender was only a matter of time. A few weeks later at Durham Station, North Carolina Johnston reached terms with Sherman who was escorted by Brigadier General Thomas Tinsley Heath and men from the Fifth Ohio.202 Though the war had ended, the Fifth Ohio remained in North Carolina as part of the Third Brigade commanded by Heath. General Heath was responsible for enforcing the law and “starting the civil machinery of government” including the appointment of

128 justices of the peace and paroling Confederate soldiers. It was an assignment for which Heath was well suited because of his experience as an attorney and long standing commitment to abolitionism. From his Raleigh brigade headquarters Heath ordered: “The soldiery will not inflame the minds of the citizens by either word or act but…and [will be] protecting both white and black.” Concerned about relations between his men and the civilian population of North Carolina, he barred foraging, adding that homes could only be entered with an officer present, but he also directed that guerrillas firing on federals would be executed upon capture.203 On May 2nd the regiment under the command of Lieutenant Colonel John Pummill was assigned to occupation duty in Franklinton, North Carolina. Pummill an original member of Fifth Ohio began his service in Company G as a first sergeant and steadily rose through the ranks to lieutenant colonel. While under his command the regiment’s area of operation was expanded to include Franklin, Warren, and Nash counties within each Heath ordered the creation of a police force of 30 to 80 men. In addition to keeping law and order, Colonel Pummill faced other challenges like ensuring the fair treatment of the freedmen while also maintaining military discipline and efficiency within the ranks of the regiment. A continuing problem for Pummill was the behavior of his men. Soldiers were accused of things like selling military property including horses and stealing corn from local residents. Drinking also became a problem resulting in fights, charges of insubordination and absences without leave. The case of William Gaines was typical. He was sentenced to three days of confinement with hard labor and a public reprimand for intoxication, disobedience, disrespectful language to a superior and being out of camp without a pass. Colonel Pummill responded by requiring each company to take two roll calls a day and perform two hours of drill daily. He also began classes for commissioned officers and insisted they sleep in camp with their men. But by the end of September theft had become such a serious problem that Heath gave civilians the right to use firearms to arrest soldiers.204 The plight of the freedmen required special attention. The end of slavery changed the lives of thousands of African-Americans living in the counties under the Fifth Ohio’s supervision. While the army was not responsible for taking care of the freedmen it did

129 have to protect them and keep the peace. Heath directed his officers to urge the freedmen to stay at or near their current homes while also encouraging landowners to hire them at fair wages. He wanted it made clear to the freedmen they should avoid traveling to garrison towns for federal aid. None-the-less problems still occurred as in the case of Fenton Johnson. He came to Franklinton, North Carolina where his wife lived and was ordered to leave by Captain John Bowls of Company D. Bowl’s based his demand on the belief that other freedmen would also come to town, and would steal rather than work. Johnson’s refusal to leave led to his arrest and Bowls placing him on a diet of crackers and water. The local Freedmen’s Bureau agent whose responsibility was to look out for the freedmen expressed concern over Johnson’s treatment. The next day Pummill appointed Captain Joseph Overturf as a military judge to hear cases involving disputes between and black and white citizens.205 Throughout the occupation the army was drawing down. As men fulfilled their terms of service and were mustered out, units were consolidated and dissolved. On June 24, 1865 Heath ordered men whose enlistment terms expired to come to Raleigh. From there they would be mustered out in small groups. By the beginning of August Company C was so small that Colonel Pummill ordered that the remaining members should be distributed across the other companies. Simultaneously an independent squadron known as McLaughlin’s Ohio Cavalry Squadron was integrated into the 5th Ohio and made into the new Company C.206 In September the regiment was ordered into the mountainous western region around Morganton, North Carolina where it remained until October 30th, when the entire regiment was mustered out, and in the words of Whitelaw Reid “after a protracted and meritorious term of gallant service, its members gladly resumed their citizenship.”207

130

Afterward

Thomas W. Fanning--- After being sent to Camp Dennison to recover from a serious illness, the 33-year-old Fanning was hit by a train and released from the Army. In September of 1863 he rejoined and was given a commission as a lieutenant in the newly organized 9th Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. Earlier in the same year P.C. Browne Printing published Fanning’s work titled The Adventures of a Volunteer, by a Non-Commissioned Officer, which covered his experiences and observations with the 5th Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. In 1865 he published another book, which consisted of his first work in addition to further observations while an officer with the 9th Ohio Volunteer titled (Take a breath!) The Hairbreadth Escapes and Humorous Adventures of a Volunteer in the Cavalry Service. By one of Them, Who Has Been Under Generals Grant, Lew Wallace, Sherman, Halleck, Rousseau, Thomas and Kilpatrick. Later he worked as a chiropodist, a type of 19th century podiatrist, in Cincinnati.208

William Henry Harrison Taylor---After receiving a surgeon’s certificate releasing him from the service, Colonel Taylor returned home to take care of his sick wife and later served as the President of the Military Commission of West Tennessee. In July of 1865 his wife Anna, a daughter of President William Henry Harrison died at the Columbus Water Cure where she was probably being treated for tuberculosis. In November of 1866 he was appointed the Post Master of Cincinnati, a position that he held until April of 1867. Shortly thereafter he moved to Minnesota because of persistent health problems and later was appointed Minnesota State Librarian, a position he held for the next seventeen years.209 He periodically returned to North Bend and Cincinnati including a trip in November of 1879 to claim a new bride, Cecelia Cilley Anderson of Sayler Park (now a Cincinnati neighborhood) and to attend reunions of his old regiment. On January 30, 1894 the old colonel died in St. Paul, Minnesota at the age of 81. 210 Two of the Colonel’s sons also served in the Union Army. William Henry Harrison Taylor Jr., his oldest son, reached the rank of captain in Eighteenth U.S. infantry while a younger son

131 John Thomas Taylor joined the Fifth Ohio but later was made a member of General Sherman’s staff at the rank of lieutenant.211

Elbridge Ricker--- Ricker returned to his Pleasant Hill home in Clermont County after his medical discharge where he remained active in a number of civic capacities. He died on March 10, 1876 leaving behind his wife Margaret and four adult children. Two of his six children also served in the Union Army though oddly neither served in their Father’s regiment. Benjamin the oldest reached the rank of major in Thirty Fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry and was severely wounded at the Battle of Fayetteville in Sept. of 1862. A younger son Thomas lost a leg at the Battle of Atlanta in August of 1864. Never fully recovering Thomas proceeded father in death on May 1, 1874.212

Thomas Tinsley Heath--- The General returned home to practice law and to a wife whom he had seen only three times after the regiment made its initial departure for the Tennessee River Valley. He married Mary Elizabeth Bagley in September of 1862 after postponing the nuptials when he volunteered to form the Fifth Ohio in the spring and summer of 1861.213 They moved to Loveland after the war and built a beautiful home he named Miamanon. For the General however, the domestic bliss was shattered when his wife died in October of 1872. Four years later General Heath married Mary Louise Slack whom bore him seven children, though two died of diphtheria in 1889. He developed a lucrative law practice but devoted almost ten years of work to the development of two inventions for the printing industry, the “Typography” and “Justifier” from which he also derived a considerable income.214 He was approached several times to run for political office because of his success and reputation for generosity but never accepted, though he remained a devoted member of the Republican Party. General Heath died in 1925 at the age of 91.
215

William Jessup---After his resignation in 1865 Captain Jessup returned home to Harrison, married, and became a farmer like his Father, the “Old” Squire”. His marriage to Helen Mae Cooper of Cleves produced nine children two of whom preceded him in death. He remained dedicated to the Democratic Party throughout his life playing an active role in

132 state and local politics. Jessup was to be elected to the Ohio General Assembly several times the first occurring in 1877 and later holding the same office from 1904-1908, when he was the Assembly’s oldest member at 64. In 1908 he returned to local politics and was elected the Hamilton County Treasurer. On December 2, 1914 Captain William Jessup passed away at the age of 73.216

Whitelaw Reid--- Reid’s success as a war journalist took him from Cincinnati to Washington D.C. where he developed strong ties with the Republican Party. At the War’s conclusion he toured the South and wrote, After the War, a volume of his collected writings about the post war South in 1866. In 1867 he tried his hand at growing cotton and failed and turned to writing again publishing Ohio and the War in 1868. The book detailed the history of the Buckeye’s State’s regiments and leaders in the war and again put him in the limelight. In the same year he went to work as a journalist for the New York Tribune and several years later with the help of financier Jay Gould purchased the paper. For the next two decades he increased the Tribune’s circulation and improved the quality of its product while becoming close to many of the nation’s top Republican leaders. His political ties led to a number of high level appointments including membership on the commission charged with working out the terms of peace with Spain after the Spanish American War and an appointment as The U.S. ambassador to Great Britain in 1905. In 1912 at the age 90 the accomplished journalist and publisher passed away while visiting London.

The letter below is a fitting means of concluding this book on the service of citizen soldiers during the Civil War. It was written by Colonel Taylor to memorialize Major Charles S. Hayes.

Major Charles S. Hayes Late of the 5th Ohio Cavalry In the death of this gallant officer the army and the country suffered a loss which it will be impossible to retrieve. A retrospective glance at his brilliant career cannot fail to inspire his comrades, his friends and his countrymen with love for his memory and emulation of his virtues.

133
Charles S. Hayes was born near Elizabethtown, Hamilton County, Ohio in March 1832, where he spent his early part of his life in agricultural pursuits. When the toxin of war resounded throughout this broad land summoning to arms the patriotic and brave to the defense of the republic, he unhesitatingly abandoned the quiet avocations of rural life to take part and finally to die in the great struggle involving the preservation or destruction of American nationality. He counted not the toil, danger, sacrifices and privations incumbent to the life of a soldier; considered not the alluring enjoyments of home with its myriad of hallowed associations; he heard only the voice of his imperiled country rallying her hardy sons around the starry emblem of freedom, to protect it from the ungrateful hands seeking its dishonor. Colonel William H.H. Taylor received authority to raise a regiment of cavalry in Ohio in August 1861, and being familiar with the character of Major Hayes, immediately tendered him a captain’s commission, which he promptly accepted, and at once entered upon the work of filling up his company. This was soon accomplished and upon the organization of the regiment in the following October he was promoted to the rank of major and placed in command of the entire third battalion, 5th Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. With the brave men of this regiment his whole future was to be identified at their head, he finally poured out his blood; as pure a libation as was ever offered upon the altar of country, at the shrine of liberty. The regiment was ordered to the field in the latter part of February 1862. The nation had been electrified by the invincible marches and achievements of our armies in the West. The Tennessee River had been cleared, and our victorious legions were already on the way to invest Corinth, the great rebel stronghold in the Southwest. To this point Colonel Taylor’s regiment was conveyed in transports, disembarking at Savannah, Tennessee. Major Hayes’ battalion was here detached and made a part of Maj. General C.F. Smith’s Corps. One of the first duties assigned to Major Hayes, was the hazardous undertaking of cutting the enemy’s communications with Columbus, Kentucky. Arrangements being completed on the thirteenth of March at midnight the brave men under Major Hayes started for the bridge on the Mobile & Ohio Railroad, near Purdy, which they reached and destroyed. So significant was the service this deemed, so prompt, efficient and thorough the execution of the work that the following complimentary order was issued the next day.

“General Order No. 4” Headquarters Expeditionary Corps, Savannah, March 14, 1862 The Major General commanding tenders his thanks to Major Hayes, 5th Ohio Cavalry, and the officer and men of the battalion of that regiment under his command, for the activity, skill and courage with which the recent movement in the direction of Purdy was so successfully accomplished by them. By Order of Major General Chas. F. Smith

134
This brought Major Hayes prominently before the army and the country; henceforth he had a military reputation to sustain, and right nobly did he sustain it. During the memorable siege of Corinth the duties devolved upon his battalion were of the arduous nature and were invaluably performed with cheerfulness, energy and skill. In the Battle of Shiloh which was fought on Monday April 7th, Major Hayes distinguished himself by gallantry and meritorious conduct and shared in the glories of the day. Soon after he marched with the army into the fortifications at Corinth, which the enemy had been compelled ignominiously to vacate. On the 18th of August, Major Hayes was ordered to Memphis to take command of the First and Second Battalions then stationed at that post. In connection with Major Ricker, he commanded these two battalions during the whole of the last summer and winter, till the latter officer retired from the service, when he assumed command of both. In the sanguinary conflict on the Hatchie (River), resulting in the complete triumph of our arms, he took a conspicuous and honorable part, adding fresh, unfading laurels to the bright chaplet already encircling his brow. From this time he was constantly engaged in the performance of valuable services in connection with the army at Memphis, enjoying the fullest confidence of his superiors in rank. On Saturday April 18th at the head of his two brave battalions, he met and fought a considerable force of the enemy near Hernando, Mississippi. The conflict was not decisive. On Sunday the fighting was renewed and during the day Major Hayes made a dashing charge, driving the enemy into Hernando, and actually capturing more prisoners than the whole number of men under his immediate command. While cheering his men, and after victory had perched upon their standard, the fatal messenger of death came, swift but sure to summon him to join that innumerable caravan, whose white tents are pitched in the valley of eternity. He received a mortal wound, which terminated his life on the following day While we mingle our tears of sorrow and affliction with those of his bereaved family, friends and companions, let us seek to emulate his extraordinary heroism and his faithful, unbounded devotion to his country. Let his comrades and his countrymen consecrate their lives to the triumph of the sacred cause in which he surrendered his life. The death of Charles S. Hayes will leave an aching void in the hearts of all who knew him well. Kind hearted generous to a fault, naturally of a cheerful temperament he possessed the happy faculty of imparting to those around him, his own buoyancy of spirit. His love for mankind flowed in the purest current and his friendship caught a glow from the intensity of his feelings. Though firm and unwavering in his belief that the cause for which he fought was the holiest ever committed to the ointment of battle, yet he seldom spoke harshly of its foes, attributing their conduct rather to a fatal delusion than to criminality of purpose. No man cherished less sectional animosity and home more earnestly desired that our dissention should buried deep in the bosom of oblivion, and that we should live together peacefully and harmonious and happy, as one people.

135
We believed that in no other way could we achieve a destiny as great, glorious and imperishable. With these lofty principles and aspirations he gave his sword and at last his life, the greatest sacrifice a patriot can make to his country, and what even may his fate, and the immortality of his history. As a cavalry officer Major Hayes was quick to decide and prompt to execute. He made some of the most brilliant charges of the whole war. Always ready to meet the enemy he was generally successful. Reckless of his own person, he was careful of his men, and possessed the confidence and respect of those under him as well as those above him. This brief notice is offered as a faint, rude memorial only, of the services and virtues of a man with whom the writer was intimately associated for many years. When the American nation, redeemed, regenerated and reestablished, shall such a monument of marble to commemorate the heroes of this war, justice will demand that high up, upon its polished front shall be engraved the name of Major Charles S. Hayes

And the night dew that falls though in silence it weeps, shall brighten with verdure the grave where he sleeps. And the tear that we shed though in secret, it rolls shall long keep his memorial green in our souls. William H.H. Taylor, Colonel 5th Ohio Cavalry

The conclusion of the War did not bring an end to the comradeship that developed between the members of the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. In Cleves in 1881 as in many communities across America, a Grand Army of the Republic (G.A.R.) Post was founded. G.A.R. Post 224 was named after the highly esteemed Charles S. Hayes, killed in battle on the banks of the Coldwater River. G.A.R. Post 224 was just one of 24 chapters established in Hamilton County with dozens of others in the surrounding counties from which the Fifth Ohio was recruited. The national G.A.R. was initially established for camaraderie but in time became powerful political force that lobbied for pension legislation, and relief work that often benefited veterans that had fallen on hard times. By 1890 its national membership peaked at over 400,000 and was considered one of the most important special interest groups in the nation. It had grown so powerful that it was thought impossible to become the

136 Republican nominee for the Presidency without the endorsement of the G.A.R. and eventually five members of the organization were elected to the nation’s highest office. With posts established locally, it was typical to have a membership that consisted of men from numerous regiments that now lived in that community. But often regiments initially raised in that community were heavily represented as in the case of the 5th Ohio at Charles S.Hayes Post 224. Eventually a Fifth Ohio Cavalry Association was created based at the Post which included men from across the nation. The Association held the first of numerous annual reunions in 1888 with the last recorded reunion taking place in 1913 though several more probably followed. The 1911 reunion as the 50th anniversary of the beginning of the War was a large affair, held at Memorial Hall in downtown Cincinnati.1 It was well attended by 200 members of the Regiment most of whom would have been in their late 60’s and early 70’s. The 1913 reunion, the 25th held by the Association, was a much smaller affair held in the home of one of the local members.

137

End Notes
1 2 3 4

Cincinnati Daily Gazette, April 15, 1861. Robert Wimberg, Cincinnati And The Civil War (Cincinnati: Ohio Bookstore, 1992), 4-5. Cincinnati Daily Commercial, April 15, 1861.

History of Cincinnati and Hamilton County; Their Past and Present (Cincinnati: S.B. Nelson and Company, 1894), 1039; Jay Jorgenson, “Scouting For Grant,” Civil War Regiments: A Journal of the American Civil War 4, no. 1 (1994): 57.
5 6 7 8 9

History of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, 1039. History of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, 1039. History of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, 1039 – 1040. History of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, 1039 – 1040. History of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, 1040.

Pauline Pearce Warner, Harrison of Berkley: Walter Cocke of Surry (P.P. Warner); National Archives, William Henry Harrison Personnel Records; Freeman Cleaves, Old Tippecanoe: William Henry Harrison and His Times (Newton, Ct.: American Political Biography Press, 1904), 304. Henry Howe, Historical Collections of Ohio (Cincinnati: Henry Howe, 1847), 229; Proceedings of the Hamilton County Agricultural Society (Hamilton County Agricultural Society, 1844); Marjorie Byrnside Burress, History of the Cincinnati Post Office (Cincinnati, M. B. Burress, 1982); Cleaves, 335. Whitelaw Reid, Ohio in the War: Her Statesmen, Her Generals, and Soldiers, 2 vols. (Moore, Wilstach and Baldwin, 1868), 2: 3-5. Thomas Heath, letter to State Adjutant General Buckingham, July 11, 1861, Ohio Historical Society, Series 147
14 13 12 1

10

Stephen Z. Starr, The Union Cavalry in the Civil War, 3 vols. (Louisiana State University P), 1:59;

1:50
15

Starr, 66-67.

Thomas Heath letter to State Adjutant General Buckingham, July 13, 1861, Ohio Historical Society, Series 147
17

16

Heath, July 13, 1861. Cincinnati Enquirer, August 25, 1861. Starr, 113; Royal Hayes, The Hayes Genealogy (Cincinnati, Royal Hayes, 1927), 239-242.

18

19

138

20

Hayes, 239; Reid, 777.

Alvin Harlow, The Serene Cincinnatian (New York, Dutton, 1950), 50; Henry Howe, Historical Collections of Ohio (Cincinnati, C.J. Krehbiel And Company, 1888), 768. James K Mercer, Representative Men of Ohio (Columbus, Press of F.J. Herr, 1908) William Jessup Letter to family July 12, 1862 Thomas W. Fanning, The Adventures Of A Volunteer (Cincinnati, P.C. Browne, 1863), 3; Ohio Adjutant General, Official Roster of the Soldiers of the State of Ohio in the War of the Rebellion 18611865, 12 vols. (Akron: Werner PTG> and Litho. Co., 1891), 9:281. Official Roster of the Soldiers of the State of Ohio in the War of the Rebellion, Volume XI, 249-295; Geoffrey Ward, Ken Burns and Rick Burns, The Civil War (New York; Alfred A. Knopf Inc., 1990), 122123. John T. Taylor, Reminiscences of Services as an Aide-de-camp with General William Tecumseh Sherman. War Talks in Kansas: A series of papers read before Kansas Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (Kansas City: Franklin Hudson Publishing Co., 1906), 128-135; Official Roster Of The Soldiers, 241 –301; Henry A. and Kate B. Ford, History of Hamilton County (Cleveland: L.A. Williams Co., 1881), 326;Official Roster Of The Soldiers, 264. Official Roster Of The Soldiers, 241; Official Roster Of The Soldiers, 261; Official Roster Of The Soldiers, 263-265. Ford, 324; Ford, Biographical page; Shirley Altoff and Peg Scmidt, The New Pioneers: The People of Delhi 1830-1890 (Cincinnati: Delhi Historical Society), 55-56.
28 27 26 25 24 23 22

21

Harlow, 51-52.

Byron Williams, History of Clermont and Brown Counties (Cincinnati: S. Rosenthal and Co., 1896), 232-233.
30

29

Williams, 127; Williams, 440-441. Williams, 440.

31

Ford, 39; Levi Coffin, The Reminiscences of Levi Coffin (Cincinnati: Western Tract Society, 1876), 525; Charles Greve, A Centennial History of Cincinnati and Representative Citizens (Chicago: Biographical Publishing Company, 1904), 752-753. William G. Lewis, Biography of Samuel Lewis: first superintendent of common schools for the state of Ohio (Cincinnati: Methodist Book Concern, 1857), 319.
34 33

32

Lewis, 319-320. Lewis, 320. Lewis, 320.

35

36

Ann Hagedorn, Beyond The River; The Untold Story Of The Underground Railroad (New York: Simon and Schuster, 2002), 54.

37

139

Marjorie Burress, The Mouth of the Great Miami; Along History’s Path (Marjorie Byrnside Burress, 2000), 79; Ford, History of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, 1889. Thomas T. Heath, letter to John Brown, November 26, 1859, The Virginia Magazine of History And Biography (Virginia Historical Society, Volume X, Number 1, 1902), 167.
40 39

38

William Jessup letter to father, July 5, 1863, Marjorie Burress Collection. Reid, 777. Reese Kendall, Pioneer Annals of Greene Township, (George F. Degelman, 1905), 53-54. Official Roster, Volume XII, 449; Fanning, 3. Fanning, 3 - 4.

41

42

43

44

Ford, 1040; Thomas Tinsley Heath, Straws, a paper read before the Ohio Commandery of The Loyal Legion, 1909, 7; John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life, 1960,150 –151 1stedition 1887.
46

45

Fanning, 7, 75. Starr, Vol. III , 9-10.

47

Isaac Scott Letter to Moses Hayes, Dec.5, 1861, Dennis Collins collection; Regimental Order Book, Special Order 13, Record Group 94,, December 12, 1861.
49

48

Eaton Register, December 5, 1861; Eaton Register, December 9, 1861.

Reid, 777; B. Lorup to John Harrison, 5th Ohio Cavalry Regimental Order Book, Record Group 94, January 25, 1862; Elbridge Ricker, Regimental Order Book, Record Group 94, January 1, 1862;Fanning, 74; Isaac Scott to Moses Hayes, Dec. 31, 1861, Dennis Collins collection. Reid, 777; B. Lorup to John Harrison, 5th Ohio Cavalry Regimental Order Book, Record Group 94, January 25, 1862; Elbridge Ricker, Regimental Order Book, Record Group 94, January 1, 1862;Fanning, 74; Isaac Scott to Moses Hayes, Dec. 31, 1861, Dennis Collins collection.
51

50

Colonel Taylor letter to G.D. Dart, Regimental Order Book, Record group 94, , December 28, 1861.

Regimental Company and Order and Letter Book, 5th Ohio Cavalry, Record Group 94 National Archives, Special Order 16, February 11, 1862; Regimental and Company Order and Letter Book, 5th Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, Record Group 94, National Archives, Special Order 15, February 11, 1862.
53

52

Isaac Scott to Moses Hayes, January 12, 1862, Dennis Collins collection.

History of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, 1040; W. H. H. Taylor to Governor Dennison, Oct.31, 1861, Ohio Historical Society series. Special Order 9 to Company Commanders, Regimental Order Book, Record Group 94, February 7, 1862; Special Order 11 to company commanders, Regimental Order Book, Record Group 94, February 10, 1862:Special Order 21 to company commanders, Regimental Order Book, Record Group 94, February 19, 1862.
55

54

140

56

Robert Major Diary, 1862, United States Military History Institute; Fanning, 7-8.

57

Whitelaw Reid, Ohio In The War, p.777-778. Fanning, 8, 43; Major , Diary, 1862.

58

Reid, 778: Major Elbridge Ricker report of March 15, 1862,Official Record of the Civil War, series I, Vol. X, p. 29. Larry Daniel, Shiloh, The Battle That Changed the Civil War (New York, Touchstone Books, 1997), 77-78. Brig. General W.T. Sherman report of March 17, 1862, Official Record of the Civil War, Part I, Vol. X, p.25; Reid ,.778: Brig. General W.T. Sherman report of March 17, 1862, Official Record of the Civil War, Part I, Vol. X. p.27. Major Charles Hayes report of March 14, 1862,Official Record of the Civil War, Part I ,Vol. X, 10; Major –General Braxton Bragg report of March 14, 1862, Official Record of the Civil War, Part I, Vol. X, 11.
63 62 61 60

59

Major Charles Hayes report of March 14, 1862, Official Record of the Civil War, Part 1, Vol. X, 11. Fanning, 17; Official Roster, Volume 11, 771-775; Fanning, 31.

64

William Jessup letter to Squire Jessup, April 3, 1862, Marjorie Burriss collection ;Thomas W. Fanning, The Adventures of a Volunteer,1863, p.28. Jay Jorgenson, Scouting For Grant: The 5th Ohio Cavalry in the Shiloh Campaign, Civil War Regiments, p.56; Thomas W. Fanning, The Adventures of a Volunteer, 1863, p. 28.
67 66

65

Jay Jorgensen, Scouting For Grant; The 5th Ohio in the Shiloh Campaign, Civil War Regiments, p.66.

Colonel W. H.H. Taylor to Major Elbridge Ricker. March 30, 1863, Regimental Order Book One.; Jay Jorgensen, Scouting For Grant: The 5th Ohio in the Shiloh Campaign, Civil War Regiments, 62. Lt. Charles Murray report of March 31, 1862, Official Record of the Civil War, Part I, Volume X, pg.78-79; Official Roster of The Soldiers Of The State Of Ohio In The War Of The Rebellion 1861-1866, 1891Volume 11, .285-288; Lt. Charles Murray report of March 31,1862, Official Record of the Civil War, Part 1,Volume X pg.79.
70 69

68

Official Roster of The Soldiers Of The State Of Ohio In The War Of The Rebellion 1861-1866, 1891 Volum11, .285-288.

Major Elbridge Ricker report of April 4, 1862,Official, Record of the Civil War, Part I Vol. 10, p. 92; Edward Aultman, The National Tribune , Saw an army But Uncle Billy Would Not Believe, 1896.
72

71

Edward Aultman, The National Tribune, Saw an army But Uncle Billy Would Not Believe, 1896.

Whitelaw Reid, Ohio in the War, 1863, p.779; Jay Jorgensen, Scouting For Grant: The 5th Ohio in the Shiloh Campaign, Civil War Regiments, p.65.
74

73

Robert Major Diary, 1862, United States Military History Institute.

141

75

Thomas W. Fanning, The Adventures of a Volunteer,1863, p.38 Whitelaw Reid, Cincinnati Daily Gazette, April 9, 1862. Fanning, 32. Isaac Scott letter to Mose Hayes, April 14, 1862.

76

77

78

Whitelaw Reid, Ohio In The War: Her Statesmen, Her Generals, and Soldiers 2 vols. (Moore, Wilstach and Baldwin,1868),2: 779.
80

79

Official Record, Vol. X, 203, 536, 537 ; Reid, 779; Daniel, 192. Isaac Scott letter to Mose Hayes, April 14, 1862

81

Reid, p.779; Jay Jorgensen, Scouting For Grant: The 5th Ohio Cavalry in the Shiloh Campaign, Civil War Regiment,(Civil War Regiments: A Journal of the American Civil War,1994)4: 73. Reid, 779; William Jessup , letter May 3, 1862, Marjorie Burress Collection; J.W. Christman letter to Jesse Christman, Eaton Register, April 12,1862 (Preble County, Ohio, and the Civil War, Audrey Gilbert, 2000).
84 83

82

Reid ,779. Fanning, 40-41.

85

Official Record, Vol. X, 203; Reid,779; Wiley Sword, Shiloh: Bloody April, (Morrow, New York, 1974), 250-251.
87

86

Reid, 779. Reid, 779.

88

Isaac Scott letter to Mose Hayes, April 14, 1862; Reid, 779; Robert Major Diary, 1862 United States Military History Institute.; Isaac Scott letter to Mose Hayes, April 14, 1862.
90

89

William Jessup letter home, May 3, 1862, Marjorie Burress Collection; Reid, 779; Fanning, 59.

Thomas Tinsley Heath, Straws, (Paper read before the Ohio Commandery of MOLLUS, April 7, 1909), 5-6.
92

91

Heath, 8. Official Record,Vol. X, p.99.

93

Henry and Kate Ford, History Of Cincinnati Ohio, (L.A. Williams, Cleveland, 1881), 109-110; Robert J. Wimberg, Cincinnati and The Civil War, Ohio Book Store, Cincinnati, 1994), 27.
95

94

Wimberg, 28; Wimberg, 29-37.

96

Fanning, Adventures of a Volunteer”, 1863, pg. 72-73. Isaac Scott Letter to Mose Hayes, April 29, 1862.

97

142

98

Fanning, p.66-68. Fanning, p.75-78. Fanning, p.66-68. Official communication by George Sprague, Personnel Records Colonel W.H.H. Taylor, May 2,

99

100

101

1862
102

Fanning, p.76. Fanning, p.76. Fanning, Ibid. p. 79-84. Fanning, p. 84. Fanning, p.85-90. Fanning, p. 87, 78, 94.

103

104

105

106

107

Reid, Whitelaw. Ohio In the War, pg. 780; Marszalek, John. Sherman: A Soldier’s Passion For Order, p.188. Heath, Thomas. Straws, 1909, p.5; Heath letter to Secretary of War Stanton, August 27, 1862, Ohio Military Records-Series 77.
110 109

108

Heath letter to Secretary of War Stanton, August 27, 1862, Ohio Military Records-Series 77. Heath letter to Secretary of War Stanton, August 27, 1862, Ohio Military Records-Series 77. Jessup letter to Charles Miller, February 7, 1863, Marjorie Burress Collection. Jessup letter to parents, July 12, 1862, Marjorie Burress Collection. William Jessup letter to parents Reid, p.780: Starr, The Union Cavalry in the Civil War,Vol. II, 1985, p.51.

111

112

113

114

115

Isaac Scott letter to Moses Hayes, August 6, 1862; William Jessup letter to Charles Miller. February 7, 1863, Marjorie Burress Collection.
117

116

Wimberg, Robert. Cincinnati and The Civil War; Cincinnati Under Attack, 1999, p.112. Wimberg, p.82-94, 128. Wimberg, Robert. Cincinnati And The Civil War: Under Attack, 1999, p.79. Perzel. Edward, Alexander Long: A Political Study Of A Copperhead congressman, 1961, p.59 Perzel, p. 1; Resse, Kendall, Pioneer Annals of Greene Township, 1905, p.49.

118

119

120

121

143

122

Perzel, p.57; Wimberg, p.164-165, p.59. Wimberg, p.59. Roster of Ohio Soldiers: War Of The Rebellion, Volume XI, 1891, p.241. OR, Series I, Volume XVII, p.246. OR, Series I, Volume XVII, p.247. Charles S. Hayes to his brother, October 10, 1862. Reid, Whitelaw, Ohio In The War, p. 781. OR, Company Logs; Isaac Scott letter to Mose Hayes, October, 1862.

123

124

125

126

127

128

129

Shelby Foote, The Beleaguered City; The Vicksburg Campaign, 1995, p.23; Silvanus Cadwallader, Three Years With Grant: As Recalled by War Correspondent Sylvanus; Whitelaw Reid, Ohio In the War, pg. 780.
131

130

Robert Ingersoll, official report, OR, Series I, Vol. XVII, p.555. Charles S. Hayes letter to his brother Mose, December 30, 1862... 133 Ohio Biographical Encyclopedia, p. 1546
134

132

Whitelaw Reid, Ohio in the War, 780; W.H .H. Taylor Compiled Service Record, National Archives.

Thomas Heath, Case LL-492—LL-515, Records of the Office of the Judge Advocate General, Court Martial Case Files 1809-1894, Record Group 153, National Archives. Thomas Heath, Case LL-492—LL515.
136

135

Thomas Heath, Case LL-492—LL-515. Thomas Heath, Case LL-492—LL-515. Thomas Heath, Case LL-492—LL-515. Thomas Heath, Case LL-492—LL-515.

137

138

139

Thomas T. Heath letter to Governor John Todd, February 8, 1863; W.W.H. Taylor order to Lt. Colonel Thomas T. Heath, February 13, 1863.; Heath, Compiled Service Record, National Archives; Thomas T. Heath letter to Governor John Todd, February 8, 1863.
141

140

Heath, Compiled Service Record.

Letter from Thomas T. Heath to Elbridge Ricker, March 30, 1863. Cincinnati Historical Society Archives.
143

142

Trounstine letter to Major Hayes, March 3, 1863. Thomas Heath letter to Cincinnati Commercial. Charles Hayes letter to Mose Hayes, April 1, 1863.

144

145

144

146

Colonel Taylor memorial letter; OR, Series I, Vol. XXIV, p.558. Royal S. Hayes, The Hayes Family Genealogy, 1927, p.239; Colonel Taylor, Memorial letter, p.7.

147

148

William Jessup Sr. letter to his son, May 30, 1863, Marjorie Burress Collection William Jessup Sr. letter to his son, July 13, 1863, Marjorie Burress Collection. William Jessup letter to his brother, July 5, 1863, Marjorie Burress Collection.

149

150

William Jessup to Colonel W.H.H. Taylor; Jessup, William, letter, July 5, 1863; Scott, Isaac. letter July 1, 1863.
152

151

Jessup, letter, July 1, 1863. OR, Series I, Volume XXIV, p.479-480; Reid, Whitelaw, Ohio In The War, p.782. William Jessup Sr. letter to his son July 26, 1863, Marjorie Burress Collection. Personnel Records W.H.H. Taylor, July 23, 1863. William Jessup Letter to Squire Jessup

153

154

155 156

OR, Volume XXXI, p.16-17; Reid, Whitelaw, Ohio In the War, p.784; William Jessup letter to Squire Jessup, Oct. 25, 1863; OR, Volume XXXI, p.17.
158

157

OR, Volume XXXI, p.16-17; Roster of the Ohio Soldiers: War Of The Rebellion, p.771-775. Roster of the Ohio Soldiers: War Of The Rebellion, p.771-775. OR, Volume XXXI, p. 19, 20. OR, Volume XXXI, p 20. OR, Volume XXXI, p. 20-21. OR, Volume XXXI, p. 21. OR, Volume XXXI, p.22; Robert Major Diary, November 21, 1863. OR, Supplement- Records of Events, Volume 49, Company I, p. 770. Robert Major , Diary, November

159

160

161

162

163

164

165

21, 1863. Stephen Z. Starr, The Union Cavalry in the Civil War, p.53; Starr, p.52; OR, Supplement- Records of Events, Volume 49, Company C, p.748; Starr, p.53; Whitelaw Reid, Ohio in the War, p.785.
167 166

Reid, p.784. Starr, The Union Cavalry in the Civil War, Volume III, p.342-343. OR, Supplement-Records of Events, Volume 49, Company H, p.765, 770.

168

169

145

170

William Jessup letter to Squire Jessup, November 28, 1863. Robert Major, Diary, November 1863.

171

Reid, p.784; OR, Supplement-Records of Events, Volume 49, p.732-778; William Jessup letter to home, January 30, 1864.
173

172

Major, January 1864. History of The Republican Party in Ohio, Vol. 1, Lewis Publishing, p.161, 1898. History of The Republican Party in Ohio, p.161. Perzel, Edward, Alexander Long, p.70. Starr, p.448.455. Starr, p.448.

174

175

176

177

178

J.A. Gilberg, The Battle of Jonesboro; A Day’s History by one of Gen. J.A. Logan’s Bodyguard, National Tribune, May 6, 1909.
180

179

J.A. Gilberg. J.A. Gilberg. Roster of the Ohio Soldiers: War of the Rebellion 1861-1866, Vol. XI, p.241-308. Thomas T. Heath letter to William Jessup, Roster of Ohio Soldiers: War of the Rebellion 1861-1866, Vol.XI, p. 263 Reid, Ohio In the War.

181

182

183

184

185

J.A. Gilberg, With the Cavalry, Kilpatrick Tilting with Wheeler Down in Georgia, National Tribune, August 20, 1903 J.A. Gilberg, With the Cavalry, Kilpatrick Tilting with Wheeler Down in Georgia, National Tribune, August 20, 1903
188 187

186

OR, report of Colonel Thomas Heath, December, 23, 1864.

OR, report of Colonel Thomas Heath, December, 23, 1864; J.A. Gilberg, National Tribune, The 5th Ohio Cav. At King’s Bridge; OR, report of Colonel Thomas Heath, December 23, 1864.
190

189

J.A. Gilberg, National Tribune, The 5th Ohio Cav. At King’s Bridge. Sherman, Memoirs, Vol. II, p.227. History of Cincinnati And Hamilton County, p.1040. OR, report of Colonel George E. Spencer, March 30, 1865.

191

192

193

146

194

OR, report of Major George Rader, March 31, 1865. Starr, p.583.

195

OR, the report of Colonel George E. Spencer, March 30, 1865; OR, report of Major George Rader, March 30, 1865.
197

196

Starr, 583-584; Reid, Ohio in the War, p.787. Starr, 586; OR, report of Major Rader, March 31, 1865. OR, report of Colonel George E. Spencer. OR, report of Colonel George E. Spencer. JA. Gilberg, National Tribune. Ohio Biographical Cyclopedia and Portrait Gallery, 1876, p.1544.

