Vol.45, no.26 •June 26 - July 2, 2013 www.frostillustrated.

com • news & VIews of AFrICAn AmerICAns
CeleBrating
yearS in the
Community
1968 - 2013 TrIeD. True. TrusTworTHY.
®
SINCE
1968
‘DEAR WHITE
PEOPlE’ PAGE 8
GROWN FOLKS COMEDY p.3
BLACKONOMICS p.4
JEANIE’S BEAUTY PAGE p.6
CHURCH DIRECTORY p.10
STOP PAINTING CITY
WITH BlOOD PAGE 2
BOYCOTT? WHY NOT
BUY OUR OWN? PAGE 4
Recent visits from Dr. Mar-
tin Luther King Jr.’s nephew
Dr. Derek King have many
Fort Wayne residents think-
ing about justice
and racial equality
in Fort Wayne area
schools. However,
reported NAACP
visits to Fort Wayne
area private schools
have many resi-
dents wondering if
our schools, after
50 years, are really
equal.
i spoke with the
Rev. Dr. Bledsoe the
Fort Wayne Chapter
NAACP’s president
recently about these visits.
The Rev. Dr. Bledsoe stat-
ed that what prompted the
NAACP to visit the schools
was “the voice of the chil-
dren.” She told me that the
NAACP has visited “several
schools” but she did not tell
me the names of the schools.
She said the meetings al-
lowed her to listen to what
the youth had to say and that
she is “pleased and proud.”
She also stated that
the ultimate goal
of their visits is to
“provide solutions
for our youth at
all levels” and that
Fort Wayne needs
to “recognize the
ability of civil rights
and embrace it.”
Unf or t unat el y,
she did not give me
the direct goal of
the visits and didn’t
give me much more
information. i also
attempted to talk to a princi-
pal of a Fort Wayne private
school who informed me that
he was not at liberty to speak
about the matter. Luckily, i
myself attend a Fort Wayne
private high school and have
attended a few of these meet-
ings and have a little more
information to give.
The meetings consisted of a
few members of the NAACP,
some of my school’s faculty
and every single black kid in
my school. Although some
African American students
stated that they had not ex-
perience any racial discrimi-
nation, a large majority said
they had. Many were even
angry and the meeting turned
into us telling NAACP mem-
bers and faculty about our
feelings. We left the meeting
with promises of more meet-
ings soon that would include
black kids from other private
schools as well. Unfortunate-
ly we haven’t had a meet-
ing since that meeting and i
myself am not sure what the
NAACP plans on doing.
One of the students from
my high school stated, “Once
[the NAACP] came and had
the meeting it seems like a
lot less racist comments were
P
R
S
R
T

S
T
D
U
.
S
.

P
O
S
T
A
G
E
P
A
I
D
F
T
.

W
A
Y
N
E
,

I
N
P
E
R
M
I
T

N
O
.

1
0
4
9
F
r
o
s
t

I
l
l
u
s
t
r
a
t
e
d


3
1
2
1

S
.

C
a
l
h
o
u
n

S
t
.



F
o
r
t

W
a
y
n
e
,

I
N

4
6
8
0
7
admiria
Cooper
SpeCial to
froSt
froSt piCniC iS
thiS Weekend!
(see ad on back page)
(See “Cooper” p.11) (See “Legion shooting” p.9)
Are private schools benefiting
African American children?
Members of the Oma-
tayo Dance group,
under the direction of
Diane Rogers, await
their turn to perform
at the recent June-
teenth Celebration.
The Weisser Park
Community Center
kicked off this year’s
three-day Juneteen
Celebration with
an evening of arts,
including dance, music
and poetry on June
20 at the center. The
celebration featured
several African dance
groups, a number of
young poets and a live
jazz performance, all
set off at the end of the
evening by a delicious
meal of curried goat.
(Photo: Andy Kurzen)
See more photos on p.7
Striking a pose
Post 148
Commander
issues
statement
on shooting
Veterans organization
taking steps to increase
security further
As told to Jeanie Summerville
Special to Frost Illustrated
EDITOR’S NOTE: On June 9, Fort Wayne resi-
dent Jabron Totton tragically was murdered in
the parking lot of American Legion Post 148 at
the corner of East Lewis Street and East Hanna
Street. While the incident happened outside the
Legion and after the veteran’s organization was
closed, Post Commander Jesse Booker told Frost
Illustrated special reporter
Jeanie Summerville that
he and post leadership and
members want to do what
is necessary to keep people
safe not only inside but also
outside. Their commitment
and concern, he explained in
an exclusive interview with
Ms. Summerville, is for the
safety and well-being of the
entire community. And while
the post has been relatively
trouble-free for many years
and the recent tragedy was a
horrible but isolated incident
there, American Legion Post
148, said Booker, already is
taking steps to do whatever it
can to increase security in the
area. The following are Com-
mander Booker’s own words
as told to Jeanie Summerville:
“I’m Jesse Booker the Commander of the Ameri-
can Legion Post 148 and the incident that happened
here, in itself, was just something that happened.
I’ve talked with a number of people about this in-
cident and it’s something that we couldn’t control,
it just happened. And as far as I’m concerned, I’m
going to leave it up to the proper authorities to get
it solved. I’ve talked with the victim’s parents and
we know what happened but we don’t know why it
happened. And, as far as the victim’s parents, they
want closure.
“Jabron was a fgure here at the American Le-
gion and he was always here from Thursday
through Sunday nights with his friends and he was
never a problem and we were also friends. As a
matter of fact, I know the family personally and I
sat down with them on several occasions since the
incident and they’re really understanding people.
And we’re all GOD-fearing people and we come
from the same background and the same church,
BOOKER
TOTTON
2
FROST Illustrated •June 26 - July 2, 2013 www.frostillustrated.com
WHITE
(See “Unity” p.9)
News
Credo: “We wish to plead our own cause. Too long has the public been deceived by misrepresentations
in things which concern us dearly. . . Hating no man, fearing no man, the BLACK PRESS strives to
help every man in the firm belief that all men are hurt as long as any one is held back.”
FROST ILLUSTRATED
®
Published by Frost Inc.
MEMBER OF THE NATIONAL NEWSPAPER PUBLISHERS ASSOCIATION (NNPA);
THE NATIONAL NEWSPAPER ASSOCIATION (NNA); THE HOOSIER STATE
PUBLISHERS ASSOCIATION & THE GREATER FORT WAYNE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
Publisher
Edward N. Smith
Executive Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Edn a M. Smith
Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M. Patterson
Layout & Production Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Andy Kurzen
Distribution Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Edward N. Smith Jr.
Snapshot Survey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Edward N. Smith Jr.
Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nikki Tabron-Booker
Sales Representative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Greg Walker
Sales Representative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jeanie Summerville
Published: FROST ILLUSTRATED
®
is published weekly for $30 a year locally, $35 outside of Fort
Wayne by Frost Incorporated, 3121 South Calhoun Street, Fort Wayne, IN 46807. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to FROST ILLUSTRATED
®
, 3121 South Calhoun Street, Fort Wayne, IN 46807.
FROST ILLUSTRATED
®
is not responsible for any unsolicited material. ADDRESS all correspondence
to Executive Editor, FROST ILLUSTRATED
®
, 3121 South Calhoun Street, Fort Wayne, IN 46807.
Telephone: (260) 745-0552. Fax: (260) 745-9503. Email: frostnews@aol.com
ATTENTION MAIL SUBSCRIBERS: If you do not receive your paper by mail or are dissatisfied with
delivery, you should ask your local postmaster for a Consumer Service Card and record your complaint
on that form. If this does not bring about improvements, please contact FROST ILLUSTRATED
®
as well
as the Consumer Advocate, US Postal Service Headquarters, Washington, D.C. 20260. If you have
not received your newspaper by Friday, please telephone your carrier and our office at (260) 745-0552.
If you do not receive your paper, we will deliver or send a replacement copy to you.
EXTRA COPIES of any particular issue of FROST ILLUSTRATED
®
are available at our office,
3121 South Calhoun Street, for up to one year.
Credo: “We wish to plead our own cause. Too long has the public been deceived by misrepresentations
in things which concern us dearly. . . Hating no man, fearing no man, the BLACK PRESS strives to
help every man in the firm belief that all men are hurt as long as any one is held back.”
FROST ILLUSTRATED
®
Published by Frost Inc.
MEMBER OF THE NATIONAL NEWSPAPER PUBLISHERS ASSOCIATION (NNPA);
THE NATIONAL NEWSPAPER ASSOCIATION (NNA); THE HOOSIER STATE
PUBLISHERS ASSOCIATION & THE GREATER FORT WAYNE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
Publisher
Edward N. Smith
Executive Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Edn a M. Smith
Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .M. Patterson
Layout & Production Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Andy Kurzen
Distribution Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Edward N. Smith Jr.
Snapshot Survey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Edward N. Smith Jr.
Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nikki Tabron-Booker
Sales Representative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Greg Walker
Sales Representative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jeanie Summerville
Published: FROST ILLUSTRATED
®
is published weekly for $30 a year locally, $35 outside of Fort
Wayne by Frost Incorporated, 3121 South Calhoun Street, Fort Wayne, IN 46807. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to FROST ILLUSTRATED
®
, 3121 South Calhoun Street, Fort Wayne, IN 46807.
FROST ILLUSTRATED
®
is not responsible for any unsolicited material. ADDRESS all correspondence
to Executive Editor, FROST ILLUSTRATED
®
, 3121 South Calhoun Street, Fort Wayne, IN 46807.
Telephone: (260) 745-0552. Fax: (260) 745-9503. Email: frostnews@aol.com
ATTENTION MAIL SUBSCRIBERS: If you do not receive your paper by mail or are dissatisfied with
delivery, you should ask your local postmaster for a Consumer Service Card and record your complaint
on that form. If this does not bring about improvements, please contact FROST ILLUSTRATED
®
as well
as the Consumer Advocate, US Postal Service Headquarters, Washington, D.C. 20260. If you have
not received your newspaper by Friday, please telephone your carrier and our office at (260) 745-0552.
If you do not receive your paper, we will deliver or send a replacement copy to you.
EXTRA COPIES of any particular issue of FROST ILLUSTRATED
®
are available at our office,
3121 South Calhoun Street, for up to one year.
Managing Editor: M. Patterson
Layout & Production Mgr: Andy Kurzen
Distribution Manager: Edward N. Smith Jr.
Distribution: Clifford F. Buttram Jr.
Snapshot Survey: Edward N. Smith Jr.
Marketing & Promotions: Nikki Tabron-Booker
Sales Representative: Greg Walker
Sales Representative: Jeanie Summerville
Publisher: Edward N. Smith
Executive Editor: Edn a M. Smith
EDITOR’S NOTE: The follow-
ing is a piece outlining a path-
way to stopping the violence in
city streets, submitted by Brother
Marcus McGee. Before present-
ing the actual piece entitled “I
once was you,” Frost Illustrated
staff thought we also would pres-
ent Brother McGee’s introductory
note to the letter that he sent us.
Introduction
The enclosed story is from my
personal experiences and the
means of the story is to uplift, not
to tear anyone down. It is not in-
tended for anyone to be forced on
a religion. You must fnd your own
rock to build your foundation on.
But, build it for the greater good
of humanity. GOD intended for
us to live a certain way and that
is through love. Our life is short-
lived when we lean on our own
understanding. We have to get bet-
ter, we must get better, to have a
productive life in harmony.
We are a peculiar people. We are
unique, equipped with many tal-
ents that we have to tap into. Have
faith in what you can do. Put the
same energy that you put into the
streets into something positive and
meaningful.
There is too much violence go-
ing on. I you have children or if
you don’t have children, think
about how you would want them
to live. Get inspired to do better.
Achieve greatness. Be somebody.
Do not just be what society says
you are—things like “a failure,”
“no good,” never amount to ‘noth-
ing,’” “thug,” “menace,” “prosti-
tute,” etc. We have to overcome
our adversities. Get out of our
comfort zone. We have to, because
achievement comes from taking
chances. We played suicide with
our lives in the streets. So, why not
try? There are only two things that
will happen from making wrong
choices: That’s getting killed or
ending up in prison. You choose
your destiny...
I once was you
How are you, ladies and gentle-
men and boys and girls? I hope
everything is well and you’re in
good spirits. Considering the cir-
cumstances, I’m truly blessed to
be alive.
Before I get started, my name
is Marcus McGee. I’m born and
raised in Fort Wayne. Everyone
calls me McGee in the streets. But,
I no longer go by that name. I’m
a born again Christian, so now I
prefer Marcus because all things
are new and old things are passed
away. I’m 34 years old, with four
children.
I’ve been in and out of prison
on drug charges since 2000. All
together, I have served 12 years
so far, including my current sen-
tence—which, God willing, will
be over in October of this year! I
hope to be able to meet you guys.
I’m not proud of what I’ve done
in my past, but I can tell you this:
It is what I have been through that
has shaped me into the man I am
today. So, I’m sure if you are sit-
ting here, you too are trying to
overcome something or are going
to be the solution to the problem
or both. I’m still in both categories
because no one’s perfect.
I once was you and still
am. I just reach out in
ways to better myself. I
don’t hold myself back
from anything.
I know I can do all
things, no matter what
the situation—and you
should too. Never limit
yourself. And again, I’m
not saying I have it all
fgured out. But, I can tell
you my experience and
what I do to be at peace
is part of my foundation
that I live on and that’s LOVE. Our
purpose is to LOVE one another,
even if we don’t want to. Our pur-
pose is to serve GOD wholeheart-
edly.
Now, I’m not telling you to be-
come a Christian but I’m telling
you that if you want to live, then
you must fnd your rock to build
on. We can’t keep serving the
streets; I used to serve the streets
literally. I lived for the streets and
look where it has gotten me. The
only reason I am able to share my
story is because of GOD’S mercy.
See, we have a mission on this
earth and it’s not a mission of vio-
lence. It’s a mission of LOVE.
Now men, I don’t want you to
start thinking like a proud man.
I’m just being frank because we
men think that showing love or
pouring our hearts out about what
we believe is soft.
And, oh, I’m sure you’re proud
of being hardcore or a thug. All
of that is fne if you utilize it for
the right reason. Use your energy
for your passions. It won’t happen
over night. It takes time. Patience
is the key. Make goals and reach
them and don’t stop there—keep
pushing. You have to because it’s
a lifelong process. Like I said, I
was once you, seeking answers
that I used to try to fgure out on
my own. But, now I have turned to
GOD for answers and surrounded
myself with positive people who
have the same interests.
We can’t keep doing the
same old things, expect-
ing different results. It
won’t work. I know. I’m
a witness to it.
This is my third in-
carceration from selling
drugs. My life is on a dif-
ferent path and all I have
is my word and I will tell
you I will help in any
way I can. Sacrifces are
what I’m willing to make.
Don’t keep going down
the same path. Start new
today.
Seek knowledge, wisdom and
understanding. Know who you are.
Study yourself and don’t lean unto
your own understanding. Lean
unto a spiritual understanding. You
might say you don’t have a spiri-
tual understanding and haven’t
connected yet. But, I would say
you have because if you’re sitting
in this gathering, then something
has awakened in you that is want-
ing out of what you were or were
becoming.
We must become beacons of
light shining in dark places. I
know that each and everyone of
you is unique. The reason I know
is because all that is in scripture
is true. I have studied myself and
found me. I was lost in darkness,
not seeing what I had become and
what I was doing until, one day, I
surrendered and gave my life over
to GOD and accepted the LORD
JESUS CHRIST as MY LORD
and SAVIOR, who is the head of
my life! I claim that what he sys
is true and will work in my life
through his will.
So, whatever it is you believe in,
Stop painting the city red:
Change can, will happen
(See “McGee” p.9)
Voices of Unity
Jackson, Houston
tribute ambitious
FORT WAYNE—On June 29, Unity Performing Arts Foundation
(UNITY) is scheduled to present what organizers say its biggest and
most innovative summer production ever. Many have asked: “What
makes this production so special?” This concert is a tribute to the
late Michael Jackson and Whitney Houston, entitled “Alive Again.”
Imagine, an evening of electrifying singing, dancing and speech, all
presented by talent from right here in Fort Wayne.
The concert will feature Fort Wayne’s own World Champion
Voices of Unity Youth Choir under the direction of Marshall White,
dancers from Sheekristyle Dance Studio as well as soloists including
professional recording artists Wayne Starks, Niyoki Nero and Mikki
White. Other soloists include UNITY alumni,
Matt Griffn, Breaun Scott and many others.
UNITY offcials said the lives and music of
Michael Jackson and Whitney Houston offer
a grand window into the fruits of uncommon
talent, perseverance and insight, as well as the
struggles to maintain balance in an often-diff-
cult world.
Marshall White, Voices of Unity music direc-
tor and CEO of parent organization Unity Per-
forming Arts Foundation, said, “Presenting a
production that requires this level of artistic genius is a serious stretch
for youth, but it is not impossible with the collective energy and tal-
ents of all who are involved.”
The choir members were required to study biographies and watch
documentaries on the lives of Michael Jackson and Whitney Houston
during the planning of this tribute. Exposing the youth to their lives
and to the power of their music helped drive home the importance for
them to achieve artistic excellence for this concert.
“It is our hope, as the organization moves forward, more people
in the community will embrace our artistic programming and youth
development platform and join us in our artistic goal of providing
quality entertainment for the entire family. You will have the experi-
ence of your life on the night of this concert. You will be mesmerized
with the talent that exists in our great city,” said White.
Veronica Townes, the creative coordinator
for the production, said, “The Voices of Unity
members and other local talent have invested
many hours of hard work and practice to present
a show that will honor the legacy of both art-
ists. In order to breathe new life and restore a
fresh appreciation of teamwork and unity during
such a turbulent disconnected time in our own
community, these young people decided to do
something fun and different. From Thriller to I
Wanna Dance with Somebody, I’m sure you will
experience something that reminds you of a happy and exciting time
in your life. A time when you were happy just because.”
Unity Performing Arts Foundation (UNITY), is a fully supported
community arts organization founded in 2000 by Marshall White and
several other members of the Fort Wayne community. UNITY is a
comprehensive artistic concept that brings singing, dancing, creative
writing, drama, oratory, and instrumental music under one umbrella.
UNITY has been very successful in flling a local artistic void,
which has existed for years in the community. The organization has
not only attracted many minorities but also youth from more than
TOWNES
Voices of Unity Youth Choir performs with Gospel star Kirk Frank-
lin. (Courtesy photo)
marcus
mcgee
SpeCial to
froSt

