REMINGTON’S INTERACTIVE MAGAZINE

America’s Game Bird

30
Oct ober 2013

PG

®

$6. 95

E Z I N E

GEARING UP: Hottest

&

Rifles, Cartridges More! 36
PG

What would Roosevelt do today?
42
PG

Caribou
PG

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DREAM HUNTS AWAIT YOU!

Canada’s Storm of Mallards pg 10

Remington’s 2020 T M Digit al Optics System pg 25

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PG

Publisher/Executive Producer: Chris Dorsey Senior VP Sales/Integrated Solutions: Shane Jones Chief Financial Officer: Amy Dorsey Post Production Supervisor: Fred Garcia Chief Of Videography: Larry Sletten Creative Director: Peter Greenstone Animation: Erik Tande Art Director: Chuck Cole Archives: Jessica Adams Senior Producer: Kevin Fay Writers: Thomas McIntyre, Patrick Kleinen Still Photography: Marcos Furer, Dusan Smetana Research: Kelly McLear, Kristen Edwards
Orion Entertainment is the largest producer of outdoor adventure programming and content in the world with dozens of series airing on nine national television networks. With a 30,000 hour global HD footage library, an archive of thousands of photographic images, and a team of the most knowledgeable outdoor and media experts in North America, Orion is the industry’s only full service marketing solutions company delivering best-in-class content and intelligence on all existing and emerging platforms.

COVER & INSIDE PHOTO: Dusan Smetana

COVER & INSIDE PHOTOS: Remington/Orion Entertainment

Finding a monster whitetail deer on the Eastern plains of Colorado is about working miles of cottonwood bottoms until Mr. Big appears...then it’s a matter of making a fleeting chance count!

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Caribou: Antelope of the Tundra 4

TRCP Conservation Report 42

Chasing the Arctic nomad.
TAB L E OF CON TEN TS

Making our hunting President proud.
Squeeg-E™ : Evolutionary Cleaning 46

Canada’s Storm of Mallards 10

Getting a jump on the fall north of the border.
Safari: Plains Truth About Africa 16

Evolutionary or revolutionary, the best way to maintaining your firearm.
Team Remington Sporting Clays 50

Finding your way today on the continent of Hemingway and Ruark.
2020 Digital Optics System 25

Powdering the targets and claiming the trophies.
Cutlery: The Legendary Bullet® Knife 52

The first truly 21st century sighting system.
Starting the Fall With Dove 30

The cutting edge for more than 90 years.
History & Heritage: Model 700™ 56

America’s wingshooting season opener.
Gearing Up for Deer Season 36

The first genuinely modern centerfire rifle.

Half the fun is the things we carry.

E Z I N E

Mission Statement: Remington Country eZine is the ultimate media zone for sportsmen around the globe seeking the latest information and insights from the world’s leading outdoor brand. Remington Country eZine combines the best in writing, photography, and video to create the next generation of media experience for hunters and shooters seeking the most credible information to help them transform their outdoor and shooting enjoyment.

©Copyright Remington Arms Company, LLC; 2013 All Rights Reserved

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Car
“It is to be hoped that there will never be so few caribou that it will be possible to count them.”
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ribou
A N T E L O P E O F T H E T U N D R A
by Tom McIntrye Many hunters believe that to experience vast herds of big game they have to journey to Africa’s Serengeti to witness wildebeest and other antelope roaming the plains in the tens of thousands. Yet, some of the greatest migratory herds in the world are to be found on this continent, when a deer, the caribou, assembles to travel across the northern tundra. There is even a word for a mass of caribou, La Foule, “the throng.” On the calving grounds, caribou can form a throng so immense it will leave biologists dumbstruck as they try tallying animals. One biologist in the 1940s, summed up the dilemma of scientists, and hunters, by saying, “It is to be hoped that there will never be so few caribou that it will be possible to count them.” Thus far, there aren’t. One of the reasons, among many, for hunting caribou is to have the opportunity of witnessing the
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spectacular natural phenomenon of these enormous herds on the move. Today, the spectacle of caribou hunting is well within the reach of the average hunter, with hunts ranging from fully guided, to semi-guided, to do-it-yourself. So the opportunities are plentiful for hunters to see the great herds. The combination of migration and herding, though, is the blessing and the curse of caribou hunting. To hunt them successfully, it is necessary to understand that their survival is dependent on their unique behavior. Caribou herd up and move long distances in order to survive. For caribou there is safety in numbers against predators, such as wolves. A lone caribou can be extremely vulnerable, while a large gathering offers the security of all those eyes and ears and noses, as well as presenting a welter of animals from which a predator finds it difficult to pick out a target. And if the herds don’t move, they will graze themselves out of lichen and other feed in short order; so they have to eat on the run, or the trot. As big as caribou herds can be, the tundra is far bigger, and locating them is the key to the hunt. A bush plane is probably the best way to locate

a migrating herd. When it is spotted, a hunter can be put down ahead of it (and in many places it is illegal to hunt the same day as being airborne, so he would have to hold off until the next day), and wait for the animals to come to him. Unfortunately, this is a very expensive proposition, and it’s not one likely to be offered by all outfitters. The other is to know the “choke points” on the tundra, such as between two large lakes, through which the caribou will funnel–at some point–and hope you can be there when they do. Timing matters more in hunting caribou than almost any other game, making it a feast or famine proposition: The animals are either passing by in herds of tens, fifties, or sometimes hundreds, their fast walking accompanied by their distinct clicking sound; or they are nowhere in sight across all the tundra. This means that two completely essential items of equipment every caribou hunter should have are a binocular and a spotting scope. And if there is a third, it would be patience. Trying to find caribou by stillhunting is like watching a movie one frame at a time. On foot without a

spotting scope, a hunter on the tundra is likely to roll around like a steel ball on a pinball table. A caribou hunter would do better to locate a good vantage point, set up his scope, be prepared to sit patiently, and hunt with his eyes rather than his feet. More often than not, caribou hunting is a wet and windy adventure, so warm and waterproof clothing is vital. Waterproof boots are necessary, too, especially with all the bogs that are likely to have to be crossed in caribou country. A packframe for packing out meat and antlers is also a good idea. Another item made for wet weather that a caribou hunter should have is a rust-resistant rifle with a synthetic stock, like the Remington Model 700™ Mountain SS or the Remington Model 700™ SPS™ Stainless. In size and weight, the caribou falls into the range between a large mule deer buck and a spike bull elk. A hunter can, therefore, rely on this deer rifle and cartridge; and the Remington stainless-synthetic models listed above will do excellent double duty. Caribou hunting almost always comes down to spotting-stalking, over tundra terrain that is much harder

A wolf will eat one caribou every ten days.

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to walk on than it looks, making a the Quebec-Labrador, may have spreads lightweight rifle, like the Remington wider than the length of the main beam, Model Seven™ Synthetic, a benefit, on which will be a deduction. both the tundra and in the deer woods. Caribou, like antelope, live in Field judging a bull caribou involves evaluating more factors than probably any other antlered game. There are at least five features to look at before deciding a bull is a trophy. First is main-beam length, and one clue there is to look for a deep curve. The brow palms, or “shovels,” are about length, width, and number of points, with a “double-shovel” bull the ideal. Not to be overlooked are the bez tines above the shovels, judged on symmetry, size, and points. Rear, or Alaska-Yukon Barren Ground Caribou “kicker,” points Mountain Caribou off the back of the Arctic Islands Caribou main beam can add significantly Central Canada Barren Ground Caribou to the score. Next Woodland Caribou to last are the top Quebec-Labrador Caribou palms and palm points. And finally there is antler spread; open country, depending on La Foule sometimes, though, caribou, such as and near-perpetual motion to stay alive.

As with antelope, a fairly long-range, flat-shooting caliber is the right choice. Caribou are eminently stalkable–or rather, intercepted; trying to catch up with them when they’re moving takes the stamina and speed of a crosscountry runner. If a hunter can set up ahead of them as they’re moving, ranges can often be shortened. Despite the sometimes hit or miss nature of caribou hunting, it remains one of the most enjoyable and exotic hunting experiences in North America, and very affordable. In certain areas, the limit is also two caribou, giving a hunter the chance to take a bull early, and then hold out for a true trophy. And have a generous quantity of excellent meat to take home. It should be noted that caribou numbers can be subject to wild fluctuations. Today, the most vivid example is the George River herd, that migrates between Quebec and
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The Rifle for Arctic Weather Caribou hunting calls for a bad-weather rifle;
and the answer John Fink, Remington’s Senior Product Manager for Rifles and a veteran caribou hunter himself, has for that is the Remington Model 700™ XCR II. Introduced in 2010, the Model 700™ XCR II features a patented Hogue® OverMolded® synthetic stock with the Remington SuperCell™ recoil pad and X-Mark Pro® Trigger. The barrel and receiver are manufactured from 416 stainless steel that is covered with the electroless-nickel TriNyte® Corrosion Control System coating that holds off scratches and corrosion like chain mail over armor. Available in all the reliable caribou calibers, in 24- and 26-inch barrel lengths, and drilled and tapped for scope mounts, the Model 700™ XCR II is a good choice for standing up to the harshest tundra conditions.
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Caribou

continued

HYPERSONIC® CENTERFIRE
For flat-shooting, hard-hitting cartridge for caribou, you can look to Remington HyperSonic® Centerfire. The HyperSonic® cartridge adds as much as 200-feet-per-second velocity to standard loads, which for caribou would include the 140-grain 270 Winchester, 160-grain 7mm Remington Magnum, 150-grain 30-06 Springfield, and 180-grain 300 Winchester Magnum. According to Remington Centerfire-Ammunition Product Manager, Nick Sachse (SACK-see), the key to the HyperSonic®’s performance, along with a proprietary blend of propellants, is the Remington Core-Lokt® Ultra Bonded® bullet. One of the projects Sachse worked on during 16 years as a R&D designer at Remington was the Ultra Bonded. The main features of that bullet include a thickened jacket in the main body of the bullet to control expansion, especially at ranges below 200 yards, while the nose uses a thinner jacket to insure expansion at all ranges. Remington’s bonding process essentially solders the lead core to the jacket the entire length of the bullet to lock core and jacket Caribou Encounters together and eliminate separation. The bullet also shifts weight to the rear for stability. The goal is deep penetration and 95-percent weight retention for complete energy transfer, producing in Sachse’s words, “the most devastating wound channel possible.”