198

199

200

201

202

Cincinnati Enquirer, Recollections of Life in Cincinnati in the Strenuous Days of the Civil War, March 2, 1914; Thomas Heat, General Order 17, March 15,1861; Heath, Special Order 237, May 5,1865, National Archives. John Pummill, Special Order 34, June 22, 1865; Heath, Special Order 23, May 23, 1865;Heat, General Order 14, September 27,1865, National Archives; Heath , General Order 13, September, 21, 1865, National Archives; Pummill, Special Order 35, June 16, 1865, National Archives; Pummill, Special Order 38, June, 21, 1865, National Archives. Heath, Special Order 237, May 9, 1865, National Archives; John Bowls to Pummill, June 5, 1865, National Archives Pummill, Special Order June 6, 1865, National Archives. Heath, Special Order 53, June 24, 1865, National Archives; Pummill, Special Order 65, August 2, 1865, National Archives.
207 206 205 204

203

Reid, p.785.

Fanning, Thomas W., The Hairbreadth Escape and Humorous Adventures of a Volunteer in the Cavalry Service, 1865, p.2-3; Cincinnati Illustrated Business Directory, 1886, p. 367.
209

208

Cincinnati Daily Gazette, November 10, 1879. Minnesota Historical Collections, 1912, Vol.14, pg. 770-771, Notes courtesy of Marjorie Burress History of Clermont County,p.440 Cincinnati Enquirer, Recollections of Life in Cincinnati in the Strenuous Days of the Civil War, March

210

211

212

213

2, 1924
214

Ibid.

147

215

Cincinnati Enquirer,1925, Mercer, James K., Representative Men of Ohio,1908,

216

148

Bibliography
Althoff, Shirley and Schmidt, Peg. The New Pioneers: The People of Delhi Township 1830-1900. Cincinnati: Delhi Township Historical Society, 1989. Burress, Marjorie B. The Mouth of the Great Miami; Along History’s Path. Cincinnati Marjorie Byrnside Burress, 2000. Billings, John D., Hardtack and Coffee; The Unwritten Story of Army Life. Chicago, R.R. Donnelley & Sons Company, 1960. Biographical Cyclopedia and Portrait Gallery of Distinguished Men, With an Historical Sketch, of the State of Ohio, Cincinnati, 1879. Cadwallader, Three Years With Grant, as recalled by war correspondent Sylvanus Cadwallader, New York, Knopf, 1955. Cleaves, Freeman. Old Tippecanoe: William Henry Harrison and His Time. Newton, Ct. American Political Biography Press, 1904. Daniel, Larry. Shiloh: The Battle That Changed the Civil War. New York, Touchstone Books, 1998. Emery, Joseph. Thirty Five Years Among the Poor: and The Public Institutions of Cincinnati, Elm Street Printing Company, 1887. Fanning, Thomas W. The Adventures of a Volunteer by a Non-Commissioned Officer Cincinnati, P.C. Browne, 1863. Foote, Shelby. The Beleaguered City: The Vicksburg Campaign, New York, Modern Library Publishing ed., 1995. Ford, Henry. History of Cincinnati. Cleveland, L.A. Williams Co. 1881 Greve, Charles T. Centennial history of Cincinnati and representative citizens, Chicago Biographical Publishing company, 1904. Hagedorn, Anne. Beyond The River: The Untold Story of The Underground Railroad. New York, Simon and Schuster, 2002. Harlow, Alvin. The Serene Cincinnatians. New York, Dutton, 1958. Hayes, Royal. The Hayes Family Genealogy. Cincinnati , 1927 Marszalek, John F. Sherman: A Soldier’s Passion For Order. New York, Free Press, 1993 McDonough, James L. Shiloh: In Hell Before Night. Knoxville, University of Tennessee Press, 1997. Mercer, James K. Representative Men of Ohio. Columbus, Press of F.J. Herr, 1908 Miers, Earl S. The General Who Marched To Hell. New York, Barnes and Noble Ed. 1992. History of Cincinnati and Hamilton County; Their Past and Present. Cincinnati S.B. Nelson Co. 1894. Phisterer, Fredrick. Statistical Record of the Armies of the United States, Edison, N.J., Castle Books Ed., 2002. Official Roster of the Soldiers of the State of Ohio in the War of the Rebellion 18611865. 13 vols. Akron, Werner PTG. and Litho. Co. Reid, Whitelaw. Ohio In The War; Her Statesmen, Generals and Soldiers. Columbus, Eclectic Publishing Co., 1893.

149

Smart, James G. A Radical View: The Agate dispatches of Whitelaw Reid 1861-1865. Memphis, Memphis State University Press, 1976. Smith, Donnal V. Ohio Historical Collections: Chase and Civil War Politics. Columbus, F.J. Heer Printing Co., 1931. Smith, Joseph Patterson. History of The Republican Party in Ohio, Chicago, Lewis Publishing Company, 1898. Starr, Stephen. The Union Cavalry in the Civil War: The War in the West, Baton Rouge Louisiana State University Press, 1985. Sword, Wiley. Shiloh: Bloody April, New York, Morrow, 1974. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, 1861-1865. 128 vols. Washington D.C., 1880-1901.(Abbreviated OR.) Williams, Byron. History of Clermont and Brown Counties. Cincinnati, S. Rosenthal and Co., 1896. Wimberg, Robert. Cincinnati and The Civil War. Cincinnati, Ohio Book Store, 1994. Unpublished Materials Cincinnati Historical Society Thomas T. Heath. Letters. Dennis Collins Collection, Cincinnati Isaac Scott. Letters. Charles Hayes. Letters. William Henry Harrison Taylor memorial of Charles Hayes Marjorie Burress Collection, Cincinnati Thomas T. Heath. Letters. Charles Miller. Letter. William Jessup Jr. Letters. William Jessup Sr. Letters. National Archives Personnel Records of John Sebastian Fries Personnel Records of William Henry Harrison Taylor Records of the Office of Judge Advocate General Court Martial Case Files 1809-1894, Case LL 492-to LL 5151 Box 574 Ohio Historical Society, Columbus Thomas Heath T. Letters. William Henry Harrison Taylor. Letters. United States Military History Institute, Carlisle Barracks Robert Major. Diary.

150

Newspapers Cincinnati Daily Gazette Cincinnati Enquirer National Tribune Articles Heath, Thomas T. “Straws.” Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, Ohio Commandery. April 7, 1909. Jorgenson, Jay. “Scouting For Grant: 5th Ohio Cavalry in the Shiloh Campaign.” Civil War Regiments: a Journal of the American Civil War, vol. iv (1994), Regimental Studies Inc. Taylor, John T. “Reminiscences of Services as an Aide-de-camp with General William Tecumseh Sherman.” Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, Kansas Commandery. Franklin Hudson Publishing Co. Kansas City, 1906.

Dissertations Perzel, Edward S. “Alexander Long: A Political Study Of A Copperhead Congressman 1816-1886” M.A. thesis, University of Cincinnati, 1962.

151

Appendix Regimental Roster

This alphabetized regimental roster was compiled from the Official Roster of the Soldiers of the State of Ohio in the War of the Rebellion 1861- 1865. The decision to alphabetize the roster was made to allow for easier searches of the 2,700 individual names contained in thirteen company and miscellaneous rosters of the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry Regiment in the Official Record. Several additional points should also be noted. When the remarks column is left empty it reflects a lack of information in the Official Record on an individual trooper . There are double entries for some troopers. The first entry indicates the intial assignment to the Fifth Ohio while a second entry indicates a transfer to a new company within the regiment usually as a consequence of a promotion in rank. In rare cases a trooper left the regiment as a consequence of an injury or fulfilling their enlistment and rejoined the Fifth Ohio at a later date. Sometimes while it appears there is a double entry the second appearance of a name is actually a son , nephew, cousin or uncle. Check out the age column to help clarify whether this might be the case. Initially each cavalry regiment was authorized a band but in the early months of the conflict the Department of War changed the table of organization and the bands were dissolved releasing the men from their commitments though many rejoined in another capacity. Finally the McLaughlin Squadron is mentioned regularly in the remarks column because in the closing months of the Fifth Ohio’s existence in 1865 the McLaughlin Squadron was integrated into the regiment’s ranks as part of Company C.

152

Last Name Adams, Urias Abercrombie, William Abgar, Robert Abraham, John Acerman, Nicholas

Rank Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

Ag e 18 31 20 20

Date of Entrance 2/28/1865 10/3/1861 9/16/1862 3/7/1865

Company Co. I Co. M Co. M Co. H

Remarks mustered out with company 10/30/1865

Pvt.

21

11/4/1862

Co. M

Achey, Jeremiah

farrier

36

9/12/1861

Co. F

Achinson, Thomas Adams, Andrew

Pvt. corporal

17 28

11/27/186 3 2/15/1865

Co. C Co. B

Adams, Charles F.

corporal

19

9/13/1861

Co. H

Adams, Joseph A.

Q.M.S.

20

9/12/1861

Co. F

Affleck, William Agen, John Aker, James W. Albers, Henry Alcorn, William Alden, Samuel C.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

48 21 18 28 23 19

9/23/1861 10/25/186 3 10/21/186 1 3/4/1865 10/9/1861 10/3/1861

Co. C Co. L Co. E Co. L Co. M Co. B

mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 9/30/1864 at Columbus, Oh., by order of War Dept. promoted to Reg. Veterinary Surgeon 11/1/1861; no further record found transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 appointed7/15/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 appointed 5/8/1862; captured 6/9/1863 near Corinth, Miss. , exchanged__; died 8/18/1864 of wounds received same day in action near Canton, Ga. appointed corporal1/21/1863; captured 6/19/1863 in action near Coldwater, Miss.; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., by order of War Dept. mustered out 10/30/1865 discharged 9/9/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 reduced from 1st sgt.1/21/1864 at his own request; mustered out 10/30/1865 at Columbus, Oh. ,on expiration of term of service discharged 9/7/1862 on surgeon's certificate died 8/25/1863 at camp Davis, Miss.

Alexander, Robert Allen, George Allen, Jerome B.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

29 21 20

9/9/1861 9/4/1861 9/20/1861

Co. E Co. K Co. M

153

Allen, Nathaniel Allen, Simeon

Pvt. Pvt.

18 39

3/3/1864 9/16/1861

Co. C Co. M

mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 5/8/1862; mustered out 11/29/1864, on expiration of term of service. mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865 appointed 11/15/1864; captured 11/24/1864 near Milledgeville, Ga.; mustered out 6/9/1865 mustered out 3/4/1865 on expiration of term of service discharged 2/22/1862 at Camp Dennison on a surgeon's certificate discharged 8/15/1862, at Mound City Il. , on surgeon's certificate of disability appointed 9/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 8/19/1865 at Washington D.C. by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865

Allen, William L Allensworth, James Almbs, August

Sgt. Pvt. Pvt. 19 18

8/23/1861 2/28/1865 1/30/1865

Co. H Co. A Co. B

Alsner, Joseph Altman, Edward C.

corporal Pvt.

19 19

2/5/1862 2/28/1862

Co. B Co. L

Anderson, Joseph Anderson, William B. Anderson, William F.

Pvt.

44

9/10/1865

Co. A

Pvt. corporal

19 18

9/23/1861 1/22/1864

Co. L Co. M

Andrews, Malcolm Andrews, William H. Anspaugh, Benjamin

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. 35 19

2/7/1865 2/24/1865 2/18/1865

Co. C Co. G Co. A

Anthony, Edward Anthony, John Anthony, Valntine Appelgate, Oliver P. Appleby, Andrew E.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

22 22 50

2/14/1865 2/15/1865 9/20/1861

Co. D Co. D Co. M

mustered out 6/27/1865 at David's Island, New York Harbor by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 7/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran transferred to Co. H 11/11/1861 transferred from Co. G as farrier 11/11/1861; appointed__; discharged 9/23/1862 at Cincinnati, Oh., by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed____; mustered out 6/22/1865, at Camp Dennison, by order of War Dept.

Q.M.S. farrier

27 28

9/3/1861 9/2/1861

Co. G Co. G

Appleby, Andrew E. Applegate, Israel Applegate, John M.

Sgt. Pvt.

28 32

9/2/1861 3/15/1865

Co. H Co. G

Sgt.

38

9/5/1861

Co. G

154

Applegate, Joseph Archer, William Aril, Peter

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

21 34 19

9/23/1861 2/11/1865 1/30/1865

Co. G Co. M Co. I

Armstrong, Jared E. Armstrong, William T. Armstrong, William T. Armstutz, Frederick Arnold, Richard B.

Pvt. Pvt.

18 22

3/7/1864 9/10/1861

Co. C Co. A

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

26 22

3/31/1864 2/8/1865 10/13/186 1

Co. C Co. A Co. G

discharged 8/6/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out 10/30/165 mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration date of service transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service captured 8/8/1863 in action near Rienzi, Miss.; mustered out 11/29/1864on expiration of term of service drowned 3/1/1864 near Huntsville, Alabama mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration date of service appointed; captured 6/19/1863 near Coldwater, Mississippi;mustered out 11/29/1864 by order of War Dep. appointed; mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dep. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus on expiration of term of service mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept.. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 7/4/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865

Arnold, Samuel Arthur, Benjamin Arthur, Elisha

Sgt. Pvt. Pvt.

21 20 18

9/2/1861 9/16/1861 9/16/1861

Co. G Co. A Co. A

Arthur, Joseph Arthur, Michael Ashman, Martin Ast, William

Sgt. corporal Pvt. Pvt.

22 18 23 18

9/11/1861 2/16/1865 9/26/1864 4/6/1865

Co.A Co.A Co. B Co. F

Atkins, Thomas

Pvt.

47

9/18/1861

Co. D

Auberry, Michael Aue, Harvey Austin, Charles M. Bailey, Eli W. Bailey, George M.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. corporal

36 25 25 38 18

9/19/1862 2/17/1865 1/25/1865 2/21/1865 2/24/1865

Co. K Co. L Co. H Co. G Co. F

155

Bailey, James K. Bain, Edward H. F. Baird, Alexander N.

Pvt.

29

2/10/1865

Co. G

Pvt. corporal

22

9/8/1861 2/1/1862

Co. C Co. M

Baker, Frederick

Pvt.

29

9/16/1861

Co. L

Baker, George W. Baker, James

Pvt. Pvt.

18 21

10/28/186 1 2/4/1865 11/13/186 1

Co. C Co. M

mustered with company 10/30/1865 captured 7/20/1863 near Germantown, Tenn.; died 4/19/1864 near Richmond Va. discharged 5/26/1863 on surgeon's certificate discharged 10/12/1862, at Bolivar Tenn., on surgeon’s certificate captured 4/12/1865; paroled; transferred from McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; absent: no further record; veteran discharged 1/13/1863 at Jackson, Tenn., on surgeon's certificate Discharged 5/22/1865 at David's Island, N.Y. Harbor on surgeon's certificate

Baker, John

Pvt.

35

Co. I

Baker, Lewis Baker, William Balance, William P. Baldwin, George W. Ballard, Daniel

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

19 32

9/12/1862 9/12/1862 9/23/1861

Co. K Co. I Co. H Co. H Co. L

18 30

2/22/1865 10/19/186 3

mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered 10/30/1865 captured 6/19/1863 near Coldwater, Miss.; mustered out 6/21/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. captured 6/19/1863 at Coldwater, Mississippi; mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of terms of service captured 7/26/1864 in action near Cartersville, Ga.; no further record discharged 1/23/1863 on surgeon's certificate; died on 4/1/1863 captured 6/19/1863 in action near Coldwater, Miss., exchanged 9/1/1863; mustered out 11/2/1864 at Chattanooga, Tenn., on expiration of term of service discharged 11/1/1862; discharged 2/22/1862 on Surgeon's certificate

Balser, John C. Banks, Nathan

Wagon er Pvt.

28

9/15/1862 1/25/1862

Co. C Co. L

Barbers, Samuel Bard, Samuel P.

Pvt. Pvt.

23

9/16/1861 10/6/1861 10/11/186 1

Co. A Co. H

Barkley, Nathan

Sgt.

40

Co. L

Barnes, Bradburry

Pvt.

21

9/9/1861

Co. K

Barnes, Ephraim F.

Pvt. musicia n

24

9/12/1861

Co. F

Barnes, George

26

9/4/1861

Band

156

Barnes, Henry

Pvt.

42

8/30/1861

Co. G

Barnes, Simeon B.

Pvt.

26

10/22/186 1

Co. C

Barnes, Uriah Barnett, Edward P. Barnhardt, George Barnhill, William C.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

26 18 22 21

2/8/1865 2/22/1865 3/9/1865 2/6/1865

Co. K Co. E Co. E Co. L

discharged 7/23/1862 on surgeon's certificate transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; no further record; veteran mustered 7/7/1865 at Washington D.C. by order of War dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865 appointed_____; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp, Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. appointed 7/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed7/18/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 captured 12/18/1862 at Lexington, Tenn.,:exchanged____;dischar ged 1/10/1865 at Camp Dennison, on surgeon's certificate mustered out 1/6/1865 at Savannah, Ga., on expiration of term of service transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865; veteran mustered out 7/24/1865 at Philadelphia, Pa., by order of War Dept. captured 6/19/1863 in action near Coldwater, Miss. ;exchanged 9/1/1863; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept. transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out 12/11/1865 by order of War Dept. no further record found

Barr, David M.

Sgt.

31

8/30/1861

Co. G

Bartels, Harmon Bartgos, Daniel A. Bartilmus, Ferdinand

Pvt. corporal corporal

25 19 49

9/20/1862 3/17/1865 2/6/1865

Co. I Co. I Co. F

Bartlesman, William

Pvt.

21

9/30/1862

Co. H

Bartley, Michael Basler, John

Pvt. Pvt.

20 28

1/6/1862 9/15/1862

Co. F Co. G

Batdorf, George Bauchard, Edwin H.

Sgt.

19

11/11/186 1

Co. C

Pvt.

30

9/8/1862

Co. M

Bauman,George

Pvt.

17

9/23/1862

Co. F

Baxter, Samuel Beagle, James

Pvt. Pvt.

17

11/27/186 3 9/16/1861

Co. C Co. M

157

Beasore, Jacob J.

Pvt.

19

10/22/186 1

Co. C

Beatty, Samuel

Sgt.

18

8/23/1862

Co. I

Becht, Jacob Beck, Charles

Sgt. Pvt.

22 29

9/24/1862 2/21/1865 10/29/186 1 9/10/1861 2/22/1865 10/23/186 3 9/7/1861 2/15/1865 9/10/1861 9/10/1861 9/10/1861

Co. M Co. C

transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran appointed 4/22/1865; mustered out 6/22/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. appointed corporal 11/1/1864; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War dept. mustered out 12/9/1865 at Columbus,Oh. , by order of War Dept. mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 11/1/1861; transferred to Co. M 3/1/1862 mustered out 10/30/1865 died 9/14/1862 near Bolivar, Tennessee from Corporal to 2nd Lieutenant 3/10/1864 promoted to Sgt. Major promoted from Sgt. Major 3/10/1864; mustered out 9/9/1864 by order of War Dept. Appointed Sgt.____; promoted to 2nd Lt. 10/29/1864; to 1st Lt. 3/1/1864 but not mustered; discharged 1/_/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 by order of War Dep. appointed 11/1/1861; discharged 7/22/1862 on surgeon's certificate appointed corporal 6/1/1865; Q.M. sgt. 7/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service

Beck, Philip Beck, Randolph Beebout, James L. Beech, Samuel Begle, James Begley, John Behymer, Alonzo Behymer, Barrington Behymer, Barrington Behymer, Barrington

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Sgt. Pvt. Pvt. Ser. Maj. corporal 2nd Lieut.

24 21 19 40 24 21 28 28

Co. C Co. A Co. A Co. L Co. B Co. B Co. A Staff Co. A

28

9/10/1861

Co. L

Behymer, Thomas B. Behymer, Thomas J.

2nd Lieut. Pvt.

22 21

11/13/186 1 9/16/1861

Co. L Co. A

Bell, Archibald

corporal

27

9/25/1861

Co. E

Bell, James T. Bell, Spencer Bennemeyer, William

Q.M.S. Pvt. Pvt.

20

10/8/1862 9/19/1861 3/25/1865

Co. H Co. H Co. F

25

Bennet, James

Pvt.

26

9/26/1861

Co. K

158

Benson, Andrew J. Benson, William Bentley, John H. Bentley, Lemer C.

Sgt. Pvt. Pvt. corporal

39 24 22 28

9/25/1862 9/10/1861 2/18/1865 2/20/1865

Co. M Co. M Co. A Co.A

appointed 6/1/1863; captured 619/1863 in action near Coldwater, Miss. mustered out 10/30/1865 appointed; mustered out 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865 prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. discharged 12/13/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 10/30/1865 appointed mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865; veteran transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; captured near Smithfield, N.C.; no further record mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out to date 9/15/1865 by order of War Dept. mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/26/ at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran discharged 8/24/1865 by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865

Benton, Daniel C.

Pvt.

26

3/30/1864

Co. C

Berkhart, John Berlew, George W. Berry, Caleb Berry, William F. Berry, Zenos A.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Com. Ser. Pvt.

19 38 24 29 17

8/23/1864 9/10/1861 2/8/1865 2/9/1865 2/4/1865

Co. I Co. L Co. A Co. A Co. D

Best, Amos

Farrier

28

10/21/186 1

Co. C

Beveridge, John P. Bevin, John Biehmann, August Biles, Samuel

Pvt. Pvt. Bugler Pvt.

27 20 20 19

8/21/1862 9/17/1861 3/7/1865 2/15/1865

Co. C Co. H Co. I Co. K

Billings, George Billingsley, Isaac Billion, Martin Bingle, James Bingle, William Binkley, John Bird, Andrew

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

41 23 21 29 19 21 37

9/27/1862 2/2/1865 3/29/1865 9/15/1864 9/11/1861 2/9/1865 2/9/1865

Co. E Co. E Co. B Co. C Co. D Co. L Co. H

159

Birtwhistle, William H.

2nd Lieut.

34

9/24/1861 10/17/186 1

Co. K

Bishop, Griffith Y.

Sgt.

24

Co. C

Bishop, Monroy D. Black, Joseph Black, William H. Blackburn, John Blackburn, Mason

1st Sgt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

23 18 20 26 19

9/11/1861 3/13/1865 10/9/1861 3/3/1865 11/8/1861

Co. B Co. H Co. H Co. K Co. L

Blaco, John

Sgt.

37

9/25/1862

Co. M

Blair, John W. Blair, Robert B.

Pvt. Pvt.

28 18

9/12/1861 2/22/1865

Co. F Co. H

Blantz, Frederick Blattenburgh, Horace Blitz, Adolph Blue, Dennis H. Blue, George W. Blue, Peter G.

Pvt. Saddler Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

19 28 20 34 28 35

9/11/1862 3/1/1865 2/7/1865 3/22/1865 3/27/1865 3/27/1865

Co. F Co. E Co. D Co. F Co. F Co. F

Bodman, Isaac

corporal

20

9/23/1861

Co. L

Boehmer, Gottlieb Boeshart, Joseph

Pvt. Pvt.

29 20

9/19/1862 3/6/1865

Co. F Co. I

appointed 1st Sgt 11/1/1861; promoted to 2nd Lieutenant 3/19/1863; to 1st Lieut. 7/25/1864, but not mustered; mustered out 1/30/1865 on expiration of term of service discharged 12/21/1862 at Cincinnati, Oh. on surgeon's certificate. appointed from Q. M. Sgt. 8/15/1862; mustered out 11/29/1864 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 8/10/1863 on surgeon's certificate appointed 11/1/1864; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. discharged 6/17/1863 on surgeon's certificate on surgeon's certificate absent on furlough 8/31/1865; no further record found mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/3/1864 at Chattanooga, Tn., on expiration of term of service also borne on rolls as "Boehm, Gottlieb", transferred 2/20/1864 at camp Alexander, St. Louis, Mo., to Co. G 22nd Reg. Veteran Reserve Corps, from which mustered out 7/3/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh. mustered out with company 10/30/1865

160

Boffing, John

Pvt.

20

9/25/1861

Co. M

Bohan, Daniel Bohrer, Henry Bolander, Andrew J.

Sgt. Pvt. Pvt.

31 27 21

8/31/1861 9/3/1861 12/27/186 1

Co. G Co. B Co. D

Bolander, Isaac D. Bollman, William

corporal Pvt.

24 24

9/11/1861 3/2/1865

Co. D Co. K

Bonar, Isaac L.D. Bonham, James H.

Pvt. Pvt.

26 30

10/22/186 1 2/20/1865

Co. C Co. D

Bonner, Benjamin Borchard, Fredrick Borger, Barney Bouchard, John C.

Pvt. Pvt. Sgt. Bugler

20 18 20 18

2/16/1865 3/18/1865 10/6/1862 9/12/1861

Co. L Co. M Co.A Co. M

Bowe, Rush

Pvt.

18

3/7/1865

Bower, Jacob

Musicia n

19

10/17/186 1 Band 12/11/186 1 10/17/186 1

Co. D discharge d 6/6/1862 by order of War Dept.

mustered out 9/30/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service captured 8/8/1863 in action near Rienzi, Miss. ; mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out 11/29/1864 transferred to the Navy by order of War Dept. mustered out 11/9/1864 at Columbus , Oh. On expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; no further record; veteran mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered 5/26/1865 at New York City, N.Y., by order of War Dept. no further record found appointed; mustered out 10/6/1865 mustered out 10/3/1865 at Camp Dennison mustered out 7/10/1865 at Portsmouth Grove, R.I. by order of War Dept.

Bowers, Frank M. Bowers, Isaac

Pvt. Pvt. 19

Co. G Co. C

Bowers, John W.

Pvt.

19

2/2/1865

Co. D

Bowers,Harrison

corporal

32

1/7/1862

Co. G

Bowersox, John R.

corporal

19

9/11/1861

Co. E

Bower, Jacob mustered out 12/27/1864 at Savannah, Ga.,on expiration of term of service discharged April__1862 at Shiloh, Tenn. mustered out 8/7/1865 at Washington D.C. by order of War Dept. mustered out 7/9/1865 at Camp Chase,Oh. By order of War Dept.; veteran appointed 11/1/1861; mustered out 11/2/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service

161

Bowles, John S. Bowles, John S.

Captain 2nd Lieut.

22 22

9/18/1861 9/18/1861

Co. B Co. D

Bowman, Cyrus Bowmaster, Jasper Boyer, Isaac

Sgt. Pvt. Pvt.

21 28 26

11/14/186 1 9/28/1861 9/16/1861

Co. C Co. L Co. K

promoted to 1st Lieutenant from 2nd Lieutenant Co. D 3/1/1864; to Captain 1/13/1865; to Major 9/4/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 promoted from Sgt. 3/15/1863; to 1st Lieut. Co. B 3/1/1864. transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron, 7/28/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865;veteran

Boyer, Jacob B. Boyes, Thomas

Sgt. corporal

20 43

9/12/1861 12/1/1863

Co. E Co. M

Bracewell, Lewis Braddock, Frank

Sgt. Pvt.

21 22

3/9/1865 9/10/1861

Co. B Co. E

Bradley, Charles Bradley, Daniel Brady, Joseph C.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. 44

12/14/186 1 2/17/1862 9/7/1861

Co. C Co. C Co. G

Braffett, Charles Braffit, Charles

Saddler Sad. Ser.

27 27

9/4/1861 9/4/1861

Co. E Staff

Brannan, John W.

Sgt.

22

10/11/186 1

Co. C

Brannan, Patrick Brannon, John

Pvt. Pvt.

28

9/29/1862 9/12/1861

Co. E Co. G

Brant, Jacob

Pvt.

22

2/1/1862

Co. I

appointed corporal___; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus , Oh. , on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed Corporal 5/1/1865; sgt. 9/5/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 died 5/4/1862 on hospital boat on Tennessee River captured 6/19/1863 near Coldwater, Miss.; mustered out 12/26/1864 on expiration of term of service died 5/17/1862 near Corinth Miss. discharged 3/10/1864 on surgeon's certificate promoted to Regt, saddler sgt. 11/1/1861; returned to company; discharged 8/11/1863 by order of War Dept. from saddler 11/1/1861; transferred to Company E transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865; veteran discharged 5/14/1864 at Camp Dennison, Oh., on surgeon's certificate discharged 3/10/1864 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 2/2/1865 at Twin Sisters Ferry, Ga., on expiration of term of services

162

Brashears, James Brashears, John Brawley, Charles H.

Pvt. Pvt.

19 27

9/19/1864 2/2/1865

Co. D Co. K

mustered out 7/26/1865 at Raleigh N.C. by order of War Dept. mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus on expiration of term of service appointed 11/1/1861; mustered out 11/29/1864, at Columbus , Oh., on expiration of term of service appointed 11/1/1861; killed 5/21/1862 in skirmish near Corinth, Miss. discharged 7/9/1863 at Memphis Tenn., on surgeon's certificate mustered out 10/30/1865 Also borne on rolls as "Bruce"; mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865

Pvt.

19

9/28/1861

Co. E

Brawley, Leander M.

corporal

29

9/15/1861

Co. E

Brawley, Silas M.

Sgt.

18

9/9/1861

Co. E

Brawley, William Brazier, Reason

Pvt. Pvt.

19 18

9/8/1862 3/31/1865 10/14/186 1

Co. C Co. B

Breese, Richard

Pvt.

21

Co. H

Brennen, Rolvin J. Brennen, William Brereton, Timothy Bretz, Theodore Brewer, Jacob

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. corporal

18 22 17 22 20

4/19/1864 9/23/1862 1/17/1865 2/22/1865 9/24/1861

Co. C Co. C Co. H Co. E Co. I

Bridge, Harry Bridges, Clarence W. Bridges, James

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

34 18 44

9/21/1862 10/23/186 2 3/11/1865

Co. F Co. E Co. H

mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 11/13/1861; died 4/17/1862 at Crump's Landing mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept.

Bright, Michael F. Brigman, Elias A.

1st Sgt. Pvt.

36 31

9/11/1861 8/10/1864

Co. D Co. C

Brigman, Elias A. Brim, John Brining, Edward Brinkley, Edward

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

31 31 19 18

8/10/1864 3/27/1865 3/20/1865 9/23/1861

Co. G Co. F Co. H Co. H

mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed from pvt. 4/25/1864; promoted to 2nd Lieut. 9/4/1865 but not mustered; mustered out with company 10/30/1865;veteran transferred to Co. G 7/28/1865 transferred from Co. C 7/28/1865; appointed____; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 died 6/25/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. mustered out 6/9/1865 by order of War Dep. ; veteran

163

Brinkley, Francis Britt, Harvey

Pvt. Pvt. 44

12/25/186 3 2/23/1865

Co. G Co. G

Brobst, John

Pvt.

42

9/11/1861

Co. D

Brock, Thomas Brockman, Benjamin Brockman, Benjamin

corporal B.Q.M. S. Pvt.

20 20 20

9/14/1865 10/8/1861 10/1/1861

Co. F Staff Co. H

Bromstop, Frederick Bromstrop, Frederick

Pvt.

19

9/30/1862

Co. F

Pvt.

19

9/30/1862

Co. H

Broos, Joseph Brower, John

Pvt. Pvt.

26 41

9/17/1861 2/9/1865 11/11/186 3 2/17/1864 2/22/1865 8/24/1864

Co. D Co. M

Brown, Addison Brown, Benjamin J. Brown, Charles Brown, George

Pvt. corporal Pvt. Pvt.

19 21 22 19

Co. K Co. F Co. D Co. G

Brown, Isaac

Pvt.

18

9/16/1864

Co. M

Brown, Robert C. Brown, William

Pvt. Pvt.

21 19

9/12/1862 9/4/1861

Co. M Co. K

mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/9/1864 at Columbus , Oh. On expiration of term of service; reenlisted 2/4/1865 for one year; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 killed 10/6/1862 by accidental pistol shot near Metamora, Miss. from Private 11/1/1861; mustered out 1/21/1864 promoted to Batt. Q.M. Sgt.11/1/1861 transferred from Co. H, 10/31/1863; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. captured 12/18/1862 at Battle of Lexington, Tenn.; transferred to Co. F10/31/1863 transferred to Co. I, 16th Regiment Veteran Reserve Corps___; from which mustered out 10/1/1864 at Harrisburg, Pa. on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. appointed 7/18/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. captured 8/8/1863 near Guntown, Miss., mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dept. at Raleigh N.C.

Brown, William H.

Pvt.

23

8/27/1862

Co. C

164

Brown, William H.

Pvt.

22

1/13/1862

Co. F

Brown, William J. Bruce, Edward Bruce, John Bruce, John B.

Com. Sgt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

29 21 44 44

9/4/1861 2/17/1865 3/2/1865 3/1/1865

Co. K Co. E Co. L Co. B

Bruce, John H. Bruce, Joseph

wagone r Pvt.

20 23

9/20/1861 2/16/1865

Co. F Co. I

Brumbaugh, Calvin Buchanan, James

corporal Pvt.

23 23

9/18/1861 10/5/1861

Co. E Co. K

Budd, George W.

Sgt.

19

10/3/1861

Co. L

Buehler, John Bukey, John A.

Pvt. Pvt.

18

9/18/1862 9/14/1862

Co. F Co. M

Bump,Louis Bunker, Charles Bunkhead, William Bunnell, Andrew J.

Pvt. Pvt.

20 21

9/14/1862 3/10/1865

Co. M Co. K

Pvt. Com. Ser.

18 34

1/4/1865 10/3/1861

Co. K Staff

Bunnell, Andrew J. Bunnell, George W. Burbage, Gilbert Burgett, Matthew Burgett, Matthew

Sgt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

34 36 38 29 29

10/3/1861 2/15/1865 9/23/1861 10/2/1861 10/2/1861

Co. G Co. D Co. L Co. D Co. H

discharged by civil authority 2/27/1862 appointed from Sgt. 2/17/1864; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865 appointed 2/1/1863; mustered out 11/2/1864 at Chattanooga, Tenn. On expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 11/1/1861; discharged12/24/1862 in Columbus, Oh., on surgeon's certificate discharged10/9/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 11/3/1864 at Chattanooga, Tn., on expiration of term of service mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept.. paroled prisoner 4/30/1864; no further record found mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out to date 11/20/1865 at Columbus, Oh., by order of War Dept. from Sergeant 6/27/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864, on expiration of term of service; reenlisted 2/21/1865; promoted to regt. Com. Sgt. 6/27/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/3/1864 on expiration of term of service transferred from Company H; died 6/25/1863 transferred to Co. D

165

Burk, Angelo Burk, James

Pvt. Pvt.

29 21

9/10/1861 2/25/1865

Co. A Co. A

mustered out 10/30/1865 captured 6/9/1863 in action near Coldwater, Miss.; mustered out 11/9/1864 at Columbus, Oh. On expiration of term of service; re-enlisted 1/30/1865 for 1 year mustered out 10/30/1865 discharged 5/10/1862 on surgeon's certificate appointed 11/9/1861 appointed 5/2/1865; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept. died 8/7/1862 near Corinth, Miss. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 accidentally drowned 3/1/1864 near Huntsville, Alabama discharged 8/27/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus , Oh., on expiration of term of service appointed 5/1/1862; mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dept. at Raleigh N.C. mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh N.C. by order of War Dept. also carried on rolls as Joseph W. Bussle; mustered out 10/30/1865 discharged 12/2/1862 at Columbus, Oh., on surgeon's certificate discharged 12/2/1862 at Columbus, Oh., on surgeon's certificate

Burkhardt, Henry Burkhardt, John M. Burlew, Ambrose Burnel, Chauncey L. Burnell, George

Saddler Pvt. Pvt. Sgt. Pvt.

18 23

9/11/1861 3/31/1865 2/28/1862

Co. D Co. B Co. M Co. D Co. D

38 17

9/11/1861 10/4/1861

Burner, Adam Burnett, Lenox Burns, James Burns, James Burns, William Burroughs, Alonzo Burson, David

corporal Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

29 36 30 21 19 20 21

9/13/1862 9/14/1861 9/10/1862 1/21/1865 2/21/1865 9/10/1861 10/16/186 1 10/23/186 1

Co. D Co. K Co. E Co. H Co. G Co. A Co. K

Burson, John W.

Pvt.

28

Co. K

Busam, Joseph Bussell, Erastus S.

corporal

27

10/4/1861

Co. M

Pvt.

19

9/16/1864

Co. C

Bussell, Moses

Pvt.

26

8/28/1862

Co. D

Bussle, Joseph

Pvt.

20

11/3/1864 10/17/186 1 10/17/186 1

Co. B

Butin, Jacob

Pvt.

46

Co. H

Butin, Jesse

Pvt.

16

Co. H

166

Butler, William Buttermore, Jacob Butts, Thomas W. Butz, Wilhelm Byer, John Bystoffer, Jacob Cable, Benjamin Cade, William Cady, John Cahill, John M.

Sgt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

20 40 19 19 25 18 16 18 18 23

2/4/1865 10/12/186 1 10/1/1861 1/30/1864 2/15/1865 2/25/1864 1/22/1864 2/9/1865 2/13/1865 2/13/1865

Co. B Co. H Co. D Co. G Co. E Co. F Co. F Co. M Co. K Co. K

Cain, Edmund K. Caldwell, Thomas W. Calhoun, James Calhoun, Louis Cambell, David A. Cambell, Hugh Cameron, Archibald

Saddler

30

8/28/1862

Co. F

1st Sgt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Sgt.

38

10/4/1861 12/25/186 3 10/3/1861 9/23/1861 2/8/1864

Co. H Co. M Co. M Co. A Co. L

appointed Corporal 7/1/1865; Sgt. 8/15/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 discharged 10/25/1862 on surgeon's certificate discharged 10/13/1861 at Cincinnati, Oh. By civil authority discharged to date 10/30/1865 by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 also borne on rolls as "Kane"; appointed 2/1/1863; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept. appointed from Sgt. 6/12/1863; mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of terms of service

43 18 27

farrier

28

9/24/1861

Co. K

Cameron, Henry Cameron, William A. Campbell, Asa H. Campbell, David W. Campbell, James A.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. corporal

42 23 21 39 23

8/4/1864 9/30/1862 10/16/186 1 2/13/1865 2/11/ 1864

Co. C Co. I Co. K Co. I Co. D

Campbell, Silas

Pvt.