FROST Illustrated • June 26 - July 2, 2013
3 www.frostillustrated.com
(See “Dog bite” p.9)
Find us at frostillustrated.com & facebook.com/frostillustrated & twitter.com/frostillustrate
Investigators need help
identifying suspects
FORT WAYNE—The Fort Wayne
Police Department is presently investigating an incident of theft and
fraud. At approximately 12:30 p.m., June 10, at 4122 Lima Road (site of
Dunham’s Sports), a male subject entered the site asking for a job appli-
cation. While in the business, he passes by an offce, observes a purse,
and immediately walks to the purse and removes the wallet from inside.
Visit www.frostillustrated.com/category/videos/ to take a look.
Later that same afternoon, another male subject, in the company of a
female subject, makes a purchase using the stolen credit card from the
wallet/purse. None of these individuals have been identifed. Investiga-
tors have obtained a video and still images captured via in-store camera
surveillance of those involved. Investiga-
tors are hopeful that someone will recog-
nize these individuals and come forward
with information.
Anyone knowing the identity or where-
abouts of the suspects is asked to contact
Fort Wayne Police at (260) 427-1201
or Crime Stoppers at (260) 436-STOP
[7867].
This is an ongoing investigation with the City of Fort Wayne Police
Department and the Allen County Prosecuting Attorney’s Offce.
Crime & Safety
Reports
courtesy
of Raquel
Foster, Public
Information
Officer,
City of Fort
Wayne Police
Department
SsNtoa BttNo Ssavtcss
Providing services to people age 55 and above who are blind or
visually impaired, to help them maintain a high quality of life and live
independently in their own homes and communities.
• Adaptivo
Bquipmont
• Advocacy
Training
• Daily Iiving
Skills Training
• Rocroation
• Support
0roups for
Poors & Family
... & many more
services!
www.the-league.org
Voice/TTY: (260) 441-0551
Video Phone: (260)440-3013
5821 S. Anthony Blvd • Fort Wayne
Ervins
brings
comedy
to the
masses
By D.l. Russell
Special to Frost Illustrated
Entrepreneur Kevin Ervins
spent the better part of 20 years as
a manager for local McDonald’s
restaurants. During those years of
toiling over the everyday opera-
tions of a fast food chain, Ervins
learned that the best way to get his
job done was to keep a smile and
to always try to incorporate laugh-
ter into his day.
It was this love of laughter that
eventually led him to pursue his
dream of bringing comedians he’d
enjoyed seeing on ground break-
ing comedy shows like BET’s
Comic View, Russell Simmon’s
Def Comedy Jam and Martin
Lawrence’s 1
st
Amendment to Fort
Wayne.
Ervins said didn’t really know
where to start, but he believed if
he was able to offer a more edgy
style of comedy, locally, people
would come out to see it. So with
nothing more than his own enthu-
siasm and a little help from his
“right-hand-man,” Cortney White,
Ervins formed Sold Out Arts En-
tertainment and jumped into the
role of comedy
show promot-
er. He began
by posting an
open call for
comedians on
the popular
internet site,
Cr a i g s l i s t .
com, and it didn’t take long before
Sold Out Arts Entertainment had
enlisted comedian Master Major
as the headliner for its frst show.
Next he needed a location, which
the Neon Armadillo was more than
happy to provide.
Since that frst show in June
of 2012, Ervins admits he has
learned a lot about promotion and
his shows have evolved into more
of an event, than simply a com-
edy show. An evening of “Grown
Folks Comedy,” now incorporates
comedians, improvisation, crowd
participation, spoken word per-
formances, and even live music.
Sold Out Arts Entertainment has
also helped local comedians like
Marlin Hill, Kool Kat Duane, and
Miss Lowe hone their skills while
networking with other performers.
In the last year, Sold Out Arts
Entertainment has promoted more
than 15 of their “Grown Folks
Comedy” shows, in four different
locations around the city, along
with hosting smaller events such
as wedding receptions, and local
company parties.
Upcoming events from Sold
Out Arts Entertainment include
a “Grown Folks Comedy,” show
featuring Amber James on June 29,
the company’s frst “Latino Com-
edy Explo-
sion,” featur-
ing comedian
Glen Martino
on July 13, and
their second
Gospel come-
dy event, later
this summer.
Ervins said his longterm goal
is to be the Midwest’s premier
provider of urban entertainment
through his promotions and if his
success over the last year is any
indication, he’s headed in the right
direction.
By Peggy Bender
Fort Wayne Animal Care & Control
FORT WAYNE—Accord-
ing to the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention 800,000
Americans seek medical atten-
tion for dog bites each year; half
of which are children. The rate of
dog bite-related injuries is high-
est for children ages fve to nine
years, and nearly two thirds of
injuries among children ages four
years and younger are to the head
or neck region.
Fort Wayne Animal Care &
Control reminds parents to su-
pervise the interactions between
children and dogs. According
to shelter spokesperson Peggy
Bender, “Young children often
lack the skills to understand when
an animal is uncomfortable or just
wants to be left alone, so the key
to safety is supervision and edu-
cation. Children don’t understand
how quickly a dog being teased
can jump a fence or break a chain
to bite them.”
Animal Care & Control strongly
advocates bite prevention to keep
children safe by providing bite free
materials to area classrooms, tour
groups and at community events.
Parents should review safety rules
throughout the summer months
when dog bites increase.
“By teaching children to respect
the dogs they own and to never
tease a dog through a fence, ani-
mal bites are reduced.”
BITE PREVENTION SAFETY RUlES
• Be cautious around dogs you
don’t know.
• Treat your own pets with re-
spect and gentle handling.
• NEVER leave a baby or small
child alone with a dog.
• Avoid unfamiliar dogs. If a
dog approaches to sniff you, stand
still. In most cases, the dog will go
away when it determines you are
not a threat.
• Don’t pet a dog by reaching
through a fence.
• Always ask permission before
petting someone’s dog.
• Don’t run past a dog. Dogs
naturally love to chase and catch
things.
• Never disturb a dog that’s car-
ing for puppies, sleeping or eating.
• If you are threatened by a dog,
remain calm. Don’t scream or yell.
If you say anything, speak calmly
and frmly. Avoid eye contact. Try
to stay still until the dog leaves, or
back away slowly until the dog is
out of sight. Don’t turn and run.
• If you fall or are knocked to the
ground, curl into a ball with your
hands over your head and neck.
Company Facts
Name: Sold Out Art Entertainment
Owner: Kevin Ervins
Specialty: Urban Entertainment
Website: www.SoldOutArts.com
Contact: (260) 425-0066
Kevin Ervins is owner of Sold Out
Arts Entertainment and a pro-
moter of “Grown Folks Comedy”
shows. (Courtesy photo)
(Courtesy FWPD)
How to enjoy a bite free summer
4
FROST Illustrated •June 26 - July 2, 2013 www.frostillustrated.com
“I was tired of giving in.”
— Rosa Parks
It is always interesting to refect
on certain events that took place in
days gone by, especially
when it comes to econom-
ic issues. In my entrepre-
neurship classes, I often
use the example of the
Montgomery bus boycott
to illustrate a very impor-
tant lesson we could (and
should) take from those
strong, dedicated, and
committed brothers and
sisters who walked until
their demands were met.
Some 42,000 bus riders
walked to work for 381
days. Not only was their action
exemplary and admirable, it also
offers a very important lesson in
economic empowerment.
Here’s what I mean:
Let’s assume the bus fare in
Montgomery at that time was 20
cents roundtrip. We know the bus
boycott lasted for 381 days. Mul-
tiply 20 cents times 381 times
42,000. The answer: $3,200,400.
How many buses do you think
could have been purchased with
that amount of money in 1956
when the boycott ended? Do you
think the people could have bought
a factory and produced seats, or
tires or signs for those buses? How
about opening a maintenance fa-
cility to service the buses? Get the
picture? Do you see the lesson?
Suppose those who walked to
work had put their bus fare into a
common fund every day as sort of
a savings account for black folks.
If they had done that, in addition
to withholding their money from
the bus company, they would have
had $3,200,400. In 1956 that was
a great deal of money and could
have created great economic
change.
While there are many other les-
sons we can learn from and take
advantage of today, the Montgom-
ery issue stands out because of a
story I read in the Toledo Journal
many years ago titled, “Restored
Rosa Parks Bus heads for new
home.” As I read it, I could not
help but think about the
above-mentioned num-
bers because the article
cited the purchase of the
bus by the Henry Ford
Museum in Dearborn,
Mich.
The bus was found in
a feld, rusted and riddled
with bullet holes. The
museum paid $492,000
for it and spent $300,000
more for its restora-
tion. With $3.2 million,
not only could the bus
boycotters have bought a feet of
black-owned buses, they could
have also bought the Rosa Parks
Bus. Do you see the irony here?
Do you see the lesson? Now if you
want to see that bus, you’ll have
to pay an admission fee to the mu-
seum. It’s like I always say, “Many
of us prefer symbolism over sub-
stance.”
Even though our “leaders” have
waited nearly 50 years to tell us
that economic empowerment is
what we must seek and fght for,
it is vital that we take our lessons
whenever and wherever we can
fnd them. We must remember that
things always boil down to eco-
nomics in some form or fashion.
I don’t know about you, but I
think we would be much better off
today if we owned a few bus com-
panies, the way blacks did with the
Safe Bus Company in Winston-
Salem, N.C., rather than having
to pay to ride on someone else’s. I
think Rosa Parks would have been
happier and would rest easier if,
for instance, black people manu-
factured and owned the school
buses our children have been rid-
ing for decades.
I would much rather go to De-
troit and ride a black-owned bus
than to go to a museum and pay
to see the bus that Rosa Parks and
others rode in 1955. It may be a
piece of history, but it’s still just
a bus, an inanimate object that
played nothing more than a pas-
sive role in what we now call our
struggle for equality. Someone
made a few hundred thousand dol-
lars from the sale of the bus. Some-
one else made another $300,000 to
restore it. And the museum contin-
ues to make who knows how much
because people want to see it, to
board it, to touch it, and to actu-
ally sit in the same seat in which
Rosa Parks sat. As Don King says,
“Only in America!”
I appreciate the willing spirit
of those who sacrifced, walked,
fought, and subjected themselves
to the Bull Connors of this na-
tion. It would be a tribute to them
if we would use their lessons to
economically empower ourselves.
Celebration and nostalgia are fne,
but what we need now are owner-
ship and control of income-pro-
ducing assets, such as buses, mu-
seums, supermarkets, hotels, and
gas stations.
Is anybody out there willing to
start an equity/investment fund?
Is anybody out there ready to put
some money into it? Is anybody
out there willing to support the
businesses developed by such an
effort? Or, are we satisfed with
simply making others wealthy by
spending our way into economic
oblivion? I don’t think Rosa Parks
would want us to do that. She was
tired of giving in, so she defed the
status quo. Are we tired enough to
make a similar change in our eco-
nomic behavior?
Jim Clingman, founder of the
Greater Cincinnati African Ameri-
can Chamber of Commerce, is the
nation’s most prolifc writer on
economic empowerment for Black
people. He is an adjunct professor
at the University of Cincinnati and
can be reached through his web-
site, blackonomics.com.
SnapShot Survey by e.n. Smith
Do you think some
groups are predisposed to
crime?
Terry Fuqua: Yes, I
believe some groups are
predisposed to crime.
I think a lot can be
contributed to lack of
education and peer pressure.
Let me not forget parents
rearing their children
properly.
Jason Luce: It is
not genetic but it is
environmental—like
gypsies, they learn from the
time they walk to take up
the trade of their parents.
That can be a positive
infuence or negative. So I
would say predisposed by
environment—not genetics.
Candice Black: I do
think some people have
preconceived notions about
how different races are.
There too many stereotypes.
I think people need to
set themselves above the
stereotypes so that they
can view us as law abiding
citizens The training and
upbringing we give our
young will erase these
notions.
Devin Hairston: I believe
that it is not genetic but it
has more to do with the
environment and where the
kids had grown in. Some
kids are more prone to crime
due to the communities
and living arrangements
that they lived in. Some
live in poor communities
where crime rates are higher
than kids who live in more
affuent neighborhoods
where crime rates are low to
moderate.
Opinion
(See “Overdraft fees” p.9)
FROST Illustrated welcomes the views of our readers on a broad range of local,
national and international topics covered in its publication. We encourage the use
of our “Letters & Opinions ” page as a forum to air differences, agreements and
alternate views. WE DO NOT ACCEPT POETRY. Letters should be typed or written
legibly; preferably no more than 250 words in length and limited to one subject.
Address letters to: Letters to the Editor, FROST Illustrated®, 3121 S. Calhoun St., Fort
Wayne, IN 46807; or e-mail us at frostviews@aol.com. Please include your name,
address and phone numbers for verifcation. We will edit for grammar and spelling
and we reserve the right to shorten letters and reject those deemed unsuitable for
publication for libelous.
Consumer news
Economic Freedom Riders:
Boycotters missed opportunity
James
Clingman
BlaCkonomiCS
By Charlene Crowell
NNPA Columnist
A new report by the Consum-
er Financial Protection Bureau
(CFPB) fnds that overdraft fees
continue to pose high risks to con-
sumers, despite recent regulatory
changes. The report focuses on the
dreaded overdraft charge, the fees
banks and credit unions collect for
covering customer transactions
that exceed checking account bal-
ances.
Sounds simple; but many times
the terms that accompany these
fees are complex, and too often
the costs are out of proportion to
the overdrawn amount. Variations
in how transactions are posted to
checking accounts and limits or
the lack thereof on the number of
fees allowed in a single day can be
confusing and harmful to consum-
ers. Even though practices vary
among institutions, one thing is
consistent: consumers lose tens of
billion to overdraft fees every year.
For customers with only mar-
ginal bank balances, the costs
incurred by overdraft fees can
remove available funds for other
household needs.
“What is marketed as overdraft
protection can, in some instances
put consumers at greater risk of
harm,” said CFPB’s Richard Cor-
dray. “Consumers need to be able
to control their costs and expenses,
and they deserve clarity on those
issues.”
The CFPB found that overdraft
fees on debit card and ATM trans-
actions in particular are associated
with higher rates of involuntary
account closure. As a result, the
affected consumers become less
able to open a checking account at
another institution.
The new CFPB report follows a
2010 rule by the Federal Reserve
that required fnancial institutions
for the frst time to secure cus-
tomer approval before enrollment
in overdraft coverage for debit and
ATM transactions. Wide variations
in the number of “opt-ins” by insti-
tutions indicate that some are more
aggressive than others in obtaining
consent forms from their custom-
ers.
Following the announcement of
the 2010 rule, the Center for Re-
sponsible Lending (CRL) noted
that the rule did not address clear
abuses that customers experience
once they are enrolled, including
the exorbitant cost of debit card
overdraft coverage or re-ordering
Overdraft fees still problem