Labrador and that less than 20 years ago achieved a historical high of nearly 1 million animals. Now, for reasons not entirely understood, the population has fallen over 90 percent. Overall in North America, there are about 2 million caribou, with perhaps three-eighths of that number in Alaska, and the rest across northern Canada. For some of the best hunting for the central Canada

Ultimate

barren-ground caribou, the place to look is the Qamanirjuaq herd in Nunavut (for hunting information, contact Henik Lake Adventures, www. heniklakeadventures.com). Consult www.orionlocations.com for more outfitters. Wherever caribou hunting is to be found, it’s time to join the crowd, or the throng.

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A caribou requires five pounds of forage, often lichen, leaves, and grasses, a day.

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THE LEGENDARY REMINGTON® MODEL 700.™

With more

than 5 million sold since 1962, it’s carved a reputation for itself out of the sporting landscape of America. The most accurate, most popular production rifle ever conceived.

Made in the USA by American workers

©2013 REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY, LLC.

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Side note:

Taming Giant Canadas
Branta canadensis maxima, the giant Canada goose, runs 14 to 15 pounds and more, which can make some hunters believe they need equally giant shot to bring one down. T and F shot sizes are just a step below buckshot, so one might think that they would be the choice for folding up a big goose. What Ts and Fs have in size though, is negated by the small number of pellets in the pattern. A load of BBs or BBBs will carry nearly twice as many pellets as an equalweight load of F shot, and at reasonable velocities, will penetrate just fine. Remington Manager Matt Ohlson prefers high velocity BBs for decoying geese, and high velocity BBBs farther out. As for his choice of shell, it’s hard to beat 3-inch 1 ¼-ounce, or 3½-inch, 1 3/8-ounce HyperSonic Steel®. For mallards, choose the same length and load, but in #2s. As for choke, he suggests Improved Cylinder through Improved Modified. Large steel shot tends to pattern less efficiently in tighter chokes. Shotshell Senior Product

T H E

E A R L Y

B I R D

C A N A D A’ S S T O R M O F

MALLARDS
by Doug Larsen Remington Pro Staff

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PHOTO: Remington Archives

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here is certainly earlyseason hunting to be found in the Lower 48 for Septembermigrators such as teal, gadwall, and wigeon. For big ducks and geese, though, the place to look is north of the border on the prairies of Canada. Waterfowl have been maintaining extraordinary numbers for several years throughout North America, and the 2013-14 season will likely be no different. The US Fish & Wildlife’s 2013 estimates of population trends show some 6.5 million breeding mallards in Canada, along with several million Canada geese. Across Canada, most waterfowl seasons open during the first week of September, and in the Arctic, even earlier. It’s only a matter of time, though, before the waterfowl will take wing to head south in clouds that literally blot out air-traffic radar across wide swaths of the flyway. In the meantime, though, exceptional shooting is to be had for those who make the trip to the “Great White North.”

There’s a unique opportunity for field hunting on the Canadian prairies in the early season, but the first step is scouting. It is illegal across Canada to pay for hunting access, which makes for a good news-bad news situation. Without a lease, a hunter cannot be assured of a place to hunt. On the other hand, when ducks or geese are scouted out on a piece of property, any hunter has an equal chance of knocking on a landowner’s door and asking for permission to set out a decoy spread in his field. Landowners are, in fact, accustomed to having hunters appear and so are prepared to talk with them. What this means, though, is not only having to put in the time and effort to locate the ducks and geese, which is absolutely necessary, but also being able to establish a relationship with a landowner that is not based on cash or check but on respect for each other. To earn that respect a hunter has to fulfill all his obligations–closing gates, driving

A Perfect Storm of Wings

only where the landowner allows him to drive, watching out for cattle and outbuildings and equipment, picking up all his empty hulls, leaving behind no trash. More than that, a hunter needs to be polite and friendly and express gratitude for the privilege of hunting, if he ever wants to return to this hunting spot, and does not want to ruin things for others who may follow, by creating a bad reputation for visiting hunters. A tip for scouting hunters looking for permission to hunt properties in Canada: Local landowners and outfitters in Canada are well aware of the migratory and daily travel patterns and feeding habits of the waterfowl that utilize the fields and bodies of water in their region. They realize the value of waterfowl and waterfowl hunting as a local resource to their communities and they do take measures to help retain waterfowl in their areas as long as possible. Both landowners and outfitters typically prefer hunters to hunt food source fields over ponds, lakes, or marshes whenever possible. This allows birds to use bodies of water as loafing and rest habitat and extends the seasonal opportunity for all. Hunters talking with locals to locate birds, or asking permission to hunt specific
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locations can help keep their names on Small family groups will work. Play the the “welcome” list by being sensitive to wind (“he who hunts with the wind in this philosophy. his face, should be hunting in another Portable ground blinds, place”), and be sure to leave landing such as layout or areas for the ducks and “coffin” blinds, work geese. As far as calling, extremely well for in the early season, don’t PLAY THE WIND field hunting for early overdo it and keep it “He who season waterfowl hunts with the in Canada. It is important, even with wind in his naive ducks and face, should geese, to make sure the blinds don’t have be hunting in that “showroomanother place.” new” shine to them. So rubbing mud on the outsides or adding plant and brush material from the field will prevent them from standing out to the birds as they whiffle in. To get those birds to come in, first scout out exactly where in the field they are landing. Setting up in the general area is not the same as being right on the spot where they naturally want to set down. You can even waypoint it on a GPS or mark it basic. Flagging can be a smart move, with some sort of flag, especially helpful too. With regards to decoys, early season steps when you are trying to relocate the waterfowl hunters in Canada routinely spot the next morning in the pitch dark. find that both geese and ducks will Once you’ve made it back to readily decoy to full body goose spreads. the “X” you marked the evening before, So the need to have species-specific you can place your decoy spread. Birds decoy spreads is not quite so critical in are hardly shy this time of year, so vast the early season and may present an spreads are not necessarily needed. opportunity to simplify gear selection,
PHOTO: Dusan Smetana

and make decoy spread placement easier, and less time-consuming. Mallard drakes molt in the late summer, and their new plumage is drab as it comes in. There may be no restrictions on taking hens; but for those who prefer to take only males, it can require close observation to recognize

a drake before it has it full green head. Before ducks and geese grow in their winter feathers, though, they carry less protection. And Remington HyperSonic Steel® loads make them even less protected. Matt Ohlson, Remington Senior Shotshell and Rimfire Product Manager, and veteran waterfowler,

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calls HyperSonic Steel® “The highestvelocity waterfowl load on the planet.” HyperSonic® 12 gauge shot charges reach 1700 feet per second. Key to these velocities is Remington’s patented Xelerator® Wad, with “an ignition chamber that extends through the propellant bed to rest on top of the

birds bagged with fewer shells and fewer cripples, by increasing energy on target, and reducing long range leads –up to a full duck body-length at 40 yards. Ohlson also recommends Remington Nitro-Steel® High-Velocity, a time-proven mainstay of the Remington waterfowl line, that offers zinc-plated,

precision-steel pellets, the zinc helping to prevent corrosion in extreme conditions. Nitro-Steel® also has a waterproof hull and primer, delivering the reliable performance waterfowlers expect at a reasonable price. HyperSonic Steel® is available in 3- and 3½-inch loads, as is Nitro-Steel®, which also has 2¾-inch lengths; and to handle all these different shell choices, there is the Remington
VERSAMAX® - Waterfowl

shotgun. Remington Shotgun Product Manager Michael Vrooman (VRO-man) has been a long-time competitive trap shooter and waterfowl hunter says, “Anywhere on a trap field or in a duckblind, I’m good.” “If there’s anything that the VERSAMAX® is built for, it’s certainly the harsh conditions of waterfowl hunting,” Vrooman says. The Remington
Autoloading VERSAMAX®

primer, capturing some of its power on ignition, and accelerating the shot charge down the barrel for a short distance before the main propellant charge ignites. Essentially a two-stage launch process” Ohlson says, that “sends shot charges downrange faster to hit harder” while controlling pressure. This means more

AUTOLOADING VERSAMAX®
“If there’s anything that the VERSAMAX® is built for, it’s certainly the harsh conditions of waterfowl hunting,” –Mike Vrooman
Product Manager, Remington Shotguns

uses the Versaport® gas system that regulates cycling pressure based on shell length allowing waterfowlers to interchangeably fire loads from 2¾- to 3½-inch magnums with consistent reliability. For early-season Canada hunting, when the birds are working in close and their plumage is light, standard velocity 3-inch #2s are ideal for mallards, and 3-inch BBs work great for geese with minimal recoil; and with 3-inch HyperSonic
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MALLARDS Continued
Steel® a hunter shooting #2s for mallards can be confident that if a goose slips in, he can take it without having to switch frantically over to BBs or triple-Bs. Early season in Canada can mean shirtsleeves and mosquitoes, a fond memory come November when the sleet of a Nor’easter is lashing into a waterfowler’s face. There is nothing like being stretched out in a layout blind in pleasant weather, peaking over the closed flaps as the sound of mallards grows louder and they circle and begin to fall out the sky. You throw the blind open, fire twice, and drop a pair of webbed-and-cupped mallards. You try to stretch it to a triple, but the birds flare up and sail off. In a few minutes, though, another flock swings in over the decoys and are coming head on, flying south; but not all the way south, not quite yet.

To practice for waterfowl season use the fastest target loads you can find. This will allow you to transition to the higher velocities of steel waterfowl loads more effectively. Remington Premier® STS Nitro™ Sporting Clays Target Loads offer practicing waterfowlers and clay target shooters velocities up to 1350 fps. One of the real advantages of shooting a Remington VERSAMAX® - Waterfowl shotgun is that the gun’s Versaport® gas-action, by reading shell length and opening the proper number of ports, makes it possible to use it on a clays course with 1-ounce, 2¾-inch loads, then switch seamlessly to 3½-inch, 1 3/8-ounce steel in the field and experience little difference in recoil. As far as which shooting game gives the best practice for waterfowl, the nod would have to go to sporting clays. Look for tower stations that provide fast dropping birds, or if there is a station you can shoot while sitting, this will give you a preview for the duck and goose blinds.

Clays for Waterfowl Hunters

REMINGTON® ULTIMATE DEFENSE PISTOL AND REVOLVER AMMUNITION.
Proven superior in FBI protocol barrier testing and based on the same platform trusted by law enforcement professionals nationwide, Remington® Ultimate Defense loads deliver the stopping power you demand. Don’t trust your safety to anything else.

Made in the USA by American workers

©2013 REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY, LLC. 14

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REMINGTON® VERSA MAX.® ANY LOAD. ANYWHERE. EVERY TIME.