35

9/9/1861

Co. I

discharged 5/13/1863 on surgeon's certificate discharged by civil authority 9/25/1861 appointed___; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dept. at Raleigh N.C. transferred to Co. I 80th O.V.I. 9/18/1864 died 3/21/1862 at crump's Landing, Tn. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed $/16/1864; mustered out with company10/30/1865. discharged 6/16/1862 at St. Louis, Mo., on surgeon's certificate of disability

167

Campbell, Sylvester Campbell, William B. Campbell, William L.

Pvt.

32

3/6/1865 10/10/186 1 9/12/1861

Co. I

Sgt. Pvt.

25 19

Co. I Co. F

Canfield, James Capper, Cornelius Capper, Gabriel Capper, Michael Carberry, Valentine D. Carnes, Samuel Carpenter, John C. Carr, Edward R. Carr, Jacob

Pvt. Pvt. Sgt. Pvt. Pvt. Musicia n Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

35 18 19 26 26 33

9/24/1862 3/1/1865 2/13/1865 2/16/1865 9/23/1861 9/23/1861 2/17/1862 2/21/1865

Co. M Co.A Co. L Co. L Co. L Band Co. K Co. F Co. K

mustered out 6/28/1865 at David's Island, New York Harbor, by order of War Dept. appointed 11/1/1861; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., by order of War Dept. discharged 7/22/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept.. died 4/25/1865 at Raleigh, North Carolina mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged to date 10/7/1865 on expiration of term of service discharged 6/6/1862 by order of War Dept. detailed3/19/1862 on secret service at Crump's Landing mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh N.C. by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10.30/1865 captured 12/18/1862 at Lexington, Tenn.; exchanged 9/1/1863; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. appointed Sgt. 11/1/1862; commissary Sgt.___; mustered 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service died 5/15/1863 at Memphis Tenn. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 captured 12/18/1862 at Lexington, Tenn.: exchanged_____;mustered out with company

18

2/10/1865

Carr, John W. Carroll, James F. Carter, James Cashen, Jeremiah Cass, Jackson B.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

21 22 21 24 34

9/19/1864 2/3/1865 2/6/1865 2/12/1865 9/13/1862

Co. D Co. D Co. A Co. G Co. M

Cass, John B.

Pvt.

34

9/10/1862

Co. F

Castlen, Thomas Catey, Milton J. Cavanaugh, James

Com. Sgt. Pvt. Pvt.

20 23 23

10/3/1861 10/6/1861 2/23/1865

Co. M Co. C Co. E

Ceiving, Christian

Pvt.

21

11/4/1862

Co. H

168

Chaddock, Louis B. Chalmers, James

Sgt. Pvt.

18 18

11/11/186 3 9/7/1861 12/30/186 3 11/8/1861 2/23/1865

Co. K Co. B

Chalpan, John Chamber, Daniel Chambers, David

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

18 38 24

Co. K Co. B Co. K

Childers, John W.

Pvt.

20

8/27/1864

Co. I

Christman, Allen Christman, John D.

Sgt.

18

10/8/1861

Co. F

Pvt.

20

9/12/1861

Co. F

Christman, John W. Christman, John W. Jr. Christopher, Gustav

Sgt. Pvt.

36 24

9/12/1861 9/12/1861

Co. F Co. F

Pvt.

26

9/20/1861

Church, Bayard M. Church, George W. Church, James F. Church, Jonathan Church, Leonidas M.

far Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

26 23 24 24 21

9/10/1861 Co. A 9/10/1861 9/10/1861 9/10/1861 9/10/1861

Co. B mustered out 11/29/186 4 by order of War Dep. Co. A Co. A Co. A Co. A

appointed____; promoted to 2nd Lieutenant 10/30, but not mustered/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 prisoner of war; mustered out 8/28/1865 at Cumberland , Md., by order of War Dept. died 5/1/1862 at Camp Dennison mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. appointed corporal 10/31/1863; Sgt.___; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran died 10/5/1862 of wounds received 10/5/1862in battle of Metamora, Miss. appointed___; promoted to 2nd Lieutenant 3rd Reg. U.S. Colored Heavy Artillery 21/21/1863 from which resigned 1/16/1865 died 9/12/1863 in Preble County, Oh. captured 6/19/1863 in action near Coldwater, Miss.;mustered out 11/29/1864

Claason, Henry Claason, Henry Clapper, John

Pvt. Pvt. corporal

25 25 19

9/10/1861 9/10/1861 2/20/1865

Co. G Co. I Co. I

Church, Bayard M. discharged 5/10/1864 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 11/29/1864 by order of War Dep. mustered out 11/29/1864 by order of War Dep. mustered out 11/29/1864 by order of War Dep. transferred from Co. I; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran transferred to Co. G; veteran appointed 7/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865

169

Clark, Benjamin F. Clark, Claudius Clark, George Clark, Gilbert Clark, John

Pvt. Pvt. Sgt. Pvt. Pvt.

23 21 24 20 22

3/28/1864 9/10/1861 9/20/1861 2/14/1865 9/14/1864

Co. C Co. G Co. C Co. L Co. B

transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed Corporal; mustered out 11/29/1864 mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dep. appointed 6/17/1862; discharged 3/22//1864 on account of wounds received 6/22/1863, in action at Mud Creek appointed 11/1/1861; mustered out 11/29/1864 appointed corporal 9/1/1862; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864

Clark, John Clark, John R.

Com. Sgt. Com. Ser.

22 29

10/4/1861 9/9/1861

Co. H Co. B

Clark, Robert J. Clark,James M. Clayton, David Clayton, John F. Cleckler, Charles Sr.

Com. Sgt Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

23 18 18 19

10/7/1861 2/17/1865 9/9/1861 11/28/186 1

Co. E Co. H Co. B Co. B Co. B

Cleckler, Martin F. Clem, Elias Clem, George W. Clemons, Robert

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

25 17 27 21

8/29/1862 10/6/1861 10/8/1861 9/13/1861

Co. C Co. M Co. M Co. B

Clevenger, Asa

Pvt.

9/21/1861

Co. H

Cliff, James R.

Pvt.

18

4/11/1864

Co. C

Cline, Eli

Pvt.

19

10/22/186 1

Co. C

Clockenbrink, Charles

Pvt.

24

9/30/1862

Co. F

no further record mustered out 6/16/1865 near Chattanooga Tenn. by order of War Dept. died 6/10/1863 near Bolivar, Tn. discharged 8/8/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 11/29/1864 discharged 11/18/1861 at Cincinnati, Oh., by civil authority transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; on detached duty; no further record transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran transferred from Co. H 10/30/1863; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept.

170

Clockenbrink, Charles Clouse, Jacob H. Clouse, Peter M. Clovin, John Clum, David

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

24 21 18 32 18

9/30/1862 9/24/1861 9/24/1861 10/22/186 1 2/17/1865

Co. H Co. D Co. D Co. D Co. A

transferred to Co. F 10/30/1865 discharged 2/18/1862 by civil authority

Coates, Erastus P. Coates, Frank M.

Captain Sgt.

22 28

10/12/186 1 2/28/1865

Co. C Co. K

Cochran, James M. Coffin, Joseph

Pvt. Pvt.

18 18

3/2/1864 1/28/1865

Co. C Co. L

Cohen, John G. Cohen, John G.

farrier Vet. Surg.

35 35

9/25/1861 9/25/1861

Co. F Staff

Colby, Isaiah Cole, William Coleman, John Coleman, Nathaniel

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

21 29 20 44

2/8/1862 2/10/1865 8/29/1862 9/28/1862

Co. K Co. H Co. A Co. A

Collins, Edward Collins, James Collins, James Collins, Matthew

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

21 28 39 32

2/8/1862 9/18/1861 3/2/1865 1/28/1865

Co. K Co. B Co. I Co. C

Collins, Matthew Collins, Samuel

Pvt. Pvt.

34 22

1/28/1865 9/27/1861

Co. G Co. B

mustered out 10/7/1865 by order of War Dep. transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865 as 1st Lieutenant; promoted to Captain 9/4/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 appointed_____; mustered out with company 10/30/1865. transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 promoted to Reg. Veterinary Surgeon 11/1/1861; returned to company; discharged 9/24/1862 on surgeon's certificate from Farrier 11/1/1861; transferred to Company F mustered out 3/14/1865 at Fayetteville, N.C., on expiration of term of service absent on furlough 10/30/1865; no further record found mustered out 6/14/1862 by order of War Dep. mustered out 5/24/1865 by order of War Dep. prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. died 8/14/1864 at Cartersville, Ga. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred to Co. G 7/28/1865 transferred from Co. C 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864

171

Collins, William

Pvt.

41

9/6/1861 10/20/186 1

Co. C

Collins, William

Pvt.

18

Co. F

Colly, John Colville, William H. Conaway, James M. Conden, Daniel Condo, George Condren, Patrick Conlin, John Connegan, Henry Connelly, Michael Conners, Patrick

Pvt.

23

10/9/1861

Co. K

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Farrier Pvt. Cook Saddler Pvt.

21 27 18 18 19 24 28 30 18

9/12/1861 9/10/1861 3/7/1865 2/17/1865 9/4/1861 1/31/1865 5/1/1864 9/11/1861 2/18/1865

Co. F Co. E Co. F Co. M Co. C Co. G Co. B Co. G Co. E

Connor, John

Sgt.

20

9/11/1861 10/20/186 1 3/1/1865 9/12/1861 10/9/1861 9/10/1861

Co. C

Connor, Newell M. Conrad, Philip Conrade, John N. Conrey, Stephen C. Conroy, George N.

Sgt. Pvt. Pvt. Q.M.S. Sgt.

20 25 22 29 18

Co. M Co. A Co. M Co. L Co.A

mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., by order of War Dept. mustered out 11/21/1864 at Chattanooga, Tenn., on expiration of term of service died 12/31/1864 at Rome, Ga., of wounds received in action 10/5/1864 at Allatoona Georgia mustered out 11/2/1864 at Chattanooga, Tenn, on expiration of term of service died 8/14/1862 at Delisle, Darke County, Oh. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration date of service mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service African-Am. under-cook mustered out 10/30/1865 discharged 10/30/1865 by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., by order of War Dept. transferred to Gunboat Service 2/28/1862 by order of War Dept. mustered out 10/30/1865 died 2/16/1864 promoted from Regt. Com. Sgt., 2/19/1864

Cook, Ebenezer T Cook, Edwin D. Cook, Jacob Cook, Jacob Cook, Michael Cook, Nathan

Sgt. corporal Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

20 21 23 25 20 16

9/24/1861 2/22/1865 9/15/1862 9/17/1861 7/3/1863 9/16/1861

Co. I Co.A Co. B Co. L Co. G Co. A

appointed____; discharged 4/9/1863 at Columbus, Oh., on surgeon's certificate of disability appointed 3/2/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dep. mustered out 11/3/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out 11/29/1864 by order of War dep.

172

Cook, Sidney

Pvt.

20

9/10/1861

Co. A

Cook, Thomas Coombs, Tunis Cooper, Charles B. Cooper, Charles B.

Pvt. corporal Major Captain

25 27 28 28

10/1/1864 9/19/1861 9/12/1861 9/12/1861

Co. G Co. L Staff Co. F

Cooper, Elijah Cooper, Samuel W/ Cooper, Thomas P.

Pvt.

19

8/28/1862

Co. D

Pvt. Pvt.

18 25

9/14/1864 9/12/1861

Co. D Co. F

Corbett, Michael Corto, Francis Costello, Michael Cotman, Henry

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

21 32 22 20

9/24/1862 9/18/1861 3/10/1865 10/24/186 1

Co. F Co. B Co. H Co. H

Couran, Oran A. Courey, Stephen C. Courtney, Cornelius Covert, John Covert, John Cowan, Edward C.

Q. M.S. Com. Ser. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

19 29

9/15/1861 10/9/1861 12/18/186 1 9/17/1861 2/14/1865 12/17/186 1

Co. C Staff Co. M Co. L Co. M Co. G

30 19

Cowan, Willard

Pvt.

18

3/7/1864

Co. C

Cowen, Ross R.

2nd Lieut.

22

9/19/1861

Co. C

Cox, Francis

Pvt.

9/24/1862

Co. F

discharged 5/24/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 6/20/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. discharged 3/27/1862, on surgeon's certificate Captain to Major 3/1/1864; Resigned 9/21/1864 promoted from 1st Lieutenant 12/19/1862; to major 3/1/1864 mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C by order of War Dept. mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C by order of War Dept. discharged 2/14/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. discharged 3/5/181863 on surgeon's certificate of disability mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 6/12/1862 at Yellow Springs, Oh., on surgeon's certificate of disability from Sergeant 2/19/1864; mustered out 11/9/1864 discharged 4/10/1863 on surgeon's certificate Left at La Grange, Tn., no further record found mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 5/4/1865 by order of War Dept. transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept.

173

Cox, James Cox, John

Pvt. Pvt.

35 25

3/2/1865 2/13/1865

Co. I Co. K

Cox, Joseph Craig, James

1st Sgt. Pvt.

22 20

8/30/1862 2/21/1865

Co. I Co. K

Craig, James E.

Pvt. Bat. Adj't.

25

3/11/1864

Co. C

Craig, John E.

22

9/20/1861

Staff

Craig, John E. Craig, John E.

1st Lieut. Pvt.

22 22

2/25/1865 9/20/1861

Co. D Co. M

Craig, John H

Pvt.

25

10/1/1861

Co. K

Cramer, Henry C.

Pvt.

19

9/17/1861

Co. L

Cramer, John

Pvt.

27

2/18/1864

Co. C

Crane, George G. Crane, Jacob M. Crane, John

1st Sgt. Pvt. Pvt.

22 21 50

9/10/1861 9/25/1861 9/11/1861

Co.A Co. G Co. G

Crapo, Henry H.

R.C.S.

22

9/18/1861

Staff

Crapo, Henry H. Crapo, John

Captain Pvt. Bat. Q.M.

22 22

9/18/1861 9/18/1861

Co. I Co. C

Crapsey, Edward

24

11/1/1861

Staff

mustered with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 4/22/1865; mustered 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; absent private to Battalion Adjutant11/1/1861;discharged 8/25/1862 by order of War Dep. promoted from pvt. 4/8/1865; to capatin10/25/1865 but not mustered; mustered out with company promoted to Batt. Adj. 11/1/1861 mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus , Oh., on expiration of term of service wounded___; mustered out 6/30/1865 by order of War Dept. transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed Corporal; to 1st Sgt. 6/22/1863; mustered out 11/29 /1864 by order of War Dep. mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service discharged 7/23/1862 on surgeon's certificate from private 11/1/1863; to 2nd Lieutenant 2/18/1864; to 1st Lieutenant 12/12/1864; to Captain 1/13/1865 promoted from 1st Lieutenant and Regt. Commisary 1/13/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 promoted to Regt. Co. Sgt. 11/1/1861 appointed Battalion Quarter Master 11/1/1861;missing since 12/31/1861

174

Crawford, James R.

Pvt.

26

9/11/1861

Co. D

Crawford, Thomas Crawford, William H. Crawley, Charles H. Crawley, Charles H. Crickenberger, Daniel

Sgt. Pvt. Pvt.

19 18 18

9/24/1861 2/16/1865 9/9/1861

Co. C Co. M Co. B

killed accidentally 3/29/1864 while at home on veteran furlough; veteran mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred to Co. M 11/9/1861 transferred to Company b 11/9/1861; died 1/10/1864 at Camp Dennison mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus , Oh., on expiration of term of service appointed 6/15/1865; mustered out 10/30/ 1865 mustered out 8/1/1865 at Camp Dennison; veteran mustered out with company 10/30/1865 prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/1865 by order of War Dep. At Columbus , Oh. By order of War Dept.; veteran discharged 6/30/1862 at St. Louis, Mo., on surgeon's certificate as William Crusan mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., by order of War Dept.

Pvt.

18

9/9/1861

Co. M

Pvt.

20

9/10/1861

Co. E

Crippen, Lemuel Crist, Abraham Crist, Benjamin Croger, Charles Croker, Thomas

Pvt. corporal Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

18 21 22

9/4/1861 2/20/1865 9/19/1861 1/4/1862 2/23/1865

Co. K Co. B Co. B Co. F Co. E

21

Cronan, John

Pvt.

30

9/18/1861

Co. E

Crossan, William

Pvt.

32

9/29/1861

Co. I

Crossett, Aaron F. Crotty, Michael Crowell, William H.

Saddler Pvt. Pvt.

35

9/25/1861 2/7/1862 2/20/1865

Co. C Co. K Co. G

25

Cruzen, Andrew

Pvt.

21

9/5/1861

Co. C

Cryer, Thomas Cryer, Thomas

R.C.S. Pvt.

22 22

9/3/1861 9/3/1861

Staff Co. B

Cryer, Thomas

Pvt.

22

9/3/1861

Co. G

mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., by order of War Dept. from private 3/4/1863; discharged 10/31/1863 by order of War Dep. transferred to Co. G 12/1/1861 transferred form Co. B 12/1/1861; promoted to 2nd Lieutenant and Regt. Commissary of Subsistence 3/4/1863

175

Cuert, Samuel Cullins, Thomas H. Cullum, Squire L.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

36 21 34

9/12/1861 9/18/1861 9/30/1861

Co. F Co. E Co. F

Culluns, William

Pvt.

24

9/26/1861

Co. E

Culver, David Cummings, John R.

Captain

39

9/10/1861 10/18/186 1

Co. F

Pvt.

21

Co. D

Cummings, John R. Cundiff, John Cunningham, Frank Cunningham, Frank Cunningham, Israel D. Cunningham, Peter

Pvt. teamste r

21 31

10/18/186 1 9/10/1861 12/14/186 1 12/14/186 1 2/22/1865 9/20/1862

Co. G Co. L

Sgt. Sgt. Pvt. Pvt.

19 19 19 29

Co. A Co. C Co. B Co. F

discharged 9/5/1862 on surgeon's certificate died 5/10/1862 on hospital boat near St. Louis, Mo. transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps 5/1/1864 mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus , Oh., on expiration of term of service appointed Q.M. Sgt. 11/6/1861; promoted to 1st Lieutenant 2/1/1862; to captain 5/9/1864; mustered out 11/1/1864 on expiration of term of service transferred from Co. G 8/26/1862; discharged---; by order of War Dept. transferred from Co. D 8/18/1862; discharged 9/12/1863 by order of War Dept. mustered out 10/27/1864 on expiration of term of service transferred from Co.C ; mustered out with Company 10/30/1865 appointed 1/1/1864; transferred to Co. A; veteran mustered out 10/30/1865 captured 6/19/1863 in action near Coldwater, Miss. mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service died 1/12/1864 at Memphis, Tenn. discharged 8/2/1865 at Camp Cleveland on surgeon's certificate of disability discharged 6/25/1862, on surgeon's certificate prisoner of war; mustered out 6/14/1865, at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 8/13/1863 on surgeon's certificate Captain to Major 9/4/1865;mustered out 10/30/1865

Curry, Michael Curtis, John G. Curwood, James M. Cushing, Gilbert W. Dagler, George W. Dailey, Patrick Dale, Thomas

Pvt. Captain

21 39

9/21/1861 8/10/1861

Co. I Co. G

Pvt. Bugler

24 34

3/29/1865 10/5/1861

Co. B Co. H

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

28 29 31

2/14/1864 2/23/1865 9/18/1861 11/19/186 1

Co. G Co. E Co. B

Dalzell, John

Major

38

Staff

176

Dalzell, John Daugherty, George Daugherty, John Daugherty, Ulysses Daum, Mathias David, Daniel Davidson, John Davis, Aaron

Captain corporal Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Bat. S.M. Pvt.

38 18 18 20 28 40 30 19

11/19/186 1 9/23/1861 9/23/1861 10/1/1861 6/26/1865 9/2/1861 1/26/1864 9/16/1861

Co. C Co. L Co. L Co. L Co. L Co. G Co. G Co. D

transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; promoted to Major 9/4/1865 mustered out to date 7/30/1862 by order of War Dept. mustered 11/3/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out 11/3/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 12/5/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out with company 10/30/1865 from private 11/11861; mustered out 1/10/1863 by order of War Dep. died 1/5/1862 appointed 5/1/1865; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept. transferred from McLaughlin Squadron 6/28/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service appointed1/1/1864; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. killed 9/18/1863 in ambush near Camp Davis, Miss. discharged 6/16/1862 on surgeon's certificate discharged 8/18/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service promoted to 1st Lieutenant from 1st Sgt. Co. H 4/8/1865; to captain 9/4/1965; mustered out with Co. 10/30/1865; veteran appointed Sgt. From corporal 5/8/1863; 1st Sgt. ___; promoted to 1st Lieutenant co. g to date 4/1/1865

Davis, Abner F. Davis, Charles H.

23 __

10/8/1861 9/11/1861

Staff Co. D

Davis, Evan W.

farrier

25

8/30/1862

Co. H

Davis, Frank M. Davis, Franklin T. Davis, John

1st Sgt. Pvt. Pvt.

20 34 22

11/4/1861 2/12/1865 10/8/1861

Co. C Co. G Co. H

Davis, John D. Davis, Oliver Davis, Oscar T. Davis, Samuel W. Davis, Silas

farrier Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

25 36 20

9/2/1862 9/9/1862 9/10/1861 9/9/1861

Co. H Co. B Co. A Co. H Co. H

18

10/3/1861

Davis, William J.

Captain

20

9/20/1861

Co. G

Davis, William J.

1st Sgt.

20

10/20/186 1

Co. H

177

Davis, Zadoc

Pvt.

24

9/6/1861

Co. G

Day, Alpheus

Pvt.

22

9/29/1864

Co. K

Dean, Josiah B. Dean, Peter Decamp, George Decker, Jacob Decker, John

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Saddler Pvt.

22 30

9/15/1862 9/10/1861 1/13/1862 3/2/1865 9/6/1861

Co. H Co. A Co. F Co. F Co. M

mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service discharged 5/9/1865 at Columbus , Oh., on account of wounds received in action captured 12/18/1862 at Battle of Lexington, Tenn.; exchanged___; died 6/26/1864 mustered out 11/29/1864 by order of War dep. appointed____; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed; mustered out 10/3/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out 10/30/1865 captured 12/18/1862 at Lexington, Tenn.; exchanged 9/1/1863; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 11/8/1864 on expiration of term of service appointed 11/1/1861; to 2nd Lieutenant 6/22/1862 promoted from Sgt. Major 6/22/1862; to 1st Lieutenant 2/18/1864 but not mustered; discharged 7/5/1864 by order of War Dept. discharged 11/18/1861 at Cincinnati, Oh., by civil authority mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service died 7/7/1862 at Springfield Oh. promoted from Com. Sgt. Co. H 4/8/1865; transferred to Co. H 8/2/1865 appointed corporal 2/1/1863; com sgt. __; promoted to 1st Lieutenant 3/8/1864; to captain 9/4/1865, but not mustered; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran mustered out with company 10/30/1865

18 19

Dee, John Deevers, Stephen A.

Sgt. Pvt.

22 23

9/26/1861 2/14/1865

Co. C Co. A

Delaney, Martin

Pvt.

25

9/11/1862

Co. F

Demaris, Elias Dempster, William D.

Pvt. Ser. Maj.

23 30

10/4/1861 9/7/1861

Co. L Staff

Dempster, William D.

2nd Lieut.

30

9/7/1861

Co. G

Dennis, O.F. Dennis, William W. Dennison, James

Pvt. wagone r Pvt. 1st Lieut.

9/2/1861

Co. H

20

10/5/1861 12/7/1861

Co. K Co. C

Denny, Edward D.

21

2/7/1862

Co. C

Denny, Edward D. Denny, Samuel T.

1st Lieut. Pvt.

21 19

2/7/1862 3/4/1865

Co. H Co. M

178

Depair, Augustus

Pvt.

22

11/1/1861

Co. B

Devlin, John Dickerson, John Dickerson, John Dickey, John H. Dickman, Joseph

Pvt. corporal Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

19 51 43 18 22

9/15/1861 2/7/1865 9/10/1861 10/15/186 3 10/5/1861

Co. C Co.. L Co. L Co. L Co. C

Diggs, James

Pvt.

36

9/20/1864

Co. C

Digman, Patrick Dill, E.F. Dimmick, George W. Dimmick, George W.

Pvt. Pvt. Vet. Surg.

44 19 24

9/3/1861 10/2/1861 9/20/1861

Co. H Co. G Staff

Pvt.

24

9/20/1861

Co. K

Dine, Squire Disborough, Louis

saddler Pvt.

37 21

9/13/1865 8/27/1862 10/17/186 1

Co. I Co. H

Dish, John

corporal

20

Co. I

Disher, George Dively, Mathias Dixon, Thomas Dobbins, Thomas Dodd, William C.

Pvt. Pvt. Sgt. Pvt. Pvt.

27 28 22 55 18

9/10/1861 2/23/1865 12/11/186 3 9/22/1861 3/3/1865

Co. E Co. L Co. E Co. H Co. F

mustered out 11/29/1864 captured 6/19/1863 near Coldwater Miss.; mustered out 11/29/1864 near Columbus Oh. by order of War Dept. appointed____; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/3/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 died 4/2/1862 at Pittsburgh Landing Tenn. mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh N.C. by order of War Dept. prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. died on or about 6/10/1862 at St. Louis, Missouri from Sergeant 11/1/1861; transferred to Company F promoted to Veterinary Surgeon 11 1/1861; returned to company___. appointed 11/13/1861; discharged 12/4/1862 at Corinth, Miss., on surgeon's certificate mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed___; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service discharged 2/4/1862 at Camp Dennison on surgeon's certificate mustered out 10/30/1865 appointed___; mustered out with company 10/30/1865.

Dodds, William D. Doerer, Joseph Dolan, James Dolle, Daniel

Sgt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

21

2/18/1865 10/23/186 1 10/4/1861 3/7/1865

Co. K Co. H Co. H Co. D

appointed from pvt. 10/12/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 sent to hospital 6/25/1862 mustered out with company 10/30/1865

22

179

Donahue, Edward H. Donham, John

Pvt. Pvt.

24 34

2/12/1865 10/1/1861

Co. F Co. L

Donley, John

Pvt.

28

2/21/1864

Co. K

Donley, Marion Donnell, James Dooley, James

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

19 48

1/4/1864 10/29/186 1 10/4/1861

Co. K Co. K Co. H

mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/3/1864 on expiration of term of service prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. paroled prisoner of war 4/29/1865 at Memphis, Tn.; no further record

Doran, James Dorman, Christopher Dorman, Henry Doty, Jathro Doughty, David W. Doughty, William L. Douglas, George Douglas, William Downing, Robert Doyle, Thomas D.

Bugler

21

8/27/1861

Co. G

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. corporal Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

21 18 42 18 28 19 18 42 43

1/10/1862 9/24/1861 10/27/186 4 10/3/1861 9/18/1861 2/20/1865 3/3/1865 11/9/1862 9/19/1861

Co. D Co. D Co. G Co. B Co. A Co. K Co. K Co. D Co. B

discharged 12/18/1862 at Cincinnati, Oh., on surgeon's certificate prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/1865 by order of War Dep.at Camp Chase, Oh. discharged 10/19/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 10/31/1861; mustered out 11/29/1864 discharged by civil authority 10/6/1861 mustered out with company 10/30/1865

Doyle, Thomas D. Draper, George A.

Pvt. Pvt.

43 21

9/19/1861 2/2/1862

Co. M Co. A

Driscol, Cornelius

Pvt.

37

8/29/1861

Co. I

Drum, Andrew B. Dudley, William Duffy, John Duffy, Martin Duminell, James M. Dunbar, Daniel D.

Sgt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

23 18 30 15 23

2/171862 2/14/1865 3/1/1865 2/14/1865 10/31/186 1 9/11/1862

Co. C Co. A Co. E Co. A Co. M Co. I

transferred to Co. M 1/1/1862 transferred from Company b 1/1/1862; killed 1/15/1862 near Milford, Oh. mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dep. mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept.. appointed; discharged 5/7/1863 at Memphis, Tn. on surgeon's certificate. mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865 discharged 10/11/1862 on surgeon's certificate

180

Duncan, Patrick Dunlap, Robert B.

Pvt. Pvt.

21 35

9/11/1861 8/29/1862

Co. K Co. A

Dunn, Benjamin Dunwoody, Loami R. Dunwoody, Samuel Dusenbury, William A Dye, Wilford M. Dye, William A

Pvt.

18

6/27/1863

Co. C

Sgt. Bugler Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

26 22 18 20 37

9/20/1861 9/8/1861 3/17/1865 9/10/1861 2/22/1865

Co. I Co. I Co. H Co.A Co. L

prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. mustered out 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed____; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service

mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed corporal 9/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865

Dyer, William Eaby, Andrew J. Earhart, Benjamin

Sgt. Pvt. Pvt.

29 27 19

12/4/1863 1/4/1864 10/23/186 1

Co. M Co. G Co.A

Earhart, Levitt T.

2nd Lieut.

21

9/10/1861 10/17/186 1 10/17/186 1 10/3/1861 3/14/1865

Co. A

Eberhart, George

corporal

18

Co. I

Eberhart, John Eberle, Edmund Eberly, Peter

Pvt. corporal Pvt.

24 29 19

Co. I Co. G Co. K

Echman, Peter L. Echman,William

Pvt. Musicia n

38 13

8/28/1862 9/11/1861

Co. D Band

Eckhardt, Peter

Sgt.

25

9/2/1861 10/14/186 1

Co. B

Eckstein, Michael

Pvt.

46

Co. H

mustered out 11/29/1864 appointed Sergeant 11/2/1861; to 2nd Lieutenant 6/1/1863; to 1st Lieutenant 10/12/1864; mustered out 1/28/1865 appointed____; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out 11/29/1864, on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C by order of War Dept. discharged 6/6/1862 by order of War Dept. captured 6/19/1863 in action near Coldwater, Mississippi;appointed Sgt. From Corporal 7/1/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 discharged 9/3/1862 at Columbus, Oh., on surgeon's certificate

181

Edmonds, David D.

Sgt.

33

11/4/1861 10/14/186 1 2/17/1865 3/21/1865

Co. C

Edwards, David J. Edwards, George W. Edwards, Jenkin Eichelberger, Peter Eicher, Henry

1st Sgt. Pvt. Pvt.

22 24 24

Co. H Co. D Co. D

transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron, 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed from pvt.___; mustered out with company 10/30/1865

Sgt. Pvt.

19 19

8/8/1862 3/4/1865

Co. B Co. I

Eikenberry, Henry Eiser, Berthold

Pvt. Pvt.

18 29

2/14/1865 2/14/1865

Co. K Co. I

Eliasson, David A.

Pvt.

26

9/4/1861

Co. E

Ellenberger, James

Pvt.

20

3/30/1864

Co. C

Ellenberger, John

Pvt.

23

11/4/1861 10/23/186 1

Co. C

Elliot, George W.

Sgt.

18

Co. G

Elliot, John Elliot, William H.

corporal Pvt.

19 23

9/9/1861 2/2/1865 11/25/186 2 2/10/1865

Co. G Co. D

Ellis, Jeremiah Ellis, Samuel

Pvt. corporal

22 26

Co. B Co. L

mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed from Corporal 11/15/1864; mustered out 9/4/1865 discharged 6/10/1865 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 7/18/1865 at Columbus, Oh., by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran appointed from Corporal 7/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran captured 4/6/1865 near Faison's Depot, N.C.; mustered out 7/28/1865; veteran mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. G, 7th O.V.C., 7/27/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 discharged 5/29/1862 at Pittsburgh Landing, Tn., on surgeon's certificate appointed; promoted to 2nd Lieutenant 9/4/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/9/1865 by order of War Dep.

Elter, Christian

Pvt.

28

9/30/1861

Co. I

Ely, Benjamin F. Embodey, John W.

Sgt. Pvt.

21 37

9/16/1861 9/23/1862

Co. A Co. A

182

Emerson, Matthew C. Emerson, William

Pvt. Pvt.

19 32

9/12/1861 9/19/1861

Co. F Co. K

Emery, Edwin D. Emich, Benedict Enders, Adam

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

20 24 18

3/30/1865 1/23/1865 9/21/1861

Co. B Co. L Co. M

English, Josiah G. Enochs, Lewis E.D. Eppert, Frederick Eppert, William R.

Pvt. Pvt. Wagon er Pvt.

29 34 28 25

9/4/1862 9/25/1861 10/28/186 1 9/23/1861

Co. H Co. E Co. D Co. L

mustered out 11/2/1864 at Chattanooga, Tenn, on expiration of term of service died 10/19/1862 at Corinth, Miss. absent, sick at muster out of company; no further record found mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 8/4/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 8/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. died 4/28/1862 on hospital boat on Tennessee River died 5/25/1862 at Corinth, Miss. mustered 11/3/1864 on expiration of term of service captured 6/19/1863 near Coldwater , Mississippi; discharged 8/22/1865 by order of War Dep. mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out to date 9/15/1865 by order of War Dept. appointed___; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran appointed___; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran captured 12/18/1862 at Battle of Lexington, Tenn., :exchanged___; appointed 5/1/1865; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865; veteran resigned 10/29/1862 mustered out with company 10/30/1865

Estelle, Clark Evans, John Evans, John D.

corporal Pvt. Pvt.

29 18 20

9/10/1861 9/21/1861 2/16/1865

Co.A Co. M Co. K

Evans, John J.

Sgt.

23

2/4/1862

Co. H

Evans, John O

Sgt.

22

2/4/1862

Co. H

Evans, Rees H. Evans, William C. Evans, William G.

corporal corporal Pvt.

18 16

8/24/1862 10/8/1861 10/4/1861

Co. H Co. H Co. H

Everly, Thomas Fagaly, William H. Fagley, Benjamin Fairman, John H.

Bugler Captain Pvt. Pvt.

21 26 25 20

11/8/1861 10/3/1861 2/17/1865 9/16/1861

Co. C Co. L Co. K Co. M

183

Faninger, Solomon

Musicia n

27

9/16/1861

Band

Fanning, Thomas W. Faulhaber, leopold Feasold, Henry Fechner, Franklin L. Fechner, Samuel Fechner, St. Clair

Q.M.S.

9/19/1861 10/10/186 1 9/10/1862 9/12/1861 10/19/186 1 9/12/1861

Co. H

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

18 29 20 20 18

Co. E Co. B Co. K Co. K Co. K

discharged 6/6/1862 by order of War Dept. appointed___; discharged 12/22/1862 at Cincinnati, Oh., on surgeon's certificate of disability prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh. By order of War Dept. mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dep.

Fehr, Nicholas Fenerstine, Nicholas

Pvt.

18

8/9/1862 10/12/186 4

Co. F

Pvt.

17

Co. L

Fenton, James Fergenbaum, Henry

Pvt. Pvt.

24 18

9/27/1862 3/8/1865

Co. H Co. L

Ferrell,William Fethcoether, William Fields, John Fike, George Finch, Henry A. Finch, Luther

Sgt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

27 30 35 33 20 35

9/27/1861 9/12/1862 9/12/1861 1/30/1865 2/14/1865 2/21/1865

Co. K Co. M Co. B Co. F Co. E Co. E

discharged 6/1/1863 for wounds received in action captured 12/18/1862 at Lexington, Tenn.; exchanged 9/1/1863; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. mustered out 10/20/1865 at Salisbury, N.C., on expiration of term of service mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. mustered with the company 10/30/1865 appointed 11/14/1861; mustered out 11/19/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept. died 8/27/1862 at Memphis, Tn. mustered out with company 10/30/1865

Finley, John S.

Pvt.

58

9/2/1861 10/12/186 4

Co. C

Finnegan, John

Pvt.

21

Co. C

Fippin, Joseph H. Firestone, Perry

Pvt. Pvt.

36 19

9/13/1862 3/20/1865

Co. B Co. B

discharged 7/31/1862 at Camp Dennison on a surgeon's certificate mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh N.C. by order of War Dept. captured and paroled 12/18/1862 at Battle of Lexington; absent 6/13/1863 mustered out 10/30/1865

184

Fisher, Edward C.

Q.M.S.

21

3/9/1865

Co. B

Fisher, Marion Fisher, Simon

corporal Pvt. Com. Sgt. Pvt. Saddler Pvt. Pvt.

18 19

9/17/1861 10/4/1861 12/30/186 3 2/22/1864 9/16/1861 9/23/1861 3/3/1865

Co. I Co. C

Fisher, William R. Fisk, Fayette Fisk, Franklin L. Fithen, David Fitzwater, Oran T.

34 18 24 24 18

Co. K Co. D Co. A Co. A Co. D

Flagg, Daniel

Pvt.

40

9/19/1861

Co. K

Flege, John Fleming, Aaron Fleming, David E. Fleming, Hawley H. Fleming, William T. Flemm, Joseph Fletcher, Charles Fletcher, Smith

farrier Pvt. Pvt.

32 18 42

9/25/1861 3/10/1865 9/13/1861

Co. G Co. A Co. G

Saddler Pvt. corporal Pvt. Bugler

22 18 21 24 18

9/18/1861 2/14/1865 2/4/1864 3/23/1865 9/13/1861

Co. E Co. E Co. M Co. D Co. B

Fletcher, William Flinn, John

Pvt. Pvt.

22

3/1/1865 9/30/1862

Co. M Co. H

Flogail, Frederick

Pvt.

34

9/26/1864

Co. D

Flora, Leonidas

Pvt.

18

9/23/1863

Co. M

Floro, Hiram W. Floyd, Michael

Pvt. Pvt.

40 44

9/10/1861 9/12/1861

Co. A Co. E

appointed Q.M. Sgt 10/15/1865;mustered out 10/30/ 1865 appointed____; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service died___ 1862 at Cincinnati, Oh. appointed from corporal 6/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 by order of War Dep. mustered out11/29/1864 on order of War Dep. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service appointed____; mustered out 11/29/1864, on expiration of term of service mustered out 10/30/1865 died 4/10/1862 at Shiloh, Tenn. discharged 4/5/1862 at Crump's Landing, Tenn., on surgeon's certificate. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 9/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 10/19/1862 on surgeon's certificate of disability discharged 10/9/1865 at Morgantown, N.C., on surgeon's certificate never joined company mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh N.C. by order of War Dept. mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. discharged 3/28/1863 at Memphis on surgeon's certificate discharged 6/14/1863 on surgeon's certificate

185

Fogelman, William C.

