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Title of Assessing Sources Unit Curriculum Language Arts Area

Grade Level Time Frame

10th
1 day

Stage 1 Desired Results


Content Standards: ELACC9-10SL2 : Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source. (CCGPS) T3 : Research and Information Fluency: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information (NETS-S)

Understandings
Students will understand that: Credibility and accuracy of sources must be evaluated before use as a valid source Related Misconceptions: If it looks official, it must be official. Anything on the internet is worth using as a research source.

Essential Questions
Overarching Questions: What information is credible? What is accurate information? Topical Questions: How can I determine if an online source is credible?

Knowledge and Skills Knowledge


Students will know: Indicators of credible and accurate information.

Skills
Students will be able to: Identify credible and accurate resources. Identify resources that are not credible and accurate for research and knowledge.

Stage 2 - Evidence Performance Task(s)


Be sure to indicate: Goal: Your goal is to find credible and accurate resources for a research assignment. Role: You are researching information on an author for inclusion in a presentation on important world authors. Audience: Your audience is students and fellow researchers. Situation: You have been asked to select an author for inclusion in a study on historical background of prominent authors who will be included in a literature anthology. Product Performance and Purpose: You will need to: Evaluate websites for credibility and accuracy.(Apply) Explain why the website is credible and valid. (Explain) Reflect on how the evaluation process is different from how you usually look at websites. (Self-knowledge) Explain what can happen when you relate information from a website that is not been validated. (Perspective) (Empathy) Reflect on why evaluating websites is important.(Interpret) Standards and Criteria for Success: Your work should include: Evaluation checklists on two credible sources found. Reflection on the evaluation process. Reflection on the relevance of the evaluation process.

Performance Task(s) Rubric(s)


Meets Standard Website information is complete, containing url and information as directed and available. Short answer questions contain a minimum of two complete sentences on topic to the description given for each point of validity (PPT) Each answer to the two reflection questions covers the topic and consists of valuable insight and revelation in regard to the evaluation process. Each answer must be in paragraph form.
Progressing Toward Standard

Website information is somewhat complete, containing url but may be missing other information Short answer questions do not contain a minimum of two complete sentences. Answers are relevant to validity (PPT) of the website but may be a bit off target. Answers to the two reflection questions attempts to cover the topic but may lack valuable insight and revelation in regard to the evaluation process. Each answer is in paragraph form with a minimum of 5 sentences.

Does Not Meet Standard Website information is not complete, no url and information is vague Short answer questions contain do not contain a minimum of two complete sentences and are completely off target in regard to evaluating validity (PPT) Answers to the two reflection questions do not cover the topic and does not address the evaluation process. Answers are not in paragraph form and are lacking in depth of thought.

Other Evidence
Evaluation Worksheet: How do I evaluate a website? Author Researched: 1st Web Site: (Cut and paste url here) then list use the following format for more information: Editor, author, or compiler name (if available). Name of Site. Name of institution/organization affiliated with the site (sponsor or publisher), date of resource creation (if available). Medium of publication. Date of access.

What is the purpose of the site or page?

What does the URL say about the site or page?

Explain the authority of the site or page.

Explain the objectivity of the site or page.

Explain the relevance of the site or page.

Explain the currency of the site or page.

Is the site or page responsible about the information given?

Discuss the clarity of the site or page.

Discuss the accessibility of the site or page.

2nd Web Site: (Cut and paste url here) then list use the following format for more information: Editor, author, or compiler name (if available). Name of Site. Name of institution/organization affiliated with the site (sponsor or publisher), date of resource creation (if available). Medium of publication. Date of access.

What is the purpose of the site or page?

What does the URL say about the site or page?

Explain the authority of the site or page.

Explain the objectivity of the site or page.

Explain the relevance of the site or page.

Explain the currency of the site or page.

Is the site or page responsible about the information given?

Discuss the clarity of the site or page.

Discuss the accessibility of the site or page.

Reflection on the evaluation process. (One paragraph minimum) Explain how you conducted searches and what you learned from the search process and evaluating the web sources you found.

Reflection on the relevance of the evaluation process. (One Paragraph minimum) Explain why you think evaluating a source for validity is important. What would happen if people believed everything they saw or read.

Stage 3: Learning Experiences


Instructor will review PowerPoint on evaluating websites. Instructor will guide students through evaluation of invalid websites. Instructor will guide students through evaluation of valid websites. Students will use the guidelines provided in the PowerPoint to evaluate websites regarding authors relevant to their current studies. Students will reflect on the process of evaluating a website for validity and the importance of performing such when conducting research. Notes to the Instructor In deciding which skills I should focus on for this module, I looked at data from the 21st Century Skills Assessment (http://www.learning.com/21st-century-skills-assessment/) which was given to 8th graders. I based my determination on scores from the skill module: Research and Information Fluency. The test data I examined was based on 2011-12 test subjects, while the students I will be working with are 10th graders now. This means that they would have taken the test in 2010-11. However, data was not available during that year, and the subjects are similar in age, demographic, and curriculum. I predicted that there would not be any significant differences in data. The average global score for the Research and Information Fluency module sat at 270. Our two middle schools performed well under that. As our students are preparing to enter college and are more frequently using the computer for research assignments, I thought evaluating websites an important skill for not only educational purposes but also as future digital citizens. Below are the results for our middle school tests in the areas of Research and Information Fluency.

Newbern Middle School

Valdosta Middle School

Resources:
List of hoax sites - http://www.shsu.edu/lis_mah/documents/TCEA/hoaxtable.html Hoax site Dog Island - http://www.thedogisland.com/ Hoax site Tree Octopus - http://zapatopi.net/treeoctopus/