Any perceived advantage of an inertia-driven autoloader dies the instant you shoulder a VERSA MAX®. Its new VersaPort ® gas system cycles every load, from light 2 ¾" to heavy 3 ½" magnums, with flawless consistency, dramatically less recoil and less maintenance than any other autoloader out there.
For a devastating combination, choose Hypersonic Steel.® At 1,700 fps, it’s the world’s fastest, hardest-hitting steel.

Made in the USA by American workers

©2013 REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY, LLC.

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SAFARIS WELL W IT HIN R E ACH OF E VE RY BUDG E T

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The thought of Africa often triggers thoughts of unaffordable. That is not always the case.
ifty or 60 years ago, “safari” did indeed seem to mean a prohibitively expensive undertaking, exclusive to those of extreme wealth. It could require days or even weeks of transatlantic travel simply to reach Africa, then months of hunting in a tented camp employing dozens of staff. A hunter in those days had to have the luxury of abundant leisure time and a voluminous bank account. The safari world is far changed from those days. As an organized, professional industry, hunting is probably available in more countries in Africa today than it was back in the 1950s and ’60s when it was almost entirely limited to the British colonies in East Africa. Certainly, it can be seen in the rise of sport hunting in South Africa in the last few decades. It’s estimated that some 7000 international hunters come to the country annually, mostly from the US, but also from countries as far away as Vietnam, generating tens of millions of dollars for the South African economy. For the American hunter looking for an African safari at a price within reason, South Africa would be the place to begin. The diversity of habitat and game in the country is remarkable, with hunting to be found in bushveld, highveld, mountains, and desert, for everything from the Big Five, to kudu, gemsbok, sable, roan, waterbuck, zebra, reedbuck, wildebeest, hartebeest, springbok, impala, warthog, and nyala. The first place to look for information on affordable South African safaris is www.Orionlocations.com. The site will link you to professional hunters and outfitters throughout the country. By looking at the sites of safari companies, a hunter can learn that prices for a plains-game safari, with one hunter to one guide, run around $400 to $450 a day, with added trophy fees. There are, though, package hunts available that include the “daily rate” plus trophy fees for a variety of some of the most sought after game, such as southern greater kudu and gemsbok. Within a range of costs from $7500 to $10,000, a hunter can have up to 10 days of safari hunting, and the chance to take five, six, or seven different species of big game. Compare that to what single-species hunts for some of the prized animals in North America can cost. The least expensive sheep hunts, for Dall’s, run to $15,000, while a Mexican hunt for desert sheep carries a $50,000 or steeper price tag. For a one-on-one, private-land, trophy-elk hunt, costs will often start around $7500, and go much higher, not including airfare and license fee (for a nonresident in a state like Montana, the fee is nearly $1000). If you want a combination moose-grizzly hunt in Alaska, expect to spend more than $20,000.
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VOTE FOR YOUR FAVORITE MODEL 783™ FEATURE
The engineering team started from scratch and combined their most advanced, accuracy-enhancing features to create an all-new platform. Vote for your favorite feature and enter to win a Model 783™ rifle and HyperSonic® Rifle Bonded ammunition. It is big-game-dropping dominance and it could
For game leveling devastation, use Hypersonic® Rifle Bonded ammunition. With hyper-charged velocities up to 200 fps faster than standard loads.

be yours.

(Rifle & Ammunition are 30-06 Springfield.)

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN. VOID IN U.S. TERRITORIES AND PUERTO RICO AND WHERE PROHIBITED BY LAW. The Remington® Ultimate Big-Game Facebook® Sweepstakes begins 10/1/13 and ends 10/31/13 (the “Sweepstakes Period”). Open only to legal residents of the 50 United States or Washington, D.C. who are 18. To enter, during the Sweepstakes Period, go to http://www.remingtonezine.com/oct2013/ to view the October issue of Remington Country eZine, click on the sweepstakes link in the eZine, which opens Remington’s official Facebook page. “Like” Remington’s official Facebook page, then click on the tab entitled “Sweepstakes” vote for your favorite Model 783 feature as instructed, complete online entry form, and submit it as directed. For Official Rules, visit www.remington.com. Sponsor will award 1 Grand Prize. Grand Prize is 1 Remington Model 783 Rifle and 1 case (200 rounds) of Remington Hypersonic Rifle Bonded ammunition. (ARV: $742). Odds of winning depend on the number of eligible entries received during the Sweepstakes Period. Sponsor and operator: Remington Arms Company, LLC, 870 Remington Dr., Madison, NC 27025.

WE WANT YOU!
Are you, or someone you know, building a dream getaway in a wild place or

L L A C G N I T CAS

TO BE THE NEXT REALITY STAR.

Orion Entertainment is currently casting dynamic talent for multiple docu-reality projects. Various opportunities include:
If you or someone you know recently left a 50 or 60-hour/week job in the rat race and grind of the city behind to relocate to a small town or the country to open a dream outdoor business (think fishing lodge, guide service, tackle shop, sporting goods store, taxidermy studio, sporting plantation, hunting lodge, fly shop, custom gun shop, dog kennel, sporting clays course, trap and skeet range, alligator farm, duck or turkey call business, etc) we want to hear from you for a new national series. Please click below and send a short paragraph describing why you or someone you know fits this description and would be interested in participating in a new TV series...and please include a photo of the people under consideration.

extreme remote location? Are you building it yourself or with the help of a construction team? Please provide a brief description of the build, who will be the key “players” involved and the time frame for the build.

Do you specialize in building homes or vacation getaways in potentially dangerous areas such as hurricane alley, the bayou or drug trafficking areas? Do you have a build coming up in the next few months? Candidates can be builders or owners. To be considered, please send in a brief description of the build and the potential dangers as well as photos and buyers of the builders and owners. Are you an expert in landscape design and construction with the ability to create ultimate backyard wildlife and bird habitats for human enjoyment? Do you see an overgrown field and envision a wildlife paradise? We are currently casting for big dreamers in the outdoor space who specialize in bringing wildlife to backyards around the country. To nominate yourself, or someone you know, please send a bio and photo of self and past work. Are you a real life Mad Max? Do you construct unique vehicles, firearms, weapons and accessories? If so, please submit a photo, bio, and images of your creations. Do you know of someone who was attacked by a dangerous game animal (brown bear, grizzly, lion, mountain lion, black bear, elephant,
hippo, crocodile, leopard, Cape buffalo, etc) and lived to tell about it? Do you know anyone who has filmed an actual animal attack? If so, we’re paying top dollar for such footage.

To share leads on the above, please email requested materials and contact information to info@orionentertainment.com subject line “CASTING”.

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How much a hunter has to pay for a hunt is, of course, not the only consideration. More than a few average hunters are willing to save for years for the expedition of a lifetime, whether it is sheep or bear or elk. But for an amount of money that may take far fewer years to save up, a hunter can have an adventure he might never have thought possible, halfway around the world. Beside a rich array of big game, a hunter on a South African plains-game safari can expect a unique hunting experience. It’s a misconception to think that African hunting is simply driving around until game is spotted, then getting out of the vehicle and shooting. A day’s hunting will often begin with finding fresh tracks, maybe crossing a road or by a waterhole, and then setting off for a hike that can cover five to 10 miles or more in a day, to see where the tracks lead and what may be at the end of them. Along the way, a hunter will get to see the work of trackers who will display a level of skill found almost nowhere else on earth. African game enjoys a reputation for toughness, and there are times when it does seem well founded. Some hunters believe that it takes more “shocking power” to bring down animals in Africa than it does in North America, although that is undoubtedly a subjective judgment. Saying that, the better calibers for Africa are probably found among the mid-caliber mangums, such as the 7mm Remington Magnum, 300 Winchester Magnum, and 300 Remington Ultra Mag, as well as the 338 Winchester Magnum. Essentially, any caliber a hunter would consider appropriate for elk or moose in this country will be more than adequate for any of the larger plains-game animals. Bullet construction is a vital factor for all big game, not
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PHOTO: Orion Entertainment

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The All-Around African Rifle
For more than a hundred years, the “Queen of the Medium Bores” has been the 375 H&H Magnum, widely considered the best “all-around” cartridge for Africa. The 375 offers a bullet with a sectional density (the ratio of weight to diameter) capable of deep penetration on thick-skinned African big game and high velocity for longer-range accuracy. Taking the H&H one step farther is the Remington 375 Ultra Magnum caliber; and for the rifle for this cartridge, Senior Product Manager for Rifles, and hunter, John Fink would point to the Remington Custom Shop and the Remington Model 700 ABG (African Big Game). According to Fink, the ABG was developed specifically to complement the 375 Remington Ultra Magnum.  “We started,” Fink says, “with a  laminate stock for strength and durability with the look and warm feel of wood.  The stock design has less drop in the comb to bring the recoil straight back making it more manageable.  We fitted the stock with an inline detachable magazine box, three round capacity, for fast reloads.  We fitted the rifle with a  26inch barrel to wring the most out of the 375 Remington Ultra Magnum ballistics; however, we can customize barrel lengths in the Custom Shop to an individual’s liking.  In a 375 H&H, I would personally recommend going to 22-inch, sacrificing some velocity/energy for faster handling and ease of getting through thick brush.  For sling attachment the rifle is fitted with a front barrel band to assist in shooting off sticks without interfering with your support hand, along with machined steel sights with front sight hood for protection.” The choice for Remington 375 Ultra Mag ammo is Remington
Premier® A-Frame™ ammunition

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THE BIG STUFF

in 300 grain, achieving 200-feetper-second added velocity over the H&H. Remington CenterfireAmmunition Product Manager, Nick Sachse, who has 20 years of bullet engineering and design experience with Remington, notes that if any bullet was made for Africa, it would be the Premier® A-Frame™ with dual-core construction and proprietary bonding process, insuring that it will “penetrate deep and retain its weight.” Sachse sums up the “beauty of the A-Frame™” when he says it is “one of the toughest bullets on the planet.” Which, of course, includes Africa.

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and post photos of your prize trophies and tell us the stories of your favorite Remington products used to take them.

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Remington® hog hammeR ammunition. Bring the big guns in the war on

feral swine. Hammer ‘em with the all-copper Barnes TSX® bullet that expands to 2X diameter and plows on through with near 100% weight retention. Loaded with a precision-blended low-flash propellant for faster follow-ups at night, plus a host of super-premium components. Only from Remington. Designed, tested and proven with pride at The Rock.
Made in the USA by American workers

©2013 Remington ARms CompAny, LLC.