1st Sgt.

18

3/30/1865

Co. B

Foley, Thomas Folger, Louis Ford, Alexander

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

35 18 21

9/15/1862 9/30/1862 9/17/1861

Co. L Co. H Co. D

appointed Q.M. Sgt. From private 7/1/1865; 1st Sgt 10/15/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 discharged 1/30/1864 at Scottsboro, Ala., on surgeon’s certificate

Ford, Alexander C. Ford, Martin Foreman, Samuel Fourney, George W. Fowler, Benjamin Fowler, Joinville

Sgt. corporal Pvt. Pvt. corporal Pvt.

24 21 21 18 32

9/10/1861 2/25/1865 9/4/1861 3/7/1865 2/21/1865 12/14/186 1

Co. E Co. E Co. M Co. D Co. K Co. C

appointed ___; discharged 6/12/1863 at Cincinnati, Oh., on account of wounds received in action appointed___; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed_____; mustered out with company 10/30/1865. mustered out 12/26/1864 at Savannah by order of War Dep. mustered out 9/8/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., on expiration of term of service wounded 6/20/1863, in action at Mud Creek, Miss. ; mustered out 11/29/1864, on expiration of term of service transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 10/6/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Dennison by order of War Dept. promoted from Corporal 4/8/1865; transferred to Co. F 7/4/1865 transferred from Co. B 7/4/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 10/27/1861 at Cincinnati,Oh., by civil authority discharged 10/27/1861 at Cincinnati, Oh.by civil authority died 6/28/1862 at camp Bridge Creek near Corinth, Miss.

Fox, George H.

Pvt.

25

9/15/1862

Co. K

Fox, Jacob

Pvt.

18

10/5/1861

Co. H

Fraise, Calvin Fralick, Lewis M. Frank, Anthony Frank, Frederick

Pvt. Sgt. Pvt. Pvt. 1st Lieut. 1st Lieut. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

18 26 26 38

3/21/1864 2/18/1865 8/23/1864 9/23/1861

Co. C Co. K Co. I Co. M

Frank, Henry

45

9/4/1861

Co. B

Frank, Henry Frank, John Frank, John Frank, Nicholas Franklin, Benjamin K.

45 33 23 25 18

9/4/1861 2/2/1865 9/26/1861 9/26/1861 10/5/1861

Co. F Co. D Co. I Co. I Co. K

186

Frazer, Noah Frazier, James Frazier, James N. Frick, Constantine

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

33 26 23 26

9/2/1862 1/18/1864 9/29/1862 9/7/1861 10/30/186 2 10/11/186 1 12/10/186 3 2/6/1862

Co. A Co. M Co. B Co. M

mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dep. missing in action 3/6/1865; no further record found

Frick, John

Pvt.

21

Co. I

Frick, John (No. 1)

Pvt.

26

Co. I

Friel, Barney Fries, John

Pvt. Pvt.

29 22

Co. G Co. B

Fritts, John

Sgt.

22

9/7/1861

Co. B

Fritts, John Fritz, John

Captain Pvt.

22 18

9/7/1861 3/30/1865 10/16/186 1

Co. E Co. H

Frizzell, Robert H.

corporal

20

Co. K

Frizzell, William A. Froeschle, Christ A.

Sgt. Pvt.

18 30

8/18/1862 10/29/186 1

Co. K Co. H

Frohlich, Gustav

Pvt.

24

12/8/1861

Co. B

Frum, Wheeler Frye, John H. Fudge, Isaac P. Fwable, Lewis

Pvt. Sgt. Pvt. Pvt.

18 30

9/25/1861 1/30/1865 1/12/1861

Co. E Co. H Co. F Co. E

30

9/11/1861

Gable, Jonathan

Pvt.

23

1/29/1865

Co. B

mustered 10/9/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., on expiration of term of service mustered 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dep. appointed Corporal;captured 6/19/1863 near Coldwater, Mississippi; promoted to 2nd Lieutenant Co. E 1/13//1865 promoted to 2nd Lieutenant from Sgt Co. B 1/13/1865; to captain 4/8/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed____; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service appointed from corporal 5/17/1865; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of the War Dept. discharged 11/18/1861 on surgeon's certificate captured 6/19/1863 in action near Coldwater, Miss.; mustered out 6/9/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh. On expiration of term of service appointed 7/7/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 9/25/1862 on surgeon's certificate discharged on 4/27/1863 on surgeon's certificate also borne on the rolls as Gabriel; mustered out 10/30/1865

187

Gaines, William Gaines, William Gainey, William

corporal Pvt. Pvt.

26 25 19

1/2/18/186 5 2/3/1865 2/22/1862

Co. D Co. D Co. B

Gallagher, Thomas Gamble, Andrew Garbutt, James Garbutt, James

Pvt. corporal Pvt. Pvt.

28 30 40 40

9/15/1862 2/7/1865 9/4/1861 9/4/1861

Co. D Co. F Co. G Co. L

Garland, James

Com. Ser.

21

9/12/1862 12/19/186 1

Co. B

Garrisom, William Garrison, Joseph D. Garrison, William H.

Sgt.

Co. C

Pvt.

25

9/14/1864

Co. C

Pvt. Corpora l Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

21

8/22/1862 10/10/186 2 11/18/186 1 2/15/1864 2/18/1865 2/16/1865 2/24/1865 9/10/1862 2/16/1865 2/13/1865 2/8/1862 9/30/1861 3/7/1865 2/14/1865

Co. C

Gearhart, Conrad Gee, Benjamin H. Geilfus, William Gelvin, Joseph Gensel, Jacob W. Gerard, William Gerhart, John Gerringer, Joseph Gesley, Sidney W. Getz, John Ghret, Kilian Gibbon, Patrick Gibson, Franklin

35 23 18 18 25 31 27 17 20 20 44 42 26

Co. A Co. K Co. F Co. A Co. A Co. L Co. A Co. M Co. M Co. K Co. F Co. E Co. I

appointed ____; mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dep. captured 3/10/1865 near Fayetteville, N.C.; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. appointed 7/18/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service transferred to Company G 2/28/1862 appointed Sgt from Corporal1/15/1865;Com. Sgt; mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dep. appointed; discharged 4/8/1863 at Germantown, Tn. On surgeon's certificate of disability mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh N.C. by order of War Dept. mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh N.C. by order of War Dept. appointed 5/1/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dep. died 5/22/1862 at St. Louis, Mo. home on furlough 6/16/1865; no further record mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dep. mustered out with company 10/30/1865

mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865

188

Gibson, Ira H.

Pvt.

18

9/6/1861

Co. C

Gibson, Ira H. Gibson, Robert

Pvt. Pvt.

18 25

9/6/1861 2/18/1865

Co. D Co. C

Gibson, Robert

corporal

45

2/18/1865

Co. G

Gift, James C. Gift, John G.

Pvt. Pvt.

18 19

11/1/1863 11/23/186 3

Co. M Co. M

Gilberg, Andrew

Pvt.

45

9/11/1861

Co. D

Gilbert, Henry Gilbert, Walter

Q.M.S. Pvt.

32

1/20/1864 9/6/1861

Co. M

dropped from rolls 8/31/1865 by order of War Dept.; veteran transferred from Company C____; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran transferred to Co. G 7/28/1865 transferred from Co. C 7/28/1865;appointed____; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/12/1865 at New York City, N.Y. by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 captured 6/19/1863 in action near Coldwater, Miss.; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh. By order of War Dept.; re-enlisted 3/16/1865 for 1 year; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 1/24/1864; discharged 5/22/1865 at Savannah, Ga., on surgeon's certificate appointed 11/9/1861; captured 6/19/1863 in action near Coldwater, Miss. ; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran mustered 11/3/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Dennison,Oh. By order of War Dept. mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dep.

Gilburg, Jacob A. Gillen, George I. Gillespie, James

Sgt. corporal Pvt.

19 20 18

9/11/1861 10/30/186 1 1/22/1864

Co. D Co. L Co. G

Gillium, Alfred

Pvt.

38

3/11/1864

Co. M

Gilpin, Enos Gilteman, James Girard, Victor

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

22 20 18

9/9/1861 2/14/1862 1/22/1864 11/17/186 5

Co. E Co. B Co. G

Girls, William

Pvt.

19

Co. F

Given, John Given, Peter C.

Pvt. Pvt.

26 19

1/5/1862 2/17/1865

Co. G Co. E

mustered out with company 10/30/1865 prisoner of war; mustered out 6/14/1865, at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865

189

Glaze, Charles O.

corporal

22

2/5/1864

Co. F

Gleich, Frederick

Pvt.

26

10/7/1861

Co. K

Glenend, August

Pvt.

28

10/9/1861 11/11/186 1

Co. L

Glenn, James R.

Pvt.

30

Co. C

Glenn, William Glinken, Fredrick Goard, Joseph Goe, John W. Golden, Elza Golden, Eugene

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

25 39 21 18 18 18

2/12/1862 9/10/1861 3/7/1865 2/28/1865 2/7/1865 10/12/186 1

Co. G Co. A Co. E Co. A Co. M Co. C

Golden, Michael Golden, William

Pvt. Pvt.

25 18

9/19/1862 2/7/1865

Co. F Co. M

Goldstein, Jacob Goldthwaite, Thomas Golforth, N. Pool Goodpaster, Cyrenus

Pvt. Pvt. Sgt. Pvt.

25 55 41 20

1/3/1865 9/18/1861 8/27/1861 2/8/1862

Co. D Co. C Co. G Co. K

appointed 7/18/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 captured 12/9/1863 on Smoky Mountain, N.C., ; no further record also borne on the rolls as Glenert; mustered out 11/3/1864 at Chattanooga, Tn., on expiration of term of service transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; no further record prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/1865, at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. discharged 3/16/1863 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 died 7/7/1862 at La Grange, Tenn. captured 12/18/1862 at Lexington, Tenn.; exchanged 9/1/1863 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/22/1865 at Columbus, Oh. by order of War Dept. killed 4/4/1862 in skirmish near Shiloh, Tenn. discharged 8/7/1862 on surgeon's certificate

Gordon, Hugh Gordon, Hugh

Farrier Pvt.

30 30

10/27/186 1 10/27/186 1

Co. C Co. K

transferred from Co. K 11/1/1861; appointed; discharged 8/18/1862 at Cincinnati on surgeon's certificate transferred to co. C 11/1/1861 appointed from Corporal 7/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran appointed 9/5/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865

Gore, Howard Gorman, John

Sgt. corporal

17 30

1/4/1864 2/14/1865

Co. I Co. B

190

Goshorn, Christopher W Gould, Levi D. Gourney, George Gowdy, Joseph W. Gowdy, Joseph W. Grace, John G.

Sgt. corporal Pvt.

25 28 37

10/1/1861 10/28/186 1 9/12/1861

Co. K Co. B Co. B

Captain 1st Lieut. Pvt.

18

10/3/1861

Co. C

18 33

10/8/1861 2/2/1865

Co. M Co. D

Grafton, William Graham, James F.

corporal

20

2/15/1865 10/24/186 4 12/19/186 4 3/13/1865 9/27/1861 10/12/186 1 1/13/1862

Co. H

Pvt.

18

Co. E

Grant, David Grashall, John Gray, Aaron S. Gray, Benjamin Gray, George M.C.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

18 19 29

Co. M Co. D Co. L Co. F Co. F

appointed 11/14/1861; captured 12/1/1863, near Marysville, Tenn.; exchanged; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service appointed 10/31/1861; mustered out 11/29/1864 mustered out 10/30/1865 promoted from 1st Lieutenant Co. M 3/1/1864; mustered out 1/28/1865 promoted to 1st Lt. from 1st Sgt. 2/1/1864; to Captain Company C 3/1/1864 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 7/15//1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 6/11/1864 at Cincinnati, Oh., on surgeon's certificate mustered out 5/24/1865 at Camp Dennison, Oh., by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 10/30/1862 on surgeon's certificate died 4/16/1862 at Pittsburgh Landing

Gray, Peter Gray, William A. B. Green, George Green, John

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

19 35 30 30

8/27/1862 9/10/1865 9/23/1861 9/28/1861

Co. E Co. A Co. D Co. H

Green, John Green, Lafayette Greener, Frederick Greiner, George

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

29 18 22 44

3/1/1865 1/27/1865 9/11/1861 12/14/186 3

Co. I Co. L Co. B Co. I

discharged 5/25/1863 at Corinth, Miss. By order of War Dept. mustered out 12/26/1864 at Savannah by order of War Dep. discharged 3/6/1863 on surgeon's certificate killed 10/20/1863 in skirmish near Cherokee, Ala. discharged to date 10/30/1865 at Detroit, Michigan by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 absent 10/30/1865 in hospital; no further record

191

Gressli, Jacob F. Grey, Aaron

Pvt. Pvt.

24 50

9/3/1861 10/3/1861

Co. B Co. M

Gribben, Franklin

Q. M.S.

21

10/22/186 1

Co. C

Griffin, Charles E. Griffin, Charles E. Griffin, John Griffith, Evan

1st Lieut. Q.M.S. Pvt. Pvt.

19 19 32 28

9/8/1861 9/8/1861 9/11/1861 10/8/1861

Co. I Staff Co. B Co. H

Griffith, Humphrey A.

Pvt.

37

9/6/1864

Co. G

Griffith, Richard Griffiths, John

.1st Sgt. Pvt.

22 21

8/30/1862 10/6/1861

Co. H Co. H

Grockett, John

Pvt.

18

9/11/1862

Co. F

Grote, Fredrick Grow, Samuel Grutz, William Gschiad, Charles Guard, Aaron B.

corporal Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. corporal

27 18 18 ___ 21

3/27/1865 3/6/1865 3/17/1865 1/15/1862 9/11/1861

Co. B Co. E Co. M Co. D Co. D

Guffey, Alexander G. Gwynn, Ezra

Pvt. Pvt.

21 28

10/15/186 1 2/13/1865 12/19/186 1

Co. H Co. E

Habig, Joseph

Pvt.

___

Co. D

mustered out 11/29/1864 discharged 9/10/1862 on surgeon's certificate transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 appointed Q.M. Sgt. 11/1/1861; promoted to 2nd Lieutenant 10/17/1862;to Lieutenant 3/1/1864 to captain 5/9/1864; mustered out 1/281865 on expiration of term of service from Private11/1/1861; to 2nd Lieutenant 10/17/1862 drowned 7/18/1862 at Memphis, Tn. mustered 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service captured 4/6/1865 near Faison's Depot, N.C.; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. appointed Corporal 2/1/1863; Sgt 11/17/1864; 1st Sgt. 4/21/1865; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. , by order of War Dept. discharged 10/11/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 9/4/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. appointed 9/5/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865;mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 died 5/1/1862 at Camp Dennison appointed 11/9/1861; died 8/14/1862 captured 8/18/1864 in action at Cartersville, Ga.; paroled2/28/1865; died 3/16/1865 at Wilmington, N.C. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 12/26/1864 at Savannah on expiration of term of service.

192

Haggans, Thomas

Pvt.

28

9/19/1861

Co. I appointed____; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran absent 6/30/1865; no final record found appointed 7/1/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 Second Lieutenant to Adjutant 7/25/1864; to Captain 1/13/1865; mustered out 5/15/1865 promoted to Regt. Adjutant 7/25/1864 died 11/7/1863 at Memphis, Tn. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 promoted from 1st Lieutenant 6/4/1862 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred to Co.M 10/1/1861 transferred from Company B 10/1/1861; no further record found mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/19/1865 at Morehead City, N.C., by order of War Dept. mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh N.C. by order of War Dept. mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. Corporal to Adjutant 5/2/1863; to Lieutenant 5/9/1864; mustered out 11/18/1864 discharged 4/18/1864 by order of War Dep. mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service

Haggerty, Patrick Hague, Marion M.D. Hagy, Jacob

Sgt. Pvt. corporal

21 18 18

10/3/1861 4/8/1864 10/3/1862

Co. D Co. L Co. B

Haldeman, Lee S. Haldeman, Lee S. Hall, Franklin Halloran, Patrick Halsey, Irvin Hamilton, James A. Hamilton, Octavius Hammit, Benjamin Hand, James Handley, Harvey Haney, Jacob

Adjutant 2nd Lieut. Pvt. Pvt. Captain Pvt. Pvt. Sgt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

24 24 19 18 24 23 18 40 22 18 27

8/16/1861 8/16/1862 3/7/1862 2/22/1864 8/28/1861 2/17/1865 3/11/1865 2/9/1865 2/14/1865 1/11/1864 9/16/1861

Staff Co. G Co. K Co. G Co. C Co. E Co. E Co. L Co. B Co. I Co. B

Haney, Jacob Hanley, John

Pvt. Pvt.

27 20

9/16/1865 2/1/1865

Co. M Co. G

Hanley, Thomas

Pvt.

38

2/13/1865

Co. L

Hanna, William

Pvt.

34

10/1/1864

Co. F

Hannagan, Peter Hannegan, James D. Hannot, Thorton

Pvt.

22

9/1/1862

Co. L

Adjutant

23

9/28/1861

Staff

Hapner, Abram

Pvt.

25

9/13/1861

Co. E

193

Hapner, Henry

Pvt.

22

9/13/1861

Co. E

Hapner, Hiram Hapner, Jesse

Pvt. Pvt.

23

9/13/1861 1/3/1862

Co. E Co. F

Harbach, Charles Harbaugh, David Harding, Samuel

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

26 21 20

9/12/1861 2/22/1865 9/20/1861

Co. F Co. L Co. C

Harding, William H.

Q.M.S.

21

8/20/1862

Co. K

Hare, Thomas W. Harmon, Lawrence

1st Lieut.

24

9/10/1861

Co. A

Pvt.

42

10/2/1861

Co. I

Harner, James Harper, Hugh H.

Sgt. Q.M.S.

21 25

9/6/1861 2/2/1865

Co. C Co. D

Harper, John

Pvt.

19

9/23/1862

Co. H

Harraman, William B. Harraman, William S. Harraman,Moses T.

Pvt.

20

9/10/1861

Co. E

Q.M.S.

45

9/10/1861

Co. E

Pvt.

58

10/1/1861

Co. E

discharged on surgeon's certificate; date unknown mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service died 6/12/1862 at Cincinnati, Oh. mustered out 11/2/1864 at Chattanooga, Tenn, on expiration of term of service mustered 10/7/1865 by order of War Dept. mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration date of service appointed from corporal 3/1/1865; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. appointed Corporal 11/2/1861; to 2nd Lieutenant 2/1/1863; to 1st Lieutenant 6/1/1863; mustered out 2/6/1865 by order of War Dep. discharged 5/26/1862 near Corinth, Miss., on surgeon's certificate appointed; mustered out 11/29/1865 by order of War Dep. appointed___; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 captured 3/10/1864 in action near Fayetteville, N.C.; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. wounded 9/11862 in action near Corinth, Miss.; mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service discharged 8/22/1862 at Columbus,Oh. on surgeon's certificate. discharged 7/8/1862 at Columbus, Oh. On surgeon's certificate

194

Harrell, Martin D.

1st Lieut.

30

8/28/1862

Co. D

Harris, Garland

Pvt.

22

9/12/1861

Co. F

Harris, James M.

Sgt.

21

9/20/1861

Co. C

Harrison, Henry Harrison, James C. Harrison, Joseph Harrop, Richard Hart, Charles F.W.

farrier

21

8/27/1861

Co. K

Adjutant Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

29 21 23 30

8/11/1861 2/12/1862 2/16/1865 2/10/1865

Staff Co. K Co. K Co. M

Hart, David Harter, James

farrier Pvt.

35 19

9/10/1861 12/28/186 3

Co. E Co. C

Harter, Joseph Hartzell, Phillip

Pvt. Pvt.

23 24

11/1/1861 9/15/1862

Co. C Co. G

Haseltine, Adelbert E. Hashhager, Dietrich Haunegan, James D.

1st Sgt.

24

9/18/1861

Co. E

Pvt. corporal

20 23

10/1/1864 9/29/1861

Co. D Co. D

Havens, Homer

Pvt.

30

8/23/1864

Co. I

Hawke, John W. Hayden, Henry

Pvt. Pvt.

22 40

10/3/1861 11/11/186 1

Co. C Co. M

appointed corporal1/1/1863; Sgt 5/19/1863; co. Sgt. 11/19/1864; captured 4/10/1865 near Fayetteville, Ga.; promoted to 1st Lieu. 4/8/1865; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh. By order of War Dept. discharged 2/4/1864 for wounds received 10/5/1862 in battle of Metamora, Miss. appointed corporal; discharged 4/8/1863 at Memphis on surgeon's certificate mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept.. captured and paroled 12/18/1862 at Battle of Lexington died 4/25/1862 at St. Louis mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed___; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service transferred from McLaughlin Squadron 6/28/1865; transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; no further record;veteran captured 12/18/1862, at Lexington Tennessee appointed from sgt. 1/21/1864; mustered out 11/29/1864, at Columbus Oh. on expiration of term of service mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C by order of War Dept. promoted to 2nd Lieutenant and Adjutant 5/2/1863 mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., on surgeon's certificate mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., by order of War Dept. no further record found

195

Hayes, Charles Hayes, Charles

Major Captain

30 30

8/27/1861 8/27/1861

Staff Co. D

Hayes, Charles C.

Pvt.

33

9/11/1861

Co. D

Hayes, Erastus

Sgt.

20

8/28/1862

Co. D

Hayes, Joseph H.

Pvt.

19

9/11/1861

Co. D

Hayes, Mahlon Hayes, Silas Hayes, Titus Hayes, Titus S. Hayes, Van Hayman, Henry

Sgt. Pvt. Musicia n Bugler Pvt. Pvt.

20 19 23 23 18 21

9/9/1862 9/11/1861 10/4/1861 10/4/1861 1/31/1865 2/25/1865

Co. D Co. D Band Co. D Co. D C o. I

Captain to Major 11/1/1861; Killed in action 4/19/1863 promoted to major 11/1/1861 mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh. by order of War Dept. appointed corporal 1/1/1865; Sgt. 5/1/1865; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept. mustered out to date 9/10/1864 at Chattanooga Tn. by order of War Dept. appointed corporal 1/1/1865; Sgt. 5/1/1865; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 6/6/1862 by order of War Dept. transferred to regimental band 11/1/1861 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 8/19/1865 at Fortress Monroe, Va., by order of War Dept. mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh N.C. by order of War Dept. captured 6/19/1863 near Coldwater, Miss. ; mustered out 11/29/1864 discharged 11/16/1861 on surgeon's certificate mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out to date 10/30/1865 by order of War Dept. appointed_____; mustered out with company 10/30/1865. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dep.

Hays, John S.

Pvt.

24

8/17/1864

Co. G

Hays, Omer T.

Pvt.

22

9/18/1862

Co. C

Hayward, David J. Hayward, Simeon Hazel, Eli Hazelwood, William E.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

27 21 18 20

9/15/1861 11/1/1861 2/22/1865 2/25/1865

Co. B Co. L Co. E Co. A

Healing, George Hearn, Charles V. Hearn, Horace Hearn, Jesse Hearn, Lorenzo D.

Pvt. corporal Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

35 29 21 31 24

3/9/1865 2/17/1865 2/15/1865 2/14/1865 8/2/1862

Co. E Co. K Co. D Co. K Co. B

196

Hearn, Samuel Heath, Benjamin F.

corporal Pvt. Lt. Colonel Pvt.

21 20

3/2/1865 2/18/1862

Co. B Co. K

appointed 9/5/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865

Heath, Thomas T. Heath, William McK.

27 18

8/26/1861 9/10/1861

Staff Co. C

Heath, William McK..

Captain

18

9/10/1861

Co. F

Heath,William McK.

R.Q.M.

18

9/10/1861

Staff

Heck, Joseph Hedges, Charles A. Heffelfinger, Sylvanus

Pvt.

27

6/26/1862 10/23/186 1 3/6/1865

Co. B

Pvt. Pvt.

21 17

Co. K Co. I

Height, Abraham

Pvt.

26

2/20/1864

Co. C

Height, Isaac

Pvt.

23

2/20/1864

Co. C

Heignutt, Thomas J.

Sgt.

37

11/19/186 1

Co. C

Heilman, Elias Heis, Charles Heis, Samuel

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

22 19 18

9/23/1861 2/24/1865 2/25/1865 11/13/186 1 5/23/1864 3/14/1865 9/28/1861

Co. E Co. A Co. I

Heisman, Gotfried Heitzman, Reed Heller, Henry Heller,Charles

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. corporal

20 22 42

Co. B Co. D Co. H Co. G

Colonel 8/11/63, Brig. General 12/15/64, mustered out 10/30/65 promoted to Reg. Q. M. Sgt. 11/1/1861 promoted to 1st Lieutenant and Regimental Q.M. 1/13/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 Regimental Quarter Master Sergeant from private 11/1/1861; to 2nd Lieutenant 2/18/1864; to 1st Lieutenant 10/12/1864; to Captain 1/13/1865 captured 8/18/1864 at Canton, Ga.; paroled; mustered out 6/26/1865 mustered 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865; veteran mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 died 7/13/1863 of wounds received 6/19/1863 near Coldwater, Miss. mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 10/19/1862, on surgeon's certificate

197

Helmick, John C.

Pvt.

22

10/10/186 1 12/25/186 3 11/1/1861 9/10/1865

Co. D

Hemphill, John Hencher, Julius Henderson, Martin V. Henderson, Samuel C.

Farrier Pvt. Pvt.

28 24 20

Co. A Co. M Co. A

discharged 7/16/1862 at Cincinnati, Oh. By order of War Dept. transferred from Co. G 7th Cav. 6/22/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 by War Dep. mustered out 12/27/1864 on expiration of term of service died 5/25/1862 at Corinth, Miss. appointed____; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service appointed 2/1/1864; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service transferred to Co. H 7/28/1865 transferred from Co. C 7/23/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 Captain to Major 2/1/1863; to Lt. Colonel 3/1/1864; mustered out 10/18/1864 appointed10/12/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 promoted to Major 2/1/1863 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 7/18/1865 discharged 10/25/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed____; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 11/14/1861; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred to Navy by order of War Dept. mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh N.C. by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865

Sgt.

37

9/25/1861

Co. I

Henley, Joseph Henry, Francis Henry, James

corporal corporal Pvt.

18 21 22

9/28/1861 9/9/1861 9/3/1861

Co. K Co. G Co. C

Henry, James T.

Pvt. Lt. Colonel

22

9/3/1861

Co. H

Henry, John

38

10/8/1861

Staff

Henry, William M. Henry,John Hensler, William J. Henwood, Moses Her, Leander Herman, Christian Herrider, John

corporal Captain Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. corporal

18 33 19 21 29 34 27

2/8/1865 10/8/1861 4/1/1865 3/30/1865 9/17/1861 2/17/1865 2/27/1865

Co. K Co. M Co. F Co. B Co. L Co. K Co. K

Hess, Deidliff J. Hess, William Hettesheimer, Adam Hettesheimer, Andrew Hettesheimer, Peter

corporal Pvt. Pvt.

27 18 18

9/19/1861 2/24/1865 9/11/1861

Co. K Co. L Co. D

Pvt. Pvt.

23 26

9/25/1861 2/15/1865

Co. D Co. D

198

Hettesheimer, William Heuderson, Richard Hewey, John Hewitt, John M.

Pvt.

24

2/14/1865 10/12/186 1 2/7/1865 3/2/1865

Co. D

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

39 21 19

Co. E Co. I Co. A

mustered out 7/5/1865 at David's Island, New York Harbor by order of War Dept. mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh,, on expiration of term of service mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered as saddler; appointed corporal___; discharged 7/23/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. G, 7th O.V.C., 7/27/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 died 4/10/1862 at St. Louis, Mo. of wounds received 4/7/1862 in Battle of Shiloh mustered out 11/29/1864 captured 2/28/1863 near Burleston, Miss., exchanged 6/18/1863; mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865 discharged 10/19/1862 on surgeon's certificate of disability at Bolivar, Tn. mustered out 11/29/1864 appointed 9/8/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 appointed from private; promoted to 2nd Lieutenant Co. M 9/4/1865 promoted from 1st Sgt Company B 9/4/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 2/4/1864 on surgeon's certificate appointed 11/9/1861; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran

Hickenlooper, Andrew

corporal

44

9/14/1861

Co. G

Hickey, Patrick Hicks, Jacob

Pvt. Pvt.

26 43

9/30/1862 1/27/1864 12/25/186 2

Co. H Co. G

Hicks, Jesse

Pvt.

19

Co. B

Hicks, Samuel Hicks, William

Pvt. Pvt.

18 18

9/18/1861 9/10/1861

Co. B Co. A

Higdon, Elias Higgins, Patrick Hilbiser, Lewis Hildebrandt, Daniel Hildebrandt, John E. Hildebrandt, William C. Hildreth, Samuel

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

23 25 25 31

2/12/1862 9/30/1861 3/6/1865 9/2/1861 10/31/186 1 9/13/1861 3/6/1865

Co. K Co. G Co. B Co. B

Pvt. Pvt. corporal

20 25 21

Co. B Co. B Co. B

Hill, Albert R.

1st Sgt. 2nd Lieut. Pvt.

24

3/21/1865

Co. B

Hill, Albert R. Hill, Alexander K.

24 30

3/21/1865 9/12/1861

Co. M Co. M

Hill, Arthur Hill, Daniel

corporal Pvt.

29 35

9/11/1861 9/12/1861

Co. D Co. D

199

Hill, Peter M. Hill, Valentine Hillery, Robert H. Hillock, William G. Hilsechutt, Henry

Captain Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

31 43

9/10/1861 9/14/1861 3/1/1862

Co. A Co. H Co. H Co. E Co. B

19 40

2/17/1865 9/23/1861

Hinchey, Patrick Hindman, John Hinkle, John

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

19 19 18

9/23/1862 9/8/1862 9/12/1861

Co. E Co. B Co. F

appointed Sergeant 11/2/1861; to 1st Lieutenant 2/1/1862;to Captain 6/1/1863; mustered out 11/29/1864 mustered out 12/1/1864 on expiration of term of service discharged 10/13/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out with company 10/30/1865 died 11/29/1862 at Bolivar, Tn. captured 3/10/1865 in action near Fayetteville, N.C.: mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dep. on sick furlough 7/31/1862; supposed to have died at Cincinnati, Oh.; no further record. appointed11/2/1861; discharged 3/7/1867 on surgeon's certificate mustered out with company 10/30/1865 died 8/201863 at New Richmond, Oh., appointed 11/13/1861; discharged 3/6/1863 at Corinth, Miss., on surgeon's certificate mustered out 11/14/1864 appointed 7/25/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/1865 by order of War Dep.at Camp Chase, Oh. mustered out 12/26/1864 at Savannah, Ga. On expiration of term of service mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dep. transferred to Co. M 3/1/1862 transferred from Company B 3/1/1862; died 4/26/1862 at Camp Dennison

Hirshman, Gottlieb

Pvt.

27

9/24/1861

Co. E

Hitch, Octavius Hitchell, William Hite, George Hobson, John

Q.M.S. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

24 22 18 30

9/16/1861 11/4/1861 2/21/1865 10/20/186 1

Co.A Co. M Co. K Co. M

Hoffman, John Hoffman, John T. Hoffner, Peter Hogan, David

farrier Pvt. Com. Sgt Pvt.

30 17 27 27

9/17/1861 9/4/1861 1/30/1864 2/15/1865

Co. I Co. B Co. G Co. B

Holden, Israel

Pvt.

32

9/17/1864 12/19/186 1

Co. D

Holden, Joseph Holland, Thomas K. Holleman, Joseph

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. 26 28

Co. D Co. B Co. B

9/12/1862 10/12/186 1 10/12/186 1

Holleman, Joseph

Pvt.

28

Co. M

200

Holliday, William

Pvt.

22

2/6/1865 11/12/186 1 10/29/186 2 11/1/1861

Co. L

Holman, Charles Holmes, John Holsberheimer,F. A.

Pvt. Pvt. Hos.St' d

18 26

Co. L Co. H Staff

Holsberheimer,F. A.

Pvt.

11/1/1861 10/16/186 1

Co. B

Holtz, David F.

corporal

21

Co. K

Holtz, John S.

Com. Sgt.

23

10/16/186 1

Co. K

Homer, John F. Homman, Andrew

Pvt. Pvt.

24 19

9/12/1861 2/20/1865

Co. F Co. I

Honneck, John

Pvt.

20

9/26/1864

Co. B

Hooper, Joseph Hooper, William Hoover, John H.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

19 19 43

9/11/1861 1/30/1865 1/21/1864

Co. D Co. D Co. C

Hoover, John H. Hoping, Joseph Hoping, Joseph F. Hopkins, Charles

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

43 19 19 18

1/21/1864 11/1/1861 11/1/1861 9/10/1861

Co. D Co. G Co. H Co. A

Hopkins, Edward Hopkins, Mack Hopkinson, Joseph

Pvt. Musicia n Pvt.

20 26 35

10/4/1861 9/26/1861 9/19/1862

Co. H Band Co. H

mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/30/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 from Private 11/1/1861; returned to Company B promoted to Hospital Steward 11/1/1861; returned to Company; discharged on surgeon's certificate 3/28/1863 appointed 11/8/1864; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. appointed from corporal 11/8/1864; prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. mustered out 10/1/1864 at Columbus , Oh. On expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 captured 3/10/1865 in action near Fayettevile, N.C.; paroled; mustered out 7/1/1865 by order of War Dep. mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh. On expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred to Co. D transferred from Company C; mustered out to date 10/30/1865 by order of War Dept. transferred to Co. H____. transferred from Co. G____; discharged by civil authority discharged by civil authority2/25/1861 discharged 11/18/1861 at Cincinnati, Oh., by civil authority discharged 6/6/1862 by order of War Dept. discharged 12/15/1862 on surgeon's certificate

201

Hopping, Henry C.

corporal

21

9/2/1861

Co. G

Horin, John Horndy, William Horner, George W.

Pvt. Pvt.

28 18

9/25/1861 3/11/1865

Co. F Co. F

mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out 10/1/1864 at Columbus , Oh. On expiration of term of service mustered out 7/31/1865 at Philadelphia, Pa. by order of War Dept. transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran appointed from Q.M. Sgt. 5/1/1865; mustered out 11/29/1864 transferred from Co.C 7/28/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 transferred to Co. A 7/28/1865 mustered out3/7/1865 at Columbus, Oh.,on expiration of term of service discharged 1/1/1862 on surgeon's certificate paroled prisoner 4/30/1863; enlisted in 3rd U.S. Cavalry;____: mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., expiration of term of service captured 5/9/1864 at Huntsville, Ala.: mustered out 6/27/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. appointed 7/12/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran appointed7/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865 killed in action 3/10/1865 near Fayetteville, N. C. discharged 12/7/1861 at Camp Dennison, Oh., by civil authority mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh N.C. by order of War Dept.

Pvt.

23

1/1/1865

Co. F

Horner, James Horning, Willoughby

Pvt.

22

11/1/1861

Co. C

1st Sgt. Com. Ser. Pvt.

22

8/23/1862

Co. B

Hosier, George Hosier, George

19 19

10/1/1861 10/1/1863

Co.A Co. C

House, Frederick House, Philip Howard, Charles R.

Pvt. Pvt.

2/20/1862 9/20/1862 10/12/186 1

Co. M Co. M

Pvt.

36

Co. M

Howe, Francis

Pvt.

27

9/4/1861

Co. K

Howe, John P.

Pvt.

25

1/7/1864

Co. M

Howell, Samuel Howenstein, James A. Howrad, Charles W. Hoy, John Hoy, Thomas Hubbard, Alexander

corporal corporal Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

24 18 18 23 20 18

9/4/1861 3/20/1865 2/18/1865 9/24/1862 9/15/1862 10/27/186 1

Co. H Co. I Co. A Co. D Co. E Co. K

Hubbard, Caleb

Pvt.

43

9/19/1864

Co. D

202

Hubbell, John H. Hubbell, William

1st Lieut. corporal

27 19

9/9/1861 2/21/1865

Co. H Co. I

Huber, Franklin

corporal

20

9/9/1861

Co. K

Huber, George Huddleston, Daniel Hudson, Lincoln

Pvt. corporal Pvt.

18 22 21

4/29/1864 2/10/1865 3/24/1865

Co. I Co. M Co. A

Huff, Stephen

Sgt.

35

10/14/186 1

Co. C

Hughes, John Hughes, Richard L. Hughes, Squire Hughey, Isaac N.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

40 26 32 33

2/1/1864 9/17/1861 9/17/1861 10/4/1861

Co. L Co. H Co. L Co. M

Hughler, Peter

Farrier

45

1/30/1862

Co. D

Hulett, Wilson S.

Pvt.

18

3/17/1864

Co. C

Huling, Americus

Pvt.

44

2/10/1864

Co. M

Hume, John Hume, William H. Hunaford, John Hunt, Theodore Hunter, George W. Hunter, Milton

Sgt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

22 19 18 18

8/24/1861 11/17/186 1 2/13/1865 9/20/1861

Co. C Co. C Co. E Co. M

Pvt. corporal

19 22

2/15/1864 2/25/1865

Co. C Co. E

promoted to 2nd Lieutenant 2/27/1862; discharged 1/9/1863 by order of War dept. appointed 7/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 11/14/1861; discharged 8/18/1862 at Cincinnati, Oh., on surgeon's certificate died 11/28/1864 of wounds received 11/27/1864 in action at Buck Head Creek, Ga. appointed 6/1/1865; mustered out to date 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron, 7/28/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. mustered out 11/30/1864 on expiration of term of service prisoner of War; no further record discharged 10/16/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 6/26/1865 at Columbus, Oh. By order of War Dept. transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; supposed to be dead mustered out6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. discharged 7/12/1862 at Yellow Springs, Oh., on surgeon's certificate. died 2/2/1864 at Memphis Tenn. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out 6/14/1865 at Camp Chase Oh. by order of War Dept. appointed___; mustered out with company 10/30/1865

203

Hunter, Robert

Pvt.