FROST Illustrated • June 26 - July 2, 2013
5 www.frostillustrated.com
Generations ago, retirement
was thought of as a time to take it
easy—a time of rocking on porch
chairs and reminiscing about the
good old days. But, that’s not
the case with the cur-
rent generation of retir-
ees. In fact, many older
people today continue
to rock on. Just look at
some of the superstars
touring and performing
concerts this year who
are old enough to collect
Social Security retire-
ment payments. They’re
still rocking, but not in
chairs.
Bob Dylan is on tour,
as he usually is dur-
ing summer months. Dylan is 71
years old. But with a recent album
and new tour dates, you’d never
know he was of retirement age.
Neil Young is touring with
Crazy Horse to support their new
album. The “godfather of grunge”
is 67 years young. He’s become
the “Old Man” he sang about in
his Harvest days.
Paul McCartney’s current “Out
There” tour may more appropri-
ately be called his “Up There”
tour. The former Beatle is now
age 70.
Willie Nelson is “On the Road
Again.” The music icon is 79
years old and seems to be on non-
stop tour.
Aretha Franklin is 71. Carlos
Santana is 65. Carly Simon is 67.
Mick Jagger and Keith Richards
are both 69, as is Joni Mitchell.
Leonard Cohen is 78. B.B. King
is 87. They’re all still performing
their music.
Of course, some of these well-
known musicians may not be
eligible to receive Social Secu-
rity benefts. But, all of them are
of retirement age. So where are
their rocking chairs and knitting
needles?
It’s hard to believe, looking at
all of these mature stars, that re-
tirement used to be as-
sociated with bridge,
bid whist and checkers.
It’s not just musicians.
In fact, many people de-
cide to put off applying
for retirement benefts.
And even after they do
begin collecting ben-
efts, many “retirees”
prefer to keep working
— or at least moving
and shaking.
Most people know
that you can begin col-
lecting early Social Security ben-
efts at age 62, with a reduction
in the monthly amount. The full
retirement age is gradually go-
ing up from 66 for people born
between 1943 and 1954, to 67
for people born in 1960 and later.
You can delay retirement even
further and receive a higher pay-
ment when you retire, up until
you reach age 70. And another
thing that has changed since the
past generation: you can continue
to work and still receive retire-
ment benefts.
Learn more about Social Secu-
rity retirement benefts by read-
ing our publication on the subject
at www.socialsecurity.gov/pubs.
When you’re ready to retire,
the best place to apply is from the
comfort of your home computer,
with some of your favorite music
blaring in the background. Begin
the process with our Retirement
Planner at www.socialsecurity.
gov/retirement. Crank up the
tunes, and start planning before
you head out to your next con-
cert.
Chuck Stovall
SoCial
SeCurity
oPInIon
Consumer News
Rocking retirement
(See “Deas” p.9)
(See “Stovall” p.9)
Want to live better on the money you already make? Visit www.stretcher.com to
fnd hundreds of articles to help you stretch your day and your dollar!
dollar StretCher tipS Copyright © 2012 dollar Stretcher inc.
Being prepared
i keep an emergency preparedness kit in my car and a flled backpack
at our front door. Tornadoes seem to be our highest natural threat where
we live, so i just recently set up another emergency preparedness kit in
the basement closet as that would be our safe room to retreat to in such
an emergency.
each emergency kit is different. For instance, the car kit contains a
compass, the front door kit is set up for evacuation, and the basement kit
contains an old cell phone for calling 911. i check my kits twice a year to
update, add, delete, and recharge the old cell phones.
Being a little more prepared is a good feeling, and it does not require
a lot of extra cash to set up a kit. Backpacks seem to be the easiest to
handle in an emergency, as they can be carried across shoulders, leaving
hands free. Plastic zipper bags work great for water-proofng supplies,
and when supplies are organized in clear bags, it is much easier to see the
contents in an emergency. inexpensive backpacks can be found at thrift
stores almost every day of the week.—Saga
When I was a kid, law offcers,
peace offcers and policemen were
referred to as cops or coppers by
the bad guys. It was the coppers
against the gangsters. In
the local movies, I would
sit on the edge of my seat
watching the good cops
take out the bad guys.
From this experience, I
wanted to become a cop
even though many of my
good friends became good
cops such as Ben Ward,
the frst black commis-
sioner of the NYC police
department. Others such
as Benny Foster, Clyde
Crab, Ed Bailey, Jimmy
Campbell, the Payne brothers, Al-
vin Canty and my good friend Ed-
gar Steibel followed suit. In fact,
I wanted to become an FBI agent,
also. That’s neither here nor there.
However, I wanted to be someone
who could protect the folks in the
’hood. I wanted to get even with
the guys that caused havoc to law
abiding youth.
In my area of Brooklyn, there
were many gangs, which were
hostile to one another. I had to be
aware of all gangs and there ter-
ritories. Well, with quick eyes and
feet, I was able to survive but many
of my friends didn’t. Some were
killed and that’s no joke. They
were killed not by cops but by
gang members. Out of this experi-
ence many of my friends became
good cops and rose high in the po-
lice department. In fact, we need
more black cops today to protect
our neighborhoods. My
cousin Sam, with whom I
hung out, was a great cop
and patrolled 125
th
Street
in Harlem like he owned
it. He was known by ev-
eryone and harassed no
one. Sam protected me as
a kid from neighborhood
bullies. We lived in the
same house on Halsey
Street in Brooklyn and
went to P.S. 70 and P.S.
26. Through the years, he
became a great police-
man and I became a doctor.
Now today, I want to enlighten
you about another good cop known
as the trace element called copper.
This is the metal that you may see
turning green on your drainpipes
lining the roofs of homes or even
on the bottom of frying pans, etc.
This metal can be a good copper or
a bad copper according to its con-
centration in your blood. Copper is
found in foods such as sunfower
seeds, which I love, pecans, corn
germ, oysters, calves liver, beef
liver, lobster, walnuts, crab meat
and good old dark chocolate.
The body is capable of maintain-
ing a certain level of copper in the
body to do what it has to do to keep
healthy. If copper becomes elevat-
ed due to poor excretion or excess
intake, it causes a disease known as
Wilson’s disease, which is the ac-
cumulation of copper in the body
tissue including the brain, causing
deterioration of mental functions.
This condition can cause destruc-
tion of the liver and neurological
system leading to seizures.
Excess copper can be deposited
in the eye as a band surrounding
the cornea and is known as the
Kayser-Fleisher Ring, named af-
ter two scientists who recognized
the signifcance of this fnding.
High cholesterol is not the only
cause of ischemic heart disease.
It has been recently reported that
eating too much fructose, which
is a sugar found abundantly in the
form of corn syrup, soft drinks,
desserts, ice cream and other pro-
cessed foods can reduce copper
in the body which ultimately can
cause ischemic heart disease. In
fact, recently, Dr. Leslie Klevay of
the U.S.D.A. claimed that reduced
copper is the major cause of coro-
nary artery disease. Just recently
another study also showed that low
levels of copper may be the culprit
in causing coronary artery disease
leading to heart attacks. It has been
suggested that the level of serum
copper should be evaluated in all
patients on high fructose diets.
My suggestion in closing is to
gerald W.
deas, m.d.mph
houSe CallS
Bad coppers, good coppers
Pantone Blue 072 CVU
TM
$16.00 Adults - $11.00 Seniors & Students - $6.00 Children 12 & under
Tickets can be purchased at Arts United Center Box Office - 260-422-4226
Arts United Center
303 E MAIN ST., FORT WAYNE, IN 46802
A TRIBUTE TO MICHAEL JACKSON & WHITNEY HOUSTON
FEATURING The World Champion Voices of Unity Youth Choir Directed by Marshall White
Saturday, June 29, 2013 @ 2:00PM & 7:30PM
U N I T Y P E R F O R M I N G A R T S F O U N D A T I O N P R E S E N T S
CHICAGO L.A.
Wrigley
FIELD
6
FROST Illustrated •June 26 - July 2, 2013 www.frostillustrated.com
Jerrell’s Barber Shop
(260) 456-8994
Strutables Nail & Hair Salon
(260) 456-1721
A professional & welcoming environment
2104 S. CLINTON ST., FORT WAYNE
Booths available, contact Jerrell: (260) 804-3617
Whatz up, babies? You already know, that from time to
time, we’re going to replace my column for a week to bring
you another specialty page and that week is now—yahoo!—
because i want to bring to you even more joy, love, happiness
and some form of peace of mind as we travel together on
our journey of love that‘s flled with beauty. And, i need
you to know, i tried so very hard to have this page totally
full for you with the businesses within the beauty and
fashion industry but it didn’t happen, for whatever reason.
But anyway, that’s not important. What’s important is the
businesses that are on this page.
So once again it pleases me to present to you your very
own Beauty Page. That’s right, it’s for all of you babies all of
our thousands, and thousands and thousands and thousands
and etc., Frost illustrated newspaper readers and Frost
Website viewers. So gaze and delight upon its beauty and
the businesses within the beauty and fashion industry that
want you to know that they are there for you so you don’t
have to waste your time guessing anymore who appreciates
your business and i hope that all of you feel as special as
you truly are, to me.
The importance of beauty, as some say, is that beauty is
in the eye of the beholder. And, i think that’s true because
everyday when i leave home on our journey of love, i can
see the outward beauty in so many of you and i love it. i
love the way some of you men look so well groomed. And,
to the ladies, what can i say? When you’re out and about
especially out on the town i love seeing the variety of your
hairstyles, fngernails and attire. it makes me feel like all of
you are models in a fashion show and i’m in the audience
watching and enjoying the beauty. High fve to all of your
barbers and beauticians for doing a fantastic job.
Now i’m taking it upon myself to ask some of our readers
what do they think about the Beauty Page that’s brought to
you in Frost illustrated and this is what they had to say:
“My name is Jovan and I think that the beauty page is a
good idea because not only does it help people know where
they can go to get beautiful it also gives the community
a good feeling because you’ll care and that’s what’s
happening.”
“Hi, I’m Jacky and I’m also an African American and I
enjoy the beauty pages that’s in Frost Illustrated because
it shows me that all of those beauticians and barbers care
about us knowing who they are and I like that and that does
make me feel special.”
One fan, who wanted to remain unidentifed, said:
“Hi, Frost Illustrated readers. I think that having a
beauty page is very important because image is everything
and you want to give a good first impression. And, that’s
why it’s important to know the people within the beauty and
fashion industry so you’ll know where to go and the beauty
page let’s us know.”
So there you have it, Fort Wayne, surrounding cities and
the worldwide web viewers and on that note, enjoy and
Patronize!!!!
Arts & Culture
Ladies First
Quality Hair Care
TUESDAY-SATURDAY
Dawn Yoquelet Norfleet
Owner/Beautician
4102 Robinwood Dr • Ft Wayne
(260) 744-2645
Tara Owen • co-worker
Brought to you by
Up Close with Jeanie
JEANIE SUMMERVILLE
upclosewithjeanie@yahoo.com
3121 S. Calhoun St., Fort Wayne
(260) 745-0552
Optimistic’s
Enterprise Inc.
3415 Warsaw St. Fort Wayne
260-456-6610
• Full Service Beauty &
Barber Salon
•Serving your whole family
• Always Striving for
Excellence
Expanding the Vision
One Dream at a Time
PICTURED LEFT TO RIGHT (Sitting): Towanda, Celestine & Lorenzo;
(Standing): Brittanie, Avril, Punkin, Tequila (inset), KiKi & Jozet
JESSE& SONS
n~vnvv a nv~u:v snov
1401 S. hanna St. • (260) 422-5931
aynell
rofessional tylist
Hair Designs By *MrDarnell
Ccll: (260) 4107007
laccbook.com/
mrdarnclls.hairstylcs
"Looking Good Can Be Rewarding"
Providing TOP
Notch quilty cuts
3927 S.Calhoun St.
UP TOP Barbershop
We Sell STACY ADAMS SHOES,
HATS, ACCESSORIES & more
3230 S. Clinton St. • (260) 456-0877
Sylvester Davis General Mgr • slysfashion@gmail.com
His&Hers
B E A U T Y S A L O N
1108 E. Pontiac St. • (260) 456-2006
Your Beauty Page
A Celebration of Natural Hair by Michael July
Now Through
August 18
A photography exhibit featuring
portraits of individuals who
celebrate natural style.
Fort Wayne Museum of Art is
funded in part by Arts United
of Greater Fort Wayne.
Fort Wayne
Museum of Art
311 Main Street
Fort Wayne, IN 46802
www.fwmoa.org
260-422-6467
Admission
Free to members
$7 - adults
$5 - students (K-college)
$20 - families
Free admission every Thursday
5-8pm and Sunday 12-5pm
$7 - Special exhibition tickets
Hours
Tuesday - Saturday: 10am-6pm
Thursday: 10am-8pm
Sunday: 12-5pm