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Traveling To Africa
There is a growing trend in Africa for hunters to use loaner or rental rifles, rather than bringing their own firearms with them from the US. That’s all well and good if there

WITH RIFLES Remington
waiting in camp for the hunter when he arrives. Most

is a reliable

Bolt Action Model 700™ or Remington Model 783™ hunters, though, prefer using their own rifle that they have set up the way they want and with which they have done their pre-hunt practicing; and traveling with a firearm, while requiring attention to a number of steps, is easier than many people expect. First, check with your outfitter to learn what the regulations are for importing your rifle into the country where you’ll be hunting. One of the requirements will be to have a US Customs Form 4457, stamped and endorsed by a customs officer before leaving the US, showing that you are taking your rifle out of the country. You will also need this form when you return, to show to customs to prove that you have not acquired your firearm overseas while traveling. Be sure to declare your firearms and ammunition at check-in with your airline (and you will have to pack those separately, with the firearm requiring an airline-approved guncase and there being special regulations for ammunition in checked luggage). You should also check with the airline ahead of time to verify its policy on transporting firearms and ammunition. Finally, make sure you have all your permit applications properly filled out before reaching customs in your arrival country, although you may have to sign the forms in the presence of a customs agent, and not beforehand.
Before your trip to Africa, we recommend that you review the laws and regulations relating to the export and import of firearms and ammunition.

just African species; and so the hunter traveling to Africa will want to make sure he is shooting a bullet that will give him both deep penetration and controlled expansion, and some of the choices for that would be the Remington Premier® Core-Lokt® Ultra Bonded®, Remington Premier® Scirocco™ Bonded, and Remington Premier® Copper-Solid, among others, which will perform as well on African as on North American game. One of the differences between hunting in North America and Africa is the style of shooting a hunter will likely find himself doing. Here, a hunter will often shoot sitting or prone, or use a rock or tree for a rest. Hunting game on the African plains frequently requires shooting from a standing position, to get above tall grass, which is why tripod shooting sticks are commonly used in African hunting. Hunter’s are always urged to practice their shooting in the way in which they will hunt. In getting ready for Africa, a hunter will want to use standing shooting sticks for practice, to perfect a skill he might not be familiar with. (Look on The Allen Company Website for various models of shooting sticks.) Carrying a rifle in a hunting vehicle can subject it to many bumps and bruises, so a hunter on the way to Africa will want to consider including a soft-sided gun case, like one of those produced by The Allen Company. Gun care is also important in safari camp, after a day of dusty travel and hiking and shooting, so packing a cleaning kit, like the Rem Squeeg-E™ Universal Gun Cleaning System® is important. Beyond South Africa, there are other countries to look to for affordable plains-game hunting, with neighboring Namibia prominent among them. Here the trophy animals are similar to those found in South Africa; and in that sparsely populated country, the hunting concessions are frequently much larger and wilder. For the truly adventurous, searching for a reasonably priced plains-game safari, there is self-guided hunting in the west-central African nation of Cameroon, where it is possible to set up a two-week hunt in the Lamido of Rey Bouba (essentially an independent principality within the country) for $5000. Included are trackers, lodging, and food, plus trophy fees (for further information, contact www.bombaziwilderness.com). This is hunting out of the old Africa, from the days of Stanley and Livingston, making it a safari that is not just classic, but pre-classic. continued
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FASTER. FLATTER. HARDER HITTING.
0" - 2.4" - 4.0"
100 yds. 200 yds.

BONDED-CORE DESIGN carries boosted velocities and energies through heavy bone with absolute lethal command HIGH-ENERGY PROPELLANT BLEND delivers velocities up to 200 fps faster than standard loads

- 5.6" - 8.2"
300 yds.
OTHER (30-06 Sprg., 150 gr.)

HYPERSONIC® (30-06 Sprg., 150 gr.)

NEW HYPERSONIC® RIFLE BONDED AMMUNITION.

A massive

breakthrough in terminal performance, with boosts in velocity up to 200 fps and the bone-busting integrity of our Core-Lokt® Ultra Bonded® bullet. There is no big-game load more lethal.
Made in the USA by American workers

©2013 REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY, LLC.

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D I G I T A L

O P T I C S

S Y S T E M

TM

by Tom McIntrye

T
A

V I S I O N

O F

T H E

F U T U R E

he riflescope has remained essentially unchanged for more than 150 years, since it was first mass-produced in the 1850s by the American optics maker, William Malcolm in Syracuse, New York. Since then, for ranges beyond 300 to 400 yards, a regular riflescope, all by itself, has been incapable of adjusting the trajectory of a bullet to take into account factors like yardage, velocity, ballistic coefficient, temperature, elevation, inclination, wind, spin

drift, Coriollis and Magnus effects, and more. It has always been up to a hunter, himself, to make all the measurements and calculations necessary to place a shot on target at extreme ranges, and in the case of big-game hunting, to accomplish them before a wild animal decides to vanish. All up to a hunter–until now. Remington has radically altered the world of sighting optics with its introduction of the Remington® 2020™ Digital Optic System (DOS). www.shoot2020.com. Created

through a collaborative effort between Remington Arms Company, LLC and TrackingPoint, an applied technology company in Austin, Texas, the Remington 2020 DOS represents, according to Alan Serven, Remington’s Director of New Technology and Business Integration, “the most revolutionary advance in the shooting sports since people put glass on top of a rifle, instead of iron sights.” Programmed specifically for a select Remington rifle and ammunition, the Remington 2020 DOS has, says Serven, a rifle, pistol, and competitive trap shooter, so many features that “it’s hard to summarize.”
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R E M I N G T O N ’ S

V I S I O N

O F

T H E

F U T U R E

The first thing about the 2020 that a shooter and hunter

setting–which can be programmed to create an aiming zone from o.1 minute of angle (MOA), or approximately 0.1 inch at 100 yards, to 4 MOA, four inches, in diameter; crosswind speed and direction setting (which the shooter needs to call and input himself in half-mile increments); recording time available, the video beginning to roll as soon as the animal is tagged; battery

is likely to take note of is the three objective lenses. The lower two are the sender and receiver for a laser rangefinder capable to 750 yards, while sitting atop them is a 3-21x zoom digital image sensor. Rather than light traveling through glass lenses to the shooter’s eye, as in optical riflescopes, the 2020’s sensor transmits a digital image to a monitor like that on a computer or digital camera. Below the trio of lenses, behind a honeycomb screen, are temperature and barometricpressure gauges. Serven explains that in the body of the device is a computer with “seven processors that handle all the ballistic calculations and image manipulation.” He goes on to note that it also “has six inertial measurement units and gyroscopes and a magnetometer,” which is an electronic compass. At the top rear of the unit are three control buttons that tag the image, enter the speed of the wind, and zoom the image

TM

D I G I T A L

O P T I C S

S Y S T E M

status–the 2020 runs off one of two installed batteries with the alternate “hot swapping” automatically when the first runs down; Wi-Fi status; rifle inclination and rifle cant; temperature, pressure, compass direction, zoom level, date, and time; mode; and ammunition selected. In advanced mode, the tagging feature reads animals out to 500 yards, and not only determines range but measures temperature and pressure. The 2020 then continually monitors inclination and cant, along with compass direction (a factor in the Coriollis effect; the 2020’s computer programs also take into account such nuances as spin drift and the Magnus effect, based on the cartridge and bullet that it is matched to–more on that below). After locking in the range, temperature, and air pressure, the system continues to read all the other variables. Based on that, the firing solution, presented as a blue reticle which indicates the actual point of impact, continues to update 54 times a second. Now, without any calculations on his or her part, the shooter moves the rifle until the reticle is on the vital area where the bullet should strike the animal. At that point the reticle turns red, indicating that the rifle hold is on the target, within the preset kill zone (the smaller the MOA, the more precise the aim must be), and may be fired.

W

26

in and out. On the back end, on either side of the ocular, which is equipped with an eyeguard, are a mode and a power button. hen the 2020 is powered up, which takes about two seconds, a “traditional” mil-dot reticle appears on the imagesensor screen, seen through the ocular. The reticle is first-focal-plane, so it will increase and decrease in size as the

image is zoomed in or out. This reticle is zeroed in at the factory for 100 yards in alignment with the bore. In this mode, pressing the “tag” button will bring up a blue “surfboard” with a white dot, and the 2020 will read the range. The device then performs like an ordinary glass-lens riflescope: Place the crosshairs on the aiming point and fire. Hitting the mode button again carries the shooter out of the realm of traditional into that of “advanced.” In advanced mode, a full “heads-up display” (HUD) appears. This image includes the target range, as in traditional mode, along with target speed, if the animal’s moving; kill-zone

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R E M I N G T O N ’ S

V I S I O N

O F

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Another feature of the 2020 is what it does with

valuable is its application as a learning tool for young shooters. Now, a student marksman, boy or girl, has a visual record of how the rest, breathing, and pull affect the shot. Another standard feature, and a remarkable one, is that the built-in Wi-Fi not only allows downloading of the video, but will send the 2020’s HUD view to an iPad or iPhone or Android device in real time, permitting an instructor or guide to direct the shot. A young hunter can be told that he is not holding on the vitals, or a guide can tell his client to move his shot to the next animal on the right, and both young hunter and client can be confident that they are on target. Apps are free for downloading, and up to three users can view the signal and the shot on their devices simultaneously. The Remington 2020 DOS is designed as a completely integrated system of sight, rifle, and ammunition, including data on muzzle velocity, bullet shape, plus the barrel’s rate of twist, and whether that twist is left- or right-handed. It is set up at the Remington factory on three different platforms: the Bushmaster Varminter in 223 Remington with a 24-inch barrel; 20-inch-barreled Remington Model 700™ SPS™ Tactical in 308 Winchester; and a 26-inch-barreled, 30-06 Springfield-chambered Model 700 Long Range, to be introduced by Remington later this year. Including 300 rounds of ammunition and a molded hardcase with custom foam and accessories, the package carries a manufacturer’s suggested retail price of $5,499.95 for the Varminter platform and $5,574.95 for the Model 700 platforms. Not bad for a vision of the future.

moving targets. If an animal begins to walk, the 2020 computer can “carve out the image of your target from the stationary background of the rest of the world,” in Serven’s words, and by measuring the inertia of the rifle’s swing and the speed of the animal’s walking and its distance, determine the proper lead. And this is without ever having to move the reticle off the animal’s vitals, because the 2020, as Serven says, “does all the math.” he shooter may be looking at “a ballistics solution that is equal probably only to what you would get in an Abrams M1A1 tank,” Serven says, which is hardly hyperbole, because one of the founders of TrackingPoint in fact worked on a sighting system for the M1A1; yet the shooter must still exercise

T

proper concentration, hold, breath control, and trigger control– all the skills that constitute expert marksmanship–but with the deviations resolved for him by the 2020. And at the shot, the shooter will be absorbed by the target and the reticle, and all the data in the HUD will withdraw to the periphery of his attention to become virtually unnoticed and not clutter the true experience. All the while, video with a memory capacity of two hours, has been recording since the tag button was pressed, and will go on recording for up to 30 seconds after the shot, depending on the length of time the shooter sets it for, before automatically switching off. What the shooter then has is a document of the shot and the hit, including audio. This can create the history of a hunt for him, but perhaps even more
G O

L O N G !