24

3/30/1865

Co. C appointed 10/1/1864; mustered out 6/16/1865 at Washinton D.C. by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran appointed___; discharged 7/23/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 9/27/1864 discharged 2/16/1861 at Camp Dennison by civil authority discharged 9/13/1862 for wounds received in service captured 12/18/1862 at battle of Lexington, Tenn. exchanged 9/1/1863 died 6/4/1862 at Pittsburgh Landing (Shiloh), Tn. accidentally wounded at Germantown, Tenn., mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. discharged 10/6/1865 on surgeon's certificate appointed 10/15/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., on expiration of term of service appointed_____; mustered out 1/29/1865 on expiration of term of service appointed from corporal 4/20/1864; mustered out 1/11/1865 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865 appointed; mustered out 10/30/1865 appointed corporal 3/18/1863; Q.M.S. 10/31/1863; promoted to Sgt. Major 5/1/1865; veteran

Hurlburt, Emory Hurlbut, James Hurley, Thomas

corporal Pvt. Pvt.

24 19 17

8/2/1864 9/16/1861 1/13/1862

Co. E Co. F Co. F

Hutchins, John Hutchinson, Francis A. Huthsteiner, Gustav Huthsteiner, Henry Hutzleman, John H. Hyde, John H.

corporal Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

53 20

10/1/1861 9/27/1861 12/14/186 1 5/7/1862

Co. G Co. B Co. K Co. K

Pvt. Captain

18 31

8/9/1862 9/1/1861

Co. F Co. C

Hyndman, Joseph Imhoff, Andrew Isgregg, Robert

Pvt. Pvt. corporal

18 42 20

8/27/1862 2/28/1865 2/6/1865

Co. G Co. A Co. B

Ishmael, George

Pvt.

19

9/10/1862

Co. G

Israel, Jabez F. Ivery, Andrew B.

1st Sgt. Pvt.

26 22

1/27/1862 3/4/1865

Co. L Co. K

Jackson, Samuel H.

1st Sgt.

21

11/6/1861

Co. L

Jacobs, Thomas K. Jacques, James H. James, Wilson

Pvt. Q.M.S. corporal

26 25 23

3/28/1864 2/21/1865 2/13/1865

Co. C Co.A Co.A

Jarret, James M.

Q.M.S.

26

9/12/1861

Co. F

204

Jarrett, James M.

Ser. Maj.

26

9/12/1861

Staff

Jarvis, Charles T.

Captain

21

10/16/186 1 10/16/186 1

Co.A

Jarvis, Charles T. Jefferies, Charles C. Jenkins, James W.

Q.M.S.

21

Co. K

Pvt. Com. Ser.

18 17

10/281861 1/22/1864

Co. K Co. B

Jessup, William Jockers, Frederick

Captain Pvt.

22 22

8/28/1861 9/27/1861

Co. D Co. B

Johnson , Paschal J. Johnson Josiah

Pvt. Pvt.

44 25

10/25/186 5 9/5/1861

Co. C Co. C

Johnson, Charlton

Pvt.

19

3/2/1865

Co. F

Johnson, Edward Johnson, Edward E. Johnson, George

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

18 18 19

3/1/1865 3/1/1865 4/4/1865

Co. G Co. C Co. M

from Sergeant 5/1/1865; to 1st Lieutenant 9/4/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 from Q.M. Sergeant to 2nd Lieutenant 1/13/1865; to Captain 4/8/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 appointed from Sgt. 11/17/1863; promoted to 2nd Lt. Co. A 1/13/1865; veteran mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, oh., on expiration of term of service appointedCorporal 6/10/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 promoted to 1st Lieutenant from 2nd Lieutenant 11/1/1861; to Captain 2/25/1863; mustered out 1/31/1865 at Savannah, Ga. on expiration term of service mustered out 6/16/1865 by order of War Dep. captured 3/10/1865 in action near Fayetteville, N.C.; mustered out 6/23/1865 at Camp Chase Ohio by order of War Dept. mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration date of service mustered out 5/3/1865 at Camp Dennison, Oh., by order War Dept. transferred from Co. C 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred to Co. G 7/28/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 died 10/18/1865 at Morgantown, N.C.

Johnson, George W. Johnson, James Johnson, John Johnson, Michael F.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

19 38 43 22

3/11/1864 9/22/1862 2/15/1865 9/18/1861

Co. C Co. G Co. I Co. I

205

Johnson, Paschal

Pvt.

25

12/26/186 3

Co. D

Johnson, Thomas Johnson, Valentine

Pvt.

28

9/13/1862

Co. G

Pvt.

21

9/21/1861

Co. G

Johnson, William

Pvt.

28

9/19/1862

Co. F

Johnson, William Johnson, William D. Johnson, William H.

Pvt. corporal

28 18

9/19/1962 2/10/1865

Co. H Co. L

Pvt.

19

9/30/1861

Co. I

Johnston, Amassa Johnston, William R. Jones, Alexander Jones, Ambrose Jones, Charles W.B.

Sgt. corporal Pvt. Pvt.

19 32 24 26

2/10/1865 3/11/1865 9/9/1861 1/30/1865

Co. M Co. L Co. B Co. K

captured 3/10/1865 in action near Fayetteville, N.C.; mustered out 6/23/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh. By order of War Dept. mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. :veteran transferred from Co. H 10/31/1863; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. captured12/18/1862 at Battle of Lexington, Tenn.; exchanged___;transferred to Co. F 10/31/1863 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service appointed corporal 9/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865

mustered out 11/29/1864 discharged 12/4/1862 at Corinth, Miss., on surgeon's certificate captured 8/8/1863 in action near Rienzi, Miss., mustered out 12/27/1864, on expiration of term of service mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh. On expiration of term of service mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. mustered out 11/29/1864, on expiration of term of service

Pvt.

23

2/2/1865

Co. I

Jones, George

Pvt.

12/16/186 1

Co. G

Jones, George

Pvt.

37

9/20/1861

Co. I

Jones, George W.

Bugler

20

9/14/1861

Co. I

Jones, Henry H.

Pvt.

42

9/18/1861

Co. D

Jones, Israel Jones, James Jones, James W.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

30 23 22

9/16/1862 8/27/1861 2/25/1865

Co. H Co. G Co. H

206

Jones, John Jones, John H. Jones, John J.

corporal corporal Pvt.

28 20 20

9/6/1861 9/17/1861 10/8/1861

Co. G Co. H Co. H

Jones, Morris S. Jones, Ralph Jones, Sylvanus Jones, Thomas Jones, Thomas Jordan, John Jordan, John B. Judy, John W. Justus, Andrew Kaeggy, Alexander

Pvt. Pvt. corporal Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. farrier

29 44 22 22 22

8/30/1862 9/26/1864 9/4/1861 9/4/1861 3/3/1865 12/14/186 1 3/11/1865 2/13/1865 2/17/1865 9/25/1861

Co. H Co. G Co. B Co. G Co. K Co. C Co. A Co. E Co. A Co. E

appointed_____; discharged 7/23/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 11/29/1864, on expiration of term of service discharged 10/1/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh N.C. by order of War Dept. appointed 10/6/1862; mustered out 11/29/1864 died 2/22/1863 at Germantown, Tenn. mustered 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration date of service mustered out 10/30/1865 discharged 7/12/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 10/30/1865 died 6/3/1862 at Pittsburgh Landing, Tennessee mustered out 11/291864 at Columbus, oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. E, 1st O.V.C. returned to same 7/26/1864 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 7/18/1865 at camp Dennison by order of War Dept. died 6/11/1862 at Bethel, Tenn. discharged 3/18/1863 at on surgeon's certificate. appointed___; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865

18 19 25 38

Kail, Adam Kammyer, Henry Kane, Luke S.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

21 42

10/5/1861 3/27/1865 3/10/1863

Co. K Co. B Co. E

Karen, John Karmen, Andrew

Pvt. Pvt.

20 39

9/12/1861 2/10/1865 12/10/186 3 1/1/1862 1/1/1862

Co. E Co. M

Karner, Charles Karnes, George W. Karnes, James

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

25

Co. I Co. F Co. F

Karreth, John Kartiss, William Kask, Simeon Katzel, Charles Katzel, John

Sgt. Pvt. corporal Pvt. Pvt.

20 22 21 22 19

1/1/1862 2/17/1865 9/12/1861 2/16/1865 2/16/1865

Co. D Co. D Co. G Co. M Co. M

207

Kaus, Jacob

corporal

18

9/18/1861

Co. I

Kean, Bruce

corporal

18

9/11/1861

Co. D

Kean, George Keating, John Keeler, James H.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

19 20

9/11/1861 12/12/186 3 1/22/1862

Co. D Co. F Co. D

appointed 3/22/1865; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. appointed 11/9/1861; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh. On expiration of term of service; reenlisted1/30/1865 for one year; mustered out 7/16/1865 by order of War Dept.

Keesey, Whittaker

Sgt.

20

1/11/1864

Co. F

Keggs, George W. Keifler, John Kelleher, Timothy

Pvt. Pvt. corporal

18 19 21

11/11/186 1 2/16/1865 2/14/1865

Co. C Co. M Co. G

Kelley, Henry

Pvt.

18

3/7/1864

Co. C

Kelley, Henry V. Kelley, Patrick Kellog, Edward A.

Pvt. Pvt. Musicia n

22 42 18

10/10/186 1 9/28/1861 9/28/1861

Co. C Co. C Band

Kelly, Charles

Pvt.

29

9/25/1862

Co. L

Kelly, Chester

Pvt.

27

9/4/1861 11/13/186 1 2/2/1862

Co. B

Kelly, Daniel Kelly, George

Pvt. Pvt.

18 26

Co. I Co. A

died 5/4/1862 at Cincinnati, Oh. appointed from pvt. 7/18/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 7/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company; veteran discharged___1862 at Memphis, Tenn. discharged 6/6/1862 by order of War Dept. discharged 5/8/1863 to accept commission in 59th Regiment U.S. Colored Troops from which mustered out with regiment as captain captured 6/19/1863 in action near Coldwater, Miss; mustered out 11/29/1864 discharged 12/4/1862 at Corinth, Miss., on surgeon's certificate mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dep.

208

Kelly, Patrick

Pvt.

23

11/13/186 1

Co. I

Kelso, Stephen Kendall, Dewitt C.

Pvt. Pvt.

18 22

3/14/1864 9/10/1861

Co. L Co. A

mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp, Chase Oh., by order of War Dept. captured 3/1/1865 in action near Waynesboro, N.C.; paroled; mustered out 6/22/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. captured 11/26/1864 near Sandersville, Ga., no further record appointed 1/21/1863; transferred 3/9/1864 to Co. I, 14th Reg. Veteran Reserve Corps, from which mustered out 9/19/1864 at Washinton D.C. On expiration of term of service mustered out 11/20/1864 on expiration of term of service died 5/7/1862 at Pittsburgh Landing, Tennessee mustered out 12/30/1864 at Savannah, Ga., on expiration of term of service ; re-enlisted 2/21/1865 for one year; appointed 10/12/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed____; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 9/26/1865 on surgeon's certificate of disability discharged 8/19/1862 at Camp Dennison on surgeon's certificate appointed___; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 3/7/1863 on surgeon's certificate mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 10/12/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 3/16/1863 on surgeon's certificate

Kennedy, Christopher Kennedy, Frederick

Pvt.

33

10/17/186 2 12/24/186 1

Co. I

Pvt.

23

Co. G

Kennedy, John Kennedy, Michael Kennedy, Mitchell

corporal Pvt. Pvt.

26 24 19

9/12/1861 10/10/186 1 1/28/1862

Co. F Co. L Co. E

Kennell, John R. Kepka, Harmen Kerden, Robert Kerner, Frederick

corporal saddler Pvt. Pvt.

21 20 18 28

11/14/186 1 2/20/1865 3/31/1865 11/2/1864

Co. K Co. M Co. F Co. B

Kessler, Jacob Keys, John R. Kilgour, David Kimbal, John

Pvt. corporal Pvt. Pvt.

32 20 44 21

9/18/1861 2/23/1865 9/10/1861 2/2/1865

Co. C Co. L Co. A Co. M

Kimble, Albert Kincaid, Edward

corporal Pvt.

25 36

2/2/1865 9/30/1862

Co. K Co. E

209

Kindle, Isaac

Sgt. Com. Sgt. Pvt.

28

9/6/1861

Co. C

Kindle, John Kindle, William F.

31 29

9/17/1861 10/25/186 1

Co. L Co. C

King, Benjamin

Pvt.

22

10/2/1861

Co. E

King, David King, Gale King, John King, John H.

Pvt. Com. Sgt. Pvt. Pvt.

20 23 21 32

9/22/1861 2/13/1865 2/23/1865 11/6/1861

Co. F Co. M Co. I Co. D

King, John H. King, Samuel King, William Kinney, John Kirby, George N. Kirby, Sylvester S.

farrier Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

32 17 18 26 21 18

11/6/1861 2/6/1865 9/15/1862 9/15/1862 9/18/1861 3/1/1865 10/23/186 1

Co. H Co. I Co. B Co. A Co. G Co. A

Kirk, Monroe

Pvt.

27

Co. K

Kirkpatrick, Alexander

Sgt.

28

9/3/1862

Co. L

Kirkpatrick, William H.

Sgt.

20

9/21/1861

Co. M

Kitson, John

Pvt.

22

9/25/1861

Co. E

appointed Corporal; mustered out 11/29/1864 mustered out 11/3/1864 at Chattanooga, Tn., on expiration of term of service mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration date of service prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. captured 6/19/1863 in action near Coldwater, Miss.; mustered out 11/2/1864 at Chattanooga, Tenn., on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred to Company H 11/6/1861 transferred from Co. D 11/6/1861; appointed____; discharged 6/11/1862 at Corinth, Miss., on surgeon's certificate mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 9/18/1862 by order of civil authorities mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dep. died 6/2/1862 qt Pittsburgh Landing, Tenn. mustered out 10/30/1865 discharged 9/13/1862 near Corinth, Miss., on surgeon's certificate appointed corporal 11/14/1864; sgt 2/1/1865; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept. appointed corporal 1/1/1863; captured 6/19/1863 in action near Coldwater, Miss., ;appointed Sgt.1/1/1864; mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service

210

Kittering, Lewis

Pvt.

24

9/9/1862

Co. L

Kittle, Robert L. Kittle, Robert L. Klein, Kasper Klein, William

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

28 24 39 36

8/28/1862 8/29/1862 9/15/1862 9/9/1861

Co. C Co. F Co. L Co. B

Kleinhans, Philip

Pvt.

24

9/12/1861

Co. D

Klug, Joseph

Pvt.

21

9/23/1862

Co. K

Knecht, Joseph Knepper, Jeremiah Knepper, William J. Knight, Andrew

Sgt. Pvt.

32 30

9/30/1861 9/15/1862

Co. I Co. D

captured 3/10/1865 in action near Fayetteville, N.C.; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. transferred from Co. F; mustered out 9/1/1865 at Nashville, Tenn. by order of War Dept. transferred to Co. C accidentally killed 4/28/1864 also borne on rolls as Michael Klein; mustered out 9/29/1864 captured 6/19/1863 in action near Coldwater < Miss. ; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus , Oh. On expiration of term of service prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/1865 at camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. appointed___; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service

Pvt. Pvt.

35 27

9/27/1862 10/22/186 1

Co. D Co. D

mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C by order of War Dept.

Knisley, John W.

Pvt.

25

9/12/1861

Co. F

Knoll, Engelbert Knowland, John Kogler, David Kolling, Henry Kollock, Edward

Pvt. Pvt. Sgt. Pvt. Pvt.

27 38 19 20

10/9/1861 2/23/1865 10/23/186 1 2/21/1865 9/ / 1861

Co. C Co. L Co. C Co. I Co. C

Kope, John Jr.

Pvt.

20

11/25/186 1

Co. C

captured 6/19/1863 in action near Coldwater, Miss.; mustered out 11/2/1864 at Chattanooga, Tenn., on expiration of term of service transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration date of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged April__1862 at Shiloh, Tenn. transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran

211

Koppelberger, Abraham Kratzer, Adam

Pvt. Pvt.

18 27

2/10/1864 10/3/1861

Co. F Co. M

Kreimer, Jacob Krishbaum, Peter Kruse, Charles D.

Pvt. Pvt. B.C.S.

40 28 21

10/9/1861 8/28/1862 9/2/1861

Co. C Co. E Staff

Kruse, Charles D. Kuhr, Henry Kuntz, Isaac Kuntz, John

Sgt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

21 31 19 35

9/2/1861 3/23/1864 3/17/1865 9/14/1864

Co. B Co. M Co. I Co. B

Kyle, William A. Lacy, Levi

Pvt. Pvt.

18 30

8/10/1862 1/31/1865

Co. C Co. K

Ladd, Edward

Pvt.

29

9/11/1861

Co. D

Laffner, John Lafler, Jacob

Pvt. Pvt.

18 19

8/20/1864 2/26/1864

Co. I Co. L

Lamb, Jacob W.

corporal

22

2/11/1862

Co. E

Landers, Lewis

Sgt.

21

9/16/1862

Co. M

Landfrit, Adam

1st Lieut.

27

9/16/1861

Co. B

Landis, Jacob K.

Pvt.

21

11/1/1861

Co. I

Landis, Samuel

Pvt.

60

9/25/1861

Co. C

discharged to date 8/3/1865 by order of War Dept. discharged 3/5/1863 on surgeon's certificate discharged 8/19/1863 at Memphis , Tenn. On surgeon's certificate absent, sick at Memphis, Tenn.; no further record found from Sergeant 11/1/1861; transferred to Company B promoted to Batt. Com. Sgt 11/1/1861; discharged 8/16/1862 on surgeon's certificate of disability substitute; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dep. transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out to date 10/3/1865 by order of War Dept. mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh. On expiration of term of service mustered out 5/24/1865 at Camp Dennison, Oh. by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 Appointed__; prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. appointed corporal 11/1/1864; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. promoted to 2nd Lieutenant from 1st Sgt. 6/1/1862; to 1st lieutenant 3/4/1863; to Captain 5/9/1864, but not mustered discharged 11/4/1864 at Washington D.C. on surgeon's certificate discharged 9/28/1862 at Yellow Springs, Oh. On surgeon's certificate.

212

Landreth, Wells

Pvt.

43

4/6/1864

Co. F

Lane, Asa Lane, Eugene Lang, Andrew M.

Pvt. Pvt. corporal

23 18 29

8/28/1862 2/14/1865 9/10/1861

Co. C Co. E Co.A

Lanier, Lewis Lantz, George W.

Pvt. Pvt.

21 20

9/5/1862 2/17/1865

Co. E Co. A

Lapish, Marquis Lapole, Martin

Saddler Pvt.

18 26

9/11/1861 9/16/1861

Co. D Co. B

Lapole, Martin Larkin, William Launsbury, William Lavin, Albert Lawrence, August Lawrence, James L. Lawrence, John G. Lawton, George P. Lawton, George W. Lawyer, John Laycock, John J. Layfield, George T. Layman, S.B. Laymon, Alfred

Pvt. Pvt.

26 40

9/16/1861 10/10/186 1 10/31/186 1 2/7/1865 3/29/1865 9/17/1861

Co. M Co. I

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

22 23 17

Co. M Co. E Co. B Co. H

Pvt. Pvt. Com. Ser. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. 18

9/18/1861 2/6/1865

Co. C Co. D

mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; no further record mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 9/29/1864 by order of War dep. discharged2/15/1864 at Camp Dennison, Oh., on surgeon's certificate mustered out 10/30/1865 appointed 12/26/1864; captured 3/10/1865 near Fayetteville, N. C.; paroled_____; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh. By order of War Dept. ; veteran. transferred to Co. M 3/1/1862 transferred from Company B 3/1/1861; mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service discharged 5/19/1862 at Shiloh, Tenn. On surgeon's certificate left sick at Pittsburgh Landing 8/31/1862; no further record found mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 9/26/1865 on surgeon's certifcate of disability discharged 6/20/1862 on surgeon's certificate discharged 9/28/1862 at Yellow Springs, Oh., on surgeon's certificate.

27 34 24 17 18 36

8/28/1862 2/23/1865 10/9/1861 3/1/1865 9/30/1861 2/14/1865

Co. C Co. L Co. M Co. F Co. G Co. M

appointed 1/1/1865; mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War. Dep. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865 by order of War Dept.

213

Lazro, John

Pvt.

21

9/12/1861

Co. F

League, Samuel Leasure, Morgan

Sgt. Pvt.

19 25

2/22/1865 9/5/1861

Co. B Co. G

Lecky, Hugh Ledwell, Thomas J. Ledwell, William Lee, George Lee, Henry Lee, Samuel

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

41 18 40 18 31 29

1/4/1864 2/29/1864 9/14/1861 2/13/1865 3/22/1865 3/22/1865

Co. K Co. D Co. I Co. K Co. F Co. F

mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran appointed Corporal 7/5/1865; Sgt. 10/15/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 discharged 3/13/1864 on surgeon's certificate prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/8165 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 died 4/1/1862 of gun-shot wound at Purdy, Tenn. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 5/24/1865 at camp Dennison, Oh., by order of War Dept. mustered out 1/27/1865 mustered out 11/15/1864 mustered out 11/29/1864 mustered out 11/29/1864 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 killed 7/23/1864 in action near Decatur, Ala. mustered out 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron; discharged 8/12/1865 by order of War Dept. died 6/6/1862 appointed____; mustered out10/8/1864 near Marietta, Ga. by order of War dept. mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dep. mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dep. missing in action 4/8/1865; no further record found mustered out 6/18/1865 at Camp Dennison, Oh., by order of War Dept. transferred from Co. G, 7th O.V.C., 7/27/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865

Lee, William B. Leeds, Andrew Leeds, Lafayette Leeds, Moses Leeds, Washington Leever, Thomas Legler, Herman Leising, Joseph

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Sgt.

21 35 21 27 18 20 18

2/19/1864 1/24/1862 9/16/1861 9/26/1861 9/10/1861 2/17/1865 9/29/1862 2/16/1864

Co. L Co. B Co. A Co. B Co. A Co. M Co. I Co. L

Leist, James Lellyett, Richard Lemmom, Thomas A. Leonard, George Leonard, John Leonard, William

Pvt. Sgt.

___ 37

_______ 9/10/1865

Co. C Co. L

Q.M.S. Pvt. Pvt. Sgt.

21 29 19 25

9/11/1861 9/19/1864 9/26/1864 9/8/1863

Co. D Co. B Co. B Co. B

Lever, Howard S.

Pvt.

18

3/3/1865

Co. F

Levering, Francis

Pvt.

25

9/8/1862

Co. B

214

Lewis, Allen Lewis, Francis M. Lewis, Martin Lewis, Samuel W.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. corporal

22 19 28 19

9/26/1861 2/22/1865 3/29/1865 8/30/1861

Co. K Co. F Co. F Co. G

Lewis, Thomas

Pvt.

22

8/27/1862

Co. H

Lewis, William T. Light, Daniel W. Likens, David W. Limberger, George

Pvt. Sgt. Pvt. Pvt.

20

10/8/1861 2/1/1862 2/10/1865 2/26/1864

Co. H Co. M Co. F Co. G

20 24

mustered out 11/4/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged by civil authority mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. promoted to 1st Lieutenant and Adjutant 110th Regiment U.S. Colored Troops 1/2/1864; resigned 9/30/1865 discharged 10/10/1863 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred to Co. H____. transferred from Co. G_____; mustered out to date 10/30/1865 by order of War Dept. transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 5/1/1865; mustered out 6/26/1865 appointed 5/1/1865; mustered out 6/26/1865 from Sergeant 4/21/1865; mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dep. appointed 1/15/1864; promoted to Regt. Com. Sgt. 4/21/1865 discharged 11/29/1863 at Cincinnati, Oh., on surgeon's certificate wounded____; transferred to 7th O.V.C. 10//10/1862 mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran mustered out 11/29/1864 mustered out 10/30/1865 appointed 7/1/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 died 2/22/1863 at Germantown, Tenn.

Limberger, George

Pvt.

24

2/26/1864

Co. H

Limbird, James Lind, Addison Lind, Thomas H.

Pvt. Sgt. Q. M.S. Com. Ser. Com. Sgt.

20 22 21

1/1/1861 8/29/1862 8/29/1862

Co. C Co. C Co. C

Lind, Whipple Lind, Whipple Lindsay, Andrew J. Lindsey, Eben R. Lindsey, William J. Line, Emerias Line, Randolph Link, William Little, D.K.

25 25

8/28/1862 8/28/1862

Staff Co. G

Q.M.S. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. corporal corporal

28 30 22 24 42 25 32

9/12/1861 11/1/1861 10/16/186 1 9/10/1861 2/17/1865 2/17/1865 10/3/1861

Co. M Co. M Co. K Co. A Co. A Co. I Co. G

215

Little, Edwin C. Little, Samuel Llewellyn, William

Sgt. Pvt. Sgt.

34 38 32

9/20/1861 12/26/186 3 1/31/1865

Co. K Co. M Co. I

Lloyd, Abner Loe, Isaac

Pvt. Pvt.

24 20

10/21/186 1 9/18/1861 11/12/186 1 3/22/1862 2/10/1865 1/1/1862

Co. C Co. C

Logan, John Lomax, Robert Lombard, Levi Long, David

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

Co. G Co. H Co. F Co. F

appointed 11/14/1861; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 7/1/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration date of service prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. discharged 16/17/1862 on surgeon's certificate

18

Long, Eli Long, Isaac

Pvt. Pvt.

19 32

9/13/1861 10/15/186 1

Co. I Co. G

mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh. , on expiration of term of service

Long, James

Bugler

23

9/21/1861

Co. F

Long, Miner S.

Pvt.

18

2/20/1864

Co. C

Long, Nathan Long, Thomas Longaworth, Cornelius Longhouse, Andrew Lotz, John

2nd Lieut. Musicia n Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

21 27 29 17 18

9/11/1861 9/23/1861 8/28/1862 9/17/1861 3/8/1865

Co. D Band Co. K Co. L Co. L

promoted to chief Bugler 11/1/1861; no further record found transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; appointed 1st Sgt. From corporal____;promoted to 2nd Lieut. 2/25/1863; to 1st Lieut. 5/9/1864 but not mustered; mustered out 12/3/1864 on expiration of term of service discharged 6/6/1862 by order of War Dept. mustered 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept. no final record mustered out with company 10/30/1865 absent 8/31/1864; orderly to General Logan; no further record found appointed___; died 9/9/1862 Eldorado, Oh.

Louk, Adam Louk, John H.

Pvt. corporal

20 18

9/12/1861 9/14/1861

Co. F Co. F

216

Love, Samuel

Sgt.

37

2/6/1865 10/24/186 1

Co. H

Lovin, Thomas

Sgt. Bat. Q.M. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

18

Co. E

Lowe, James Lowe, James Lowery, John Loyd, Edward

26 26 20 19

11/1/1861 11/1/1861 9/11/1861 10/14/186 1

Staff Co. M Co. D Co. H

Lucken, George B. Luckey, Joseph W. Ludlow, George

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

35 18

9/21/1864 2/8/1865 9/21/1861 11/23/186 3 9/28/1864 9/15/1862 9/9/1862 3/31/1865 2/3/1862 10/24/186 1 9/27/1861 2/24/1864 4/1/1863

Co. D Co. K Co. H

Luke, John G. Lumley, William Lutz, George Lynch, Cornelius Lynch, David Lynn, Isaac R. Lynn, James D. Mace, Washington L Macka, Henry Madaka, Frederick

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Sgt. corporal Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

19 19 24 24 27 24 18 25 32 20

Co. M Co. B Co. A Co. C Co. D Co. E Co. E Co. L Co. I Co. B

appointed 7/5/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed___; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran Battalion Quarter Master from private 11/1/1861;missing since 12/31/1861 promoted to 1st Lt. and Batt. Quartermaster 11/1/1861 discharged 5/26/1863 on surgeon's certificate discharged 10/17/1862 on surgeon's certificate captured 3/10/1865 in action near Fayetteville, N.C.; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh. By order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 6/21/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 5/24/1865 at Camp Dennison, Oh., by order of War Dept. captured 4/25/1865 near Durham Station, N.C. Killed in action near Benton Station. Alabama, 10/20/1863 appointed 5/1/1865; mustered out 6/26/1865 appointed_____; mustered out with company 10/30/1865. died 6/24/1862 in camp near Corinth, Miss. discharged 6/22/1862 on surgeon's certificate died 12/19/1861 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. G, 7th O.V.C., 7/27/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out 9/18/1865 at Columbus ,Oh. ,by order of War Dept.

Magruder, James Mahone, Americus

Pvt.

28

5/7/1863

Co. B

Pvt.

28

9/24/1862

Co. G

217

Mahone, James W.

Pvt.

22

9/24/1862

Co. G

Mahoney, Daniel

Pvt.

19

9/20/1862

Co. G

Mahringer, Henry Mais, Christian Major, Robert

Pvt. Pvt. Ser. Maj.

35 36 27

9/11/1862 2/16/1865 9/7/1861

Co. M Co. I Staff

Major, Robert

2nd Lieut.

27

9/7/1861

Co. F

Majors, Francis M. Malatt, Isaac Mallot, Uriah Malone, Michael

Pvt. corporal Pvt. Pvt.

22 27 38

9/3/1861 2/7/1865 10/31/186 1 9/8/1861

Co. M Co. L Co. L Co. H

mustered out 8/25/1865 at Columbus, Oh., by order of War Dept. captured and paroled 12/17/1862 at Battle of Lexington, Tenn. mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 11/1/1861; to 2nd Lieutenant 6/1/1862 promoted from Sgt. Major 6/1/1862; to 1st Lieutenant 2/18/1864 but not mustered; mustered out 1/31/1865 on expiration of term of service. transferred to Gunboat Service 1 /31/1862 by order of War Dept. appointed___; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 12/25/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 5/24/1865 at Camp Dennison, Oh., by order of War Dept. appointed 3/20/1864; died 6/2/1864 died 3/29/1863 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed___; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/23/1865 at Columbus, Oh., by order of War Dept., captured 12/18/1862 at battle of Lexington, Tenn., exchanged____; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept. mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service

Malonee, George Malott, Ira Malott, Josephus Malson, Frank Manes, William

Pvt. corporal Pvt. Pvt. corporal

19 18 19 36 36

2/19/1864 10/3/1861 10/13/186 1 2/20/1865 3/6/1865

Co. L Co. B Co. L Co. D Co. E

Maney, Edward Mann, James R. Manning, William B.

Pvt. Pvt.

35 20

3/19/1864 1/4/1865

Co. C Co. E

Pvt.

20

10/4/1861

Co. L

Manuel, Richard Manuel, William

Pvt. Pvt.

42 28

9/11/1862 9/17/1861

Co. H Co. H

218

Marcher, Lewis Mark, Edward

Pvt. Pvt.

38 18

10/20/186 1 2/27/1865

Co. M Co. E

Marker, Caleb Marklain, Emory Markland, Randolph

Captain Sgt. corporal

33 19 25

9/2/1861 2/29/1864 2/15/1865

Co. E Co. G Co. G

Markland, Samuel Markland, William Marks, Charles

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

21 28

2/29/1864 9/17/1864 9/9/1861

Co. G Co. B Co. H

discharged 5/4/1863 on surgeon's certificate mustered out with company 10/30/1865 promoted from 1st Lieutenant 3/4/1863; discharged11/28/1863 for physical disability appointed 7/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 7/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dep. transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 by War Dept.; veteran

Marks, James L. Markwood, James W. Marmion, Henry Maroney, Isaac

Wagon er Pvt. Sgt. corporal

26 19 21 21

10/14/186 1 2/27/1865 9/21/1861 9/14/1861

Co. C Co. B Co. C Co. F

Marpe, Henry

Pvt.

24

2/24/1862

Co. G

Marquis, Scott

Pvt.

18

9/6/1964

Co. I

Marriott, Joseph J.

Pvt.

27

9/23/1861

Co. K

Marshall, Frank J. Marshlll, James S. Martin, August

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

__ 18 20

10/8/1861 2/24/1865 1/8/1865

Co. C Co. B Co. H

mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration date of service discharged 7/22/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 4/10/1865 at Goldsboro, N.C,, by order of War Dept. mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. captured 12/11/1863 on Smokey Mountain, North Carolina mustered out 3/18/1863 at Memphis, Tenn. By order of War Dept. mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept.. mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept.

Martin, Jacob

Pvt.

41

8/29/1862

Co. M

Martin, James

Pvt.

27

9/24/1861

Co. K

Martin, Jefferson

Pvt.

28

2/28/1862

Co. M

219

Martin, John A. Martin, Joseph Martin, Thomas Martiney, John Mason, Henry Massie, Henry Masters, Stephen Mattchett, Thomas L.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

18 21 23 25 21 18 33

2/11/1865 2/16/1865 12/21/186 1 9/17/1861 2/8/1865 3/7/1865 9/29/1862 10/16/186 1

Co. A Co. K Co. D Co. D Co. H Co. H Co. L

Pvt.

23

Co. K

Matter, John B. Mattox, John N. Mauller, John H. Maurer, John

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

19 22 28 26

9/30/1861 10/24/186 1 3/18/1865 2/23/1861

Co. I Co. A Co. E Co. B

Maxwell, John Maxwell, Patrick Maybush, Conrad Mayhugh, Benjamin F.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

20 33 19 21

9/23/1862 9/17/1861 10/17/186 1 10/8/1861

Co. K Co. K Co. I Co. H

McAfee, Samuel McAleb, Wilton R.

Pvt. Pvt.

18 19

11/11/186 1 2/22/1865

Co. C Co. E

McBride, Francis

Saddler

36

8/30/1862

Co. H

McCabe, Patrick McCabe, William

Sgt. Pvt.

23 18

9/29/1862 9/15/1862

Co. E Co. D

mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 died 7/1/1864 at Cartersville, Ga. discharged 12/5/1862 by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 4/17/1863 on surgeon's certificate discharged 5/6/1862 on account of accidental pistolshot wound sent to hospital 5/12/1862 from Corinth, Miss.; no further record found mustered out 11/29/1864 by order of War Dep. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 died 6/19/1862 at Grand Junction, Tn. mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept.. discharged 1/13/1863 on surgeon's certificate of disability discharged 5/30/1864 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; no further record;veteran mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 2/17/1864; captured 3/10/1865 in action near Fayetteville, N.C.; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh. By order of War Dept. appointed 5/1/1865; detached as color bearer 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division Cavalry, 5/2/1865; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept.

220

McCain, Patrick

Pvt.

30

9/10/1861

Co. C

McCammon, John McCann, James McCann, Philip

Sgt. Pvt. corporal

20 21 29

9/20/1861 3/8/1865 2/1/1865

Co. I Co. K Co. D

McCarthy, Joseph McCarty, Charles McCarty, Dennis McCarty, Frank

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

19 18 43

3/7/1864 2/4/1865 9/25/1861 2/1/1865

Co. C Co. L Co. H Co. H

McCarty, John McCarty, John McCarty, Patrick

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

24 18 26

9/24/1862 9/25/1861 3/8/1865

Co. H Co. L Co. K

McCauley, John

Pvt.

21

9/12/1861

Co. F

McCausland, Joseph A

Sgt.

24

10/5/1861

Co. K

McChesney, John

Corp.

29

3/10/61

Co. A

McClain, Isaac McClain, Orion McClain, Sylvester McClintic, William McCollough, Alphen J. McCord, Jackson McCowan, Alexander J.

Pvt. Pvt. Com. Sgt. saddler

23 18 24 33

9/11/1861 9/25/1861 9/10/1861 3/7/1865

Co. D Co. L Co. L Co. I

discharged 9/20/1861 at Camp Dick Corwin on surgeon's certificate appointed___; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed____; mustered out with company 10/30/1865. transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 never joined company mustered 10/30/1865 mustered out 5/24/1865 at Camp Dennison, Oh., by order of War Dept. died 10/8/1863 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 captured 8/8/1863 near Rienzi, Miss.; exchanged___; mustered out 10/27/1864 at Chattanooga, Tenn. On expiration of term of service. prisoner of war; appointed from corporal 2/17/1864; mustered out 6/9/1865 at camp Chase,Oh., by order of War Dept. appointed 11/15/1862;mustered out 6/9/1865 order of War Dep. mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh. By order of War Dept. discharged 7/9/1862 on surgeon's certificate veteran mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. never joined company mustered out with company 10/30/1865

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

40

8/29/1862 9/25/1861 9/11/1863

Co. M Co. H Co. H

20

221

McCoy, Joseph C. McCracken, John R. McCullough, Alpheus J. McDonald, Frank McDonald, John McElfresh, William

1st Sgt. Pvt. farrier Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

18

1/2/1864 9/5/1861

Co. M Co. H Co. M Co. H Co. L Co. H

38 39 26 34

8/28/1862 2/4/1865 1/24/1865 3/3/1865

McEntire, James McFadden, David R. McFarland, Frank McFarland, Medbury H

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

35 28 24 24

9/18/1861 9/11/1863 9/30/1861 9/11/1861

Co. B Co. H Co. F Co. D

mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1865 on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 captured 11/21/1864 in action near Canton, Ga.; paroled; mustered out 6/24/1865 by order of War Dep. mustered out with company 10/30/1865

McFarland, Medbury H McFarland, William W.

Pvt. R.Q.M.

24 39

9/11/1861 8/31/1861

Co. M Staff

McGarry, John W.

Pvt.

19

11/8/1861

Co. C

McGarry, Milton McGee, Charles W.

Pvt.

20

10/16/186 1

Co. C

Pvt.

29

10/8/1861

Co. C

McGee, John McGee, John R. McGehan, Courtland McGeorge, Griffith J.

Sgt. Pvt. corporal farrier

18 21 23 29

9/2/1861 1/31/1865 10/2/1861 2/14/1865

Co. B Co. K Co. I Co. K

transferred to Co. M 1/3/1862 transferred from Company D 1/3/1862; discharged 6/29/1865 at David's Island, New York Harbor on surgeon's certificate discharged by order of War Dep. 6/30/1862 transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865;veteran transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; no further record found; veteran mustered out 5/16/1865 at Nashville, Tenn. , by order of War Dept. appointed 11/1/1861; mustered out 11/29/1864; re-enlisted 2/3/1865 for 1 year; mustered out 6/13/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865

McGhee, George

Pvt.