FROST Illustrated • June 26 - July 2, 2013
7 www.frostillustrated.com
(See full list on back page)
1717 South Calhoun Street
Fort Wayne, IN 46802
Now Accept i ng New Pat i ents!
Medical ● Dental ● WIC
260-458-2641
www.nhci.org
Boys & Girls Clubs of Fort Wayne
2609 Fairfield Avenue
(260) 744-0998 • www.bgcfw.org
‘Evening of Art’ for Juneteenth
> See more photos at www.frostillustrated.com
Weisser Park Youth Center kicked off their Juneteenth celebration with artistic presentations from many
talented acts. Juneteenth is an African American holiday, inspired by June 19, 1865 when slaves being
held in Texas first found that they had been freed—some 18 months after the Jan. 1, 1863 date when
President Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation officially became effective. Since the initial
celebration in Texas in the 19
th
century, the date has come to be celebrated in black communities across
the nation.
Short fiction from
michael patterson
managing editor of frost
Coming aug. 1 from
Strange, Weird & Wonderful publishing
www.strangeweirdandwonderful.com
The Akoma Dance Crew puts on a live dance for people attending the Juneteenth celebration at Weisser
Park Youth Center. (Photos: Andy Kurzen)
Diane Rogers introduces the
Omayato Dance group.
Ms Z emcees the event.
The Dono Ntoaso Percussion Theater Dance group moves to a traditional
African rhythm.
Young poets Kemit Oladuwa
(above) and Aric Curry (below)
deliver original works of spoken
word poetry.
The Nellems, Patterson, Sanders & Steele quartet plays an “acid jazz”
number for the croud.
& see us
next door at
Turn’N
Headz II!
8
FROST Illustrated •June 26 - July 2, 2013 www.frostillustrated.com
Roommate’s boyfriend
wrecked my car
Dear Gwendolyn: Last year, I moved off-campus and took in
a roommate. After two months, my roommate moved in her boy-
friend without discussing it with me. We had been friends since
middle school. I had no idea she had changed. She drinks, does
drugs and steals not only my clothes, but also steals from depart-
ment stores.
I am up for a scholarship to graduate school in the east. One
night while I was sick in bed with the fu, my roommate’s boy-
friend went out in my car. He wrecked it and
now I owe tons of money because he was not
on my insurance.
Gwendolyn, how can I make him pay the ex-
penses incurred? I cannot afford an attorney.
—Ruth
Dear Ruth: Even if you could afford an at-
torney, you would only be throwing away your
money. Think about it. Have him prosecuted.
You also need to ask your roommate to leave.
This may mean you have to move back on
campus. You don’t want anything to jeopar-
dize your scholarship.
I know when you go east to graduate school,
you will need your car. But, don’t worry about
it. If the university has housing for graduate
students, live there. Then, soon look for an apartment off-cam-
pus. Living away from school is more of a graduate student’s
lifestyle. When seeking off-campus housing, get within walking
distance from school or take public transportation.
Ruth, your car incident is not the top issue. Clear your house
before you are involved in a drug bust. And remember, Ruth,
people do change and not always for the better. That’s why when
trying to become a success, friends (and sometimes family) are
few. I know you have heard the statement, “It’s lonely at the top.”
That is not true. There are people at the top and they all have
ambition, goals, and high character. But if you don’t hurry and
rid yourself from your roommate and her kind, making it to the
top—won’t be your concern.
Got a problem? Don’t solve it alone. Write to Gwendolyn Ba-
ines at: P. O. Box 10066, Raleigh, N.C. 27605-0066. To receive
a reply, send a self-addressed stamped envelope). Or email her
at: gwenbaines@hotmail.com and visit her website at: www.
gwenbaines.com.
gwendolyn
Baines
aSk
gWendolyn
horoSCope
ARIES—Anybody may occasionally have a week
when their energy feels low. Your natural good health
will see you through a possible down time if you
just go with the fow and let yourself relax. Rest if
you have the chance and you’ll feel like your wonder-
ful self in no time fat!
Soul Affirmation: I calm my emotions by forget-
ting about the past.
Lucky Numbers: 16, 28, 35
TAURUS—You are the center of attention this
week and while you’ll be very busy you’ll love every
moment. Enjoy your time in the spotlight! You may
want to indulge yourself with some emotional theat-
rics this week. Add up the costs and benefts before
acting out. If you can afford it go for it! If not count to
ten and smile, smile smile!
Soul Affirmation: All vibes are good, and good for
me this week!
Lucky Numbers: 3, 10, 34
GEMINI—Stay fexible this week especially
where a partner is concerned. While they may be
moody there’s no need for you to join them in their at-
titude unless you really, really want to! Stay positive
and go with the good vibrations that surround you.
Soul Affirmation: I exercise to lower tension this
week.
Lucky Numbers: 33, 45, 54
CANCER—Ding-dong! Destiny is at the door. Let
it in and enjoy the change of pace. You’ll be happy to
make a few adjustments for this most welcome guest.
Follow through on instincts and hunches!
Soul Affirmation: My spirit makes all things new.
Lucky Numbers: 38, 41, 55
LEO—Stay on course with your current decisions
and dreams . You may doubt your progress this week
but you really are moving toward a better tomorrow
with your determined attitude.
Soul Affirmation: I enlarge my happiness by for-
getting about myself this week.
Lucky Numbers: 20, 27, 32
VIRGO—You feel great! Your shining spirit at-
tracts many seekers this week so let your best wisest
self answer questions that are put to you by those who
want advice. You’ll smooth over a sticky situation at
work with ease.
Soul Affirmation: Distant love is sometimes
sweeter.
Lucky Numbers: 12, 24, 36
LIBRA—Busy week. You’ll want to get up with
the birdies and you may even want to whistle a happy
little tune. You’ll be very much in demand for your
expertise and positive attitude. Way to go!
Soul Affirmation: I enjoy the act of adoring.
Lucky Numbers: 11, 16, 18
SCORPIO—Happiness arrives and sits on your
shoulder like a bright butterfy this week. A relation-
ship can make signifcant progress if you stay open to
love. Keep your evening free for romance in a social
setting.
Soul Affirmation: I give thanks for who I am this
week.
Lucky Numbers: 5, 26, 49
SAGITTARIUS—Take charge of a project at work
and get it fnished up. It’s been languishing on some-
one else’s shoulders and desk for way too long. A sen-
sible outlook will get you far this week.
Soul Affirmation: My hunches work well for me
this week.
Lucky Numbers: 17, 32, 48
CAPRICORN—You may fnd yourself faced with
many distractions this week but you’ll sail through and
accomplish much if you stay focused on each task and
take them one at a time. You know you can do it this
evening.
Soul Affirmation: Money opens doors for friend-
ship to enter.
Lucky Numbers: 13, 32, 44
AQUARIUS—Creativity is favored and yours
is especially favored with some project that you’ve
been working especially hard on. For the next few
days watch for a romance that will bring special gifts.
Soul Affirmation: I care deeply about the feelings
of others.
Lucky Numbers: 14, 19, 29
PISCES—Your new ideas combine well with your
will and skill. You get a lot done at work this week. Be
soft and forceful. Make time for family life tonight.
Your rewards come from those who are related to you
by blood.
Soul Affirmation: I let positive emotions carry me
through the week.
Lucky Numbers: 6, 22, 31
STAY IN THE KNOW—SUBSCRIBE TO
ONLY $30.00 FOR ONE YEAR
6 Month Subscription—$20.00
$35 PER YEAR OUTSIDE OF FORT WAYNE
6 Month Subscription—$25.00
3121 S. Calhoun St. • Fort Wayne, IN 46807
Yes, I would like a one year subscription to FROST Illustrated newspaper.
I am enclosing a check or money order in the amount of $______________.
Name______________________________________________________________
Address____________________________________________________________
City__________________________________ State__________ Zip___________
E-Mail Address_______________________________________________________
Telephone Number_____________________________ Date___________________
NON-REFUNDABLE AFTER TWO WEEKS
SUBSCRIPTIONS MUST BE PAID IN ADVANCE
To subscribe using a credit card or for questions, call (260) 745-0552.
To subscribe using a Visa, Mastercard or Discover card, or for questions, call (260) 745-0552
Entertainment
Top 20 Top 20
21st Century 21st Century
R&B Soul R&B Soul
The Reel Soul The Reel Soul
Frank-o Smooth • 614-829-3248 • Columbus, Ohio
www.myspace.com/21stcenturysoul
Now Playing: 7.5 million listeners,52 broadcasting stations and 29 internet stations,
www.myspace.com/21stcenturysoul, www.jamsource.net, www.moshows.com, www.zydecoevents.com,
www.frostillustrated.com, www.ning.com/franko_smooth, www.souldandbluesreport.com, www.bluescritic.com,
boogiesmusicreporters.ing.com/profile/FrankJohnson and Saturdays at 10 a.m. dr-love.com click on southern soul
on the Tom Davis show airing out of ATL
The Frank-O Smooth Soul Show can be heard on the following stations: WAPZ, We-
tumpka, Ala.; KAKJ, West Helena, Ark.; KCLT, West Helena, Ark.; WPRL, Lorman, Miss.;
WNBN, Meridian, Miss.; WTYJ, Natchez, Miss.; KTLR, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; WFSK,
Antioch, Tenn.; WJAK, Jackson, Tenn.; KGOT, Dallas, Texas; WMGJ, Gadsenden, Ala.;
KALA, Rock Island, Ill.; WPMD, Long Beach, Calif.; WGNG/WGNL, Greenwood, Miss.;
WQMA, Marks, Miss.; WROX AM-FM, Clarksdale, Miss.; VOL, Boston, Mass.; WUFO, Buf-
falo, NY; WZZA, Tuscumbia, Ala.; KHITS, Los Angeles; KTLZ, Los Angeles; WMPD, Cer-
ritos, Calif.; and WLTS, Cleveland, Ohio. *Because of Privacy Act, not all stations are listed.
The Frank-O Smooth Show is a radio advertising promotional service. The Original
Checkmates Ltd Unreleased @ www.youtube.com/drfrankosmooth
R&B SOUL DOZEN
1. Monica.....Everything To Me
2. Bruno Mars........Grenade
3. Carl Marshall.....Let's Step
4. Nelly.....Just A Dream
5. Frank-o....Sexy Feeling
6. Patrick Green..... Rated PG
7. O.B. Buchana....That Thang Thang
8. Magi 9......Sweet And Sexy
9. Roy Roberts....A Woman Needs Love
10. James Jr./Kurtis Blow/Terry Troutman....Girl Like You
11. Uvee Hayes Feat. Otis Clay.....Steal Away To The Hide Away
12. Donnie Ray.....It's B.Y.O.B.
21st Century R&B Soul
(Reel 2 Reel Soul) Top 20
1. Cee-Lo Green..... Forget You