Finding long-distance ranges, to get the most out of a Remington 2020 DOS system, is an increasing challenge, but there are probably more than might be expected. In fact, here are just a few to look at, starting with the NRA Whittington Center in Raton, New Mexico (www.nrawc.org/). Open year round, the Whittington Center offers a high-power-rifle range, with firing lines from 200 all the way out to 1000 yards. Opened in 1957 in suburban north Phoenix, Arizona, the 1650-acre Ben Avery Shooting Facility (http://www.azgfd.gov/basf), with its extensive array of courses, includes a high-power range that goes out to 1000 yards. The name of The Original Pennsylvania 1000 Yard Benchrest Club, Inc. (www.pa1000yard.com/), does seem to say it all. Located in Trout Run, Pennsylvania, the range has been in operation since 1967; and the club provides members not only with high-power practice shooting at long ranges, but an extensive schedule of competitive long-range matches throughout the summer months.
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Looking for Places to Shoot Long Range?

REMINGTON® CORE-LOKT ® .

The world’s best-selling centerfire

hunting ammunition, and the most proven big-game bullet available today. Delivering consistent 2X diameter expansion, deep penetration and high weight retention, it set the standard for lethality seven decades ago and continues to fill more tags and freezers than any other. Only from Remington.

Made in the USA by American workers

©2013 REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY, LLC.

Selected Ammunition
For each of the rifles matched to the Remington 2020 Digital Optic System, there are three matched rounds, keyed to the type of shooting or hunting that is going to be done. For the Bushmaster Varminter in 223 Remington, there is the target Remington Premier® Match 69-grain Sierra® MatchKing®. The hunting round is the 55-grain Remington
Premier® Accutip; and

the alternative is the all-copper Barnes™ VOR-TX® TSX® 55-grain
http://www.barnesbullets.com/ products/ammunition/choose-yourvor-tx/6607-2/, for areas where

required by regulations or for hunters who appreciate the performance of the TSX. The three loads paired with the 308 Winchester Remington Model 700™ SPS™ Tactical again include the Remington Premier® Match, this time in the 168-grain Sierra® MatchKing®; 150-grain Premier®
Core-Lokt® Ultra Bonded®; and the

Barnes® VOR-TX® TSX® 168-grain. For the Remington Model 700 Long Range in 30-06 Springfield, it’s the Premier® Match 168-grain Sierra® MatchKing®, 180-grain Premier® Core-Lokt® Ultra Bonded®, and Barnes® VOR-TX® TSX® 168-grain. Simply selecting the code for Match, Hunting, or Alternative on the HUD sets the programming in the 2020 for the correct load.

PHOTO: Dusan Smetana

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“Doping the wind” can be done with a spotting scope by reading the angle of heat waves downrange at the target: If the heat waves are vertical, the wind is zero; if horizontal, the wind is blowing at least 10 miles per hour.
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AMERICA’S

GAME

BIRD:

DOVE
STARTING T H E FA L L WITH
by Russ MacLennan, Remington Pro Staff Among the birds of North America, the mourning dove (Zenaida macroura) is one of the most abundant and THE NUMBERS ARE widespread. It is estimated that the bird’s population is over 300 million, attracting 1.3 million dove hunters who spend 7 million hunting days afield every year. The annual dove harvest is more than 16 million birds (greater than that for all duck species, combined), and that leads to the expenditure of somewhere between 80 and 125 million shotgun shells each season. Beyond statistics, doves are very often someone’s introduction to hunting. While doves are the first gamebirds of fall, they are also the signature game of summer, their hunting

season falling on the cusp of those two times of the year. The memory of a first dove hunt NEARLY STAGGERING. can be pressed into a hunter’s mind like a stamp into sealing wax. It usually begins in the dark of early morning with the smell of cool air and crops. The feel of the oncoming heat of the day rolls in as sweat begins to soak into hat bands. The sky brightens until the birds can be seen on the wing and around the field watches are anxiously checked for the stroke of shooting hour. A shot sounds in the distance, and soon guns are going off all around. Then a bird dips in and a young hunter raises his shotgun, pushes off the safety, slaps the trigger, and is surprised to see a puff of feathers as wings fold up and a dove
Continued on page 32

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O C T O B E R

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comes down like a shuttlecock. In seasons before, this young hunter’s job was to run out and pick up the birds for the grown men and women, now he runs out to pick up his own first dove, beginning a lifelong September tradition for another young sportsman. Another tradition of dove hunting, especially on opening day, is to share the hunting field with a group of hunters rather than hunting alone. Dove are gregarious birds that usually fly in flocks, and without hunting pressure, they tend to settle into the most isolated part of a field. A good dove shoot often requires enough hunters to keep the birds stirred up, and to encircle a field, spaced close enough so that the doves do not have flight lanes that keep them out of shooting range. Before heading out for the actual hunt, it is important to scout out fields that offer the best chance of success. Doves can be found commuting to and from roost areas, feed fields such as sunflower, millet, milo, or wheat, and also at watering holes and gravel spots like farm ponds or pastures. When scouting, it is important to gauge the peak time of day for the birds to use an area. In the mornings, doves will usually be flying off the roosts to go to food, while late in the day they may be coming to water, or heading back to their roosts. In scouting a dove field, some hunters will simply count how many birds are flying in over periods of time. Scouting should not be done too far ahead of the season, though, because crops might suddenly be harvested just before the opener (and with more efficient farming techniques, there may be very little spillage left on the ground to attract birds–and always check hunting regulations about the finer points of hunting in agricultural fields). There are as well, the vagaries of weather. There’s nothing like a large-scale thunderstorm or cold snap on the 31st of August to wreck the shooting on September 1st. Doves start the fall; and as we have seen, they often start youngsters on the road to hunting. When the doves are flying, hunting them is never dull, and they may be the perfect game to hold a young hunter’s rapt attention on a late summer afternoon. Among the major miscalculations a mentoring hunter can make though, is giving a young hunter a 410 as a

first dove gun. A 410 may seem like a kid’s gun, and it certainly has the advantage of light recoil to help a youngster avoid developing a flinch, but when it comes to doves, the 410 is really more for an expert shooter who enjoys the challenge of taking a bird with a half ounce of 7½ shot. If the idea is to introduce a young person to hunting and to cultivate a genuine interest in it, the young person ought to stand a fair chance of hitting a bird. This suggests a gun like the 20-gauge Remington Model 870™ Express® Compact Jr with a 12-inch length of pull, a reduced-sized version of “the best-selling shotgun of all time,” in the words of Remington Shotgun Product Manager, Michael Vrooman (VRO-man). “And,” he adds, “it is the best-seller for a reason; it’s the reliability and quality you get with an 870™.” For even more recoil absorption for a small shooter there is the 20-gauge semi-auto Remington Model 11-87™ Sportsman®
Youth Compact Synthetic. One of the notable features of the

11-87™ is the Remington Adjustable Length of Pull System that allows the gun to grow with a young hunter. Both the 870™ and the 11-87™ accept RemChoke Choke Tubes and Wrenches, that will give a novice the best pattern for taking doves. And while a modified tube is the one usually recommended for doves, an improved-cylinder may actually put more birds in the bag with fewer shells fired, and that is equally true for experienced hunters. Decoys can be very effective in drawing doves closer to hunters, especially later in the season when hunters are fewer and doves are warier. The secret to using decoys for doves is to get them up as high in the air as possible. The top branches of a small tree or bush are an excellent spot; but the top

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wire of a fence will work, too, while some hunters might use long PVC poles to hoist decoys in a place without natural perches. A mechanical spinning-wing decoy can also be added, and some hunters imitate the plaintive voice of a dove with a call to make the setup even more attractive. The ultimate form of dedication to dove hunting is in creating your own dove field. While placing grain or other bait in a field is illegal for dove hunting, it is legal (and again, consult the regulations in your state or area) under at least federal law, to raise a crop for dove hunting. The crops might include sunflowers, of course, but also corn, millet, or sorghum, and others. This requires a minimum number of acres, but maybe not as many as might be expected, as well as careful planning. The end result can be a permanent hunting spot for America’s gamebird. The unique qualities of dove hunting include the social aspect, the time of year, the opportunity to introduce young people to hunting, and the sheer pleasure of it. Some hunters view doves as primarily a warm-up to other hunting, such as waterfowl; but it’s clear that doves are more than worthwhile in their own right, especially when they reach the grill. Which brings us to the final thought–never freeze dove breasts; they are too good to get lost in the bottom of a freezer. Always eat doves fresh from the field. Then repeat as necessary.

Best Dove Cartridge
Remington Heavy Dove Loads are the clear choice for mourning doves, white-winged dove, and increasingly, the exotic Eurasian collared dove, which is colonizing wide areas of the country and in many states, offers yearround hunting. Available in 7½ and 8 shot sizes, Heavy Dove Loads represent an ideal combination of price and performance. Remington Senior Shotshell and Rimfire

Product Manager, Matt Ohlson, a dove hunter himself, concurs with Heavy Dove as the right choice, but offers

Mourning doves can survive in deserts by drinking brackish water half as salty as seawater. Doves fly at up to 60 miles per hour. The “mourning” cry of a dove is made by the males to attract females.

two more suggestions for the mix. As he notes, “Doves are challenging enough to hit without switching from load to load all the time, and a lot of shooters see value in taking the same load they use on the clays course to the shooting fields.” He goes on to add, “The harder shot we put into our STS® and Nitro 27® clays loads is ideal for doves as well.” Premier® STS® Target Loads and Premier® Nitro
27® Target Loads not only stand out in clay target sports,

but for challenging birds on the wing, too. STS® and Nitro 27® offer a variety of payloads and velocities to suit every shotgunner’s needs.

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QUICKER KILLS. FEWER MISSES. 11% SHORTER LEADS. MORE HEAD & NECK SHOTS.