22

9/13/1861

Co. I

mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/5/1864 at Columbus , Oh., on expiration of term of service

222

McGinn, John McGinnis, Edward McGohen, Thomas McGowan, Hugh B. McGowen, Alexander McGowen, John C. McGowen, Joseph McGraw, Michael McGrew, Alfred McGrew, George W. McKay, Charles McKay, Charles Mckee, Robert F. McKenny, Samuel B. McKinney, Andrew McKinney, George McKinney, William McLean, John

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Bugler

19 20 20 27

9/2/1862 2/2/1865 9/10/1861 11/11/186 3

Co. F Co. E Co. A Co. K

mustered out 9/4/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service appointed___: mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service discharged 10/18/1862 at Memphis on surgeon's certifcate mustered out 9/29/1864 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/2/1864 at Chattanooga, Tenn, on expiration of term of service discharged 4/28/1863 on surgeon's certificate discharged4/19/1863 on surgeon's certificate

Pvt.

18

9/8/1861 10/20/186 1

Co. E

corporal

26

Co. E

Farrier Pvt. Pvt.

40 20 18

9/5/1861 9/6/1861 2/26/1864

Co. C Co. B Co. L

Pvt. Sgt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

38 19 19 24 21 39 29 37 36

10/3/1861 10/8/1861 10/8/1861 9/12/1861 10/29/186 1 2/23/1865 2/14/1865 2/14/1865 9/11/1861

Co. F Co. M Co. M Co. E Co. B Co. D Co. G Co. G Co. D

McLean, John

Pvt.

38

9/5/1864

Co. M

McMacher, Green McMahon, John W. McManus, Charles H.

corporal corporal

21 23

1/6/1862 9/27/1861

Co. F Co. L

Pvt.

23

10/8/1861

Co. E

mustered out 11/29/1864 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 10/19/1862 on surgeon's certificate of disability mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept.. appointed 10/31/1862; mustered out 1/6/1865 at Savannah, Ga., on expiration of term of service mustered out 11/3/1864 on expiration of term of service discharged 10/2/1862 at Columbus , Oh., on surgeon's certificate

223

McMillan, William

Surgeo n

30

4/26/1863

Staff

McMillen, John W.

Pvt.

18

9/13/1864

Co. C

McMinis, Eli McMulkin, Christie McMurchy, William H.

1st Sgt. corporal Pvt.

18 18 20

9/10/1861 1/27/1864 9/10/1861

Co. A Co. L Co. A

transfer from 9th O.V.C. 7/23/1865; Assistant Su Assitant Surgeon to Surgeon 8/3/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out 9/22/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. on expiration of term of service appointed from private; to 2nd Lieutenant 9/4/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 appointed corporal 9/30/1864; sgt. 4/22/1865; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865; veteran mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred to Co. G 7/28/1865 transferred from Co. C 7/28/1865; appointed____; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 captured 11/26/1864 near Waynesboro, Ga.: mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh. By order of War Dept. discharged6/23/1862 at St. Louis, Mo., on surgeon's certificate appointed; mustered out 10/30/1865 died 5/5/1862 at Jefferson Barracks, Mo. prisoner of war; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran mustered out April___1865, on expiration of term of service

McMurray, James K.P.

Sgt.

19

8/27/1864

Co. I

McNabb, James McNamara, John McNamara, Patrick

Saddler Pvt. Pvt.

20 30 19

11/25/186 1 2/2/1865 2/27/1865

Co. C Co. D Co. C

McNamara, Patrick McNamara, Patrick McNeil, Neil

corporal corporal Pvt.

17 27 30

2/27/1865 2/27/1865 8/31/1861

Co. G Co. H Co. B

McPherson, Jeremiah McPherson, John J. McSwegin, James D. McWhinney, John W. McWhinney, William McWister, James C.

Pvt.

22

1/4/1864 10/18/186 1 2/14/1865 10/4/1861

Co. F

Pvt. Sgt. Pvt.

21 26 22

Co. E Co. A Co. E

Pvt. Pvt.

18 20

10/3/1861 3/22/1862

Co. E Co. H

224

Mead, Jarvis Meander, Henry C.

Hos.St' d

23

11/1/1861

Staff

Pvt.

18

10/5/1861

Co. K

Mearhoff, Christian Mearhoff, Christian

Sgt. Pvt.

25 25

9/30/1862 9/30/1862

Co. F Co. H

mustered out 11/9/1864 mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service transferred from Co. H 10/31/1863; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. transferred to Co. F 10/31/1863 discharged 3/16/1863 at Kookuk, Iowa on surgeon's certificate wounded 10/4/1862 at Battle of Corinth, Miss.; discharged 11/21/1862 at Mound City Ill., on surgeon's certificate mustered out 10/27/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out 6/7/1865 at Washington D.C. by order of War Dept. discharged 5/4/1863 on account of wounds received 4/7/1862 in Battle of Shiloh, Tn. mustered as pvt. ; appointed from sgt. 10/12/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865 appointed 2/1//1865; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh N.C. by order of War Dept. discharged 6/22/1863 on surgeon's certificate transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran appointed from corporal 11/1/1864; mustered out 5/24/1865 t Columbus, Oh., by order of War Dept.

Mee, James

Pvt.

20

9/26/1861

Co. H

Mee, Michael Meeker, Arthur J. Meeker, Leonidas Meenach, Robert B. Meguire, Isaac Meguire, William H.H. Meil, Herman Mendenhall, Edward G. Merchant, John W.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

22 21 21

10/22/186 1 9/26/1861 9/10/1861 12/26/186 3 10/8/1861 10/14/186 1 9/4/1861

Co. H Co. I Co. L

Pvt. Pvt.

44 17

Co. C Co. M

Pvt. Pvt.

18 32

Co. M Co. M

1st Sgt. Pvt.

18 18

9/17/1861 3/17/1865

Co. K Co. A

Mering, David

Q.M.S.

26

9/2/1862

Co. H

Merrill, Israel Mertz, John F.

Pvt. Pvt.

20

8/23/1864 1/26/1862

Co. I Co. F

Messenger, Asa

Pvt.

18

11/4/1861

Co. C

Messick, George Messner, Christian

Sgt. Pvt.

41 22

2/1/1864 10/21/186 2

Co. M Co. I

225

Mestney, Frederick Metzger, Jacob Metzger, William H. Milbruner, Christopher

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

22 24 18 31

9/15/1862 9/11/1862 10/8/1861 10/28/186 1

Co. L Co. B Co.A Co. M

captured 3/10/1865 in action near Fayetteville, N.C.: mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dept. mustered out 12/24/1864 by order of War Dep. mustered out 11/29/1864

Miles, Elwood T.

Q.M.S.

29

9/12/1861 10/14/186 1

Co. F

Miles, Samuel

Pvt.

24

Co. F

Milholland, John Miller, Benjamin

corporal Pvt.

18 18

10/8/1861 3/3/1865

Co. H Co. E

Miller, Benjamin Miller, Benjamin F. Miller, Blasure

Sgt. corporal Pvt.

25 26 25

9/12/1861 9/12/1861 9/14/1861

Co. M Co. K Co. G

appointed from pvt. 9/1/1862; promoted to 2nd Lieutenant Co. I 1/13/1865; veteran mustered out 11/2/1864 at Chattanooga, Tenn, on expiration of term of service appointed_____; mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Company K 7/1/1863; appointed from corporal 1/1/1864; mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service transferred to Co. M 7/1/1863 mustered 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service;reenlisted2/6/1865 for one year; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed___; discharged 11/26/1862 at LaGrange Tn., on surgeon's certificate wounded 10/29/1863 in action near Cherokee Creek, Ala. ; transferred to Co. H 19th Regiment Veteran Reserve Corps from which mustered out 12/26/1864 at Elmira, Ny., on expiration of term of service

Miller, Cassius M. Miller, Charles

Pvt. Pvt.

18

11/14/186 1 9/28/1862

Co. K Co. M

Miller, Charles A.

Q.M.S.

19

9/12/1861

Co. M

Miller, Cyrus Miller, David Miller, Frank

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

18 29 18

9/15/1861 2/14/1865 2/6/1865

Co. E Co. I Co. K

Miller, Hayden

Pvt.

19

9/15/1862

Co. D

mustered out 6/1/1865 at Nashville, Tn. by order of War Dept.

226

Miller, James

Sgt.

23

9/10/1861 10/11/186 1

Co. M

Miller, James H.

1st Sgt.

20

Co. D

Miller, James H. Miller, Jefferson Miller, Jesse Miller, John Miller, John Miller, John Miller, John

1st Lieut. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

20 29 18 23 21 18 18

10/11/186 1 2/14/1865 3/3/1865 9/28/1862 9/18/1861 2/16/1864 9/18/1861 10/19/186 1 10/12/186 1

Co. L Co. G Co. E Co. B Co. B Co. F Co. M

appointed Corporal 11/1/1862; Sgt. 1/1/1863 no further record found appointed from pvt. 5/1/1863; promoted to 2nd Lieut. Co. L 1/13/1865; veteran promoted to 2nd Lt. from 1st Sgt. Co. D 1/13/1865; to 1st Lt. 4/8/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 12/24/1864 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; no further record; veteran discharged 7/23/1862 at Waynesville , Oh. On surgeon's certificate discharged on 9/19/1864 at Louisville, Ky. On surgeon's certificate mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 captured near Coldwater, Miss., mustered out 11/28/1864 on expiration of term of service discharged 11/4/1862 at Bolivar, Tenn. killed 10/16/1864 in action at Snake Creek Gap, Ga. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 died 8/14/1864 at Cincinnati, Oh. transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865

Miller, John D.

Pvt.

24

Co. C

Miller, John W.

Pvt.

40

Co. C

Miller, John W. Miller, Michael Miller, Robert

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

43 18 18

2/10/1864 3/4/1865 2/8/1865

Co. C Co. E Co. M

Miller, Robert C. Miller, Robert M. Miller, Samuel B. Miller, Thomas H.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

21 31 24 18

9/12/1861 9/14/1861 2/14/1864 3/29/1865

Co. C Co. C Co. F Co. G

Miller, William Miller, William J. Miller, William W.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

31 25 23

9/15/1862 9/26/1862 8/28/1862

Co. G Co. E Co. B

Miller, William M.

Pvt.

18

3/16/1864

Co. C

227

Miller, William Milligan, Joseph D. Mills, Alfred Milner, Philip

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Bugler

18 21 18 20

3/21/1865 10/16/186 1 10/3/1865 9/10/1861

Co. M Co. K Co. E Co. A

Mitchell, Samuel

corporal

37

9/11/1861

Co. D

Mitter, Dorsey O. Mix, John

Pvt. Pvt.

24 28

9/4/1861 2/4/1865

Co. K Co. A

mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 6/6/1863on surgeon's certificate died 11/14/1862 at Corinth, Miss. mustered out 11/29/1864 by order of War Dep. appointed 11/9/1861; mustered out 11/9/1864 at Columbus , Oh. on expiration of term of service. captured 10/29/1863 in action near Cherokee, Ala., mustered out 6/19/1865 at Columbus , Oh., by order of War Dept. mustered out 12/12/1865 at New Orleans, La. By order of War Dept. appointed; mustered out 10/6/1865 on expiration date of service appointed 7/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/14/1865 mustered out 11/3/1864 by order of War Dept. mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service; reenlisted2/24/1865 for one year; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service

Moak, William

Pvt.

30

8/28/1862

Co. D

Moller, Barney Molloy, John Molson, John C. Monjar, Thomas

corporal Corpora l Pvt. Pvt.

23 20 20 20

10/6/1862 8/12/1862 9/12/1862 10/4/1861

Co. A Co. G Co. A Co. L

Montagnier, Theodore Monteith, Thomas Montgomery, Robert Montgomery, Robert Moody, Walter P. Moore, David Moore, Dennis

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. corporal Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

22 26 20 20 21 18 19

9/4/1861 10/5/1861 12/12/186 4 2/20/1865 9/28/1861 2/23/1865 9/25/1861

Co. K Co. H Co. G Co. I Co. C Co. L Co. B

Moore, Joseph Moore, Oliver

Pvt. corporal

22 18

9/17/1861 2/7/1865

Co. L Co. M

appointed 7/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration date of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 mustered 11/3/1864 at Chattanooga, on expiration of term of service appointed 9/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865

228

Moran, John

Pvt.

33

9/23/1862

Co. H

Morath, Frank P.

Pvt.

18

10/8/1861

Co. C

Morehead, Calvin Morehead, Joseph W. Morford, James Morford, Napoleon B.

Pvt.

20

12/5/1861

Co. C

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

23 17 25

9/20/1861 10/14/186 1 9/10/1861

Co. M Co. L Co. A

Morgan, John E. Morgan, John O. Morgan, Patrick

Pvt. corporal Pvt.

22 22 20

1/27/1862 2/7/1865 2/1/1865

Co. G Co. H Co. G

mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. discharged 3/18/1863 at Memphis on surgeon's certificate. transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran transferred to Gunboat Service 2/28/1862 by order of War Dept. discharged 12/20/1861 by civil authority discharged 1/1/1863 on surgeon's certificate of disability prisoner of war; mustered out 4/20/1865 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service appointed 7/14/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 reduced fro 1st Sgt., to pvt. at his own request 10/31/1862; appointed. Sgt. 2/10/1863; mustered out 10/27/1864 discharged 6/1/1863 on surgeon's certificate

Morgan, Robert W. Morgan, Silas R. Morin, John M.

Com. Sgt. corporal Pvt.

40 40 27

9/6/1861 10/28/186 1 12/21/186 1 10/14/186 1 2/20/1865

Co. F Co. M Co. D

Morris, Charles H. Morris, Frank

corporal Pvt.

20 21

Co. M Co. A

Morris, John H.

Pvt.

23

1/22/1862

Co. H

Morris, John K.

Pvt.

19

9/10/1861

Co. A

Morris, Manuel Morris, Peter Morris, Thomas M.

1st Sgt. corporal Pvt.

31 46 20

10/1/1861 9/23/1861 10/14/186 1

Co. I Co. G Co. H

Morrow, James A.

Pvt.

18

1/6/1864

Co. I

appointed 1/1//1863; mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out 6/14/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 at Savannah, Ga., on expiration of service captured 6/19/1863 near Coldwater, Mississippi; accidentally drowns near Huntsville, Ala. 3/1/1864 appointed 11/1/1861; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service discharged 7/23/1862 at on surgeon's certificate discharged 12/1/1862 on surgeon's certificate prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept.

229

Morrow, William G. Morton, George B. Mountz, Sylnaus

Pvt. Pvt. Sgt.

22 26 19

9/11/1862 9/26/1861 3/17/1865

Co. H Co. I Co. I

Mugavin, John Mullarky, John Mullen, Charles H. Muller, Albert Muller, Felix Muller, Felix Muller, Peter Muller, Thomas Mumma, Charles Mumma, John R. Munger, Christopher Murphy, Clement Murphy, Edward Murphy, James

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Ch'f. Bug. Bugler Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. corporal Pvt. Captain Q.M.S. Pvt.

26 25 21 27 21 21 27

8/12/1861 2/25/1865 9/10/1861 10/13/186 1 9/23/1861 9/23/1861 9/21/1861 8/20/1862

Co. F Co. E Co. L Co. B Staff Co. K Co. H Co. B Co. I Co. I Co. C Co. I Co. I Co. C

captured 6/9/1863 while on picket duty at Corinth, Miss., exchanged___; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept. died 7/1/1862 at Hamilton, Oh. appointed 7/18/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/2/1864 at Chattanooga, Tenn, on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 1/30/1863 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 11/29/1864 from Bugler 9/22/1863; mustered out 10/30/1865 promoted to Chief Bugler 9/22/1863 mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out 6/9/1865 by order of War Dep. mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran appointed 7/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865

18 18 22 37 31 25

11/1/1861 2/15/1865 9/3/1861 9/3/1861 11/1/1861 8/9/1862

appointed 11/1/1861;died 10/24/1864 at Cartersville, Ga. mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N. C., by order of War Dept. mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service captured 4/6/1865 near Faison's Depot, N.C., no further record mustered out 10/30/1865 promoted from 1st Lieutenant 10/17/1862; mustered out 12/3/1864 on expiration of term of service

Murphy, James T. Murphy, John

Pvt. Pvt.

29

8/27/1862 11/12/186 1

Co. E Co. H

Murphy, Joseph Murphy, Thomas

Pvt. Pvt.

19 30

9/26/1862 2/13/1865

Co. G Co. B

Murray, Charles Murray, James Murray, James

Captain Pvt. Pvt.

25 18 18

9/2/1861 10/23/186 2 3/11/1865

Co. I Co. E Co. E

prisoner of war; mustered out with company 10/30/1865

230

Murray, Thomas Mushrush, John B. Myer, Joseph Myer, Leopold, Myers, Benjamin Myers, Charles Myers, David

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Q.M.S. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

26 23 18 21 18 19 30

9/11/1861 3/14/1865 2/9/1865 2/12/1864 2/25/1865 2/13/1865 3/23/1865

Co. G Co. D Co. B Co. L Co. K Co. I Co. M

Myers, George Myers, Harman B.

Pvt. Pvt.

22 18

9/28/1861 9/11/1863

Co. I Co. G

Myers, Henry Myers, Jacob Myers, John W. Myers, Joseph

Sgt. saddler Pvt. Pvt.

29 27 19 19

8/28/1862 9/23/1861 3/20/1865 3/20/1865

Co. D Co. M Co. I Co. K

Myers, Randolph M. Myers, Ulysses Nash, Enos W.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

19 20 20

10/21/186 1 10/14/186 1 9/16/1861

Co. C Co. M Co. A

Neal, John M. Nealon, Patrick Nealon, Thomas

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

19 28 21

9/5/1861 2/14/1865 2/14/1862

Co. C Co. G Co. F

Neely, James J. Neff, Barnhart

Farrier Pvt.

34 30

9/21/1861 2/21/1865

Co. D Co. M

killed 4/6/1862 in Battle of Shiloh mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865 appointed 9/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed corporal1/1/1863;Sgt. 5/1/1865; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept. no further record found mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; no further record;veteran Transferred from Company B 11/1/1861 mustered out 11/29/1864 captured 6/19/1863 near Coldwater, Miss.;mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of terms of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged to date 2/15/1862 at Columbus, Oh. By order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865

231

Nelson, John W. Nermire, Philip

Pvt. Pvt.

19 39

9/8/1861 3/27/1865

Co. C Co. B

Newberry, Reason T.

Pvt.

24

10/10/186 1 11/29/186 3

Co. L

Newell, John W.

Pvt.

18

Co. K

Newell, William Newkirk, William H. Newman, Charles A.

Pvt.

18

12/6/1863

Co. L

saddler

27

9/8/1862

Co. K

Pvt.

1/26/1862

Co. F

Newman, Levi M. Newman, William

Pvt. Pvt.

18 21

3/9/1864 2/4/1865 10/16/186 1

Co. C Co. I

Nicholas, Richard

Sgt.

23

Co. H

Nichols, David G. Nichols, John P.

corporal Pvt.

20 17

10/7/1861 10/7/1861

Co. M Co. M

Nichols, Robert H. Nichols, W.H.H.

1st Sgt. Pvt.

24 19

10/3/1861 10/8/1861

Co. M Co. M

Nichols, William E. Niehaus, Henry Ninskern, Nicholas Jr.

1st Lieut. Pvt. Pvt.

24 22 18

9/16/1861 9/6/1861 9/8/1861

Co. A Co. B Co. C

captured 3/10/1865 at Soloman's Grove, N.C.; mustered out 6/30/1865 at Camp Chase , Oh. By order of War Dept. mustered out 10/30/1865 captured 7/23/1864 in action near Cartersville, Ga., mustered out 5/30/1865 at Columbus , Oh., on expiration of term of service prisoner of war; mustered out 6/14/1865, at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. captured 7/23/1864 in action near Cartersville, Ga., mustered out 6/21/1865 at Annapolis, Md., by order of War Dept. mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. discharged 1/20/1863 for wounds received 10/5/1862 in battle Metamora, Miss. transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 4/1/1865; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order appointed 1/1/1862; mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service discharged 12/1/1861 on surgeon's certificate appointed 10/31/1862; mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service to 1st Lieutenant 11/2/1861 from Q.M. Sergeant 11/2/1861; mustered out 6/1/1862 by order of War Dep. prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/1865 by order of War Dep. discharged 11/6/1861 by civil authority

232

Noble, Ulysses Nolan, Patrick S. Noose, Andrew Norris, Granville M.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

18 29 28 18

10/10/186 1 2/20/1865 2/25/1865 9/10/1861

Co. L Co. E Co. E Co. A

Norris, James

Com. Sgt.

22

9/16/1862

Co. H

Norris, James A.

Pvt. Sad. Ser. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

38

8/28/1862

Co. K

North, Charles North, Charles Northup, William Norton, A.A. Norton, Albert

34 34 25 44 18

9/3/1862 9/3/1862 2/1/1865 9/11/1861 3/6/1865

Staff Co. B Co. I Co. C Co. E

Norton, Norris R.

Captain

28

9/26/1861

Co. K

Nunan, Patrick Nutting, Henry W.G. O'Bryon, Richard C.

2nd Lieut. Pvt. Captain

22 42 22

10/8/1861 2/6/1865 9/9/1861

Co. H Co. G Co. B

O'Connor, John

Pvt.

19

9/3/1862

Co. G

Oding, John O'Herron, John

Pvt. Pvt.

40 27

9/17/1861 9/22/1862

Co. G Co. G

Ohlmer, John Oldham, George W.

Pvt. Pvt.

27 21

9/24/1861 2/16/1865

Co. I Co. G

mustered out 11/3/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 died 3/23/1863 at Memphis, Tenn. appointed corporal 11/18/1864; Com. Sgt. 4/1/1865; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept. mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. from Private 11/1/1863; mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War. Dep. promoted to Regiment Saddler Sgt. 11/1/1863 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 died 6/16/1863 at Yellow Springs, Oh. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 resigned 3/12/1863 as a result of wounds received at Wewalla, Miss., 4/5/1862 appointed Sgt. 11/1/1861; promoted to 2nd Lieutenant 2/27/1862; resigned 6/3/1863 on account of disability mustered out with company 10/30/1865 promoted from 1st Lieutenant 3/19/1863 prisoner of war; transferred 3/2/1864 to 120th Co., 2nd Battalion Veteran Reserve Corps from which mustered out 6/29/1865 at Evansville, Ind., by order of War Dept. mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service captured and paroled 12/18/1862 discharged 12/4/1862 at Corinth, Miss., on surgeon's certificate mustered out with company 10/30/1865

233

Oldhauser, William Olt, George

Pvt. Pvt.

35 38

9/23/1861 3/4/1865

Co. M Co. E

Omeara, Stephen Orange, William

Pvt. Pvt.

__ 19

3/24/1864 3/30/1865 10/12/186 4

Co. C Co. M

Osterhaus, Lewis

Pvt.

22

Co. D

Ostrander, Martin O'Sullivan, Michael Otto, William Overturf, Joseph E.

Pvt. Sgt. Pvt. 2nd Lieut.

43 46 37

9/23/1862 3/17/1863 2/5/1864

Co. A Co. E Co. F

26

9/5/1861

Co. E

Overturf, Joseph E.

Captain

26

9/5/1861

Co. H

Owens, Archibald

Pvt.

20

2/29/1864

Co. C

Owens, James Owens, John F. Owens, John F.

Pvt. Musicia n Pvt.

25 22 22

1/27/1864 9/28/1861 9/28/1861

Co. M Band Co. C

Owens, William Packer, Benjamin F.

Captain Com. Sgt.

38

9/26/1861 10/14/186 1

Co. K

23

Co. H

discharged 6/6/1863 on surgeon's certificate mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh. By order of War Dept. captured 6/19/1863 in action near Coldwater, Mississippi; mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dep. appointed_____; mustered out with company 10/30/1865. killed 3/10/1865 in Fayetteville, N.C., assigned from Company H 9/30/1863; returned to Company H 3/31/1864 appointed sgt 11/1/1861;1st Sgt. ___; promoted to 2nd Lieutenant 3/23/1863; assigned to Co. E 9/30/1863; returned to company 3/31/1864; promoted to 1st Lieutenant 7/25/1864; to captain 1/13/1865; to major 10/25/1865 but not mustered ; mustered with out company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; mustered out 7/5/1865 at Camp Dennison, Oh. By order of War Dept. discharged 6/6/1862 by order of War Dept. transferred to regimental band 11/1/1861 promoted from 1st Lt. 4/13/1863; mustered out 12/3/1864 on expiration of term of service appointed from pvt. 7/4/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865

234

Pagget, Alexander W.

Sgt.

20

9/3/1861

Co. C

Paggett, David W. Palladay, Franklin

Sgt. Pvt.

18 26

9/6/1861 10/2/1861

Co. C Co. K

Palmer, Joseph

Sgt.

20

10/20/186 1

Co. C

Palmer, Richard Parker, William E.

Pvt. Pvt.

19 32

9/11/1861 9/17/1861

Co. D Co. A

Parks, Henry M. Parks, William E. Parmerlee, Lemuel V.

Pvt. Pvt.

20 16

8/27/1862 3/23/1865

Co. E Co. M

Sgt.

26

9/15/1861

Co. E

Parrish, Joseph E. Parrot, David Parsons, George W. Parvin, Hosea Parvin, James E. Passmore, Joseph Patterson, Henry H. Patterson, Oscar F. Patterson, Robert A.

Pvt. Pvt. Sgt. Pvt. Pvt.

36 19 28 19 43

2/26/1864 2/1/1865 9/20/1861 9/10/1861 9/10/1861

Co. L Co. I Co. C Co. A Co. A

mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., by order of War Dept. mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., by order of War Dept. discharged 7/8/1862 on surgeon's certificate transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865; veteran captured 6/19/1863 in action near Coldwater, Miss.; mustered out to date 7/25/1865 by order of War Dept. discharged 1/23/1863 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N. C., by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed___; died 5/13/1862 on hospital boat near Corinth, Miss. mustered out to date 10/30/1865at Columbus, Oh., by order of War Dept. appointed 5/1/1864; mustered out on 11/29/1864 mustered out 11/29/64 mustered out to date 10/11/1865 by order of War Dept. appointed 7/13/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh N.C. by order of War Dept. died 8/21/1862 at Cincinnati captured 6/19/1863 in action near Coldwater, Miss.; mustered out 11/2/1864 at Chattanooga, Tenn., on expiration of term of service; reenlisted 3/15/1865, for one year; mustered out with company 10/30/1865

Pvt. corporal

35 25

3/6/1865 3/15/1865

Co. I Co. H

Pvt. Pvt.

18 22

10/1/1862 9/10/1861

Co. G Co. A

Patterson, William H.

Pvt.

19

9/12/1861

Co. F

235

Patterson, William M. Patton, Alexander J. Patton, John G. Patton, Joseph P.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. 1st Lieut.

31

9/10/1861 1/2/1862

Co. A Co. G Co. C Co. C

22 22

11/9/1861 9/23/1861

mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out 1/11/1865 on expiration of term of service mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration date of service promoted from Sgt. 4/13/1863 appointed from corporal 3/15/1864; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service wounded 12/6/1862 in action in action at Bear Creek Ala.; died 3/8/1864 of wounds received 6/20/1863 in action at Mud Creek, Mississippi mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 11/4/1861 at Cincinnati, Oh., by civil authority transferred to Company G transferred from Regt. Saddler Sgt. ___: died 10/26/1862 at Bolivar, Tenn. discharged 3/17/1862 on surgeon's certificate prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/1865 by order of War Dep. promoted to hospital steward 10/12/1865 from Private 10/12/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 resigned 7/20/1862 but remained with command until 10/20/1862 discharged 6/6/1862 by order of War Dept. transferred to regimental band 11/1/1861 promoted from Sgt 11/4/1861; resigned 10/4/1862 mustered out 11/29/1864

Pauline, William H.

1st Sgt.

22

9/13/1861

Co. I

Paxson, Elisha Pealy, Frederick

Pvt. Pvt.

18 18

10/1/1861 3/18/1865

Co. E Co. M

Pearce, Albert R. Pearce, Henry

Pvt. Sad. Ser.

18 35

9/23/1861 11/16/186 1 11/16/186 1 9/16/1861 8/28/1862 3/29/1865 3/29/1865 9/30/1861

Co. L Staff

Pearce, Henry Pearson, Mahlon Pearson, William Peddie, William Peddie,William Pegan, Francis

Sgt. corporal Pvt. Pvt. Hos.St' d Pvt.

35 30 23 20 20 20

Co. G Co. L Co. A Co. M Staff Co. B

Pelley, John Pendry, Alexander Pendry, Joseph

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. 1st Lieut. Musicia n Bugler 2nd Lieut. Pvt.

21 19 19

9/24/1861 9/16/1861 4/8/1865

Co. I Co. G Co. M

Penn, Elijah G. Penny, John H. Penny, John H. Penny, John W. Penny, Joshua

26 20 20 21 21

10/3/1861 10/9/1861 10/11/186 1 9/28/1861 9/10/1861

Co. L Band Co. D Co. D Co. A

236

Penny, Richard Penny, Richard

Pvt. Pvt.

36 18

9/10/1861 10/9/1861

Co. A Co. D

Penny, Thomas M. Penny, William Pepper, Franklin B.

corporal Pvt. 2nd Lieut.

24 24 22

9/10/1861 9/10/1861 9/10/1861

Co. A Co. A Co. A

discharged 6/16/1862 on surgeon's certifcate discharged 3/19/1863 on surgeon's certificate appointed; captured 6/19/1863 near Coldwater , Mississippi;mustered out 11/29/1864 by order of War Dep. mustered out 11/29/1864 resigned 10/29/1862 captured 6/19/1863 near Coldwater , Mississippi; discharged 11/29/1864 by order of War Dep. mustered out 2/2/1865 at Twin Sisters Ferry, Ga., on expiration of term of services mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 1/14/1863 on surgeon's certificate mustered out with company 10/30/1865 absent on furlough since 4/30/1862 on account of sickness; no further record found died 5/9/1863 at Memphis, Tenn. mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N. C., by order of War Dept. promoted from Q.M. Sgt. Co. H 1/13/1865; to Captain 4/8/1865 but not mustered; mustered out 5/13/1865 by order of War Dep. appointed corporal 5/8/1862; Q.M. Sgt. 2/1/1863; promoted to 2nd Lieutenant Co. C 1/13/1865; veteran discharged 9/25/1861 at Cincinnati, Oh. On surgeon's certificate of disability appointed 7/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 by order of War Dep. transferred to Co. G 7/28/1865

Pepper, Samuel G.

Pvt.

24

9/10/1861

Co. A

Pepper, William Peppest, James Perkermyer, Martin Perkins, Philip R.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

20 20 40 20

2/1/1862 9/16/1862 10/16/186 1 2/9/1865

Co. I Co. G Co. M Co. M

Perrine, Thomas M. Perry, David

Pvt. Sgt.

23 28

9/17/1861 8/27/1861

Co. L Co. G

Perry, Mortimer

Pvt.

20

9/16/1862

Co. E

Peters, Martin H.

2nd Lieut.

23

2/8/1862

Co. C

Peters, Martin H. Peterson, John

Q.M.S. Pvt.

25

2/7/1862 9/6/1861

Co. H Co. H

Pettibone, John Pettiboue, Edward Pfeifer, John Philips, Granville Phillips, Frederick

Pvt. Sgt. Pvt. Bugler Pvt.

35 21 21 21 19

9/10/1861 2/18/1865 2/23/1865 9/10/1861 3/23/1865

Co. C Co. I Co. B Co. A Co. C

237

Phillips, Frederick

Pvt.

19

3/23/1865

Co. G

Phillips, John

Sgt.

18

11/18/186 3

Co. I

Phillips, Josiah D. Phillips, Peter Phipps, George W. Pickerell, Isaac M. Pickerell, Jesse Pickerell, John R.

farrier Pvt. Pvt. Sgt. corporal Pvt.

30 22 29 30 30 19

9/25/1861 9/9/1862 2/13/1865 9/21/1861 9/21/1861 9/21/1861

Co. E Co. G Co. D Co. M Co. M Co. M

Pierce, Nathaniel Pierce, Richard Pilcher, Jonathan Pine, James L. Pluncket, John R. Podesta, Bartholomew Poe, George Poe, Harry M. Pohlman, John Poland, Samuel Pollard, William A. Pollock, John

Sgt. chaplai n Pvt. Pvt. corporal

21 29 40 26 38

8/27/1861 9/1/1861 9/23/1861 10/6/1861 2/26/1865

Co. G Staff Co. C Co. K Co. L

Sgt. farrier Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

19 35 19 20 23 18 ___

10/3/1861 4/30/1864 2/17/1865 3/15/1865 9/15/1862 10/3/1861 2/10/1862

Co. G Co. M Co. E Co. F Co. B Co. L Co. C

transferred from Co. C , 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed from corporal 7/1/1865; absent in hospital 8/31/1865 at Richmond, Va. ; no further record found appointed___: mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service discharged 5/25/1865 on surgeon's certificate mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 12/13/1862 on surgeon's certificate discharged 12/13/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out 6/9/1865, at Camp Chase, Oh. By order of War Dept; veteran discharged 2/27/1862 by order of War Dep. mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration date of service died 10/31/1863 at his home in Ohio mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh. By order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 died 5/28/1864 near Huntsville, Ala. discharged 4/18/1863 on surgeon's certificate transferred from Co. B McLaugthlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865.

Pomeroy, Albert A.

Sgt.

18

11/20/186 1

Co. C

238

Pomeroy, Ensign

Pvt.

17

3/17/1864

Co. C

Pond, Maynard Poor, Chester M. Poppe, Ernest Porter, George Porter, James T. Porter, Robert Porter,Charles W. Powell, J.B. Powell, Oliver A. Powell, Sylvester Powers, Benjamin F. Powers, Patrick Preston, Edward J. Preston, Henry C. Prickett, William

1st Sgt. Captain Pvt. Pvt. 2nd Lieut. Bugler Pvt. corporal Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

24 24 22 19 28 18 18 18 23 18 31 24 34 26 23

10/5/1861 9/23/1861 10/13/186 4 3/19/1865 9/17/1861 2/16/1865 1/8/1864 9/18/1861 1/25/1865 2/14/1865 1/21/1865 1/25/1865 9/6/1861 3/7/1865 10/16/186 1

Co. H Co. H Co. D Co. H Co. G Co. E Co. K Co. G Co. E Co. E Co. A Co. G Co. H Co. F Co. L

transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; discharged 8/20/1862 at Corinth, Miss. On surgeon's certificate. resigned 2/27/1862 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 died 3/22/1862 at Shiloh Church, Tenn. appointed___; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged____ by civil authority mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 died 8/31/1865 at Camp Heath near Morgantown N.C.

Primmer, John W. Prince, James Probert, Thomas

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

24 ___ 19

10/21/186 1 12/10/186 1 2/20/1865

Co. C Co. C Co. A

mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/3/1864 on expiration of term of service transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; no further record; veteran also borne on rolls as "Rince" mustered out 10/30/1865 appointed corporal 11/2/1861 ; discharged on surgeon's certificate of disability mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept.

Prothero, John Prus, William Puffenbarger, David

Sgt. Pvt.

23 17

9/16/1861 3/4/1865

Co. C Co. M

Pvt.

46

9/26/1861

Co. I

Pults, Simon

Pvt.

18

9/22/1862

Co. M

239

Pults, Virgil

Com. Sgt.

38

4/22/1862

Co. M

Pults, William H.

Pvt. Lt. Colonel

20

9/17/1864

Co. M

Pummill, John

40

9/2/1861

Staff

Pummill, John Purviance, Marcus D. Quilin, Isaac S.

Captain

40

9/2/1861

Co. G

corporal Captain

19 30

9/18/1861 9/10/1861

Co. E Co. A

Quinn, James Radcliff, Charles Rader, George H. Rader, George H.

Pvt. Sgt. Major Captain

25 20 32 32

9/2/1862 2/18/1865 12/27/186 1 9/27/1861

Co. C Co. I staff Co. L

Raggles, Frederick Ramsey, David J.

Sgt. Pvt.

26 40

10/17/186 1 2/22/1865

Co. I Co. D

appointed corporal 11/1/1864; Com. Sgt__; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept.. Captain to Major 1/13/1865; to Lt. Colonel 9/4/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 appointed 1st Sgt 11/7/1861; promoted to 1st Lieutenant 2/6/1863; to captain 10/12/1864; to major 1/13/1865 appointed____; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service from 1st Lieutenant 11/1/1861; died 5/19/1863 at Bethel, Ohio mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh N.C. by order of War Dept. appointed 7/1/1865; mustered out with 10/30/1865 Captain to Major 3/1/1864; mustered out 4/10/1864 promoted from 2nd Lt. 10/29/1862; to major 3/1/1864. appointed from corporal___; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service appointed from corporal 6/29/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 promoted from 1st Sgt. Co. F 9/4/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 by order of War Dept. appointed corporal1/21/1863; 1st Sgt.___; promoted to 1st Lieutenant Co. E 9/4/1865; veteran appointed corporal 1/21/1863; Com. Sgt.____; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 Assistant Surgeon to Surgeon 10/20/1864; mustered out 5/15/1865 by order of War Dep.

Ramsey, William

Sgt.

24

12/4/1863

Co. M

Randall, Asa B.

1st Lieut.

22

9/20/1861

Co. E

Randall, Asa B.

1st Sgt. Com. Sgt. Surgeo n Pvt. Pvt.

22

9/20/1861

Co. F

Randall, Wilson

40

9/6/1861

Co. F

Rannels, David V. Ransom, Charles A. Raper, James M.

8/19/1862 41 22 9/17/1861 1/31/1864

Staff Co. K Co. A

mustered out 10/30/1865

240

Raper, Leonard F.

