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Build Point System

By: Omen - the Divine Referee

This system makes character development and advancement more versatile.


For example, if you wanted a character with more feats than would otherwise be
possible, or to have outlandish ability scores (at a cost), then this is a rule
variation you might wish to consider... talk it over with your group.

Some things to consider as a DM: Multiclassing penalties... You can


choose to incur a 1BP penalty for multiclassing when the classes are more than 1
level difference. You can choose to forgo this if you want to encourage
multiclassing... however, I would recommend limiting the number of classes a
character can have. If a character has the maximum number of classes allowed,
and reaches the max level in one of them, and then it should be acceptable for
that character to take on another class. For example, if you set the maximum
number of classes at 2 and one of the classes is a racial paragon class (3
levels), once the player reaches level 3 in the paragon class, I personally
would allow an additional class to be taken. Another thing to consider when
restricting the number of classes is that some prestige classes require
multiclassing to begin with, so you might decide to have a limit to the number
of base classes and have a separate limit on the number of prestige classes.

This system is based roughly on the "Stat-Buy" system from the DMG, so
we'll start with that.

Buying ability Scores

Score Cost Upgrade Score Cost Upgrade


1 -7 X 21 38 6
2 -6 1 22 44 6
3 -5 1 23 51 7
4 -4 1 24 58 7
5 -3 1 25 66 8
6 -2 1 26 74 8
7 -1 1 27 83 9
8 0 1 28 92 9
9 1 1 29 102 10
10 2 1 30 112 10
11 3 1 31 123 11
12 4 1 32 134 11
13 6 2 33 146 12
14 8 2 34 158 12
15 11 3 35 171 13
16 14 3 36 184 13
17 18 4 37 198 14
18 22 4 38 212 14
19 27 5 39 227 15
20 32 5 40 242 15

On this table, the Cost column is the cost of the skill at creation, the upgrade
column is the cost of moving up to that score from the previous one. For
example, if you start a character with a Str score of 13, it costs 6BP, and to
raise it to 14 later costs an additional 2BP. Sound familiar? Yeah, I know,
But wait, there's more you can do with Build Points.
Buying Class Levels

Level Start cost Level-up Level Start cost Level-up


1 1 1 11 66 11
2 3 2 12 78 12
3 6 3 13 91 13
4 10 4 14 105 14
5 15 5 15 120 15
6 21 6 16 136 16
7 28 7 17 153 17
8 36 8 18 171 18
9 45 9 19 190 19
10 55 10 20 210 20

I think this table should be fairly self-explanatory.

One thing about this system is that you don't gain feats from gaining
levels (except bonus feats from class levels). Feats must be bought separately
at the cost of 1BP each.

Level Adjustments

Level adjustments for playing an unusual race can be handled in one of 2


ways, depending on how exotic you want to encourage your players to be. There
are 2 ways of handling this, either point for point, or treat the level
adjustment as class cost. For example, if a character were to be a Jann (Janni
P116 of the Monster Manual) with a level adjustment of +5, the cost would either
be 5BP or 15BP respectively. Regardless, the Player would still have to get the
DM's ok on the race. As per D&D rules, when racial ability score adjustments
are calculated, you adjust AFTER the roll, so in this case you'd adjust AFTER
the buying of the ability scores. When it comes to advancing your character, to
keep things at least a little bit more balanced, you pay the cost of upgrade as
normal, regardless of what your racial ability score adjustments would be. So,
a Drow (+2Int +2Cha) could get a starting Int Score of 14 by paying only the 4BP
cost of 12, but after the character is made, would have to pay the normal 3BP to
reach 15.

Comparisons

Going on an average roll (3d6) at Level 1, 1 feat for Level 1, the BP


equivalent of an average roll would be approximately 14BP (all stats 10 = 12BP +
1 level = 1BP + 1 Feat = 1BP = 14BP total)
Based on the same 3d6, Level 1 character who was lucky enough to roll all
6's, (22*6) + 1 + 1 = 134BP because an ability score of 18 costs 22BP, times 6
ability scores then add one for the level, and one for the feat.
Based on a (1d8+10) stat roll, with straight 14's, at level 1, with 1
feat, the equivalent would be 50BP.

Final Comments

Try a few quick stat rolls and calculate the equivalent BP value, then set
the starting limit and choose the specifics for your first test campaign using
this system. Choose Multiclassing penalty or Multiclass limit... How to handle
Level Adjustments... and how many points to start characters with, and you're
ready to give it a whirl.
1000XP = 1BP