PATENTED XELERATOR® WAD TECHNOLOGY

WOUNDED OR MISSED BAGGED

Hypersonic Steel ®
(1700 fps, 1¼ oz.) @ 40 yds

Turbocharger Twin afterburners

High Velocity Steel

®

(1450 fps, 1¼ oz.) @ 40 yds

HYPERSONIC STEEL.® THE WORLD’S FASTEST, HARDEST-HITTING STEEL.

The hottest waterfowl load today, it reduces required lead by 8” at 40 yards. Meaning you’ll put more pellets in the head and neck, and kill more birds with fewer shots. Powered by our patented Xelerator® wad. Loaded by the name America trusts. Remington.®
Made in the USA by American workers

©2013 REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY, LLC.

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Taming High Volume Recoil
Another advantage of using the Remington Premier® STS® Target Loads and Remington Premier® Nitro 27® Target Loads for both practice and hunting is the lower recoil they offer. A limit of doves can take several boxes of shells; and a hunter may wish to reduce the impact on his or her shoulder. The best combination of shotgun and cartridges for reduced recoil is matching a lighter load shell with a semi-auto shotgun, like the Remington VERSAMAX® Sportsman®. Michael Vrooman, Remington Shotgun Product Manager, points out that “the heart and lungs of the gun, which is the Versaport® gas system, are the same as the standard VERSAMAX® gun, so you’re still getting that same level of performance,” but with the price savings of $300 through the streamlining of some of the extra VERSAMAX® features. That means that loads as light as 1-ounce target will cycle smoothly and easily through the gun. Add to that the SuperCell™ Recoil Pad, which uses a complex matrix of millions of SuperCells to harness and release energy over a much longer time period, and you have one of the softest shooting shotguns on the market. One more tip: One of the factors in “perceived recoil” is muzzle blast, so good hearing protection, while not only being a matter of safety, will also cut down on the perceived “kick.”

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S P E C I A L

R E P O R T

GEARING UP
for deer season
by David Morris Remington Pro Staff

D

eer hunters always seem to be looking for a magic bullet. Literally. Maybe they call it a GPS or a can’t-fail deer lure or trail cams. Whatever it may be, they hope it will bring them the buck they are after when the season opens. There is nothing wrong with any of that. But maybe it can somewhat obscure the essence of deer hunting. Because the gear a deer hunter really needs for the season ahead can be a lot more fundamental, which creates the added benefit of raising the level of a hunter’s skills when he no longer depends on the latest gizmo, that can threaten to get between him and the true meaning of a deer. Hal Blood, a guide and outfitter in northern Maine Cedar Ridge Outfitters and the author of Hunting Big Woods Bucks, thinks that the answer to gearing up for deer season is less about having the right technology than learning how

deer “act, travel, communicate, and survive in their environment.” Some of the preparatory steps he recommends are getting into good physical shape to let you hunt longer and harder; learn about deer behavior and the routes they travel in their territories and the sign they leave; have a working knowledge of woodsmanship so you can feel confident on a hunt that if you somehow get lost or have to stay out overnight, you can deal with the situation; practice with your weapon so using it becomes second nature. Rather than equipping yourself with complicated technology, here is a list of gear to put together for deer season that you will not have to worry about the batteries dying in, or that will max out your credit card. A small pack. Put this together before the season, and as time goes by you will learn what you really need to have in it, and what

you can leave behind. Some items for it would be– A topo map and compass. Blood says that these two “will set you free to roam the woods.” Fire-making materials. A flashlight (ok, this one is a batteriesrequired item), poncho, knife sharpener, extra gloves, emergency snack bar, water bottle, parachute cord, flexible wire. Don’t forget toilet paper and wet wipes. Basic first-aid kit. Waterproof notebook and pen. Use it to write down observations, draw maps, leave notes. Knife. Forget the Bowie; most hunting chores can be done with a 3- or 4-inch drop point. A lock-back folder takes up less room on your belt, and is less likely to lead to accidents–like missing the sheath when slipping it away. Binocular. For mule deer in the mountains and on
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Overview of essentials l Education for newbies, l Review for experienced hunters

Letting a buck reach 5 1/2 or 6 1/2 years of age ensures that it has reached its true trophy potential. Look for a long nosed buck with droopy eyes and a sagging belly.
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PHOTO: Remington Archives

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Slug Hunting for Whitetail
Some hunters may claim that they can take deer out to 100 yards with buckshot; but with a well-tuned shotgun, load, choke, and sight, 40 to 50 yards is probably a more likely maximum. Not so with slugs, which can stretch out to 150 yards and beyond to take deer effectively. As far as the slug for deer, there is the Remington Premier® Accutip Bonded Sabot Slug, that Matt Ohlson, Remington Senior Shotshell and Rimfire Product Manager, calls the “industry leader” in slug technology. Available in 2¾- or 3-inch, 12 and 20 gauge, the 58-caliber Accutip (45 caliber in 20 gauge), is the only slug on the market to offer the Power Port™ Tip, giving in Ohlson’s words, “extreme accuracy and controlled expansion” for deep penetration and a “wide wound cavity on both sides.” The Accutip is made to be fired out of a fully rifled barrel; and to optimize that performance, Michael Vrooman, Remington Shotgun Product Manager, would go with the Model
PHOTO: Remington Archives

Whitetail antlers grow up to an inch a day.

870™ Express®, such as the Model 870™ Express® Synthetic Deer. “There’s no more chosen shotgun for professional use [by

police agencies and militaries] in the world than the 870™,” says Vrooman. He adds, “If people are willing to trust their lives with it, I’m willing to trust my hunt.” For the benefits of greater recoil reduction, Vrooman points to the Remington Autoloading
Model 11-87™, “a staple in the Remington shotgun line since

1987,” refining the choice to the Remington Model 11-87™
Sportsman® Synthetic Deer with cantilever.

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A trophy is defined by what a given area has to offer. This buck would qualify as a true trophy in many parts of America where heavy hunting pressure reduces the chances of taking massive antlered, mature bucks.

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THE NEW REMINGTON® MODEL 783.™ From a blank sheet

of paper to one ragged hole. Designed from the ground up with the world’s most advanced accuracy-enhancing features. By the masterminds who brought you the Model 700. The new Model 783. Developed by Remington.

Made in the USA by American workers

©2013 REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY, LLC.

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GEARING UP Continued from page 36
the plains and prairies, pick a 10x40mm. For whitetail in dense hardwoods, a 6x30mm is the way to go. Why a binocular in thick cover? It will help you pick an ear, eye, or antler out of the foliage. Never use a riflescope for spotting. Which brings us to the rifle (see caliber selection below). For the Maine woods, Blood has been “carrying a Remington Model 7600™ Pump Action Centerfire Rifle carbine in 3006 for over 30 years now, and it has performed flawlessly in all conditions.” For a bolt action, Blood has hunted with the new Remington Model 783™. The Model 783™ is an all-new rifle platform from Remington, with useradjustable CrossFire™ trigger, carbonsteel magnum-contour button-rifled free-floated pillar-bedded barrel, and SuperCell™ Recoil Pad. It’s a rifle that Blood found exceptionally accurate, with a crisp trigger pull, the convenience of a detachable magazine, and a remarkable price. Available in 30-06 Springfield, it’s the ultimate piece of deer-hunting gear.

Caliber Selection
For every deer hunter there’s another theory about what’s the best deer caliber. While many will pick the 243 Winchester as a minimum, just as many can make a compelling case for the 223 Remington, especially the 62-grain Remington Premier® CoreLokt® Ultra Bonded® round. Where legal, it is a perfectly fine cartridge for whitetail, particularly does. The golden mean for deer calibers, though, would probably start with a 25-06 Remington. A popular round in the West for mule deer, and more and more Western whitetail as their populations expand, the best-selling load from Remington for the 25-06 Remington is, according to Nick Sachse, Remington Centerfire-Ammunition Product Manager, the Remington Core-Lokt® Trophy Whitetail Patterns Centerfire in 120 grains. Another somewhat overlooked cartridge that also demonstrates remarkable performance, is the 140-grain 280 Remington, in Remington Core-Lokt®, as well. For big-country mule deer and longer-range whitetail, there is, of course, the 7mm Remington Magnum, with the supremely accurate, polymertipped 140-grain Remington Premier® Accutip. The fact is, however, that the two most popular, and some would argue, best deer rounds, ever, are the 30-30 Winchester and 30-06 Springfield. Sachse would “go out on a limb” to say that the 30-30 Winchester, with a 170- or 150-grain Core-Lokt®, “has taken more whitetails” than any other cartridge. With the 30-06, Sachse says that Remington has taken “a great bullet that’s been around ‘forever,’ that your grandfather hunted with,” and in the Remington HyperSonic® Centerfire is firing that bullet “at higher velocity than ever seen before”–in the thicker-jacketed 150-grain Core-Lokt® Ultra Bonded®, at 3035 feet per second at the muzzle, versus 2910 in the standard load.
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S P E C I A L

R E P O R T

conservation
S P E C I A L A N A LY S I S F R O M

THE TEDDY ROOSEVELT CONSERVATION PARTNERSHIP
by Whit Fosburgh President, TRCP

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n 1912 President Theodore Roosevelt said: “There can be no greater issue than that of conservation in this country.” Roosevelt was a visionary who understood the importance of prioritizing the conservation of our nation’s natural resources. Hunters and anglers embraced Roosevelt’s challenge, by organizing to stop market hunting and protect critical fish and wildlife habitat. Moreover, hunters and anglers pushed for a professional system of wildlife management and stepped up to fund the system through license sales and dedicated excise taxes on guns, ammunition and fishing and boating

equipment. This system became known as the North American Model of Fish and Wildlife Management and it stands as a model for the rest of the world. Sportsmen went on to create myriad groups aimed at restoring degraded habitats and depleted species. Today, almost every species has a group supporting it, from elk and mule deer to pheasant and bass. The results speak for themselves. White-tailed deer and wild turkey, extirpated in much of the country 100 years ago, now support a multi-billion dollar hunting industry and provide the core for friends and families to share in hunting rituals that have been handed down for generations.

But as sportsmen shifted their focus from the national cause of conservation to restoring and protecting individual species, hunters and anglers began to lose their voice in Washington. In 2002 – just over a decade ago – the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership was formed with a clear and uncompromising vision: to unite and amplify the voices of hunters and anglers around the biggest federal conservation issues facing the sporting community. The TRCP is a coalition of organizations and grassroots partners that work together to preserve the traditions of hunting and fishing by
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TRCP Vision
In 1912 Theodore Roosevelt said, “There can be no greater issue than that of conservation in this country.” While in the political arena, he succeeded in making conservation a top tier national issue. T.R. had the foresight to address these issues still so significant to sportsmen today, understanding that if we want to ensure critical habitat, special hunting grounds and secret fishing holes will be around for future generations, we must plan carefully today.