Pvt.

24

9/16/1861

Co. A

Raphuse, Andrew

corporal

17

9/11/1861

Co. I

Rauch, Nicholas

Pvt.

19

2/27/1865

Co. C

Ravens, Deidrick Ray, Joseph L. Reagan, William S. Reardon, John

Pvt. corporal Pvt. Pvt.

24 23 20 21

9/23/1861 2/16/1865 9/11/1861 2/21/1865

Co. K Co. H Co. D Co. E

mustered out 11/29/1864 appointed 11/13/1864; prisoner of war; mustered out6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. transferred to Co. G 7/28/1865 there borne on the rolls as Nicholas Roach mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service appointed 7/12/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865

Reboulet, Peter

Pvt.

28

9/12/1862

Co. I

Redding, Francis

Pvt.

20

10/22/186 1

Co. C

Redding, Michael Reddish, James

Pvt. Pvt.

24 29

4/1/1861 9/23/1861

Co. C Co. G

Redrow, Isaac Redrow, William Reed, Allen G.

corporal Pvt. Pvt.

19 20 18

9/11/1861 9/7/1861 9/3/1861 8/6/18186 2 2/4/1865 10/1/1861 3/20/1865

Co. B Co. B Co. G

Reed, Amos C. Reed, Charles Reed, David S Reed, Horace

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

18 18 22 18

Co. G Co. K Co. G Co. H

Reed, Newton M.

2nd Lieut.

25

9/5/1861

Co. C

mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept. transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865;veteran transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service appointed 10/31/1861; mustered out 11/29/1864; also appears on the rolls as Isaac Rechtrow died 10/22/1862 at Louisville, Ky. mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran discharged 1/23/1863 at St. Louis, Mo., to enlist in Marine Brigade mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran mustered out with company 10/30/1865 detached as Brigade Commissary 1/12/1863; promoted to 1st Lieut. 5/2/1863 but not mustered; mustered out 9/14/1864 by order of War Dep.

241

Reed, Thomas J.

Pvt.

24

3/15/1865

Co. H

Reese, Cornelius

Pvt.

22

9/4/1861

Co. E

Reese, George Reese, John

Pvt. Pvt. 33

1/7/1862 10/8/1861

Co. G Co. H

Rehle, Christopher

Pvt.

22

2/12/1862

Co. D

Reid, Daniel E.

Pvt.

18

9/24/1861

Co. E

Reid, William P.

Pvt.

27

10/1/1861

Co. E

Reilly, Lee Reinienschneider, H. Reitz, Jacob Remple, Samuel A.

Pvt.

2/2/1862

Co. L

Bugler Pvt. Pvt.

25 27 24

10/7/1861 10/1/1861 2/2/1865

Co. I Co. B Co. H

Renner, Jacob Renner, Jacob Repp, George

Sgt. Pvt. Pvt.

20 21 39

9/10/1862 9/10/1861 3/22/1865

Co. B Co. B Co. F

Reuscher, Henry Reynolds, Charles L. Reynolds, James Reynolds, John

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

27 21 18 19

9/20/1862 10/9/1861 2/27/1865 2/20/1865

Co. I Co. K Co. H Co. B

mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out 1/15/1865 at Nashville, Tenn., on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred to Co. I, 16th Regiment Veteran Reserve Corps___; from which mustered out 7/28/1865 at Ridgeway, Pa. on expiration of term of service captured 9/3/1863 near Corinth, Miss.: mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus on expiration of term of service mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service captured 6/26/1864 in action near Cartersville, Ga., paroled___; mustered out 7/1/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. appointed____; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out 10/31/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed Corporal 11/16/1864; Sgt 4/1/1865; mustered out 6/26/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dep. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 in hospital 10/1/1863 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept.

Rhinschilt, John

Pvt.

19

9/15/1862

Co. L

mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept.

242

Rhorer, Lafayette Rice, Augustus Rice, Fredinand Rice, George Rice, John D. Rich, William Rich, William Richards, Harry

Pvt. Pvt. corporal Pvt. Sgt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

20 33 23 22 20 19 19 19

10/10/186 1 10/5/1861 9/20/1861 2/1/1865 2/16/1865 2/23/1861 9/23/1861 2/9/1865

Co. L Co. H Co. F Co. G Co. A Co. B Co. M Co. H

mustered out 11/3/1864, on expiration of term of service died 1/9/1862 near Evansville, Ind. appointed___; died 8/23/1862 in Preble, County appointed; mustered out 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. M transferred to Company B 10/10/1861 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron ____; prisoner of war; mustered out 6/20/1865 at Louisville Ky. By order of War Dept. transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; appointed 3/7/1865; mustered out with company10/30/ 1865 mustered out 10/6/1865 at Raleigh N.C. on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 captured 7/26/1864, in action near Cartersville, Ga.: paroled___; mustered out 6/22/1865 at Camp Chase, by order of War Dept. discharged 12/4/1862 at Corinth, Miss., on surgeon's certificate appointed___; mustered out 11/9/1864 at Columbus, Oh. by order of War Dept.; reenlisted 3/9/1865 for 1 year ; mustered out with company 10/30/1865. mustered out 2/2/1865 at twin Sisters Ferry, Ga., on expiration of term of services mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service

Richards, William F.

Pvt.

24

8/22/1862

Co. C

Richardson, Daniel Richardson, Madison Richardson, William H. Richardson, William H.

Pvt. Sgt.

19 19

4/6/1864 2/25/1865

Co. C Co. F

Pvt. Pvt.

19 18

10/5/1864 3/7/1865

Co. C Co. F

Richardson, William L. Richtening, Herman

Pvt.

Co. L

Pvt.

36

9/17/1861

Co. I

Richter, Charles

Sgt.

37

9/11/1861

Co. D

Richter, Charles

Bugler

26

2/1/1862

Co. I

Richter, Louis

Pvt.

19

9/16/1861

Co. I

Richter, Manuel

Pvt.

20

9/20/1861

Co. I

243

Ricker, Elbridge

Major

43

9/10/1861

Staff

Rickert, George Riddle, Augustus M.

Pvt.

40

9/30/1862

Co. I

Pvt.

23

9/12/1861

Co. G

Ridenour, Edward T. Ridgely, John B. Ridgeway, Z. Rierdon, Michael Riley, Charles W. Riley, Thomas N.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

19 18 18 45 18 19

9/20/1861 9/14/1861 2/22/1865 9/23/1861 2/28/1865 2/20/1865

Co. C Co. F Co. H Co. D Co. B Co. A

Riley, William

Pvt.

18

8/21/1862

Co. E

Rinninger, Jacob

Pvt.

18

9/22/1862 11/19/186 1

Co. D

Rinninger, John Rissing, George A. Rittenhaus, Joseph Rittenhouse, Clarkson

Pvt.

19

Co. D

Sgt.

30

10/7/1862

Co. B

Q.M.S. corporal

21 26

8/28/1861 2/23/1865

Co. D Co. K

Ritterhoff, William Ritteris, Frank

Pvt. Pvt.

37 25

9/13/1862 2/24/1865

Co. G Co. H

Roach, Nicholas

Pvt.

19

2/27/1865

Co. G

Roberts, Lewis Robertson, Elza C.

Pvt. Pvt.

21 18

8/27/1862 4/6/1865

Co. L Co. F

Captain to Major 11/1/1861; Resigned 3/4/1863 mustered out 6/10/1865 at Washington D.C., by order of War Dept. mustered out 1/8/1865 at Cincinnati, Oh., by order of War Dept. transferred to Co. H, 14th Regiment Veteran Reserve Corps 4/5/1864 from which mustered out 9/20/1864 on expiration of term of service Killed 8/6/1863 in action near Rienzi, Miss. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged by civil authority mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N. C., by order of War Dept. captured 5/18/1864 near Adairsville, Ga.; paroled__; mustered out 6/24/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh. By order of War Dept. mustered out 12/26/1864 at Savannah, Ga. On expiration of term of service appointed Corporal 11/16/1864; Sgt 4/1/1865; mustered out 6/26/1865 appointed1/1/1863; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept. appointed___; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. C__, where borne on rolls as "Rauch"; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865

244

Robinson, Alfred N. Robinson, Charles W. Robinson, George W. Robinson, John H. Robinson, John M. Robinson, John M. Robinson, Joseph H. Rockey, George W. Rockwell, Frederick

R.Q.M. corporal 28

2/15/1863 9/10/1861

Staff Co.A

Pvt. Pvt.

23 22

10/3/1861 9/10/1861

Co. K Co. F

resigned 12/31/1862 died 10/20/1863 near Benton Station, Alabama mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service appointed 11/9/1861; discharged 11/24/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 9/2/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out 12/24/1864 appointed____

Bugler corporal Pvt. corporal Pvt.

23 27

9/11/1861 8/31/1861 12/4/1861 10/14/186 1 2/4/865

Co. D Co. G Co. B Co. G Co. A

32 24

Roder, Charles Rodgers, Reuben Roland, George Romanoweitz, Joseph

Pvt. Pvt. corporal Pvt.

37 19 27 20

9/2/1862 2/24/1865 3/14/1865 9/25/1861

Co. E Co. H Co. I Co. B

discharged 11/26/1862 at Columbus, Oh., on surgeon's certificate mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed7/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 appointed from Corporal ; captured 6/19/1865 near Coldwater, Mississippi; mustered out 11/29/1864 discharged 9/8/1862 at Columbus, Oh., on surgeon's certificate appointed from Sgt. 6/2/1862; captured 6/19/1863 in action near Coldwater, Miss.; mustered out 11/20/1865 died 6/18.1865 at Miamisburg, Oh., veteran captured 4/6/1865 at Faison's Depot, N.C.; no further record; veteran transferred to Gunboat Service 1/31/1862 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865

Romanowitz, Lucas

Sgt.

28

9/25/1861 10/27/186 1

Co. B

Root, Samuel

Pvt.

39

Co. I

Rope, Jacob A. Rose, Augustus

1st Sgt. Pvt.

23 33

9/6/1861 9/10/1861 12/27/186 1

Co. C Co. G

Rosenthal, Peter Ross, Albert G. Ross, Benjamin Ross, James M.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. 23 41 18

Co. G Co. M Co. H Co. A

10/3/1861 2/20/1865 2/25/1865

245

Rossman, Alexander Rossman, Alexander C. Roth, David E.

Captain 1st Lieut. farrier

21

9/8/1861

Co. E

21 20

9/8/1861 2/22/1865

Co. I Co. E

Roth, Frederick Roth, Simeon

corporal Pvt.

20 28

1/27/1865 10/3/1861

Co. H Co. H

Rothan, Joseph Rothan,John Rothwell, Charles

corporal Pvt. Pvt.

19 20 18

9/20/1861 9/11/1861 2/20/1865

Co. B Co. B Co. I

Rough, Jacob F. Rough, John

Pvt. Pvt.

25 35

9/28/1861 3/21/1865 10/20/186 1 10/8/1861

Co. E Co. M

Rowe, William D. Rowlands, Richard

Pvt. Pvt.

43 26

Co. I Co. H

Ruble, John R. Rudicil, Harrison

corporal Pvt.

22 33

9/4/1861 9/20/1864

Co. B Co. D

Rudicil, Hiram

corporal

26

8/28/1862

Co. D

Rudicil, Michael Ruffin, Charles Rumbaugh, Rufus

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

32 18 21

9/12/1862 9/17/1861 3/23/1865

Co. D Co. G Co. A

Runck, Henry

Q.M.S.

18

9/22/1862

Co. L

promoted from 1st Lieutenant Co. I 3/1/1864; mustered out 1/28/1865 on expiration of term of service promoted fro 2nd Lieutenant 10/171862; to captain Co. E 3/1/1864 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 7/15/1865 ; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service discharged 4/1/863 at Memphis for wounds received 12/21/1862 in action at Davis Mills, Tn. mustered out 9/15/1864 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 9/13/1862 near Corinth, Miss., on surgeon's certificate mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service died 10/61862 of wounds received 10/5/1862 in action near Metamora, Miss. mustered 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept. appointed 5/2/1865; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept. captured 3/10/1865 in action near Fayetteville, N.C.; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh. , by order of War Dept. discharged 6/25/1862, on surgeon's certificate mustered out 10/30/1865 appointed corporal 11 14/1864; Q.M. Sgt. 2/1/1865; mustered out6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept.

246

Rush, Algia Rushford, Mitchell

Sgt. Sgt.

24 28

2/1/1862 12/1/1863

Co. I Co. L

Russell, John Russell, Michael Rutherford, Harrison P. Rutherford, Henry M. Rutherford, James C.

Pvt. Sgt.

19 24

9/9/1862 9/11/1861

Co. L Co. A

Farrier

44

9/10/1861

Co. A

Pvt. Pvt.

18 21

9/10/1861 9/10/1861

Co. A Co. A

Ryan, George W. Ryan, Hugh

Sgt. Pvt.

28 19

12/14/186 1 3/7/1865

Co. D Co. E

Ryan, Patrick Ryan, William Rybolt, Jacob J. Rybolt, Michael Rybolt, William

corporal corporal Pvt. Pvt. corporal

26 39 19 20 23

9/14/1861 2/11/1865 2/14/1865 2/14/1865 9/18/1861

Co. E Co. M Co. K Co. K Co. B

Sacks, Frederick Salesbury, Edwin E. Salsbury, Larude

Pvt. Pvt. Saddler

23 32 21

9/17/1862 3/7/1865 9/24/1861

Co. L Co. K Co. H

Salter, John

Pvt.

18

11/4/1861

Co. C

Samuels, William

Pvt.

19

9/12/1861

Co. F

appointed_____; mustered out 2/2/1865 at Twin Sisters Ferry, Ga., on expiration of term of service appointed__; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. appointed 5/1/1865; mustered out 6/26/1865 discharged 2/22/1862 at Camp Dennison on a surgeon's certificate also carried on the rolls as Montraville Rutherford; mustered out 10/30/1865 discharged 10/8/1861 on surgeon's certificate appointed_____; mustered out 12/26/1864 at Savannah, Ga. On expiration of term of service. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed____; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service appointed 9/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 10/31/1861; mustered out 11/29/1864 mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 9/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company10/30/1865; veteran captured 6/19/1863 in action near Coldwater, Miss.; exchanged 9/1/1863; discharged 10/16/1865 by order of War Dept.

247

Sanders, Evan A.J.

Pvt.

26

9/9/1861

Co. G

Sanders, John W. Sauer, Benjamin F. Sauers, Francis M.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

44 23 29

10/3/1861 3/31/1864 9/23/1861

Co. L Co. F Co. B

mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 10/15/1862 at Bolivar, Tn., on surgeon's certificate captured while on duty 2/15/1865 in South Carolina died 7/12/1862 in Memphis, Tn. transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865; veteran missing since 8/31/1862 appointed 11/15/1864; captured 11/24/1864 near Milledgeville, Ga.; mustered out 6/9/1865 captured 6/19/1863 in action near Coldwater, Miss.;paroled;captured 3/10/1865 at Battle of Fayetteville, N.C.; mustered out 6/9/1865 transferred from Co. G, 7th O.V.C., 7/27/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 discharged 8/4/1863 at camp Dennison, Oh., on surgeon’s certificate Resigned 9/3/1862 mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service. discharged 9/12/1862 on surgeon's certificate died 9/28/1863 at Camp Davis, Miss. mustered out 10/30/1865 dischraged by civil authority 1/30/1862 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 captured 6/19/1863 in action near Coldwater, Miss.; mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of war Dep.

Saumiller, Isaac

Pvt.

18

3/15/1864

Co. C

Saumiller, Wilson Sayer, Daniel

Sgt. Bat. Adj't.

19 22

3/8/1864 11/1/1861

Co. C Staff

Schaffner, Jacob

corporal

4/1/1863

Co. B

Schaffner, John

Pvt.

23

9/4/1862 12/20/186 2

Co. B

Schelmic, David

Pvt.

18

Co. B

Schenck, David Scherer, Frederick Schiffmire, John

Pvt. Major Pvt.

23 49 40

9/13/1861 9/20/1861 3/21/1865 11/13/186 1 1/20/1862 10/28/186 1 2/27/1865 9/15/1861 1/22/1864

Co. I Staff Co. B

Schindler, Conrad Schindler, Jacob Schirenbrandt, John Schleisner, Frank Schmidt, Charles Schmita, John

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

30

Co. I Co. F Co. H Co. B Co. M Co. G

27 29 15 27

Schoerph, John

Pvt.

23

9/10/1862

Co. B

248

Schofield, Robert T. Schomberg, Henry Schorle, John Schotsman, Peter Schrader, Jacob H. Schrader, Jacob H.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. 19 32 18 36

9/12/1861 3/1/1865 2/3/1864 10/20/186 1 1/14/1864

Co. H Co. D Co. G Co. F Co. C

discharged 4/24/1863 at Mound City, Ill. On surgeon's certificate mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 10/24/1861 by civil authority transferred to Co. F transferred from Co. G____; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh. By order of War Dept.; re-enlisted 2/6/1865 for 1 year; mustered out with company 10/30/1865. transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865; veteran appointed 4/1/1863; captured 11/24/1864 in action near Coldwater, Miss.; mustered out 11/29/1864 missing since 8/31/1862 mustered out 5/17/1865 by order of War Dep. died 11/27/1864 at Branch No.8 General Hospital, New Albany, Ind.

farrier

36

1/14/1864

Co. F

Schriber, John

Pvt.

30

9/21/1861

Co. D

Schuckers, Walter F.

Sgt.

20

3/23/1864

Co. C

Schultz, Joseph Schultz, Joseph N. Schuman, Frank Schwartz, Frederick Schwartz, Nicholas Schwartzell, George Schwenzer, John

corporal Bat. Adj't. Pvt.

23 24 26

9/3/1861 11/1/1865 9/9/1862 10/12/186 1 2/15/1865 11/8/1861 3/21/1865

Co. B Staff Co. B

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

40 26 22 19

Co. G Co. K Co. M Co. B

Scott, Isaac Scott, John H. Scott, John T. Scott, Leroy

corporal Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

19 28 20 18

9/11/1861 2/15/1865 2/20/1865 2/2/1865

Co. D Co. A Co. A Co. H

Scott, William Seal, William M.

Pvt. corporal

20 32

2/20/1864 2/21/1865

Co. C Co. K

mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out 10/30/1865 appointed 11/9/1861; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh. On expiration of term of service mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed___; mustered out with company 10/30/1865

249

Seals, James Seals, Thomas Searles, Enos

Pvt. Pvt. Vet. Surg.

21 26 28

3/7/1865 2/22/1864 9/16/1861

Co. I Co. I Staff mustered out with company 10/30/1865 from Sergeant 4/1/1861; transfer to Company L promoted to Veterinary Surgeon 4/1/1863; returned to company___; no further record appointed 4/1/1865; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of the War Dept. transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 appointed___; mustered 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service transferred to Co. M 3/1/1862 transferred from Company B 3/1/1862; mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10.30/1865 discharged 7/1/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed corporal 9/1/1862; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service; re-enlisted 3/4/1865 for one year; appointed Q.M. Sgt. 6/28/1865; mustered out with company appointed 11/14/1861; discharged 1/2/1863 at Cincinnati, Oh., on surgeon's certificate mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865

Searls, Enos I.

Sgt.

28

9/16/1861

Co. L

Sefton, Everett

Sgt.

18

8/30/1862

Co. H

Seibert, Benjamin

Com. Ser.

24

8/29/1861

Co. C

Seifert, Valentine Sellers, Henry

corporal Pvt.

24 33

10/2/1861 9/18/1861

Co. I Co. B

Sellers, Henry

Pvt.

33

9/18/1861

Co. M

Sellers, Joab Sense, William H. Sepen, Peter Sewell, George

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

20 18 20 41

8/27/1864 2/23/1865 9/16/1861 2/9/1865

Co. I Co. L Co. M Co. M

Sexton, John

Q.M.S.

23

9/5/1861

Co. K

Shaddinger, William H.

Sgt.

28

9/14/1861

Co. K

Shaffer, Balser Shaffer, Balser

Pvt. Pvt.

31 35

9/3/1861 2/2/1865

Co. E Co. H

Shaffer, William

Pvt.

20

3/23/1864

Co. C

250

Shannon, George W. Shannon, Thomas Sharkey, William D. Sharp, George

Pvt. corporal Pvt. Pvt.

20 18 19 21

12/10/186 1 10/3/1861 8/21/1862 2/3/1865

Co. C Co. M Co. K Co. A

Shaw, Charles H. Shaw, Clayton W.

corporal Pvt. 21

1/10/1862 10/3/1861

Co. F Co. M

Shaw, Edwin T.

1st Sgt.

21

9/9/1861

Co. G

Shaw, Edwin T. Shaw, Robert H. Shay, John Shell, William

2nd Lieut. corporal Pvt. Pvt.

21 24 23 25

9/9/1861 10/5/1861 9/7/1861 3/14/1865

Co. K Co. H Co. K Co. F

mustered our 12/10/1864 at Nashville, Tenn. On expiration of term of service died 5/5/1862 at Pittsburgh Landing killed 8/17/1863 on scout near Rienzi, Miss. mustered out 10/30/1865 appointed 1/1/1863; mustered out 1/6/1865 at Savannah, Ga., on expiration of term of service died 5/22/1862 at New Richmond, Oh. appointed 9/13/1863; promoted to 2nd. Lieutenant Co. K ,1/13/1865 promoted to 1st Sgt. Co. G 1/13/1865; captured 3/9/1865 in action near Fayetteville, N.C.; promoted to captain 4/8/1865 but not mustered; mustered out 5/27/1865 by order of War Dept. mustered out 11/29/1864, on expiration of term of service

Shelley, Isaac N. Shelley, Richard L. Sheperd, Jeremiah Sheperd, William H.

Sgt.

23

9/12/1861

Co. F

Pvt.

21

9/23/1861 10/21/186 1 10/16/186 1

Co. F

farrier Pvt.

29 21

Co. K Co. K

Sherbocker, Charles

Sgt.

22

9/10/1861

Co. G

Sherer, Jesse Sheridan, William Sherman, Thomas J. Shetter, Isaac

Pvt. Pvt.

20 19

1/28/1862 3/16/1865

Co. E Co. K

appointed from Farrier 7/18/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran mustered out 11/2/1864 at Chattanooga, Tenn, on expiration of term of service mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service died 5/22/1862 at Monterey, Tenn. appointed 9/1/1865; promoted to 2nd Lieutenant 9/4/1865, but not mustered; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran captured 3/19/1865 in action near Fayetteville, N.C.; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept.; veteran appointed Sergeant 11/15/1864; mustered out 6/9/1865 by order of War Dep. no further record found

Q.M.S. Pvt.

20 40

9/10/1861 10/8/1861

Co.A Co. M

251

Shingledecker, Amos Shingledecker, Amos

Sgt.

18

9/26/1861

Co. C

Pvt.

18

9/26/1861

Co. H

Shingledecker, Calvin Shingledecker, Calvin Shingledecker, Milton Shohoney, Andrew J.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Ass. Surg.

18 18 20 40

10/18/186 3 10/19/186 3 9/26/1861 1/18/1865

Co. C Co. I Co. C Staff

captured 6/19/1863 near Coldwater, Miss. :transferred to Co. H 7/28/1865; veteran transferred from Co. C 7/28/1865; mustered out 8/1/1865 by order of War Dept. transferred from Co. I____; mustered out 6/2/1865 at Camp Dennison Oh. By order of War Dept. transferred to Co. C died 3/17/1862 at Camp Dennison mustered out 10/30/1865 discharged 9/26/1862 at Bolivar, Tn. On a surgeon's certificate of disability mustered out 11/29/1864 also borne on the muster rolls as "Sharp"; mustered out 9/10/1864 mustered out 11/3/1864 at Chattanooga, Tn., on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh N.C. by order of War Dept. mustered out 6/14/1865 at New York City, by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration date of service appointed 3/25/1865; mustered out 6/26/1865, at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. discharged 7/14/1862 mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept.. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 7/22/1862 on surgeon's certificate discharged 3/25/1865 on surgeon's certificate

Shook, David W. Short, Abraham

Pvt. Pvt.

27 38

8/31/1861 9/10/1861

Co. B Co. A

Short, Levi

Pvt.

22

9/10/1861

Co. A

Short, Thomas H. Shorts, John

Pvt. Pvt.

21 29

10/1/1861 2/22/1865

Co. L Co. H

Shotts, Henry V.

Pvt.

23

8/29/1862

Co. C

Shoull, George W. Shoull, Milton C. Shrigley, Thomas

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

19 28 20

3/22/1865 3/22/1865 9/7/1861

Co. F Co. F Co. C

Shroyer, Edward Shultz, Lawrence Shumake, Frederick Shuman, George Shuman, William Shumard, Joseph

Sgt. 2nd Lieut.

20 20

9/25/1863 8/31/1861

Co. L Co. B

Pvt. Pvt. corporal Pvt.

29 22 23

9/14/1862 3/7/1865 9/12/1861 2/1/1865

Co. M Co. H Co. F Co. M

252

Sibbald, John A. Silverthorn, William D.

Pvt. Pvt.

21 21

3/20/1865 2/10/1865

Co. H Co. M

Simmons, Samuel

Pvt.

18

2/27/1865

Co. B

Simond, John Simpkins, Enoch Simpson, Jeremiah Simpson, John

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

27 24 45 22

9/13/1862 10/16/186 1 9/12/1861 9/27/1861

Co. L Co. L Co. F Co. A

Simpson, Nathan

Pvt.

19

11/1/1861 10/25/186 1

Co. C

Sine, Madison

Pvt.

49

Co. K

Sisco, William E.

Pvt.

21

8/31/1861

Co. B

Skeeles, Isaac W.

Pvt.

21

3/2/1865

Co. F

Slade, William C.

Captain Bat. Q.M.

45

10/8/1861

Co. M

Slatery, James C.

27

9/20/1861

Staff

Slatery, James C. Slaybaugh, David Sleight, Henry Slemmer, Henry Slippy, John F. Slippy, Sylvester Smallwood, C.C. Smallwood, Samuel

1st Sgt. Pvt. Sgt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. corporal Pvt.

25 21 40 23 43 18 37 34

9/20/1861 10/22/186 2 8/27/1861 2/6/1865 9/10/1861 9/12/1861 9/9/1861 9/9/1861

Co. C Co. I Co. G Co. K Co. F Co. F Co. G Co. G

mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out to date 8/22/1865 by order of War Dept. discharged 10/10/1865 at Greensboro, N.C. on surgeon's certificate of disability mustered 5/24/1865 at camp Dennison, Oh., by order of War Dept. discharged 4/17/1863 on surgeon's certificate discharged 9/1/1863 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 5/28/1865 transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; captured 4/10/1865 at Smithfield, N. C. ; no further record found; veteran mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service discharged 9/22/1862 at Detroit, Michigan on surgeon's certificate of disability mustered out 7/14/1865 at Camp Dennison, Oh., by order of War Dept. promoted to 2nd Lt. 2/1/1863; mustered out 12/3/1864 on expiration of term of service Battalion Quarter Master from 1st Sergeant 11/1/1861; mustered out 6/1/ 1862 promoted to 2nd Lieutenant and Battery Quarter master 11/1/1861 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 died 1/8/1864, at Athens, Tenn. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 10/24/1861 by civil authority discharged 11/15/1862 on surgeon's certificate discharged 5/5/1863 on surgeon's certificate

253

Smart, Leander Smiley, James Smiley, Leander Smiley, Leander

Pvt. Pvt. Hos.St' d Pvt.

18 43 22 22

3/15/1864 2/10/1865 9/26/1861 9/26/1861

Co. C Co. F Staff Co. G

Smith, Albert A. Smith, Charles

Pvt. Pvt.

18 18

9/10/1861 1/26/1865

Co. A Co. B

Smith, David

Pvt. Com. Sgt. Pvt. Pvt.

18

10/14/186 1

Co. C

Smith, David Smith, Elias Smith, Ezbon

18 19 17

9/13/1861 9/15/1861 2/22/1865

Co. E Co. E Co. E

transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 from Private 11/1/1861; mustered out 10/30/1865 promoted to Hospital Steward 11/1/1861; veteran captured 6/19/1863 near Coldwater, Mississippi; no further record died 9/5/1865 at Morgantown, N.C. transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company; veteran appointed____; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 7/11/1865 at Columbus, Oh. By order of War Dept. appointed Corporal; mustered out 11/29/1864 appointed; mustered out 11/29/1865 by order of War Dep. mustered out 11/3/1864 on expiration of term of service appointed 5/1/1865; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept. appointed 9/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 Captain to Major 3/4/1863; Resigned 9/8/1864 appointed 9/21/1861; promoted to major 3/4/1863 transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; transferred to Company H____.

Smith, George W. Smith, Gideon Smith, Henry

Pvt. Sgt. Pvt.

18 40 29

2/3/1865 9/20/1861 2/18/1865

Co. E Co. C Co. A

Smith, Henry W. Smith, James

Sgt. Pvt.

25 26

9/10/1865 9/17/1861 12/27/186 2 2/23/1864 9/2/1861 9/2/1861

Co. A Co. L

Smith, James H. Smith, John Smith, Joseph C. Smith, Joseph C.

corporal corporal Major Captain

18 21 27 27

Co. E Co. M Staff Co. E

Smith, Martin Smith, Oliver A.

Pvt. Pvt.

22 20

3/11/1864 9/22/1861

Co. C Co. G

254

Smith, Oliver A.

Pvt.

9/22/1861

Co. H

Smith, Oran Smith, Robert B

Pvt. Pvt.

38 25

9/4/1861 10/17/186 1 11/10/186 2 3/6/1865

Co. K Co. H

captured 12/8/1862 at Battle of Lexigton; exchanged____; mustered out 11/29/1864 mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., by order of War Dept; re-enlisted 2/21/1865 for one year; mustered out with company 10/30/1865

Smith, Samuel Smith, Samuel Q.

Pvt. Pvt.

31 30

Co. C Co. E

Smith, Seneca E. Smith, Skidmore

Pvt. Pvt. 40

9/23/1861 10/28/186 1

Co. H Co. M

Smith, Thomas W.

Pvt.

25

2/8/1862

Co. K

Smith, William A. Smith, William M. Smyser, George Snider, Harrison

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

32 17 18 24

9/14/1861 2/10/1865 3/3/1865 9/17/1861

Co. I Co. G Co. E Co. L

mustered out 6/14/1865 at Camp Chase Oh. by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged to receive promotion in Kentucky Cavalry 11/1/1861 discharged 12/18/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered 3/14/1865 at Fayetteville, N.C., on expiration of term of service mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh,, on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered 11/3/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service discharged 6/6/1862 by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 1/19/1865 at Columbus, Oh. on expiration of term of service mustered out 11/29/1864 accidentally killed on 11/23/1862 near Rienzi, Miss., while in the line of duty discharged 2/4/1862 at Camp Dennison on surgeon's certificate

Snider, Henry Snider, James G. Snider, William S. Snyder, Frederick Snyder, Philip Somerfield, Thomas H. Spaulding, Reuben

Pvt. Pvt. Musicia n Pvt. Pvt.

20 24 18 23 21

10/7/1861 9/10/1865 9/23/1861 1/23/1865 1/30/1865

Co. K Co. A Band Co. L Co. L

Pvt. Pvt.

21 19

1/12/1862 9/10/1865

Co. D Co. A

Speath, Benedict Spencer, Anderson

Pvt.

32

9/23/1861

Co. K

Pvt.

18

9/12/1861

Co. E

255

Spencer, Henry

Q.M.S.

19

9/12/1861

Co. E

Spencer, Jackson Spencer, Jackson Spencer, Lemuel J.

Pvt. Pvt. Sgt.

22 22 21

12/3/1863 12/3/1863 10/30/186 1 10/30/186 1

Co. C Co. H Co. E

Spencer, Mark

Pvt.

36

Co. E

Spencer, Martin V.

corporal

20

9/14/1861

Co. E

Spencer, William K. Spencer, William L.

Pvt. Pvt.

18 23

10/15/186 1 9/13/1861

Co. C Co. E

Spong, Thomas Sprague, George Sprasser, Christian

Sgt. Ass. Surg.

24 24

8/29/1862 9/11/1861

Co. D Staff

appointed from pvt. ____; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. H____; mustered out 5/24/1865 at Camp Dennison by order of War Dept. transferred to Co. C appointed____; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 5/23/1863 at Corinth, Miss., on surgeon's certificate appointed____; prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh. By order of War Dept. transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 12/11/1865; veteran died 5/16/1862 at New Madison, Dark County appointed corporal 1/1/1863: Sgt. 5/1/1865; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept. mustered out 11/18/1864 discharged 5/1/1862 at Shiloh, Tn. On surgeon's certificate of disability mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus on expiration of term of service discharged 6/5/1863 at Cincinnati on surgeon's certificate mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/1865 at camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. discharged 7/17/1863 at Memphis Tn. On surgeon's certificate of disability discharged 6/6/1863 near Corinth, Miss., on surgeon's certificate

Pvt.

45

9/18/1861

Co. B

Squires, Elijah St. Clair, Adolphus

Pvt.

21

9/11/1861 12/27/186 1

Co. D

Pvt.

Co. D

Staab, Martin

Pvt.

35

9/15/1862 12/25/186 3

Co. L

Stacey, Preston Stackpole, Charles

Pvt.

20

Co. L

Pvt.

30

9/16/1861

Co. B

Stacks, Henry Stafel, Charles Stailey, William H.

Pvt. Pvt. corporal

23 19 20

9/15/1861 9/23/1862 2/17/1865

Co. I Co. K Co. A

256

Stall, David Stall, John S. Stanley, William Stansbury, Henry

Pvt. corporal Pvt. Pvt.

18 23 25 18

12/17/186 3 10/1/1861 3/21/1865 1/31/1865

Co. M Co. L Co. D Co. E

Starkey, Artilis

Sgt.

18

10/30/186 1

Co. K

Stayton, John W. Steedel, John D. Steel, John W.

Sgt. Pvt. corporal

44 22 21

9/12/1861 2/24/1865 3/2/1861

Co. F Co. A Co.A

Steel, Robert Steele, Henry Steele, Jerome Stephens, Alfred Stephens, Joseph

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

23 35 18 20

9/15/1861 3/10/1865 2/25/1865 9/29/1861 11/16/186 1

Co. F Co. M Co. B Co. F Co. M

mustered out 6/10/1865 at McDougall General Hospital, New York Harbor by order of War Dept. discharged 11/15/1861 on surgeon's certificate of disability mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company appointed corporal 11/8/1864; prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept.; veteran captured 6/19/1863 in action near Coldwater, Miss; exchanged 9/1/1863; mustered out 11/2/1864 at Chattanooga, Tenn., on expiration of term of service mustered out 10/30/1865 appointed 3/9/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 transferred 5/1/1864 to Co. I 23rd Regiment Veteran Reserve Corps from which mustered out as Sgt. 9/19/1864 at St. Louis, Mo., expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 10/24/1861 by civil authority

Stevens, Charles W. Stevens, Frank M. Stevens, Henry Stevens, John H. Stevens, Thomas R. Stevenson, Samuel

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. farrier com.. Sgt. Pvt.

22 19

8/29/1862 9/16/1861 12/18/186 1 2/8/1864

Co. D Co. C Co. M Co. G

32

48 23

9/16/1861 9/17/1861

Co. D Co. I

transferred to Company H, 14th Regiment Veteran Reserve Corps, from which mustered out 7/17/1865 at St. Louis, Mo. By order of War Dept. died 5/28/1862 at Corinth, Miss. discharged 4/10/1863 on surgeon's certificate mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed____; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran died 5/27/1863 at Henderson , Ky.

257

Stewart, Alexander

corporal

29

9/2/1861

Co. B

Stewart, Daniel D. Stewart, Fielding Stewart, John Stewart, John W. Stewart, Roland C. Stewart, William P. Stiles , Thomas D. Stiles, Thomas D. Stilzinger, Frederick Stitzlein, John T.

corporal Pvt. Chaplai n Pvt. corporal Pvt. Hos.St' d Pvt.

22 21

9/2/1861 9/30/1862 3/22/1862 3/4/1865 2/24/1865 3/2/1865 8/31/1861 8/31/1861

Co. M Co. K Staff Co. L Co. L Co. B Staff Co. G

appointed 10/31/1861; discharged 8/23/1862 at Memphis, Tn. On surgeon's certificate appointed 6/1/1862; mustered out 10/6/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service discharged 3/13/1864 on surgeon's certificate resigned 6/10/1862 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865 from Private 11/1/1861; returned to Company G discharged 7/18/1862 on surgeon's certificate discharged 1/15/1863 at Jackson, Tenn., on surgeon's certificate mustered out 10/30/1865 discharged 8/16/1863 at Memphis on surgeon's certificate of disability mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 7/1/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred to Co. G 7th Regiment Veteran Reserve Corps; discharged 12/9/1864 at Washington D.C., on surgeon's certificate transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company10/30/1865; veteran

23 27 40 50 50

Pvt. Pvt.

28 18

9/26/1861 2/28/1865

Co. I Co. A

Stiver, Henry Stock, Conrad Stone, Alexander Stone, Harmon J. Stonebreaker, James D Stordgel, Rufus Stotler, Jacob Stotts, William H.

Pvt. Pvt. corporal Pvt. 21 38 38

9/12/1862 3/11/1865 1/12/1864 3/19/1865

Co. B Co. I Co. F Co. F

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

18 23 19 25

1/1/1864 3/4/1865 2/4/1865 4/6/1865

Co. K Co. L Co. L Co. F

Stoughton, Eli

Pvt.

9/4/1862

Co. L

Stout, Daniel

Pvt.

22

11/11/186 1

Co. C

258

Stout, Dewitt C. Stout, Jackson

corporal Pvt.

18 24

9/8/1861 2/17/1865

Co. E Co. A

Stouter, John L.

Sgt.

26

10/12/186 1

Co. C

Stowe, William Strade, Henry Straight, Francis M.

corporal Pvt. Pvt.