2. Carl Sims....Just One Night
3. Carl Marshall.....Let's Step
4. Floyd Taylor.....All Of You All Of Me
5. Monica Feat. Ludacris........Still Standing
6. Joe B. Cutchings Jr......I'm To Tired Too Cheat
7. Patrick Green......Rated PG
8. Frank-o........Sexy Feeling
9. Ms. Jody........The Jody Juke
10. Magi 9......Sweet And Sexy
11. Queen Emiley......No Way To Say Goodbye
12. Sheba "Potts" Wright/Ms. Jody....You Did Your Job Right
13. LaRome Powers......Knocking
14. Chuck Roberson......Gonna Make My Move On You
15. Roy Roberts....A Woman Needs Love
16. Uvee Hayes Feat. Otis Clay.....Steal Away To The Hide Away
17. Nelly....Just A Dream
18. Roy Roberts....Hey Baby
19. Stephanie Pickett....I'm Taking My Man Back
20. Bruno Mars.....Grenade
Contemporary/Traditional Gospel
1. Blood Brothers.........Lord Help Me
2. Lori Jones.....Thank's Giving
3. BeBe & CeCe Winans..... I Found Love
4. Kenny Reese.... Stormy Weather
5. James Sneed.....Praise the Lord
6. David Austin.......Loving Him
7. Stanley Straube... A Touch of Life
8. Carol Lockridge....Jesus Is
9. Patricia Conroy........God Speed
10. Frank-o.....By His Strife
DJ Night Train
Record Pool & Street Team Promotions
7107 Hickory Creek Dr., B-1
Ft. Wayne, IN 46809
260.241.7001
kennyreese2001@yahoo.com
Kenny Reese
From the Frank-O Smooth Soul Show
TOP 10
21st Century R&B Soul
Reel Soul
1. Roy Roberts....A Woman Needs Love
2. Stephanie Pickett....I'm Taking My Man Back
3. Frank-o...Sexy Feeling
4. Patrick Green...... Rated PG
5. Ms. Jody........The Jody Juke
6. Magi 9.....Sweet And Sexy
7. Carol Lockridge.......You're So Special To Me
8. Nelly....Just A Dream
9. Joe B. Cutchings Jr......I'm To Tired Too Cheat
10. Uvee Hayes Feat. Otis Clay.....Steal Away To The Hide Away
Frank-O
Johnson
PSR Radio Network
Frank-O Smooth Show
PSR Radio Network
Frank-O Smooth Show
#1 REPORTERS FOR 11 YEARS
614.829.3248 • Columbus, OH
The Frank-o Smooth Soul Showis a radio advertising
promotional service. The Original Checkmates Ltd
Unreleased @ www.youtube.com/drfrankosmooth
Listeners 52 BROADCASTING STATIONS
& 29 INTERNET STATIONS
www.myspace.com/21stcenturysoul
www.youtube.com/drfrankosmooth
www.jamsource.net • www.moshows.com
www.dr-love.com • www.zydecoevents.com
www.soulandbluesreport.com
www.bluescritic.com
www.boogiesmusicreporters.ning.com/profle/boogie
www.boogiesmusicreporters.ning.com/profle/
FrankJohnson
The Frank-O Smooth Soul Show can be heard on the
following stations: WAPZ, Wetumpka, Ala. • KAKJ,
West Helena, Ark. • KCLT, West Helena, Ark. • WPRL,
Lorman, Miss. • WNBN, Meridian, Miss. • WTYJ,
Natchez, Miss. • KTLR, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma •
WFSK, Antioch,Tenn. • WJAK, Jackson, Tenn. • KGOT,
Dallas, Texas • WMGJ, Gadsenden, Ala. • KALA, Rock
Island, Ill. • WPMD, Long Beach, Calif. • WGNG/WGNL,
Greenwood, Miss. • WQMA, Marks, Miss. • WROX
AM-FM, Clarksdale, Miss. • VOL, Boston • WUFO,
Bufalo, NY • WZZA, Tuscumbia, Ala. • KHITS, Los
Angeles • KTLZ, Los Angeles • WMPD, Cerritos, Calif. •
and WLTS, Cleveland. *BECAUSE OF PRIVACY ACT ALL
STATIONS NOT LISTED*
Contemporary/Traditional Gospel
1. Jim Perking....God’s Love
2. Charlie Samson.....Take It Of Lord
3. Frank-o......Heavenly Father
4. Jake Roberson.....Love
5. Benny Love....Help Me God
6. Mickey Jones....Priest Hood(levi)
7. The Heaven Gate....Say God Loves Me
8. Roy C.......Let’s Go Back To God
9. James Pad....Holy One
10. Big - O.....Help
R&B Soul Dozen
1. Mr. Zay....Get The Hell On
2. Gregg A. Smith....Time To Go To Work
3. JT Watkins....Bartender Blues
4. EL Willie.....Man On A Mission
5. Tommie Leveal....Here We Go
6. Sheba Potts Wright....Can’t Get You Of My Mind
7. Floyd Taylor....Cut To The Chase
8. Luther Lackey....Man Up To It
9. O.B. Buchana....Can’t Get You Of My Mind
10. Ms. Jody.....Weekend Loving
11. Frank-o.....Only Time Will Tell
12. Tommie Leveal....Midnight Love Afair
21st Century R&B Soul
(Reel 2 Reel Soul) Top 20
1. Charles Wilson....Change It Up
2. Magi 9......Sweet And Sexy
3. Mr. Zay....Get The Hell On
4. Tommie Leveal....Midnight Love Afair
5. Willie B.....She Made A Freak Out Of Me
6. EL Willie.....Man On A Mission
7. Jaye Hammer.....I’m In Love
8. Ms. Jody.....Weekend Loving
9. Donnie Ray....Southern Soul Blues Slide
10. Stepanie Pickett....My Love Is Guaranteed
11. LaRome Powers....Knocking
12. RB & Company......Hey Baby
13. O.B. Buchana....Can’t Get You Of My Mind
14. Frank-o......Ruby Red Ring
15. Tommie Leveal....Here We Go
16. Randy “Wild Man”Brown....Cold Weather
17. Sonny Mack....Sit Her On The Table
18. Kelly Rowland/Lil Wayne....Motivation
19. Floyd Taylor....Cut To The Chase
20. Jim Peeler....Stop Me
DJ Night Train • Kenny Reese from the
Frank-O Smooth Soul Show
Record Pool & Street Team Promotions
7107 Hickory Creek Dr., B-1
Ft. Wayne, IN 46809
260.241.7001
kennyreese2001@yahoo.com
TOP 10
21st Century R&B
Soul Reel Soul
1. Tommie Leveal....Here We Go
2. Carl Marshall....Just Blues
3. Carl Sims....Hell On My Heels
4. Mr. Zay....Get The Hell On
5. Tommie Leveal...Midnight Love Afair
6. Frank-o....H-U-R-T
7. Randy “Wild Man”Brown....Cold Weather
8. Ms. Jody.....Weekend Loving
9. Jaye Hammer....I’m In Love
10.T.J. Hooker Taylor....Your Babies Need A Daddy
Top 20 Top 20
21st Century 21st Century
R&B Soul R&B Soul
The Reel Soul The Reel Soul
Frank-o Smooth • 614-829-3248 • Columbus, Ohio
www.myspace.com/21stcenturysoul
Now Playing: 7.5 million listeners,52 broadcasting stations and 29 internet stations,
www.myspace.com/21stcenturysoul, www.jamsource.net, www.moshows.com, www.zydecoevents.com,
www.frostillustrated.com, www.ning.com/franko_smooth, www.souldandbluesreport.com, www.bluescritic.com,
boogiesmusicreporters.ing.com/profile/FrankJohnson and Saturdays at 10 a.m. dr-love.com click on southern soul
on the Tom Davis show airing out of ATL
The Frank-O Smooth Soul Show can be heard on the following stations: WAPZ, We-
tumpka, Ala.; KAKJ, West Helena, Ark.; KCLT, West Helena, Ark.; WPRL, Lorman, Miss.;
WNBN, Meridian, Miss.; WTYJ, Natchez, Miss.; KTLR, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; WFSK,
Antioch, Tenn.; WJAK, Jackson, Tenn.; KGOT, Dallas, Texas; WMGJ, Gadsenden, Ala.;
KALA, Rock Island, Ill.; WPMD, Long Beach, Calif.; WGNG/WGNL, Greenwood, Miss.;
WQMA, Marks, Miss.; WROX AM-FM, Clarksdale, Miss.; VOL, Boston, Mass.; WUFO, Buf-
falo, NY; WZZA, Tuscumbia, Ala.; KHITS, Los Angeles; KTLZ, Los Angeles; WMPD, Cer-
ritos, Calif.; and WLTS, Cleveland, Ohio. *Because of Privacy Act, not all stations are listed.
The Frank-O Smooth Show is a radio advertising promotional service. The Original
Checkmates Ltd Unreleased @ www.youtube.com/drfrankosmooth
R&B SOUL DOZEN
1. Monica.....Everything To Me
2. Bruno Mars........Grenade
3. Carl Marshall.....Let's Step
4. Nelly.....Just A Dream
5. Frank-o....Sexy Feeling
6. Patrick Green..... Rated PG
7. O.B. Buchana....That Thang Thang
8. Magi 9......Sweet And Sexy
9. Roy Roberts....A Woman Needs Love
10. James Jr./Kurtis Blow/Terry Troutman....Girl Like You
11. Uvee Hayes Feat. Otis Clay.....Steal Away To The Hide Away
12. Donnie Ray.....It's B.Y.O.B.
21st Century R&B Soul
(Reel 2 Reel Soul) Top 20
1. Cee-Lo Green..... Forget You
2. Carl Sims....Just One Night
3. Carl Marshall.....Let's Step
4. Floyd Taylor.....All Of You All Of Me
5. Monica Feat. Ludacris........Still Standing
6. Joe B. Cutchings Jr......I'm To Tired Too Cheat
7. Patrick Green......Rated PG
8. Frank-o........Sexy Feeling
9. Ms. Jody........The Jody Juke
10. Magi 9......Sweet And Sexy
11. Queen Emiley......No Way To Say Goodbye
12. Sheba "Potts" Wright/Ms. Jody....You Did Your Job Right
13. LaRome Powers......Knocking
14. Chuck Roberson......Gonna Make My Move On You
15. Roy Roberts....A Woman Needs Love
16. Uvee Hayes Feat. Otis Clay.....Steal Away To The Hide Away
17. Nelly....Just A Dream
18. Roy Roberts....Hey Baby
19. Stephanie Pickett....I'm Taking My Man Back
20. Bruno Mars.....Grenade
Contemporary/Traditional Gospel
1. Blood Brothers.........Lord Help Me
2. Lori Jones.....Thank's Giving
3. BeBe & CeCe Winans..... I Found Love
4. Kenny Reese.... Stormy Weather
5. James Sneed.....Praise the Lord
6. David Austin.......Loving Him
7. Stanley Straube... A Touch of Life
8. Carol Lockridge....Jesus Is
9. Patricia Conroy........God Speed
10. Frank-o.....By His Strife
DJ Night Train
Record Pool & Street Team Promotions
7107 Hickory Creek Dr., B-1
Ft. Wayne, IN 46809
260.241.7001
kennyreese2001@yahoo.com
Kenny Reese
From the Frank-O Smooth Soul Show
TOP 10
21st Century R&B Soul
Reel Soul
1. Roy Roberts....A Woman Needs Love
2. Stephanie Pickett....I'm Taking My Man Back
3. Frank-o...Sexy Feeling
4. Patrick Green...... Rated PG
5. Ms. Jody........The Jody Juke
6. Magi 9.....Sweet And Sexy
7. Carol Lockridge.......You're So Special To Me
8. Nelly....Just A Dream
9. Joe B. Cutchings Jr......I'm To Tired Too Cheat
10. Uvee Hayes Feat. Otis Clay.....Steal Away To The Hide Away
Frank-O
Johnson
PSR Radio Network
Frank-O Smooth Show
‘Dear White People’ film
explores racial identity
By Admiria Cooper
Special to Frost Illustrated
The new movie Dear White People has everybody talking and it’s not even
in theaters. African American director, writer and producer Justin Simiens
states that with this new flm he hopes to “explore racial identity in ‘post
racial’ America” and “bring back” the movie styles of
movie directors such as Spike Lee.
Dear White People stars Sam, an African American
student who struggles with being “a black face in a very
white place.” She and the other members of the Black
Student Union are tired of the discrimination at their Ivy
League university and demand change. Sam decides to
create a radio show that addresses the white students and
faculty of the university, hence the movie’s title Dear
White People.
Simien’s flm, as you may guess, has sparked some
controversy. The controversy not only comes from some
whites who are offended by the subject but also from some blacks who are
offended by director Simien’s negative comments toward Tyler Perry. One of
the characters in the movie’s trailer states that Tyler Perry’s movies are “ste-
reotypes wrapped up in Christian dogma.” Simien himself stated, “I have no
desire to be the next Tyler Perry”. However, according to Simien the purpose
of his flm is not to criticize Tyler Perry, even though he continually talks
about Tyler Perry in the movie and in interviews. Simien states:
“From the time a person is born, televi-
(See “Film” p.9)
(Image: Courtesy dearwhitepeoplemovie.com)
SIMIENS