TRCP Mission
In order to guarantee all Americans quality places to hunt and fish, we strengthen laws, policies and practices affecting fish and wildlife conservation by leading partnerships that influence decision makers.
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PHOTO: Dusan Smetana

REMINGTON® PREMIER® AMMUNITION.

Our R&D staff is tirelessly perfecting the science behind

the one-shot kill, for you. Proudly crafting the most accurate, most lethal family of big-game ammunition available today. Premier ® ammunition, by the name America trusts. Remington.®

PREMIER ® ACCUTIP™

PREMIER ® CORE-LOKT™

PREMIER ® SCIROCCO™

PREMIER ® A-FRAME™

Made in the USA by American workers

©2013 REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY, LLC.

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conservation

Continued from page 42

strengthening federal policy and funding for conservation and access. In short, we work to guarantee all Americans a quality place to hunt and fish.

row crops that are almost useless as wildlife habitat. In the West, changing ownership patterns on private lands, with new “No Trespassing” signs popping up at every turn, have effectively blocked access to millions of acres of public hunting lands. Across the country, landowners who have always allowed access for responsible hunting and fishing are shutting off that access, perhaps because of new leases or perhaps because they fear liability from allowing the public on their lands. And even when we are fortunate enough to have public lands to hunt, too often hunters find industrial development, from oil and gas rigs to solar arrays and wind farms, in places that used to provide quality fish and wildlife habitat. True to its mission, the TRCP has worked to enable – and increase – access to the lands where hunters pursue their passions. The core of our work involves incentivizing private landowners to expand access for sportsmen and other users. Beginning in 2004, the TRCP advocated for a federal access program that became the “Open Fields” program in the 2008 Farm Bill. “Open Fields” provides competitive grants to encourage owners of privately-held farm, ranch and forest land to voluntarily make their land available for access to the public for wildlife-dependent recreation, including hunting and fishing. Since its inception, Open Fields has added more than 2 million acres of hunting lands for the

public to enjoy. Today we are fighting to have the program reauthorized and fully funded. The TRCP has rallied its partners to support full funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund, which uses a small portion of federal offshore drilling fees to protect important fish and wildlife habitat and open space for all Americans. We are also promoting passage of the Making Public Lands Public legislation that would target some of the LWCF funds to projects that provide public access to blocked federal lands through easements, rights-of-way, or fee title acquisitions from willing sellers. On public lands, we are working to make sure that when development does occur, it’s done in the right places and minimizes impacts to fish and wildlife and sportsmen’s access. Remington also understands that hunters need access to quality places to hunt. Together, Remington and the TRCP are partnering on behalf of conservation and access, highlighting and strengthening the connection hunters and shooters have to America’s outdoor resources and the role they play in preserving our nation’s sporting heritage. In 1907 Roosevelt noted “The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others.” These words ring true today. We hope you will join us on behalf of conservation.

The TRCP has four guiding tenets:
ff Conserving and restoring fish and wildlife habitat; ff Seeking robust funding for fish and wildlife conservation programs; ff Supporting science-based, sustainable management of the nation’s fish and wildlife resources; and ff Increasing public access to quality hunting and fishing opportunities. For far too long, the hunting and fishing communities have been fractured by species or geography or even gear type. At the TRCP, we believe that when sportsmen unite, working in coordinated partnership, it amplifies and strengthens the voices of the conservation community. Nowhere is this more important than sustaining and improving sportsmen’s access to quality fish and wildlife habitat. We know that many hunters are having a harder time finding places to hunt. On the coasts, the relentless march of urban sprawl has eliminated many traditional hunting grounds. In the Midwest and Great Plains, conservation lands are being plowed under to expand

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evolutionary cleaning

REMINGTON SQUEEG-E™

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A

long with being the acknowledged leader in arms and ammunition, Remington wants to carry its proven expertise into the evolution of gun cleaning. That has led to the development of the Remington Rem® Squeeg-E™
www.Squeeg-E.com gun cleaning

system. Behind the development of the Squeeg-E™ is the belief, according to Dean B. Deloe, Remington Director of Gun Care, that “anything that makes the shooting more fun, easier to do, more enjoyable, is a positive for the consumer,” and the ease, convenience, and innovation of the Rem® Squeeg-E™ has that goal at its heart. Deloe trained

in mechanical engineering and grew up duck hunting with his father in northern California’s waterfowl Mecca of the Sacramento Valley. He says that the system’s kits are “tailored to the specific use” for the firearm type, so that before the user “thinks he or she needs it, we already have it in the kit.” At the core of the system is the Remington Rem® Squeeg-E™ itself. Made from a proprietary polymer that is not affected by cleaning chemicals, the Rem® Squeeg-E™, made for rifle, pistol, and shotguns from 22 caliber to 12-gauge, is pulled through from the breach on a flex rod, removing all debris the system’s bronze bore brushes have dislodged. It is designed to scrape the lands and grooves to a “mirror clean”

condition with a single pull, keeping abrasive carbon fouling from harming the bore. Having years of useful life, the Rem® Squeeg-E™ eliminates the need for mops or patches, which not only translates into savings in money (cleaning just 20 guns a year could save $10 in costs, more than paying for the Rem® Squeeg-E™), but cuts down on flammable used patches piling up on a bench in the basement and winding up in a landfill. The other key to the system is the water-based Rem® All In™ Bore Cleaner that when used on a brush removes carbon, copper, plastic, and lead deposits, while remaining safe for long-term firearm care. Its other feature is that it is non-caustic and has no unpleasant odor,
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cleaning

Continued from page 45

making cleanup easy–just rinse the Rem® Squeeg-E™ in water. Remington pulled together their experts in R&D, defense and law enforcement, and armorers and instructors–a group that includes chemical engineers, professional shooters, former FBI and Navy SEALs, and gunsmiths–to come up with innovative component

designs like high-strength, lightweight, coated cables and advanced tools and handles, like the Pistol Grip Handle with three attachment points for preferred handle-barrel cleaning positions. Deloe sees a lot of “hocus pocus” in gun cleaning, that can have gun owners going through more involved steps than found in an experiment in a

postgraduate chemistry course. Which is why the Rem® Squeeg-E™ is made to cut to the chase, saving up to 15 minutes of work to get a gun cleaned, insuring it will be done regularly, improving the shooting of the firearm and prolonging its life and value.

Essential Oil:–Why Rem Oil Belongs on Every Bench
If you look back to the oils recommended in the past for lubricating firearms, you will find a rather startling array. In the late 1800s, English gunmaker W. W. Greener recommended neatsfoot, pure Arctic sperm-whale oil, Vaseline®, best Russian tallow, chronometer oil, Rangoon oil, and petroleum for oiling gun parts, and a wire knitting needle or a bodkin for applying them to shotgun bolts, cocking-lifters, and triggers. After that, “lubricant” came to mean a certain “triple” form of oil, followed by a waterdisplacing liquid that, legend has it, was smuggled out of aerospace factories. Yet all the while Remington Rem® Oil has been around, in fact for 100 years. Today it offers the gun owner the advantages of a cleaner for dirt and grime on metal surfaces, while displacing unseen moisture in the pores of the metal. It protects internal and external parts from rust and corrosion, as well, while its

special formula provides a thin, durable film to reduce metalto-metal wear, while keeping actions working smoothly. As a tip for applying oil, use just enough to leave a distinct fingerprint when the part is touched.

Remington Cleaning Kits
The Remington Rem® Squeeg-E™ cleaning system offers a kit for every firearm and shooter. The individual kits feature pouches, according to Dean Deloe, with “heavy-duty zippers, heavy-duty construction, water resistant on the pouch faces–the way you want things to be to last a long time.” Kits are available for shotgun, handgun, and universal field with cables, as well as universal rod, and the operator field system for AR and handgun. The ultimate kit is the Rem® Squeeg-E™ Universal Gun Care System, containing all 10 assorted-sized Rem® Squeeg-Es™ and matching bronze bore brushes, a coated cable system in rifle, shotgun and handgun lengths, patented Fast Snap T-Handle for quick adaptability, nylon and brass brushes, threaded revolver adapter, Rem® Pad gun mat, gun cloth, one ounce of Rem® Oil, and a onehalf-ounce bottle of Rem® All In™ Bore Cleaner, which all fit into a canvas bag that can hold four boxes of shotgun shells or up to eight boxes of other ammunition.

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S P E C I A L

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TEAM REMINGTON

T

SPORTING CLAYS
In July, the Spanish Grand Prix was held at Castillejo de Robledo, in the mountainous central Spanish province of Soria, about 100 miles north of the while Team Remington’s Ashleigh Hafley was crowned the Lady World Champion. A point of pride for Remington is that shooters relied on Remington

his year, Remington is supporting 23 competitive shotgun shooters in the sports of sporting clays, trap, and skeet, including three young competitors, 14-year old sporting clays shooter Annabelle Ayers and trap shooters Samantha Foppe, age 14 and Hardy Musselman, age 17. Several Team Remington members are part of the National Sporting Clays Association (NSCA) Team USA, which recorded its strongest finish ever at the 2013 World English Championship, Spanish Grand Prix, and the 35th World FITASC Championship. Team USA members are chosen, based on points earned in a series of selection shoots, to represent the US in national and international competitions. According to Shane Naylor, Shooting Sports Manager for Remington, “Team USA has dominated the world of FITASC and sporting clays this year.” The 2013 World English Championship was held this past March at the multimillion dollar National Shooting Complex located on 671 acres of rolling countryside in the Texas Hill Country in San Antonio, Texas; and NSCA Team USA took gold in every one of the national-team categories.