20 21 23

9/18/1861 2/15/1865 9/10/1865

Co. D Co. D Co. A

mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service; re-enlisted 3/3/1865 for one year; absent on furlough 10/30/1865; no further record found mustered out 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865; veteran appointed 11/9/1861; discharged 9/8/1862 at Cincinnati, Oh. On surgeon's certificate

Straight, Oliver P.

Sgt.

22

9/16/1861

Co.A

Straight, William H. Straight, William H. Strasser, Frederick

R.Q.M. Pvt.

27 27

9/16/1861 9/16/1865

Staff Co. A

farrier

23

9/13/1861

Co. E

Strauss, David

Pvt.

18

3/30/1864

Co. C

Strauss, William

Pvt.

39

10/8/1861

Co. B

Strayer, Daniel Strayer, John H. Stuart, Alexander Stuart, Turner Stubbs, James Stultz, Henry F. Stutler, Isaac

Pvt. Sgt. Pvt. Pvt. corporal Bugler Pvt.

20 25 18 38 24

3/15/1864 9/10/1861 3/14/1865 9/6/1861 2/27/1865 10/3/1861

Co. C Co. C Co. D Co. D Co. H Co. L Co. M

mustered out 11/29/1864 Captured 6/19/1863 near Coldwater, Mississippi;mustered out 11/29/1864 Quarter Master Sergeant from private 3/18/1864;to 1st Lieutenant 4/8/1865; to Captain 9/4/1865;mustered out 10/30/1865 promoted to Regt. Q.M. Sergeant 3/18/1864 appointed___; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company10/30/1865 discharged 3/16/1863 at Memphis, Tn. On surgeon's certificate of disability transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 1/20/1862 by order of War Dept. mustered out 11/3/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service

46

10/4/1861

259

Summers, Anthony Surry, William

Pvt. Pvt.

18 18

3/19/1865 9/10/1861

Co. I Co. A

Sutton, Gabriel L. Sutton, Harvey W. Sutton, Harvey W. Sutton, Sampson Swain, Calvin Swain, Calvin

Pvt. Sgt. Q.M.S. Pvt. corporal farrier

31 38 38 28 19 22

9/18/1862 2/13/1865 2/13/1865 2/9/1865 2/8/1864 2/8/1864

Co. E Co. M Staff Co. L Co. F Co. F

Swain, Martin A.

corporal

21

10/2/1861

Co. E

Swain, Walter B. Swaisgood, Daniel Swartz, Samuel T. Swearinger, Samuel Swenker, Frederick Swerer, Barton W.

Pvt. Pvt. corporal Pvt.

28 18 22 18

9/6/1861 2/27/1865 2/17/1865 1/20/1864

Co. E Co. L Co. E Co. F

Pvt. B.C.S.

22 24

8/28/1862 9/6/1861

Co. D Staff

Swerer, Barton W. Swerer, Lewis C.

Com. Sgt. 2nd Lieut.

24 30

9/6/1861 9/10/1861

Co. E Co. E

mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 captured 3/8/1865 while on march through N. C.; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. appointed Regt. Q.M. Sgt. 6/3/1865 from Sergeant 6/3/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 7/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 8/20/1865; mustered out with company mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh. By order of War Dept.: veteran mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus , Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed___; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 6/5/1863 at Cincinnati, Oh. by order of the War Dept. from Private 11/1/1861; transfer to Company E promoted to Regt. Com. Sgt. 11/1/1861; returned to company; discharged 1/10/1863 by order of War Dept. appointed 11/4/1861 appointed 9/1/1862; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh. on expiration of term of service transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865;

Swerer, Samuel Swift, William

Q.M.S. Pvt.

28 32

9/5/1861 3/25/1865

Co. E Co. F

Swigert, Jesse L.

Pvt.

22

3/8/1864

Co. C

260

Switzer, Jacob

Pvt.

33

10/13/186 1

Co. I

Swoonbrook, Joseph

Pvt.

21

9/15/1862

Co. F

Swope, William J.

Pvt.

18

10/5/1861

Co. C

Swygart, Anthony Synder, George

Pvt. Pvt.

21 26

9/23/1861 3/11/1865

Co. K Co. B

Synder, William A. Tacque, John Q. Taggs, Isaac

1st Lieut. Pvt. Pvt.

36 21 21

9/11/1861 11/7/1862 9/19/1861

Co. F Co. E Co. G

Talbert, Shadric

Pvt.

21

8/23/1864

Co. M

Talbert, Thomas

Pvt.

24

8/23/1864

Co. M

Tanner, Lorenzo D. Tarrant, Fenn Tarrant, William

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

18 24 19

9/30/1861 9/26/1864 9/30/1864

Co. D Co. B Co. B

Tasse, Ubalt Tatman, Benjamin F. Tavin, Milton Taylor, David

Pvt. Pvt. corporal Pvt.

23 18 21 18

12/1/1863 9/27/1861 2/7/1865 2/16/1865

Co. L Co. L Co. E Co. B

mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service. captured 6/19/1863 in action near Coldwater, Miss. ;exchanged 9/1/1863; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept. discharged 7/9/1862 at Springfield, Oh. By order of War Dept. mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out 10/30/1865 appointed Sgt. 11/6/1861; 1st Sgt.___; promoted to 1st Lieutenant 1/13/1865; Captain 4/8/181865, but not mustered ; mustered out 5/15/1865 by order of War Dept.; veteran discharged 3/18/1864 on surgeon's certificate mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept.. discharged 6/1/1862 on surgeon's certificate of disability; re-enlisted 3/21/1864 for three years; mustered out to date 7/19/1865 by order of War Dept. mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dep. mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dep. captured 10/4/1864 in action near Marietta, Ga., paroled 4/28/1865 near Jacksonville Fla., ; mustered out 6/14/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. mustered out 11/3/1864 on expiration of term of service appointed___; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865

261

Taylor, Edward T

Pvt.

21

3/14/1865

Co. H

Taylor, Henry

Pvt.

25

9/19/1862 10/16/186 1

Co. L

Taylor, James E.

1st Sgt.

18

Co. K

Taylor, James E. Taylor, Jasper

Captain corporal

18 26

10/16/186 1 10/21/186 1

Co. M Co. M

Taylor, John R. Taylor, John T. Taylor, Robert Taylor, Silas

Pvt. 1st Lieut. Pvt. farrier

19 21 18 40

8/19/1862 8/3/1861 2/16/1865 1/4/1864

Co. C Co. G Co. B Co. K

mustered out with mustered out with company 10/30/1865 captured 3/10/1865 in action near Fayetteville, N.C., mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. appointed Q.M. Sgt 1/1/1864; promoted to 1st LieutenantCo. M 1/13/1865;veteran promoted to 1st Lt. from 1st Sgt. Company K 1/13/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran appointed 12/1/1863; no further record found mustered out 7/26/1865 at Raleigh N.C. by order of War Dept. resigned 2/6/1863 mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 captured 12/18/1862 at Battle of Lexington, Tenn.; exchanged 9/1/1863 Resigned 8/11/1863 mustered out 11/29/1864 killed 7/23/1864 in action near Atlanta appointed 7/18/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; paroled prisoner; no further record captured 11/26/1864; paroled___; appointed Sgt., 7/18/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out 6/12 1865 at Nashville, Tenn. By order of War Dept. captured 8/8/1863 near Rienzi, Miss.; exchanged___; mustered out 11/2/1864 at Chattanooga, Tenn. On expiration of term of service.

Taylor, Thomas J. Taylor, William H.H. Tedrow, Wesley Teglar, Herman Tenny, Sylvanus Terrell, Edward J.

Pvt. Colonel Pvt. Pvt. corporal Pvt.

19

9/9/1862 8/26/1861 9/10/1861 9/29/1862 2/9/1864 2/18/1862

Co. F Staff Co. A Co. I Co. F Co. K

18 20 44

Terrell, Henry

Pvt.

21

11/21/186 1

Co. C

Thayer, Albert N. Thomas, Evan B.

Sgt. Pvt.

18 20

9/20/1861 10/14/186 1

Co. F Co. H

Thomas, Hugh T.

Pvt.

29

8/29/1862

Co. H

Thomas, Marquis L.

Sgt.

21

10/14/186 1

Co. F

262

Thomas, Thomas A. Thomas, William

Sgt. Pvt.

29 33

10/8/1861 1/6/1862

Co. H Co. G

Thomas, William T.

Pvt.

20

10/4/1861

Co. C

Thompson, Benjamin Thompson, Harrison Thompson, James E. Thompson, John M. Thompson, Joseph Thompson, Robert Thompson, William Thorton, Charles

Captain corporal Farrier Pvt. corporal Pvt. Pvt. Surgeo n

26 21 22 19 21 21 19 29

10/8/1861 1/31/1865 1/20/1865 3/6/1865 1/3/1865 9/5/1861 2/22/1865 8/27/1861

Co. H Co. E Co. D Co. E Co. D Co. B Co. I Staff

died 11/14/1863 at Corinth, Miss. killed 4/10/1865 at Monroe Cross Roads, N.C. also borne on the rolls as Thomas W. Thomas; mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service promoted from 1st Lieutenant 2/27/1862; to Major 10/12/1864, but not mustered; mustered out 12/3/1864 on expiration of term of service appointed___; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 7/10/1865; mustered out with company10/30/1865

Thurston, Alvin M.

Pvt.

24

8/28/1862

Co. E

Tice, Jacob

Pvt.

28

9/24/1861

Co. I

Tigh, John Tilson, Samuel

farrier Pvt.

36 19

10/23/186 1 2/17/1865

Co. F Co. F

Tinsman, Ludwell Todd, Foster Todd, James Todd, James M.

Pvt. Musicia n Musicia n Pvt.

20 20 21 18

8/28/1862 9/23/1861 9/23/1861 2/20/1865

Co. K Band Band Co. A

Todd, Marion

Pvt.

21

9/16/1861

Co. K

mustered out 9/2/1864 mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. discharged 1/7/1862 at Camp Dennison, Oh., on surgeon’s certificate appointed 10/30/1863; mustered out 11/2/1864 at Chattanooga, Tenn., on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. discharged 6/6/1862 by order of War Dept. discharged 6/6/1862 by order of War Dept. mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service

263

Tolbert, Andrew

wagone r

26

8/23/1862

Co. K

Town, Charles W. Towner, Ezra Towner, Oscar F.

Pvt. Sgt. Pvt.

28 22 29

9/12/1861 9/20/1861 9/20/1861

Co. F Co. M Co. M

Tracy, Matthew Traverse, Michael

Pvt. Pvt.

40 29

9/9/1861 10/10/186 1

Co. F Co. I

mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. mustered out 10/27/1864 at Chattanooga, Tenn.; on expiration of term of service discharged 12/13/1862 on surgeon's certificate discharged 12/15/1863 on surgeon's certificate captured 8/8/1863 at Battle of Rienzi, Miss., died 3/26//1864 at Richmond, Va., while prisoner

Tredway, William H.

Pvt.

18

9/5/1861

Co. K

Tribble, Thomas A. Trimble, Michael W. Troue, George Trounstine, Philip

Captain

22

9/27/1861 10/17/186 1 8/27/1862 8/31/1861

Co. L

Pvt. Pvt. Captain

19 19 23

Co. I Co. E Co. B

Troy, Francis N. Troy, Joseph C. Truitt, John D. Trump, George Trunk, Andrew Tucker, James H. Tudor, William W. Tuller, Walter A. Tussy, William Tweedy, James

1st Sgt. Pvt. 2nd Lieut. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

23 ___ 27 19 23 19 20 28 28 27

3/16/1864 ____ 9/10/1861 10/3/1861 2/18/1865 9/11/1861 10/4/1861 1/28/1862 2/18/1865 3/25/1865

Co. L Co. C Co. F Co. L Co. E Co. E Co. H Co. C Co. E Co. I

promoted to 1st Sgt Co. F 56th Regiment U.S. Colored Troops; died 8/30/1865 at Vidalia, La., as 2nd Lieutenant appointed musician 11/1/1861; Sgt__: promoted to 1st Lt. 10/29/1862; to captain 3/10/1864; mustered out 1/28/1865 on expiration of term of service mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service killed 3/10/1865 in Fayetteville, N.C., resigned 3/19/1863 promoted to 2nd Lt. 9/4/1865 but not mustered; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 no further record resigned 6/1/1862 on account of disability mustered out 11/3/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 3/19/1863 on surgeon's certificate died 12/15/1864 at Annapolis, Md.; veteran killed 8/16/1862 at Horne ,Lake Miss. absent on furlough; no further record never reported to company

264

Twineham, Arthur Twohig, Daniel Twohig, Jeremiah Ulrey, William H. Underhill, Byron Underwood, Samuel Vale, Joseph

Pvt. corporal Pvt. 1st Sgt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

18 24 42 18 21 18 24

9/6/1864 2/14/1865 2/14/1865 10/16/186 1 3/24/1864 2/7/1865 9/30/1861

Co. I Co. G Co. G Co. L Co. G Co. B Co. F

mustered out 6/26/1864 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept appointed 7/1/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company promoted to captain Co. M, 2nd O.V.C. 10/6/1862

Van Amburg, Rollin Van Amburgh, Rollin Van Ausdal, John W. Van Ausdol, Arthur S. Van Ausdule, Angus

2nd Lieut. Pvt. Pvt.

18 18 44

10/5/1861 10/5/1861 9/10/1861

Co. E Co. K Co. A

mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran promoted from pvt. Co. K 12/7/1863; mustered out 12/3/1864 on expiration of term of service promoted to 2nd Lieutenant Co. E to date 12/7/1863 mustered out 11/29/1864 mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service appointed 1/1/1863; discharged 3/7/1864 on surgeon's certificate appointed_____; mustered out 12/30/1864 at Savannah, Ga. On expiration of term of service. promoted from 2nd Lt. 3/19/1863; mustered out 12/3/1864 on expiration of term of service. appointed wagoner; mustered out 11/29/1864 by order of War Dep. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 captured 6/19/1863 in action near Coldwater, Miss.; mustered out 11/29/1864 discharged 6/7/1863 on surgeon's certificate of disability appointed 7/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed 7/1/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865

Pvt.

32

9/11/1861 10/16/186 2

Co. E

corporal

44

Co. M

Van Bibber, Andrew

corporal

22

12/18/186 1

Co. K

Van Cleve, Elijah T. Van Gundy, Jefferson Van hook, Lambert Van Kirk, Eben Van Malley, Charles L. Van Meter, John B. Vanblariacum, David Vanblaricum, Joseph

1st Lieut.

31

9/7/1861

Co. K

Q.M.S. Pvt. Pvt.

24 28 19

9/16/1861 3/7/1865 3/21/1865

Co.A Co. I Co. I

Pvt. Pvt. Sgt. corporal

19

9/13/1861 12/7/1861

Co. B Co. D Co. G Co. G

21 19

9/9/1861 3/4/1864

265

Vanderveer, Uriah Vandyke, Lafayette VanGordon, Abraham

Sgt. Pvt.

21 29

9/15/1861 2/9/1865

Co. E Co. K

Pvt.

39

1/29/1862

Co. C

Vanmatta, Samuel Varley, Orester M.

Pvt. farrier

52 23

9/13/1861 9/17/1861

Co. I Co. L

Verbryck, William Vertue, George

Pvt. Pvt.

35 24

11/16/186 1 2/16/1865

Co. C Co. F

appointed from corporal; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus , Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out to date 10/7/1865 by order of War Dept. mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh N.C. by order of War Dept. discharged 4/28/1862 near Corinth, Miss., on surgeon's certificate discharged 12/29/1862 on surgeon's certificate transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company10/30/1865; veteran appointed 4/5/1862; discharged5/31/1862 on surgeon's certificate of disability mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865 captured 7/26/1864 in action near Cartersville, Ga.; mustered out 5/30/1865 at Columbus, Oh., by order of the War Dept. mustered 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept. mustered out3/14/1865 at Fayetteville, N.C., on expiration of term of service died 7/22/1865 at Lewisburg, N.C. captured 6/19/1863 in action near Coldwater, Miss. ;exchanged 9/1/1863; mustered out 11/2/1864 at Chattanooga, Tenn., by order of War Dept. mustered out 6/27/1865 at Louisville, Ky. By order of War Dept. mustered out 11/29/1864on expiration of term of service mustered out 10/30/1865 died 5/14/1864

Vincent, Ellis G. Vining, Elijah Vinson, Leondias Viox, Sebastin

corporal Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

20 20 36

2/18/1862 3/11/1865 7/18/1862 3/2/1865

Co. K Co. E Co. H Co. B

Vogt, William Wade, Hesekiah M.

saddler Pvt.

22 30

9/10/1861 8/291862

Co. L Co. M

Wade, Peter Waggoner, William J.

Pvt. Pvt.

20 19

2/17/1862 2/20/1865

Co. K Co. A

Wagner, Benjamin

Pvt.

26

9/10/1861

Co. F

Wagner, Jeremiah Wagner, Philip Wahington, George Wahrnock, James

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

19 17 32 22

3/21/1864 10/9/1861 2/17/1865 9/24/1861

Co. M Co. H Co. A Co. I

266

Waide, Samuel Wait, Harvey Waites, Oliver

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

24 30 18

9/25/1862 11/6/1861 10/1/1861 10/28/186 1 1/30/1865 10/16/186 1

Co. F Co. L Co. B

Walburn, John M. Walker, Edwin Walker, Nelson R.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

24 19 24

Co. E Co. D Co. L

Walker, William H. Wallace, Edwin Wallace, James C. Walls, James Walser, John D. Walsh, Jacob M.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

27 28 48 22 19 21

9/3/1862 2/1/1865 2/22/1865 2/10/1865 2/4/1865 9/2/1861

Co. K Co. D Co. A Co. I Co. H Co. E

captured 12/18/1862 at Battle of Lexington, Tenn., returned to company 8/26/1864; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. discharged 5/3/1864 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 11/29/1864 discharged 5/9/1862 at Camp Dennison, Oh., on surgeon's certificate mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 3/5/181863 on surgeon's certificate of disability died 1/25/1865 at Beaufort, S.C., of wounds received for 11/29/1864 at Buckhead Church, Ga. mustered 7/5/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept. mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 8/19/1863 on surgeon's certificate captured 3/10/1865 in action near Fayetteville, N.C., mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. transferred to Co. G 7/28/1865 transferred from Co. C 6/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 promoted to 2nd Lieutenant Co. A 47th OVI captured 6/19/1863 in action near Coldwater, Miss. mustered out 11/2/1864 at Chattanooga, Tenn, on expiration of term of service appointed 2/1/1863; mustered out 11/29/1864, on expiration of term of service discharged 5/16/1863 near Corinth, Miss., on surgeon's certificate

Walsh, John Walters, Frederick

Pvt. Pvt.

24 30

9/2/1862 3/2/1865

Co. L Co. C

Walters, Frederick Walters, Isaac N. Walters, Jacob

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

30 22 19

3/4/1865 9/4/1861 9/5/1862

Co. G Co. C Co. B

Walters, James

Pvt.

18

9/23/1861

Co. F

Walters, Valentine

corporal

27

9/21/1861

Co. H

Walton, Frank T.

Pvt.

44

9/26/1861

Co. I

267

Wampler, John

Pvt.

20

10/7/1861

Co. F

Wamsley, Alvin C.

Pvt.

18

8/29/1862

Co. D

Wamsley, Anderson

1st Lieut.

21

9/11/1861

Co. D

Wamsley, Samuel Wansbrough, George

Captain Pvt.

41

8/28/1861 9/14/1861

Co. D Co. H

Ward, Elijah Ward, Michael Ward, Michael

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

29 18 25

9/28/1861 3/4/1865 3/1/1865

Co. A Co. H Co. M

Ward, William J. Wardlow, James Ware, George Warman, Courtland W. Warman, John W.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

19 21 18 24 57

10/1/1861 3/1/1865 2/10/1865 9/18/1861 9/18/1861

Co. C Co. L Co. K Co. B Co. B

captured 6/19/1863 in action Coldwater, Miss., exchanged 9/1/1863 mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C by order of War Dept. appointed 1st Sgt. From Sgt. 11/1/1861; promoted to 2nd Lieutenant 8/18/1862; to 1st Lieutenant 2/25/1863; mustered out 12/3/1864 on expiration of term of service promoted from 1st Lieutenant from 11/1/1861; resigned 3/12/1863 died 4/29/1862 at Pittsburgh Landing, Tenn. captured 6/19/1863 at Battle of Coldwater, Mississippi; mustered out 11/29/1864 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865 with company mustered out 9/20/1864 at Nashville, Tenn. On expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 died 6/17/1862 at Grand Junction, Tn. discharged 7/10/1862 on surgeon's certificate of disability Appointed corporal___;Sgt___; 1st Sgt. 7/1/1865; promoted to 1st Lieutenant 9/4/1865, but not mustered; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran mustered out 10/30/1865 discharged 3/22/1862 at Camp Dennison on a surgeon's certificate mustered 11/3/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 captured 12/18/1862 at Battle of Lexington, Tenn.; exchanged 9/1/1863

Warmouth, Henry C. Warner, Charles C. Warren, George H. Warren, Henry C. Warren, William H. Washburn, Edward

1st Sgt. Pvt.

21 18

10/15/186 1 2/10/1865

Co. G Co. A

corporal Pvt. Pvt.

21 22 23

9/10/1861 9/18/1861 2/22/1865

Co. A Co. L Co. I

Pvt.

20

9/20/1862

Co. F

268

Waters, Charles Waters, Thomas G. Watkins, Evan R. Watring, Henry H.

Sgt.

21

11/1/1861

Co. C

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

20 25 25

9/25/1861 10/14/186 1 2/3/1865

Co. F Co. H Co. A

Watson, James C. Watt, Joseph

2nd Lieut. Pvt.

30 22

10/9/1861 2/19/1865

Co. M Co. I

Watts, David H. Way, Frank Weaver, Edward Weaver, Francis L. Weaver, Francis L. Webb, Jason Webber, Benjamin Webber, Henry

Q.M.S. Pvt. Pvt. Sgt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

29 37 20 32 27 34 22

9/8/1862 8/26/1862 1/24/1865 9/10/1861 9/19/1861 10/3/1861 9/13/1861 2/20/1865 10/13/186 1

Co. B Co. K Co. L Co.A Co. A Co. K Co. H Co. B

transferred from Co. B. McLaughlin Squadron, 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/2/1864 at Chattanooga, Tenn, on expiration of term of service discharged 6/1/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 10/30/1865 appointed Corporal 11/1/1861; Sgt___; promoted to 2nd Lt. 2/1/1863; to 1st Lt. 5/9/1864 but not mustered; mustered out 12/3/1864, on expiration of term service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed Corporal 1/1/1863; Sgt 11/15/1864;1st Sgt 1/1/1865; wounded 3/10/1865 in action in Fayetteville, N.C.; reduced in rank from 1st Sgt 5/1/1865 at his own request; mustered out 7/10/1865 by order of War Dep. died 1/12/1864 at Richmond Va. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed; mustered out 9/24/1864 mustered out 9/20/1864 discharged 5/6/1862 on surgeon's certificate never joined company mustered out 10/30/1865 discharged 6/21/1862 at Evansville, Ind., on surgeon's certificate transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 5/14/1863 at Memphis, Tn., on surgeon's certificate mustered out with company 10/30/1865

Webster, David B.

Pvt.

Co. H

Webster, John Weikel, Jacob

Pvt. Pvt.

36 20

10/16/186 1 2/16/1865

Co. C Co. M

Weil, Moses Weisgerber, Frederick

Pvt. Pvt.

24 22

9/8/1862 2/18/1865

Co. L Co. G

269

Welch, Columbus

Pvt.

18

3/28/1864

Co. C

Welch, Michael Weller, Andy M. Wellington, Oliver P.

Pvt. corporal Sgt.

40 24 26

9/4/1861 10/7/1861 1/6/1863

Co. C Co. F Co. E

transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; discharged 1/8/1863 at Bolivar, Tenn., on surgeon's certificate of disability appointed____; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; died 5/29/1864 appointed corporal 9/1/1862; Q.M.S. 11/1/1862; mustered out 3/8/1865 by order of War Dept. appointed11/9/1861; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh. On expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. captured 6/19/1863 in action near Coldwater, Miss.; mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/9/1864 at Columbus , Oh. On expiration of term of service transferred to Co. H, 14th Regiment Veteran Reserve Corps 9/20/1864 from which mustered out 9/20/1864 on expiration of term of service from Washington D.C. transferred to Co. G 7/26/1865; veteran transferred from Co. C 7/28/1865;appointed____; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran appointed 10/12/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 missing since 12/31/1862 dischraged 6/3/1862 near Corinth, Miss., on surgeon's certificate

Welsh, Michael Wendle, Augustus

Pvt. Pvt.

18 18

3/11/1864 2/4/1864

Co. C Co. L

Wendleken, John M.

Q.M.S.

20

2/1/1862

Co. M

Wennings, Robert Wentworth, Elmore

Wagon er Pvt.

32 18

9/11/1862 8/29/1862

Co. D Co. D

Wentz, Frederick Werminger, Christian

Pvt.

26

9/1/1862

Co. M

Pvt.

19

4/1/1863

Co. B

Werner, George

Farrier

25

9/24/1661

Co. D

Werner, Nicholas Wertz, Charles H.

Pvt. Pvt.

23 21

9/24/1861 12/14/186 1

Co. D Co. C

Wertz, Charles H.

Sgt.

21

12/14/186 1

Co. G

Wesling, Henry West, William

Sgt. R.Q.M.

19 29

2/18/1865 9/26/1861

Co. K Staff

West, William

Pvt.

29

9/26/1861

Co. I

270

Wetzel, Henry

Sgt.

32

9/9/1861

Co. I

Whipp, James M. White, Chester B. White, John White, John W. White, Rufus White, William Whitely, Charles W. Whitely, Charles W. Whitesell, Peter

Sgt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Sad. Ser. Pvt. Pvt.

23 28 37 37 19 18

10/15/186 1 2/18/1865 9/14/1861 9/14/1861 10/5/1861 2/17/1865

Co. C Co. A Co. M Co. B Co. H Co. I

mustered out as corporal 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service; re-enlisted 3/9/1865 for one year; appointed 7/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out 10/30/1865 discharged 5/10/1862 on surgeon's certificate transferred to Co. M 10/1/1861 mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service from saddler11/1/1861; mustered out 8/4/1864 by order of War Dep. promoted to Chief Saddler Sgt. 11/1/1861 died 3/31/1862 at Camp Dennison prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/1865 at camp Chase, Oh. , by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 7/8/1862 at Camp Bridge Creek, Miss., on surgeon's certificate prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/1865 at camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept.; veteran transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; captured 8/3/1864; no further record mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C. by order of War Dept.. mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N. C., by order of War Dept. from saddler 8/1/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865

26 26 43

9/23/1861 9/23/1861 9/18/1861

Staff Co. B Co. K

Whiting, John L. Whitney, William Whittaker, Edgar

saddler Pvt. Pvt.

41 31 18

9/30/1862 2/19/1865 1/25/1865

Co. I Co. M Co. E

Wickham, Peter

Pvt.

29

9/7/1861

Co. K

Widdoes, Curtis

Pvt.

23

8/28/1862 10/23/186 1

Co. K

Widdoes, Joseph

Pvt.

19

Co. K

Widler, Henry Wiggins, William H.

Pvt.

20

4/11/1864

Co. C

Pvt.

27

9/8/1862

Co. D

Wikel, Henry A. Wilbur, George W.

Pvt. Sad. Ser.

20 22

9/12/1862 1/30/1865

Co. I Staff

271

Wilbur, George W. Wiler, Alexander

Saddler Farrier

22 22

1/30/1865 11/20/186 1

Co. H Co. D

Wilkin, John

Captain

19

9/15/1861

Co. D

Wilkin, John

Sgt.

19

9/15/1861

Co. E

Wilkinson, Joseph William, Silas Williams, Abraham

Pvt. Pvt.

20 19

2/4/1865 2/20/1865

Co. E Co. L

Pvt.

9/2/1861

Co. B

Williams, Albert E. Williams, Alexander D. Williams, Bayard Williams, Frederick Williams, George W. Williams, George W. Williams, Harrison

1st Lieut.

23

9/18/1861

Co. E

Pvt. Pvt. Cook

38 24 18

9/28/1861 9/4/1861 5/1/1864

Co. E Co. C Co. B

Pvt.

22

9/4/1861

Co. C

Pvt. Pvt.

23 22

12/3/1863 2/21/1865

Co. K Co. M

promoted to Regt. Saddler Sgt. 8/1/1865 discharged to date 9/26/1864 by order of War Dept. ; veteran promoted to 2nd Lieutenant from Sgt. Co. E 1/13/1865; to captain 4/8/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed____; promoted to 1st Lieutenant Co. D 1/13/1865; veteran mustered out 7/5/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 discharged 9/25/1861 at Cincinnati, Oh. On surgeon's certificate of disability promoted to 1st Lieutenant from 1st Sgt.9/4/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration date of service African-Am. under-cook mustered out 10/30/1865 discharged 10/18/1862 at Bolivar, Tenn. On surgeon's certificate prisoner of war; mustered out 6/9/1865 at camp Chase, Oh., by order of War Dept. appointed___; captured6/19/1863in action near Coldwater, Miss. ; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran discharged 3/7/1863 on a surgeon's certificate mustered out with company 10/30/1865 died__1862 while at home on sick leave appointed 5/21/1864; mustered out 11/29/1864

Williams, Jackson Williams, James Williams, James Williams, Jesse Williams, John M. Williams, Samuel

Sgt. 2nd Lieut. Pvt. Pvt. corporal Pvt.

29 32 19 20 21

11/1/1861 9/10/1861 2/11/1865 9/4/1861 9/13/1861 2/10/1865

Co. D Co.A Co. K Co. C Co. B Co. M

272

Williams, Thomas J. Williams, William E. Williams, William W.

corporal

18

1/27/1864

Co. M

Pvt.

29

8/29/1862

Co. H

Sgt.

23

9/12/1861

Co. B

Williams, Wright Williamson, Peter Williamson, Theodore N.

Pvt. Musicia n Sgt.

9/2/1861 27 26 9/11/1861 1/17/1864

Co. B Band Co. M

Willis, John W. Wilson, Americus

Q.M.S. Pvt.

26 20

2/10/1865 9/19/1861

Co. L Co. B

Wilson, Charles Wilson, George W. Wilson, Henry

Sgt. Pvt. 1st Sgt.

21

2/24/1865 12/30/186 1 2/23/1865

Co. B Co. G Co. I

23

Wilson, Henry Wilson, James D.

2nd Lieut. Pvt.

23 25

2/23/1865 3/14/1865

Co. K Co. K

captured 4/9/1865 at Faison's Station, N.C., discharged 9/23/1865 on surgeon's certificate mustered out 6/24/1865 at Camp Dennison. Oh., by order of War Dept. appointed from Corporal 3/29/1864; mustered out 11/29/1864 discharged 9/25/1861 at Cincinnati, Oh. On surgeon's certificate of disability discharged 6/6/1862 by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed____; discharged to date 8/23/1865 by order of War Dept. transferred to U.S. Navy 5/13/1865 appointed Corporal8/1/18165; Sgt 9/51865; mustered out 10/30/1865 died 6/23/1862 at Jackson, Tenn. appointed_____; promoted to 2nd Lieutenant Co. K 9/4/1865 promoted from 1st Sgt. Co. I 9/1/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 by order of War Dept. captured 6/19/1863 at Battle of Coldwater; mustered out 11/29/1864 appointed 1/1/1863; mustered out 5/24/1865 at Columbus, Oh., by order of War Dept. mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh N.C. by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh. On expiration of term of service mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service discharged

Wilson, Nicholas

Pvt.

22

9/16/1861

Co. A

Wilson, Samuel

Sgt.

37

9/12/1861

Co. M

Wilson, Stewart Wilson, William

Pvt. Pvt.

19 22

8/29/1862 1/31/1865

Co. D Co. G

Wilt, Ebenzer

Pvt.

41

9/12/1861

Co. E

Wiltman, Jacob Winans, Allen

Pvt. Pvt.

24 18

9/26/1861 9/10/1861

Co. I Co. A

273

Winders, Alexander P. Winders, Daniel P.

Pvt. Pvt.

8/9/1862 8/29/1862

Co. M Co. M

discharged 3/16/1863 at Germantown, Tn., on surgeon's certificate no further record found mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh. By order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 died 6/19/1862 at Paducah, Ky. mustered out 6/1/1865 at Camp Dennison, Oh. By order of War Dept.; veteran _________________________ __ mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed___; mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran discharged 9/29/1865 on surgeon's certificate discharged 6/30/1862 at Camp Dennison, Oh. On surgeon's certificate mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service. mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service; re-enlisted 3/3/1865 for one year; mustered out 10/30/1865; mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration date of service appointed 11/1/1861; died 6/1/1862 at Monterey, Tenn. transferred from Co. B McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company10/30/1865; veteran mustered out 11/20/1864 on expiration of term of service transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 7/28/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865;absent with leave since 10/2/1865; no further record

Wingert, Lewis Winkleman, Isaac Winning, George W.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

18 19 21

9/11/1861 2/16/1865 10/28/186 1

Co. D Co. L Co. E

Winters, August Winters, John Wirtland, John M.

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

20 18 31

9/17/1861 1/26/1864 2/15/1865

Co. D Co. C Co. D

Wirtz, Adam Wise, John

corporal Pvt.

25 20

9/10/1861 4/1/1865 12/14/186 1

Co. E Co. M

Wissinger, John

Pvt.

___

Co. C

Wolf, Joseph

Pvt.

18

10/3/1861

Co. E

Wolf, Michael Wolf, Simeon Wolfram, Charles Wollard, Robert M.

corporal Pvt. Pvt. corporal

23 21 38 22

9/30/1861 9/8/1861 2/15/1865 9/10/1861

Co. I Co. C Co. H Co. E

Wollet, Moses Wood, John R.

Pvt. Pvt.

26 20

11/14/186 1 11/12/186 1

Co. C Co. L

Wood, Naman

Pvt.

20

4/4/1864

Co. C

274

Wood, Thomas G. Wooden, Charles W. Woolbaugh, William H. Woolfick, Edward Woolfick, William F. Woolflayer, Joseph Worcester, Leonard Wright, Benjamin F. Wright, David Wright, James E. Wright, John L. Wright, Luther S. Wunder, George

1st Lieut. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Ldr. Band Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

34 19 18 19 21 39 25 18 21 19 18 24 22

10/8/1861 9/18/1861 2/22/1865 9/30/1864 9/29/1864 10/27/186 1 9/2/1861 2/15/1865 2/21/1865 2/13/1865 9/11/1861 10/1/1861 2/22/1865

Co. M Co. K Co. E Co. B Co. B Co. I Band Co. I Co. M Co. K Co. D Co. K Co. K mustered out 10/30/1865 mustered out 5/24/1865by order of War Dep. mustered out 6/26/1865 by order of War Dep. discharged 7/9/1862 at Corinth, Miss., on surgeon's certificate. discharged 6/6/1862 by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran discharged 5/12/1862 on surgeon's certificate mustered out with company 10/30/1865 captured 12/18/1862 at Battle of Lexington, Tenn.; exchanged 9/1/1863; mustered out 6/26/1865 at Raleigh, N.C., by order of War Dept. mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 6/21/1865 at Camp Chase, Oh. By order of War Dept. appointed 7/4/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed from corporal 9/1/1865; mustered out with company 10/30/1865 also carried on the rolls as Henry L. Castleton; from private to Adjutant 9/4/1865; mustered out 10/30/1865 Borne on rolls as Henry L. Castleton; promoted to 1st Lt. and Adj. 9/4/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865

Yager, Joseph Yagle, George W.

Pvt. Pvt.

41 25

9/10/1862 1/30/1865

Co. F Co. D

Yancey, Joseph Yazel, John Q.

Pvt. Sgt.

23 23

9/17/1864 2/28/1865

Co. C Co. H

Yeatts, William

Sgt.

24

2/15/1865

Co. M

Yocum, John M.

Adjutant

36

2/7/1865

Staff

Yocum, John M. Yohler, Martin Young, David

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

36 20 27

2/7/1865 9/17/1861 2/7/1865

Co. M Co. H Co. L

275

Young, George

Pvt.

31

2/7/1865

Co. L

Young, Jacob Young, Thomas J. Zeck, Adam Zehender, Christian

farrier Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

23 21 24 26

9/17/1861 3/21/1865 2/14/1862 9/25/1861

Co. I

mustered out with company 10/30/1865 appointed___; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran mustered out11/29/1864 on order of War Dep. transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 2/28/1865; paroled prisoner____; no further record mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 3/14/1865 at Fayetteville, N.C., on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 appointed___; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865; veteran mustered out11/29/1864 on order of War Dep. transferred from Co. A McLaughlin Squadron 2/28/1865; paroled prisoner____; no further record mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 3/14/1865 at Fayetteville, N.C., on expiration of term of service mustered out with company 10/30/1865 mustered out 11/29/1864 appointed___; mustered out 11/29/1864 at Columbus, Oh., on expiration of term of service

Co. E Co. B

Zeigler, Ransom Zimmerman, Lehmowsky Zimmerman, Lewis

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

18 18 18

3/30/1864 3/20/1865 4/3/1865

Co. C Co. M Co. M

Zinn, James Zoller, John Zuber, George

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

22 18 26

3/1/1862 3/7/1865 10/10/186 1

Co. H Co. H Co. A

Young, Jacob Young, Thomas J. Zeck, Adam Zehender, Christian

farrier Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

23 21 24 26

9/17/1861 3/21/1865 2/14/1862 9/25/1861

Co. I

Co. E Co. B

Zeigler, Ransom Zimmerman, Lehmowsky Zimmerman, Lewis

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

18 18 18

3/30/1864 3/20/1865 4/3/1865

Co. C Co. M Co. M

Zinn, James Zoller, John Zuber, George

Pvt. Pvt. Pvt.

22 18 26

3/1/1862 3/7/1865 10/10/186 1

Co. H Co. H Co. A

Young, Jacob

farrier

23

9/17/1861

Co. I

276

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