FROST Illustrated • June 26 - July 2, 2013
9 www.frostillustrated.com
sion, movies, cliques in school and
Abercrombie and Fitch ads sub-
tlety suggest to them on a subcon-
scious level who they should and
should not be due to their race,
gender, looks and sexual orienta-
tion (just to name a few). Identity
is a powerful concept. It can open
up potential and it can severely
limit it.”
He also states:
“When you grow up and you
don’t see stories that refect your
experience out there, it can make
life harder. It can make your ambi-
tions and your dreams that much
further out of reach, so to know
there’s a program that’s cultivating
diversity in the industry and feed-
ing the culture with these stories
that refect people in the culture, I
think that’s huge.”
With this flm Simien said he
hopes to put more black faces in
Hollywood that inspire blacks to
be and do something.
One major issue I see with
Simien’s argument is he states
that the African American “experi-
ence” isn’t presented on TV. How-
ever, every African American’s ex-
perience isn’t the same and many
people do relate to Tyler Perry’s
“Christian dogma.” I myself attend
a private school, so I may be able
to relate to his flm but not every-
one can—that’s why it’s important
to have multiple flm directors.
Also I feel that you can’t state
that one of the most famous and
successful African American di-
rectors in the world is terrible and
title a movie “Dear White People”
and not expect controversy. How-
ever, I am interested in watching
the flm since he is making it seem
amazing by comparing himself to
Spike Lee and by saying essential-
ly that he is better than Tyler Perry.
Unfortunately, as I previously stat-
ed the movie has not been released
so we will have to wait to see if the
movie lives up to his expectations.
The flm is still in the fund-rais-
ing stage, but you can go to www.
frostillustrated.com/category/vid-
eos/ to view a trailer.
Admiria Cooper is a graduat-
ing senior at Canterbury High
School in Fort Wayne, who served
as a student intern at Frost Illus-
trated this past month as part of
the Canterbury Senior Internship
Program. Cooper is scheduled to
attend Howard University—one of
the nation’s premier Historically
Black Colleges/Universities—in
the fall, majoring in communica-
tions.
Christ Temple, and that’s where
Jabron was laid to rest at in peace.
But, they want closure and we
do too because it’s a terrible and
senseless loss and the American
Legion Post 148 is very sorry
about the whole incident. That’s
not what we’re about.
“We anticipate people coming
out to enjoy themselves with us
and everything but it’s totally sad
and totally senseless that another
person took another person’s life
over something that’s meaningless
and our condolences go out to his
family. I know the family person-
ally and I’ve sat down with them
on numerous occasions and we’re
showing love to the family and the
family is showing love back and
they know that anything we can
do to appease this situation we’re
willing to do so.
“In order to ensure that this
doesn’t happen again there will
be more lighting outside, but the
lighting is really going to have to
come from the city because we’ve
got poles out here that we’ve been
on the city about getting this taken
care of but it hasn’t been done yet.
We’re also going to have more in-
frastructure around the building as
well and we’re going to really be
on top of security by increasing
it and we’re going to have roll-
ing patrols and we’re going to do
a lot and we’re on top of it. This
incident might have been a wake
up call, but we were on top of it
before but you just can’t predict
what happens.
“There should be no fear at all
for you to come back to this Le-
gion because we’re beefng up se-
curity and you’re well protected.
This was just one incident that
happened after we closed and it
happened in the parking lot, not
on the inside and the police and
everyone here that’s part of the
Legion knows exactly what hap-
pened because we have surveil-
lance cameras and everything else,
and you’re well protected and
safe here. I’ve been doing this for
the past eight years and we have
a good crew here. And, I have an
excellent board and maybe I didn’t
come out and speak my mind right
off the bat but that was because
I was kind of hesitant, as far as
making a statement about what
happened here, and I apologize
for that. But I was with the family
since the inception, so all I can say
now is that I’m making this state-
ment now only in Frost Illustrated.
“This is really one of the best
posts in the 4th District and we
have 32 post and we’re the only
minority post and we run 100 per-
cent on membership every year
and we donate thousands of dollars
to the community through scholar-
ships and different organizations
every year. We’re a viable fxture
in the community and we’re going
to be here. We made a stamp and
it’s signed, sealed and delivered.
“So far this year, Fort Wayne
has had 23 or 24 homicides and
this is just half of the year and
I think that from last year as a
whole we only had 30. And with
this number being what it is now,
they’re at a record breaking pace
and I don’t know what’s going on.
Whether it’s the gang activity but
these are young folks and I’m not
taking anything away from Jabron
because he’d come here and talk
with me about everything because
he was like a son or a nephew.
He was an excellent person and
he had good manners and at his
services he was well represented
and was well respected and well
liked in the community. So he’s
defnitely going to be missed, and
I miss him already and I know that
people grieve in various ways and
the American Legion Post 148 is
here for you, and if we need to do
something or establish something
for his children we can put that in
place. Because I would love to do
something for them even though
we’re limited in some aspects of
what we can do, but anything we
can do to help out the family just
contact us and let us know what
you want. Because we want him
to be remembered and like I said
that’s something senseless and
should not have happened anyway.
But we really want to be a part of
being a fxer or being the solution
and we’re on top of it.”
read labels on all of your foods
and drinks. If fructose appears as
the frst ingredient, you can bet it
is a major ingredient. Folks are
drinking too many sugary bever-
ages that are loaded with fructose.
Those gallons of fruit juices on the
store shelves may be more impor-
tant than the fat in the meat at the
butchers. The beverage industry
is part of the problem and is not
being monitored by our govern-
ment agencies. It’s time to police
yourself by restricting foods and
beverages that have high fructose
contents and I am sure your heart
disease will be prevented and ar-
rested. It is suggested that most
people get their vitamins and min-
erals needed by eating a balanced
diet, however diets in today’s
world are not balanced when fast
foods make up many meals.
For great health tips and access
to an online community of physi-
cians and other healthcare profes-
sionals visit DrDeas.com.
claim it for the good of you and
society and don’t be part of the
problem—become part of the
solution. I will tell you again, I
was once you. Change can hap-
pen and will happen. You have
to want it and show action and
not talk about it—be about it.
So, my words to you are “DO
SOMETHING.”
I hope that I didn’t offend
anyone. That was not my inten-
tion. But, I have to be aggres-
sive for GOD and capture souls
that are lost to Satan. GOD is
the foundation of LOVE. He
has no picks and chooses. He
loves no matter what. I hope my
outreach was heard. I’m yelling
for GOD.
Don’t make life hard on your-
self. Keep pushing forward and
have FAITH because it’s not
what you see, it is what you
don’t see is where FAITH re-
sides.
I LOVE YOU GUYS. I will
write again, GOD willing. I
will see you guys in six months.
Please pay it forward tell-
ing everyone to “stop painting
the city red.” Thank you! GOD
BLESS YOU ALL!
Mcgee
(Continued from page 2)
Overdraft fees
(Continued from page 4)
legiOn shOOting
(Continued from page 1)
deas
(Continued from page 5)
dOg bite
(Continued from page 3)
filM
(Continued from page 8)
Unity
(Continued from page 2)
Protect your face.
PREVENT YOUR DOG FROM BITING
• Avoid highly excitable games
like wrestling or tug-of-war.
• Use a leash in public to ensure
you are able to control your dog.
• Keep your dog healthy with
yearly vaccinations. How your
dog feels directly affects how it
behaves.
• Spay or neuter your pet. Al-
tered dogs are less likely to bite.
• Don’t chain your dog. Chain-
ing increases aggression in dogs.
• Socialize your dog or young
puppy, so it feels at ease around
people and other animals. Gradu-
ally expose your dog to a variety
of situations under controlled cir-
cumstances; continue that expo-
sure on a regular basis.
• Don’t allow your dog to be in
places where it might feel threat-
ened or be teased.
• Attend a dog training class.
The basic commands “sit,” “stay,”
“off,” and “come” can be incorpo-
rated into fun activities that build
a bond of obedience and trust be-
tween pets and people.
What Should I Do If My Dog
Bites Someone?
Even if the bite can be ex-
plained (e.g., someone stepped on
your dog’s tail), it’s important to
take responsibility for your dog’s
actions by taking these steps:
• Confne your dog away from
the scene of the bite.
• Check on the victim’s condi-
tion. Wash wounds with soap and
water. Professional medical ad-
vice should be sought.
• Report the bite. Call Fort
Wayne Animal Care & Control
inside the city and the sheriff’s
department in the county.
• Consult your veterinarian for
advice about dog behavior that
will help prevent similar prob-
lems in the future.
• If someone else’s dog bites
you, seek medical treatment, and
then call authorities with every-
thing you know about the dog to
help animal control offcers locate
the dog.
Dogs are wonderful com-
panions. By acting responsibly,
owners not only reduce dog bite
injuries, but also enhance the re-
lationship they have with their
dogs.
transactions to maximize
fees. And because the size
or frequency of the fees was
not addressed, fnancial insti-
tutions have the incentive to
secure as many opt-in forms
as possible.
Previous research by CRL
has found that:
• Most debit card transac-
tions that trigger overdrafts
are far smaller than the size
of the overdraft itself;
• Most consumers sur-
veyed would rather have
their debit card transaction
declined than have it covered
in exchange for an overdraft
fee;
• In 2008, Americans aged
55 and over paid $6.2 billion
in overdraft fees; Americans
aged 18-24 paid nearly $1.3
billion in overdraft fees.
CRL along with others
including Pew Charitable
Trusts, have also called for
banning institutions from