Ashleigh Hafley capital city of Madrid, drawing 330 competitors. Team USA FITASC swept every concurrent (same age class), the ladies’, and High Over All (HOA) trophy, which fell to Team Remington shooter Gebben Miles. A week later, the 35th World FITASC Championship was also held at the same club in Castillejo de Robledo. The competition was again dominated by Team USA, which claimed four gold and one silver medals as a team, with shooters taking individual medals as well. Team Remington shooter Brad Kidd, Jr. was “one bird out of the gold,” says Naylor, earning the silver,

Diane Sorantino

Gebben Miles

target loads, Remington Premier® Nitro 27® Target Loads and Remington
Premier® Nitro™ Gold Sporting Clays Target Loads, to carry them through the

championships. Beyond sporting clays and FITASC competitions, there is the Grand American World Trapshooting Championships, held August 7 to 17 at the World Shooting and Recreational Complex in Sparta, Illinois. This year marked the 114th championships. The Grand American dates to 1893, with the first using clay targets taking place in 1900 in Queens, New York. From there, it moved to Chicago,

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Sporting Clays vs. FITASC
Although sporting clays was not introduced widely into the US until the 1980s, when some of the first matches were organized at the Remington Gun Club in Connecticut, most shotgun shooters are familiar with it. Its roots go back well over a century to England, with hunters wanting a way to replicate the speed, angles, and flights of gamebirds with artificial targets such as glass balls and later clay pigeons, to allow them to practice year-round. Somewhat later, the Fédération Internationale de Tir aux Armes Sportives de Chasse, or “FITASC” was founded, out of which evolved what is essentially an international form of sporting clays. While shooters in sporting clays shoot from individual stations that each simulate a type of game, like quail, teal, or rabbits, the FITASC course groups all of its traps in a single layout, or parcour, which is shot from three different positions or “pegs,” to present the targets at different angles as the shooter changes pegs. The shotgun must be held in the low position before calling for the target, and the shooter is allowed “full use” of the gun, meaning he can fire both barrels at the single targets without a penalty, or on doubles can use two shots to break one “bird” and score it. Taken together, all of this is why FITASC is often considered the most challenging of all the clays sports.

St. Louis, and Columbus, Ohio, before being held for more than 80 years in Vandalia, Ohio. In 2006, the Championships came to Sparta, Illinois, and the World Shooting Complex with 120 trap fields,

Wendell Cherry

Brad Kidd, Jr.

creating the world’s longest trap line at 3½ miles. The Championships draw over 17,500 shooters over 11 days. Team Remington shooter Harlan Campbell, Jr. won the Grand American HOA for all events from August 12 to 17, with 986 out of 1000 targets. The HOA winner of the Preliminary Week, August 7 to 11, was Sean Hawley with a score of 988x1000 and 1481x1500, overall. Hawley also won the HOA for all events during the 10 days of shooting (prelim and main week, with a total of 2600 targets thrown) with 2559x2600, with Harlan Campbell the runner-up. There were, as well, when the target dust settled, several Team Remington winners in individual events.

u p c o m i n g clay targets events

In sporting clays, the National Championships will be held in San Antonio, Texas, at the National Shooting Complex, on October 22-27, drawing 1500 of the country’s best shooters to the competition. The world of trap is looking forward to the Missouri Fall Handicap Championships, September 28 through October 6 in Linn Creek, Missouri, at the Missouri Trapshooters Association, followed by the Autumn Grand (Satellite Grand) Championships, November 2-10, in Tucson, Arizona, at the Tucson Trap and Skeet Club. Finally, for skeet shooters, there is the World Skeet Shooting Championships, September 27 through October 4, in San Antonio, Texas, at the National Shooting Complex.
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cutlery
THE LEGENDARY BULLET® KNIFE

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t the outbreak of the First World War in Europe, Remington began building rifles for several overseas militaries. Among these were the British Enfield for Britain, the Berthier for France, and the Moisin-Nagant for Russia. Then with the US’s entry into the war, Remington’s focus became supplying weapons to our Army. With the signing of the Armistice, the company found itself with excess manufacturing capacity as the need for military armaments dwindled. (As a historical sidelight, Britain and Germany were known as the pre-War world’s knife makers; but many of England’s skilled Sheffield cutlers died on the battlefield, as did Germany’s, compounded by a backlash against German products in the US after 1918, severely damaging both countries’ knife industries.) Recognizing the unsatisfied demand as a way to utilize surplus capacity, and realizing that it’s true, sustained market would be among hunters, Remington turned to the

making of pocket and hunting knives. On February 9, 1920, the first Remington knife came off the cutler’s bench. At the height of production in the 1920s, Remington had a thousand different knife patterns. During the Great Depression, that number was reduced to some 300, with the iconic Remington “Bullet® Knife” remaining among them. With the onset of World War II, Remington was once again called upon to concentrate on defense work, collaborating with the US Army to construct several ordnance plants to produce ammunition, as well as building the M1903A3 Springfield bolt-action rifle, the company essentially having gone out of the cutlery business in 1940 to devote itself to the war effort’s need for firearms and ammunition. It was not until the 1970s that Remington returned to making knives. For the Remington Bullet® Knife, the company began producing a yearly, collectible, 100-percent US made version in 1982. That year’s model, the

two-bladed Trapper™ with jiggered bone scales, or handles, has multiplied in value in the thirty years since its initial introduction, so that today, 1982 Bullet® Knives in mint condition are considered to be among the most valuable collectible knives in existence, fetching up to $675 apiece. An authentic Bullet® Knife has the circle-type Remington “Made in the USA” tang stamp on one side, and on the other, the model number. Part of the information supplied by the model number is the kind of material used for the scales. On the 2013 Bullet® Knife, “The Forester™”–a knife designed,

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Cutlery was never an afterthought with Remington.
including saw cuts on the auburn bone scales, to commemorate the woodsmen and women who dedicate themselves to maintain our forests for greater hunting and outdoorrecreation opportunities–the final numeral of the model number, R1303, indicates that the scales are bone/stag. Drew Kohler, Remington Category Manager for Hunting and Shooting Accessories, offers the complete list of Bullet® Knife handle-material designations: The single-blade–a 3½-inch “clip” blade–lockback Forester™ retails for $106 in 440 stainless steel, while the limited-edition ladder Damascus blade costs $230. It is also worth noting that the artistry of the Bullet® Knife has inspired famed visual art. From 1982 to 1997, California artist L. W. “Larry” Duke created the popular series of posters showing the Remington Bullet® Knife pressed into service during dramatic outdoor calamities, such as Bad Time for a Snag, in which canoeing hunters must use the knife to cut themselves free, to avoid capsizing in the rapids. (Many more of Duke’s posters can be found at www. shopremingtoncountry.com.) Always remember, survival is possible without a good knife, just less of a sure thing.

➊ Redwood ➋ Black ➌ Bone/Stag ➍ Pearl ➎ Pyremite, or
Celluloid (invented
by Remington to take varied colors)

➏ Genuine Stag
(on older models)

➐ Ivory or White
Bone (also on older
models)

➑ Cocobolo ➒ Metal ➓ English
Buffalo Horn
2013 Remington Bullet® Knife “The Forester™”

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You need to be familiar with the field, the woods, the marsh, the forest, or the mountains where you hunt. If you work long and hard at this aspect of hunting, you can become part of the place you hunt. You will sense when you start to belong to the country. –Jim Posewitz, Beyond Fair Chase

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PHOTO: Dusan Smetana

THE MODEL 1911 R1.™ A LEGEND IN TOP FORM.

The only thing

more American than a Model 1911 is one made by America’s oldest gunmaker. For more than 100 years, it’s defended freedom, served justice, protected families and dominated competition. And the Model 1911 R1™ marks our proud return to one of the greatest legacies in firearms history, with the finest blend of exacting craftsmanship and out-of-box performance available today.

Made in the USA by American workers

©2013 REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY, LLC.

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S P E C I A L

R E P O R T

history & heritage
THE REMINGTON MODEL 700

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oming out of World War II, when most of its production had been devoted to arms for the military, Remington wanted to introduce a new centerfire, bolt-action rifle for the hunting and shooting public. They turned to a future legend to come up with one, and he gave them two. For 37 years, Merle “Mike” Walker, who died this past March at the age of 101, worked as a lead engineer and designer for Remington, including serving as Director of Research and head of the Custom Shop at Remington’s Ilion, New York, facility. A dedicated competitive benchrest shooter, Walker, and fellow designer Homer W. Young, were behind the Model 721 Bolt Action Centerfire Rifle in long action, and the Model 722 Bolt Action Centerfire Rifle in short. Walker even developed

a cartridge that could be chambered in the Model 722, the 222 Remington, the “triple deuce” that dominated shortaction benchrest matches until the advent of the PPC family of rounds, designed by Ferris Pindell and Dr. Louis Palmisano in the mid-1970s, followed shortly by the 6mm Bench Rest Remington cartridge. By the start of the 1960s, Remington wanted a more strikinglooking, better-performing rifle than the 721/722, which led to Walker’s design, and the introduction in 1962, of the Bolt Action Model 700™. Since then, the Model 700™ has gone on to be the best-selling centerfire rifle of all time, with more than 5 million purchased by hunters and shooters. With millions sold, the Model 700™ is probably the universal rifle, one that everyone is familiar with. The rifle has been built in scores of variations over

the years, and chambered in nearly every caliber from 17 to 458. The rifle’s stock options span the spectrum from camo to colored synthetic, American walnut, wood laminate, and in standard and thumbhole configurations. It has also been called the most accurate rifle, out of the box, ever made. The accuracy begins with the “three rings of steel” (please see below), which first of all gives the cartridge extreme support in the chamber. Then there is the trigger, especially the newer externally adjustable X-Mark Pro® Trigger, widely thought of by knowledgeable shooters as an excellent factory trigger. Finally, there is a lock time more usually found in precision target rifles. Lock time is the period from when the sear releases the firing pin until the firing pin strikes the primer, which in the Model 700™ is less than 3 milliseconds.

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A clear indication of the trust put in the Remington Model 700™ is its extensive use by the military and law enforcement. It has formed the basis for sniper rifles for armed forces around the world. The United States Marines no doubt have the longest history with the Model 700™. The M40, which was essentially a wooden-stocked, factory Model 700™, became the Corps primary sniper weapon in 1966. (The US Army version of the Model 700™ was put into service in 1988, designated the M24.) It is estimated, as well, that fully 90 percent of law-enforcement tactical sharpshooters are armed with the Model 700™. Of course, where the Model 700™ was made to excel was in the hunting field; and there it continues to be the choice for everything from varmints and predators to deer and brown bear, and the animals in between, and has been carried with confidence to all the exotic game fields across all the oceans.

The Three Rings of Steel Design
One of the signature features of the Model 700™ is its “three rings of steel” design. Unlike other bolt actions that simply lock the cartridge base up against the breech, the rings-of-steel design supports the case head with three different, distinct components. First is the bolt that completely surrounds the cartridge base. The bolt nose, cupping, as it were, the base, then slides into a counter bore in the action end of the barrel, providing a second circle of steel. It also insures precise and correct alignment between the bolt and the barrel. Finally, there is the receiver that encloses the barrel and the bolt, cladding the cartridge base three times around; thus, three rings of steel, creating what many consider to be the strongest bolt action in the world.

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Remington Arms Company, LLC 870 Remington Drive P.O. Box 700 Madison, NC 27025-0700 TEL: 1-800-243-9700

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