processing transactions from
the largest to smallest. This
change would diminish the
number of overdraft fees
charged and thereby free-up
consumer monies for other
items.
In reaction to the CFPB re-
port, CRL said, “We remain
concerned about fnancial
institutions that deliberately
trigger overdraft fees by re-
ordering daily transactions
from the highest to lowest,
often resulting in more fees
from customers. This de-
ceptive practice remains far
too common despite fueling
widespread litigation.… We
look forward to future stud-
ies by the CFPB that will
shed even more light on an
issue that affects millions of
Americans each year.”
Charlene Crowell is a
communications manager
with the Center for Respon-
sible Lending. She can be
reached at: Charlene.crow-
ell@responsiblelending.org.
20 zip codes and cities in both
Illinois and Ohio. UNITY has
become a place for all young
people, no matter their cultural,
racial, artistic, religious, social
or economic background. Late
last fall, UNITY was added to
the list of 10 funded partners
of Arts United of Greater Fort
Wayne. This honor has given
UNITY a high mark of legiti-
macy and has added credibility
to its cause.
White explained, “UNITY
belongs to the community and
is reaching out to the entire
community to join our cause to
help provide hope to the youth
in our community. Expanding
their lives includes giving them
exposure to opportunities and
experiences before they enter
college and adulthood that will
change their lives.”
Do business where you and your business are
respected. support the advertisers in
10
FROST Illustrated •June 26 - July 2, 2013 www.frostillustrated.com
Spiritual Matters
Obituaries
Marsha Leann Bright, 38, of
I ndi anapo-
lis, departed
this life on
Wednesday,
June 5, 2013.
She was born
on Aug. 9,
1974, in Fort
Wayne. Sur-
viving are
her mother, Debra Fields of Fort
Wayne; father, Marshall (Clau-
dia) Fields of Fort Wayne; sisters,
Zonitra (Alex) Brookshire of Fort
Wayne, Emoka Martin of Rich-
mond, Va., MaRetha Fields and
Mary Fields, both of Fort Wayne;
and a host of other relatives and
friends. She was preceded in death
by her son, Javonte Dequan Fields;
and daughter, Zamesha Dashay
Fields. Memorial services were
Monday, June 17 at Imani Baptist
Temple, 2929 Indiana Ave. Ar-
rangements were by Carmichael
Funeral Service.
Alvin C. Davis, 59, of Fort
W a y n e ,
passed on
T h u r s d a y,
June 13,
2013. Sur-
viving are
his daugh-
ter, Shmiria
L e S h o r e ;
b r o t h e r s ,
Sanders (Verlinda) Davis, Bryant
Davis, Deon (Danette) Davis, and
Alan (Demita) Wyatt, all of Fort
Wayne and of Indianapolis; sis-
ters, Shirlene (James) Stephens,
Kathy Davis, Carmela Davis,
Linda Davis, Janice Wyatt, and
Maebell Johnson; two grandsons;
and a host of other relatives. Fu-
neral services were Friday, June
21, 2013, at Kingdom Door Chris-
tian Worship Center, with burial in
Highland Park Cemetery. Arrange-
ments were by Carmichael Funeral
Service.
Kevin Randolp, 57, passed
away on Mon-
day, June 10,
2013. Servic-
es were Satur-
day, June 15,
2013, at New
Joshua Bap-
tist Church,
4202 Hessen
Cassel Road.
Arrangements were by Nelson
Memorial Gardens Inc.
Jabron Q. Totton, 37, departed
this life on Sunday, June 9, 2013.
Surviving are his mother, Merlene
Totton; daughters, Jahyra Lewis-
Totton and Rakiya Jackson-Totton;
brothers, Christopher and Goldie
(Bonnie) Tot-
ton; sisters,
Linda Mingo,
Phyllis, Te-
resa “Rita,”
Chana Totton,
Kivi Totton-
James, and
R a t o s h i a
Smith; and
long time companion, Rochelle
Jackson; along with a host of fami-
ly and friends. He was preceded in
death by his father, Willie Quinn;
two sisters, Brenda K. Malone and
Carolyn Ann Totton; and a sister-
in-law, Bobbie “Poochie” Totton.
Services were Monday, June 17,
2013, at Greater Christ Temple
Apostolic Church, 2940 S. An-
thony Blvd. Arrangements were
by Nelson Memorial Gardens Inc.
A Word from Jesus
“Hear me when I call, O
God of my righteousness:
thou hast enlarged me when
I was in distress; have mer-
cy upon me, and hear my
prayer.”
—Psalm 4:1
This week’s scripture as
chosen by Pastor Winston
Pearson of Jesus congrega-
tion, 406 W. Branning Ave.
Sabbath services conducted
at 8 p.m. Friday evenings
and 1 p.m. Saturday after-
noons. For more informa-
tion, call (260) 267-2937.
Abundant Love Church
2615 New Haven Ave. 46803 • 260-420-5683
Pastor Gary L. Bush Sr.
Calvary Third United Presbyterian
4700 S. Anthony Blvd. 46806 • (260) 456-4137
Christ Church of Faith
1702 McKinnie Ave. 46806 • 260-744-3175
Bishop Clarence Eldridge
The Church In Jesus Christ
3425 Winter St. 46806 • 260-744-3459
Pastor Donald D. Samuel
Come As You Are Community Church
7910 South Anthony Blvd. 46816 • 260-447-6036
Rev. Anthony Payton
Community Baptist Church
3032 Smith St. 46806 • 260-456-2545
Pastor Thayer Williamson
Destiny Dome @ Cathedral of Praise Int’l
3501 Harris Rd. 46808 • 260-471-9639
Apostle Dr. Oscar J. Underwood
Dupree Memorial COGIC
1231 Hayden St. 46803 • 260-426-4375
Pastor Lester A. Bush
East Chestnut Street Church ofChrist
3601 Chestnut St. 46803 • 260-426-5051
Rev. Randy Cole Sims, Sr.
Emmanuel Baptist Church
2340 Fairfeld Ave 46807 • 260-744-7000
Apostle Darence Smith
Fellowship Missionary Church
2536 E. Tillman Road 46816 • 260-447-3578
Pastor Dave DeSelm
1st Redeemed By the Blood Church
3130 New Haven Ave. 46803 • 260-422-5969
Dr. Hubert J. Coats
Freedom Worship Center
6011 Hessen Cassel Rd 46816 • 260-447-3959
Pastor Alice Kelsaw
Friendship Baptist Church
451 E. Douglas St. • 260-422-7672
Pastor Guy Willis
Good Hope Baptist Church
809 Elmrow Dr. 46806 • 260-744-3834
Rev. Timothy R. Williams
Grace Temple COGIC
2241 Smith St. 46803 • 260-456-8159
Pastor Paul Hayes
Greater Christ Temple Church
2940 Anthony Blvd. 46806 • 260-426-8200
Bishop E. C. Haywood
Greater Mt. Ararat Baptist Church
2111 Edsall Ave. 46803 • 260-424-2348
Rev. Ernest K. Starks
Greater Progressive Baptist Church
2215 John St. 46803
260-744-6235
Rev. Anthony R. Pettus Sr. & Lady Quila Pettus
www.greaterprogressivelive.com
Sunday Worship @ 7:30, 9:30 & 11:30 am
Sunday School & New Members @
9:15 & 11:15 am
Greater Spirit of Love COGIC
6116 S. Calhoun St. 46806 • 260-744-0074
Rev. Paul Taylor
Harvest Word of Life Ministries
2260 Lake Ave. 46805 • 260-422-5750
Bishop Malcolm Howell
House of Prayer/Higher Height Ministries
905 E. Washington Blvd. • 260-409-5922
Pastor Ugertha Smith-Tulip
Imani Baptist Temple
2920 Indiana Ave. 46807 • 260-755-0194
Rev. Bill McGill
Jerusalem Baptist Church
1151 Francis St. 46803 • 260-424-0933
Dr. Michael A. Grifn
Jesus
406 W. Branning Ave. 46807 • 260-267-2937
Pastor Winston Pearson
King’s Chapel Assembly
703 E. Jeferson Blvd. 46802 • 260-422-0946
Rev. Juan A. Sanchez
Kingdom Door Christian Worship Center
1004 E. Pontiac St. 46803 • 260-744-8412
Pastor Harold Johnson
Life Changing Ministries
437 W. Rudisill Blvd. 46807 • 260-744-3731
Pastor Jefrey Thomas
Lighthouse Deliverance Cathedral
1315 Hanna St. 46802 • 260-426-1652
Rev. Melvin Bolden
Love Church
1331 East Berry St. 46803 • 260-422-8961
Pastor Wallace Butts
Memorial Baptist Church
2900 North Anthony Blvd. 46805 • 260-483-3008
Rev. David Mitchell
Mt. Calvary Missionary Baptist Church
3506 Warsaw St. 46806 • 260-456-2821
Rev. Michael Nickleson
Mt. Olive Baptist Church
1025 E. Creighton St. 46803 • 260-744-1841
Pastor J.W. Kizer
New Beginnings Church
2601 S. Hanna St. 46803 • 260-267-6427
Rev. Carlton A. Lynch
New Covenant Worship Center
3701 S. Calhoun St. 46807 • 260-744-0914
Senior Pastor Luther Whitfeld
New Horizon Baptist Church
2601 Alma Ave. 46809 • 260-478-5800
Rev. Cedric Cheatham
New Jerusalem Charismatic Orthodox Church
3902 S. Wayne Ave. 46807 • 260-456-5950
Bishop George C. McCowan, D. Div.
New Jerusalem COGIC
124 E. Pontiac St. 46803 • 260-447-9268
Pastor W.W. Tolbert Jr.
New Joshua Missionary Baptist Church
4202 Hessen Cassel Rd. 46806 • 260-387-6384
Prophet Cedric Lee Walker Sr.
New Life Church of God
1201 McKee St. 46806 • 260-744-2756
Pastor Stephen L. Terry
New Zion Tabernacle
1835 Spring St. 46808 • 260-424-9466
Dr. Crystal Bush
Old Landmark COGIC
6303 S. Anthony St.
Dr. Elton Amos
Providence Missionary Baptist Church
2317 Holton Ave, 46803 • 260-744-2958
Pilgrim Baptist Church
1331 Gay St. 46803 • 260-424-5416
Dr. Rev. Sam Shade Jr.
Providence Missionary Baptist Church
2317 Holton Ave. 46803 • 260-744-2958
Rev. McKissack Richmond III
Renaissance Baptist Church
5515 S. Hanna St., 46806 • 260 744-9600
Rev. Michael Latham Sr.
Restoration Center Church of God in Christ
5522 McClellan St. 46807 • 260-745-8075
Pastor Michael A. Payton Sr.
St. Augustine Lutheran Church
3316 S. Calhoun St. 46807 • 260-797-3412
Reverend Dr. Yared Halche
St. John Missionary Baptist Church
2421 Hanna St. 46803 • 260-456-8395
Pastor-Servant Frederick Sleet
Southern Heights Baptist Church
4001 S. Anthony Blvd. 46806 • 260-744-9307
Rev. Dr. Otha Aden
Star of Bethel Missionary Baptist Church
3223 Smith St.46806 • 260-456-7076
Rev. Hue E. Guy
Summit Church
2320 Maumee Ave. 46803 • 260-424-5683
Dr. Al Jennings II
Total Change COGIC
1810 Hinton Dr. 46808 • 260-749-9191
Pastor Terry L. Newsome Sr.
Tree of Life Missionary Baptist Church
520 E. Washington Blvd. 46802 • 260-444-5705
Rev. Mozell Davis
Trinity Church of the Nazarene
4150 Stellhorn Rd. • 260-485-0312
Pastor Ken Stirratt Sr.
True Love Missionary Baptist Church
715 E. Wallace St. 46803 • 260-745-4901
Rev. Robert W. Bell
Union Baptist Church
2200 Smith St. 46803 • 260-456-3421
Unity of Fort Wayne Spiritual Center
3232 Crescent Ave. 46805 • 260-482-2477
Rev. Barry Vennard
Unity Worship Center
1223 E. Wayne St. 46802 • 260-267-9154
Rev. Joey W. Simpson Sr.
Victory Worship Center
Search for “Victory Worship Center”on Facebook
Pastor David Moore
The Way of Holiness Church
2101 Phenie St. 46802 • 260-420-8412
Supt. Bennie Williams
Wings of Deliverance Holiness Tabernacle Church
2502 Fairfeld Ave. 46807 • 260-744-3316
Bishop Jimmie Clark, Sr.
Zion Bethel Missionary Baptist Church
1005 Colerick St. 46806 • 260-744-5260
Rev. Michael D. Moore
Zion Tabernacle Assembly
2915 Evans St. • 260-745-9327
District Elder Melvin Falkner
Places of Worship
Turner Chapel A.M.E. Church
836 E. Jeferson Blvd. 46803 • 260-426-3121
Rev. Kenneth Christmon
Sunday School: 9:00 am
Sunday Worship: 10:30 am
Tuesday Bible Study: 6:30pm
Faith United Methodist Church
207 E. DeWald St. 46803 • 260-744-4238
Pastor Denise Lapsley
Sunday Service: 10:15 am
ALSO AVAILABLE: Small Group Studies,
Youth Activities, Scouting, N.A. Groups
Call for times & more info
“A church for all people in the heart of the city”
If you would like to see your
place of worship listed here
at no charge, please contact
Andy at (260) 745-0552.
Extra lines, box, photo and
display ads available for a small
fee. Call for more information.

FROST Illustrated • June 26 - July 2, 2013
11 www.frostillustrated.com
Mass choir to honor
legendary Al Stiles
FORT WAYNE—He’s performed at the famed Apollo Theater
in New York, shared the stage
with some of the world’s top
show business luminaries
including people like Lionel
Hampton, sat at the kitchen
table and discussed songwriting
with Billie Holiday; he’s served
as a central city economic
development advocate, worked
as a union pioneer and been
the frst person of color to hold
numerous positions in industry;
he’s been an entrepreneur
running a number of businesses
including one of Fort Wayne’s
landmark record shops, a record
company, a unique shoe shine and repair business, and helped a
number of talented young people develop their skills to the point of
notoriety through his Talent Factory.
He’s Fort Wayne’s own legend Al Stiles.
At 5 p.m., July 6, friends, the Give God an Opportunity Mass
Choir is scheduled to preset an Al Stiles Musical Appreciation
Celebration at Tabernacle Baptist Church, 3404 Chestnut Street.
Robert Taylor, one of the organizers and director of the choir,
said they will performing most of the music for the evening along
with other guest musical contributors. Also, a number of speakers,
including Chief Condra Ridley, will be on hand to pay tribute to the
legendary Al Stiles and honoring him for his contributions.
Through his innovative Al Stiles’ Talent Factory, he taught
generations of young performers more than the technical aspects of
music, dance, singing and theater. He taught them the importance of
being on time, presentable and professional in their work—in other
words, how to conduct themselves as responsible young people and
later adults.
At age 92, Stiles is still very much involved with trying to teach
people how to be better not just as entertainers but in life.
“Mr. Stiles keeps a plan. He’s always working on something,” said
Ridley. “You have to appreciate his zeal. Mr. Stiles has managed to
keep alive the ‘class’ in performance. That was his effort—to teach
young people that class and style that was part of the performance
ethic that was around in the ’40s and ’50s when he was a young
man.”
For more information about the Al Stiles Musical Appreciation
Celebration, call Robert Taylor at (260) 602-7616.
836 E. Jefferson Blvd.
(260) 426-3121
Sunday School
9:00 am
Sunday Morning
Worship Service
10:30 am
Tuesday Bible Study
6:30 pm
Rev. KeNNeTH
CHRiSTMON
ClaSSifiedS
HElP WANTED
AD SAlESPERSON
Send resume & cover letter to:
FROST IllUSTRATED
3121 S. Calhoun St. Fort Wayne, IN 46807
or frostads@aol.com EOE
FOUND
BRACELET:
Special Mother’s
bracelet, found
early this year at
Captain Black’s
restaurant. If it
belongs to you
or someone you
know, please call
Sheryl at 260-
418-7122!
Music mogul Russell Simmons, poses with Wilmington Ten members
Wayne Moore and Dr. Ben Chavis in New York recently. Last week, Sim-
mons asked his over 2.2 million followers on Twitter sign the NAACP’s
Wilmington Ten pardon petition.
YWCA Director of Crisis Services -This full-time position
will be part of the leadership team for the organization and will
oversee the daily operations of the Crisis Service facility. Duties
include: leading a comprehensive shelter program ensuring an
environment that promotes safety, dignity, and respect; training,
developing and supervising staff; general operations of a resi-
dential facility; providing seamless continuum of care for clients
by working closely with other departments; represent the YWCA
and collaborate with others in the community; evaluate and de-
velop programs to address emerging needs; coordinate shelter
services; provide residential adult and child clients with domestic
violence support services to assist them achieve their goals, col-
laborate with service providers and stakeholders, maintain com-
pliance standards and accurate records. Successful candidates
will understand and have experience in budgets, scheduling,
strategic planning, and goal setting. Bachelor's degree in social
work or related feld required.
Candidates must be profcient in Microsoft Offce, have a valid
driver's license and personal insurance. Prior experience work-
ing in a crisis-orientated environment or case management is a
plus. CPR/First Aid Certifcation required upon hire.
Send resumes to jobs@easihr.com. EOE
6/26
Drivers, CDL-A: Dedicated Account.
Get home 2-3 times weekly! The Best
Pay, Equipment, Benefts & More! Roll
with the best @ US Xpress: 866-293-9006
6/26
Spiritually speaking: God,
man’s fnal frontier, last result
made.” However, she said she
doesn’t know if that change hap-
pened because of the meetings or
because the students were “scared”
of getting in trouble.”
i myself am not sure if these
meetings have had any effect on
my school. This is my last year
attending that school so i unfortu-
nately will not be able to see the
future meetings or the effect they
may potentially have. Hopefully
something will be done soon to
help ensure that African American
students and all students feel com-
fortable going to school.
Admiria Cooper is a graduat-
ing senior at Canterbury High
School in Fort Wayne, who served
as a student intern at Frost Illus-
trated this past month as part of
the Canterbury Senior Internship
Program. Cooper is scheduled to
attend Howard University—one of
the nation’s premier Historically
Black Colleges/Universities—in
the fall, majoring in communica-
tions.
Special to the NNPA from The
Dallas Weekly
The older i get, the more
convinced i am that i am going
to surely fail, fail miserably as a
matter of fact, in my attempt to be
perfectly Christ-like. We all know,
or should know, this is just not
going to happen. However, as we
also know, it is our job to humbly
and consistently keep trying and
striving to emulate our Lord and
Savior.
There are all kinds of
expressions to describe this
rather unique occurrence in the
Christian experience; everything
from “backsliding,” to falling off
the wagon, to suffering a setback,
or simply falling down. in each
instance, i think the Christian’s
obligation is to weather the storm
and reverse direction, or more
aptly put, “get back up on my feet
again.”
i don’t know about you but one
of the hardest things for me to
do is to know i’ve blown it with
regard to Christian behavior. i
have maintained an un-Christian
attitude for longer than i should;
held onto my anger too long.
Or, i’ve enjoyed someone else’s
misfortune much too much. You
see, when that happens, because i
profess and believe the good news
of the gospel, i do understand what
is supposed to be inherently good
and what is not. Yet i’ve acted or
reacted outside of the parameters
of what i know is good Christian
behavior. At this point, i know
i’m in trouble because i
indeed do know better.
it becomes hard and
kind of embarrassing to
ask God for forgiveness,
when you know He
knows that you do know
better.
For me, that’s pretty
tough. it’s like stealing
and having to confess to
your mother, or, being
caught cheating and
your punishment was
delivering the bad news
to your mother by a note
from your teacher. For those of
you who have had to carry such
burden, i’m sure you understand
that sinking feeling as you have
exhausted every excuse possible
in a vain attempt to delay the
inevitable. The moment of truth
has come. You’ve got to tell Mom.
Stay with me for a moment and
relate this situation to having to
tell God:
You know that He already
knows. it is then absolutely
necessary and incumbent upon
me or you to stand up, “‘fess up”
and proceed down the only road
that makes sense, with the full
knowledge that you will be okay.
The Lord still loves you.
Getting through that whole
process has always been very
diffcult for me because, i believe
what i’m feeling is generally
stupid and certainly clear
about knowing better.
When you’re a Christian,
you do know better. i
don’t know which is
worse, knowing better or
having to tell God that
you knew better. The
good news is, God knows
what’s in your heart. it is
His measure of who you
are and who you are in
relation to Him that really
matters. it’s because of
that, that God knows you
are repentant, just like
your mother knew you that you
knew better because she raised
you. She also knew you were truly
sorry. it remains the only basis for
forgiveness.
For me it still remains an
uncomfortable exercise to square
my shoulders, assume the position
faced down in reverent prayer
and enter into the domain of my
Father and reveal that kind of
failure. each time it happens, i’m
reminded that God did not come to
call the righteous, but the sinners
of which i am one, regardless of
how enlightened i might think i
am. Remember this the next time
you review the day and realize
how much better you could have
behaved.
May God bless and keep you
always. —James
cOOper
(Continued from page 1)
Your communitY newspaper
James
Washington
Spiritually
Speaking
(File photo)
12
FROST Illustrated •June 26 - July 2, 2013 www.frostillustrated.com
pB
FROST Illustrated • Dec.26-Jan.1, 2012
Sunday, June 30 • 1pm
Food available as long as it lasts, starting at 2pm!
@ Memorial Park (2300 Maumee/1100 Glasgow)
For sponsorship or volunteer information, please call (260) 745-0552
FREE: Food • Games • Giveaways
Haircuts • Health Screenings & more!
1st Redemption Tattoo
Gallery
Albright’s Meats & Deli
Applebees
Big Daddy Catering
Boys & Girls Club
Catholic Charities
Cinema Center
Credit Solutions
Comcast
Dicky’s Wild Hare
DJ Night Train
El Mexicano Newspaper
Fort Wayne Museum
of Art
Karma Barber-Beauty-
Hair Studio
Kroger
LaRay Williams
Lee’s Chicken
MLK Montessori School
Meijer
Miller’s Merry Manor
Optimistics
Strange, Weird &
Wonderful Publishing
Snacks on Wheels
Subway
Turn N Headz
Unity Barber Shop
Urban League
Walgreens
FORT WAYNE—The Fort
Wayne Alumni Chapter of Kappa
Alpha Psi Fraternity Inc recently
awarded four scholarships to stu-
dents who have graduated and will
be going to college to continue
their education.
The recipients of the scholar-
ships were the following:
Book Stipends Scholarship
Award for $250.00
• Adrian Mable of South Side
High School who will be attending
Indiana University.
• Jalen Mclntosh of Snider High
School who will be attending Uni-
versity of Indianapolis.
Scholarship Award for 500.00
• KeyOntae Green of South Side
High School who will be attending
Indiana State University
• Richkard Saint-Victor of
Northrop High School who will be
attending Indiana University.
The members of the Fort Wayne
Alumni Chapter of Kappa Alpha
Psi Fraternity are Joe Shade Jr.,
Dennis Johnson, Tarryl Madi-
son, Duval Bailey (Chapter Pole-
march), Howard Whitlow, Kenard
Robinson and Dr. Charles Green.
Kappa Alpha Psi awards scholarships
From left: Kappa members Joe Shade, Dennis Johnson, Tarryl Madison, DuVal Bailey, scholarship winners
Jalen McIntosh—Snider High School, KeyOntae Green—South Side High School, Adrian Mable—South Side
High School, Richard Saint-Victor—Northrop High School, and Kappa members Howard Whitlow, Kenard
Robinson and Charles E. Green. (Courtesy photo)
 
N a t i o n a l   C r e d i t   E d u c a t i o n a l   S e r v i c e s  
NCES does the work necessary to fight the ‘Big 3’ Agencies 
on your behalf. Credit “Education” and Restoration 
Services help consumers to reestablish their credit rating. 

   











Please call for additional information or listen to one of our
live conference calls covering credit in America and how it
affects us all.
CALL 1-260-245-1041

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful