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Drumming Monkey: Mathematics LEGO, the LEGO logo, and WEDO are trademarks of the LEGO Group. ©2010
Drumming Monkey:
Mathematics
LEGO, the LEGO logo, and WEDO are trademarks of the LEGO Group. ©2010 The LEGO Group.

Drumming Monkey Mathematics Teacher Guide

Lesson At-A-Glance

Lesson Overview

Learning Outcomes

LEGO ® Education WeDo™

The students will count the number

• Add and multiply whole numbers.

Materials

of beats the Drumming Monkey plays within an elapsed time and use a practice schedule to solve multiplication

• Use a physical model to represent, compose, and decompose whole numbers.

• Completed Drumming Monkey model • “Practice Makes Perfect”

word problems. Students will make connections to real-life experiences by learning to do a novel task with an estimation of how many tries or how

• Communicate mathematical ideas using grade-appropriate vocabulary and sentence structure.

worksheet • Drumming Monkey Mathematics Rubric • “Drumming Monkey Elements

much time it might take to master a particular skill.

• Measure and carry out basic operations within elapsed time.

Inventory” tracking sheet • “My Program” tracking sheet

• LEGO ® Education WeDo™ Software

Cross-Curricular

Suggested Other Materials

Suggested LEGO Elements

Connections

• Objects to assist in learning a

• LEGO Education WeDo

• LEGO Sceneries Set 779385

• Literacy • Physical Education

novel task (e.g., paper balls made from scrap paper to throw into a container or cup, tongue twisters

Construction Set 979580

(optional)

to learn)

• Assorted LEGO bricks (optional)

• Premeasured and cut lengths of string to mark a consistent, appropriate distance from the cup (if doing the paper ball-toss challenge)

 

Estimated Completion Time

Student Organization

Suggested Programming Blocks Used

• Start • Motor Power • Wait For • Motor Off • Motor On For • Add to/Multiply by Display • Display

(2 hours + Extension) • Part 1: 30 minutes • Part 2: 30 minutes • Part 3: 30 minutes • Part 4: 30 minutes

• Part 1: Class, Individual • Part 2: Partners • Part 3: Partners • Part 4: Class, Individual

Assessment Suggestions

Assessment Suggestions Vocabulary

Vocabulary

• Completed “Practice Makes

• add

Perfect” worksheet

• multiply

• Daily math journal entry

• subtract

• Interview

• difference

• learn

• equal

• schedule

• represent

• enough

• successful

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Drumming Monkey Mathematics Teacher Guide

Connect (Part 1 – 30 minutes)

Ask the students to think about a special talent or skill that they have practiced very hard to learn (e.g., playing the guitar, shooting free throws in basketball, doing a triple pirouette, speaking another language). Encourage a few students to share their abilities with the class.

Guiding Questions:

• Do you have a special talent or skill? • Have you always been good at doing this? • Can you remember a time when you found it difficult to do this? • How did you learn to do it well? • How long have you been practicing, studying, or learning to do this skill?

Tell the students that today they will be starting the class with a challenge. They will practice a task many times and keep track of how many times they need to practice in order to be successful.

Explain and demonstrate the challenge to the class (e.g., throwing a paper ball into a cup that is several feet away).

Give each student an assortment of LEGO ® elements in a variety of shapes and sizes. Tell the students that today they will be using the elements to represent the number of times it takes for you (the teacher) to be successful in the task (e.g., a green eight-stud brick represents eight attempts, an orange two-stud brick represents two attempts, a pink single-stud brick represents one attempt).

Guiding Questions:

• What other tools have we used in the past to represent whole numbers? (e.g., pictures, tally

marks, count on fingers, base-10 blocks)

• How can we use these elements to show success? (e.g., a green eight-stud brick represents eight attempts, an orange two-stud brick represents two attempts, a pink single-stud brick represents one attempt)

Demonstrate the challenge again and have the students use their elements to represent the number of attempts you make before you are successful. Have students share their representations with the class to show that the same number of attempts can be shown using many different combinations of LEGO bricks.

Hints:

• Students may use the elements from the LEGO ® Education WeDo™ Construction Set or the Sceneries Set to complete this activity depending on what is available.

• Novel tasks to learn for this challenge may include throwing a paper ball into a cup from a specified distance, walking between two points with something balanced on one’s head, or saying a tongue twister in a specified time with no mistakes.

• Sharing special skills and abilities may also be done with partners or as a journal entry. Students who are not comfortable sharing their own abilities may talk about a respected athlete, musician, mentor, and so forth.

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Drumming Monkey Mathematics Teacher Guide

Construct (Part 2 – 30 minutes)

Divide the class into partners and give each pair of students a piece of scrap paper, a premeasured and cut length of string, and a container into which they may toss the paper ball. Give the students time to complete the challenge themselves, with each partner representing the other student’s success using the LEGO ® elements.

Have the students share their element combinations with another group, comparing the way that each group has represented the number of practice tries before successfully tossing the paper ball in the container.

Drumming Monkey Mathematics Teacher Guide Construct (Part 2 – 30 minutes) Divide the class into partners

Tell the class that professional athletes and musicians must practice the same skill thousands of times, every day for many weeks, months, or even years before they master it. Discuss a few examples with the class.

Consider how many times a professional musician or athlete needs to practice something before he or she becomes proficient. Tell the class that the Drumming Monkey would like to be a great drummer, so he (or she) needs to practice every day.

Have the students assemble the Drumming Monkey model and open the WeDo™ software in preparation for programming.

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Hints:

• Premeasuring and cutting a length of string to measure the distance a student must stand away from the container will ensure that all students are completing a task with the same level of difficulty.

• If students master the skill quickly (or find it very difficult), another task of a different nature may be assigned, such as walking between two points with something balanced on one’s head or saying a tongue twister in a specified time without making a mistake.

• It is important to emphasize that everybody learns different skills at a different pace. Discuss the importance of patience and perseverance in learning something new, whether it is a skill like riding a bike, drawing a lifelike image, or programming a robot.

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Drumming Monkey Mathematics Teacher Guide

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Contemplate (Part 3 – 30 minutes)

Tell the class that the Drumming Monkey is learning to be a great drummer. He practices every day, but he doesn’t always practice for the same amount of time each day. His drum teacher wants to know how many times he beats his drum each week while practicing.

Keep students with their partners from Part 2 Construct and walk them step-by-step through the timer program with variable motor speed, as outlined in the Drumming Monkey Mathematics Suggested Programming and Building Guide. Demonstrate how they can change the motor speed in the program and when finished have the students record the program they will use on the “My Program” tracking sheet.

Hand out the “Practice Makes Perfect” worksheet and have students calculate the amount of time the Drumming Monkey practiced through the week.

Guiding Questions:

• What operations can you use to find out how many minutes the Drumming Monkey practiced each day?

• The Drumming Monkey’s teacher asked him to practice for 15 minutes last week. Did he practice long enough? Do you think this is enough practice time to be a great drummer?

When the “practice schedule” section has been completed, have students return to their computers with their partner. For each question on the worksheet, the pair will work together to adjust the program appropriately, count the number of beats the Drumming Monkey plays, and use the practice schedule to respond to the word problems. Students will set the motor speed, count the number of beats in one minute, and multiply it by the number of minutes the Drumming Monkey played that day.

Number of Beats per Minute with Recommended Cam Configuration:

• Motor Speed 1 = 24 beats/minute

• Motor Speed 2 = 29 beats/minute • Motor Speed 3 = 34 beats/minute

Resources:

Drumming Monkey Mathematics Teacher Guide 102 Contemplate ( Part 3 – 30 minutes) Tell the class

“My Program” tracking sheet

Drumming Monkey Mathematics Teacher Guide 102 Contemplate ( Part 3 – 30 minutes) Tell the class

“Practice Makes Perfect” worksheet

Hints:

• This lesson can be divided into two separate lessons if necessary.

• Make sure that students all use the same cam configuration to ensure that all groups have the same number of beats per minute. See the Drumming Monkey Mathematics Suggested Programming and Building Guide for an illustration of the appropriate configuration.

• Encourage students to use the LEGO ® elements as a manipulative to assist with calculations. (e.g., Use 5 four-stud bricks to represent drumming four beats per minute for five minutes.)

• Circulate around the room to interview students as they progress through the activity.

• This lesson touches on the concept of elapsed time in order to provide a real-life context for tracking and representing numbers. Some students may require a brief review of units of time (e.g., seconds, minutes, hours).

• A calculator program may be used to assist students and verify responses completed in this activity.

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Drumming Monkey Mathematics Teacher Guide

Continue (Part 4 – 30 minutes)

When all students have completed their worksheets, reassemble as a class and give each student an assortment of LEGO ® elements. Students may share elements as necessary.

Gather the responses to the worksheet together, pausing after each question to use the elements to represent the numbers or calculations completed in Part 3 Contemplate. Partners may group with other pairs to form larger numbers.

Have students complete a daily journal entry for one week about something they do every day (e.g, how many strokes they use to brush their teeth or how many steps they take from the entrance of the school to their coat hook). Use the LEGO elements to represent the number each day, and write an explanation for the element choice and combination each time (e.g., Yesterday and today, I used 32 strokes to brush my teeth. I used 4 eight-stud bricks last time. I know eight and eight is 16, so today I used two 16-stud plates).

Extension Activities:

• Have a number of quick class challenges to represent the same whole number or

mathematical equation using a variety of LEGO elements. (e.g., Sceneries Set flowers or plants as multiples of three, plates and bricks in combination to represent larger numbers or equivalent numbers) (15 minutes)

• Have the students complete a goal-setting activity about something they would personally like to learn, with an estimate of the practice/learning time and steps required to accomplish that goal. This can be sealed and opened at the end of the school year. (30 minutes)

• Complete a journal entry or short story about something that required a lot of practice to learn. (30 minutes)

Portfolio Suggestion:

Publish the daily journal entry with illustrations as a small storybook.

Resources:

Drumming Monkey Mathematics Teacher Guide Continue (Part 4 – 30 minutes) When all students have completed

“Practice Makes Perfect” worksheet

Drumming Monkey Mathematics Teacher Guide Continue (Part 4 – 30 minutes) When all students have completed

“Drumming Monkey Elements Inventory” tracking sheet

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Hints:

• If using the WeDo™ elements for this activity, have students work in partners and share one Element Set so that elements are all returned to the same kit. This should not be a problem if students are using the Sceneries Set or Bricks Set elements.

• Use the “Drumming Monkey Elements Inventory” tracking sheet to make sure all elements are returned to the WeDo Elements Set.

• Base-10 blocks can be used to represent larger numbers.

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Drumming Monkey Mathematics Teacher Guide

Mathematics – Suggested Programming

Resources:

Drumming Monkey Mathematics Teacher Guide Mathematics – Suggested Programming Resources: “My Program” tracking sheet The “My

“My Program” tracking sheet

The “My Program” tracking sheet is a helpful tool for students to organize their program before actually going to the computer.

Using a Timer and Controlling Motor Speed

We can create a timer program in which we set the speed of the motor and control how long the motor spins. This will be very useful when completing the “Practice Makes Perfect” worksheet because we can set the speed to anything and make the monkey drum for any amount of time. This program can be made in two ways, modeled in either Figure 1 or Figure 2.

Both of these programs will start the motor at a speed of 2 for 60 seconds
Both of these programs will start the motor at a speed of 2 for 60 seconds (1
minute) and then stop the motor after that time.

Figure 1 & Figure 2

The programs above only move the motor for one minute, so we can only count how many times the monkey drums for one minute. The worksheet wants us to calculate how many times the monkey drums in more than one minute, maybe eight minutes. To do this, we need to multiply the number of times the monkey drums in one minute by eight. We can use the WeDo™ software to create a calculator program that multiplies two numbers for us.

Using the WeDo™ Software as a Calculator

To use the WeDo™ software as a calculator, we will use the Add to Display block. This is shown in Figure 3.

Drumming Monkey Mathematics Teacher Guide Mathematics – Suggested Programming Resources: “My Program” tracking sheet The “My

Figure 3

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Drumming Monkey Mathematics Teacher Guide

To modify the Add to Display block to perform different arithmetic, we can simply click on the block to toggle its functionality. Because we want to multiply, we can drag the Add to Display block onto our screen. If we click this block once, we see the addition symbol change to become a multiplication symbol, as shown in Figure 4.

Drumming Monkey Mathematics Teacher Guide To modify the Add to Display block to perform different arithmetic,

Figure 4

If we want to multiply two numbers, each needs to be in its own Add to Display block in multiplication mode. If we are multiplying 34 by 8, our blocks will look like Figure 5.

Drumming Monkey Mathematics Teacher Guide To modify the Add to Display block to perform different arithmetic,

Figure 5

We can now put this program together to see our result. The program is shown in Figure 6.

output Figure 6
output
Figure 6

Note: When using WeDo™ to calculate totals, you must reset the display after every calculation. This is achieved by simply using the Display function to display a blank space using the space bar, as shown in Figure 7.

Drumming Monkey Mathematics Teacher Guide To modify the Add to Display block to perform different arithmetic,

Figure 7

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Drumming Monkey Mathematics Teacher Guide

Mathematics – Suggested Building

Recommended Cam Configuration

The cam configuration illustrated in Figure 8 will keep the pace of the monkey’s drumming consistent and slow for easier counting and more manageable numbers. This will make the monkey use both arms at the same time.

Drumming Monkey Mathematics Teacher Guide Mathematics – Suggested Building Recommended Cam Configuration The cam configuration illustrated

Figure 8

Using the LEGO ® Elements to Represent Whole Numbers We can use LEGO ® elements to count the number of times we attempt a task by representing each attempt with one stud on a LEGO brick. For example, the LEGO brick shown in Figure 9 has four studs, so it represents four attempts.

Drumming Monkey Mathematics Teacher Guide Mathematics – Suggested Building Recommended Cam Configuration The cam configuration illustrated

Figure 9

For larger numbers, we can create many different combinations of LEGO bricks to represent the same number of attempts, as shown in Figures 10 and 11.

Drumming Monkey Mathematics Teacher Guide Mathematics – Suggested Building Recommended Cam Configuration The cam configuration illustrated

Figure 10

The white plate on the far left has 16 studs. The two bricks in the middle have eight studs each, combining to have 16 studs. The pieces on the right also combine to have 16 studs.

Drumming Monkey Mathematics Teacher Guide Mathematics – Suggested Building Recommended Cam Configuration The cam configuration illustrated

Figure 11

Each brick or combination of bricks has six studs and represents six attempts.

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Drumming Monkey Mathematics Vocabulary

Drumming Monkey Mathematics Vocabulary successful add equal multiply schedule subtract represent difference enough learn LEGO, the

successful

add

equal

multiply

schedule

subtract

represent

difference

enough

learn

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Drumming Monkey Mathematics Student Worksheet

Practice Makes Perfect

Name: ______________________________

Date: ___________________

This is the Drumming Monkey’s practice schedule for last week. Complete the schedule with the number of minutes he practiced each day.

Practice Time

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Start

12:05

4:33

8:22

8:07

7:02

9:09

9:14

p.m.

p.m.

a.m.

a.m.

p.m.

a.m.

a.m.

Finish

12:06

4:36

8:25

8:08

7:04

9:11

9:15

p.m.

p.m.

a.m.

a.m.

p.m.

a.m.

a.m.

Total

             

Practice Time

minutes

minutes

minutes

minutes

minutes

minutes

minutes

Use the information in the practice schedule to answer the following questions. Show your work using pictures, numbers, or words.

  • 1. On Tuesday, the Drumming Monkey practiced his medium-paced beats on Motor Speed 2. How many beats did he play on Tuesday?

  • 2. On Friday, the Drumming Monkey practiced his fast beats on Motor Speed 3. How many beats did he play on Friday?

  • 3. On the weekend, the Drumming Monkey practiced his slow beats on Motor Speed 1. How many beats did he play on Saturday

and Sunday?

  • 4. On Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday, the Drumming Monkey practiced his slow beats on Motor Speed 1. On which day did

he play the most beats? How many beats did he play that day?

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Drumming Monkey Mathematics Student Worksheet Practice Makes Perfect Name: ______________________________ Date: ___________________ This is the Drumming

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Drumming Monkey Mathematics Rubric

Name: ______________________________ Date: ___________________ Drumming Monkey Mathematics Rubric Expectation: Needs Improvement Fair Good Excellent Demonstrates understanding
Name: ______________________________
Date: ___________________
Drumming Monkey Mathematics Rubric
Expectation:
Needs Improvement
Fair
Good
Excellent
Demonstrates
understanding of
the relationship
between addition
and multiplication.
/25
5 ------------------- 10
Demonstrates
a limited
understanding of
the relationship
between addition
and multiplication.
11 ------------------ 15
Demonstrates
some
understanding of
the relationship
between addition
and multiplication.
16 ----------------- 20
Demonstrates
a considerable
understanding of
the relationship
between addition
and multiplication.
21 ----------------- 25
Demonstrates
a thorough
understanding of
the relationship
between addition
and multiplication.
Uses critical and
creative thinking
to represent whole
numbers using
physical models.
/25
Uses critical and
creative thinking
to represent
whole numbers
using physical
models with limited
effectiveness.
Uses critical and
creative thinking
to represent
whole numbers
using physical
models with some
effectiveness.
Uses critical and
creative thinking
to represent whole
numbers using
physical models
with considerable
effectiveness.
Uses critical and
creative thinking
to represent whole
numbers using
physical models
with a high degree
of effectiveness.
Expresses
Expresses
and organizes
mathematical
ideas with limited
effectiveness.
Expresses
and organizes
mathematical
ideas with some
effectiveness.
Expresses
and organizes
and organizes
mathematical
mathematical
ideas.
ideas with
considerable
/25
effectiveness.
Expresses
and organizes
mathematical
ideas with a
high degree of
effectiveness.
Applies
knowledge and
skills in familiar
contexts.
/25
Applies knowledge
and skills in
familiar contexts
with limited
effectiveness.
Applies knowledge
and skills in
familiar contexts
with some
effectiveness.
Applies knowledge
and skills in
familiar contexts
with considerable
effectiveness.
Applies knowledge
and skills in
familiar contexts
with a high degree
of effectiveness.
Comments:
/100

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Drumming Monkey: Literacy LEGO, the LEGO logo, and WEDO are trademarks of the LEGO Group. ©2010
Drumming Monkey:
Literacy
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Drumming Monkey Literacy Teacher Guide

Lesson At-A-Glance

Lesson Overview

Learning Outcomes

LEGO ® Education WeDo™

The students will describe a new

• Write a descriptive paragraph

Materials

robotic pet monkey in detail, including

• Drumming Monkey model

information about where the new pet is from, its age, personality traits, likes, dislikes, and so forth. The final presentation will also include tricks the monkey has been “taught.” The students will accomplish this through a demonstration, using the WeDo™ Drumming Monkey model and software.

in complete sentences, using appropriate punctuation.

• Use a model to organize thoughts and ideas in a logical order.

• Use specific sensory details (e.g., strong verbs, adjectives) to enhance descriptive effect.

• “Look What We Can Do!” worksheet

• 900097 LEGO ® Education WeDo Activity Pack - Sound List (page 21)

• Drumming Monkey Literacy Rubric • “Drumming Monkey Elements Inventory” tracking sheet • “My Program” tracking sheet • LEGO Education WeDo Software

Cross-Curricular

Suggested Other Materials

Suggested LEGO Elements

Connections

• Small stuffed animal

• LEGO Education WeDo

• LEGO Sceneries Set 779385

• Dramatic Arts • Science • Visual Arts

• Books, movies, or video clips about children with pets (optional) • 8-1/2" x 11" blank paper

Construction Set 979580

(optional)

• Assorted LEGO bricks (optional)

 

Estimated Completion Time

Student Organization

Suggested Programming Blocks Used

• Sound Sensor input • Tilt Sensor input • Wait For • Start • Motor This Way • Motor Off • Play Sound • Motor Power • Random input • Number input

(2.5 hours + Extension) • Part 1: 30 minutes • Part 2: 30 minutes • Part 3: 60 minutes • Part 4: 30 minutes

• Part 1: Class, Partners • Part 2: Class, Partners • Part 3: Small groups • Part 4: Individual, Class

Assessment Suggestions

Assessment Suggestions Vocabulary

Vocabulary

• Completed worksheet

• train

• Presentation

• learn

• Completed descriptive paragraph

• practice

• Working program

• repeat

• talented

• teach

• taught

• encourage

• trick

• perform

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Drumming Monkey Literacy Teacher Guide

Connect (Part 1 – 30 minutes)

Arrange the desks/chairs around the room or sit on a carpet in a central area to form a discussion circle. Show the class the completed Drumming Monkey model and introduce it as your “new pet.”

Guiding Questions:

• Is this a popular type of pet? Why or why not? • What are some popular kinds of pets? • What are some of the responsibilities that come with owning a pet? • Think about pets that would be comparable to a monkey. Do these pets need to be trained to live with people? • What kind of training do they need? • Can this pet be taught to do tricks? • What kind of tricks can this pet do? • Raise your hand if you would like to own a pet such as this. Why or why not?

As students make pet suggestions, list them on the board or on a large piece of poster paper. Leave room beside the name of each kind of pet to indicate whether it is a kind of animal that can be trained or taught to do tricks.

Give the students a few minutes to discuss with an “elbow partner” (another student sitting nearby). The pair should choose from the list a pet that they would like to own and care for and discuss why they would choose this animal.

Using a small stuffed animal as a talking stick, have a few students share their opinions with the class.

Give the students a few minutes to discuss a pet from the list that they would not like to own or care for. With their elbow partner, they should discuss reasons why they would not choose this animal.

Once again, have a few students share their opinions with the class.

Tell the class that your Drumming Monkey is an excellent pet and that he has even learned some tricks that he will later perform for the class.

Guiding Questions:

• How can we train a pet to do a trick? • Have you ever trained a pet to do something? • How did you train your pet?

Drumming Monkey Literacy Teacher Guide Connect (Part 1 – 30 minutes) Arrange the desks/chairs around the

Hints:

• Use a small stuffed toy as a talking stick. Only the person holding the animal may speak while the other members of the class listen attentively.

• Some students might not have had the experience of owning or caring for a pet. Encourage them to share their experiences with the pets of friends or family or relate the experience to a favorite book or movie.

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Drumming Monkey Literacy Teacher Guide

Construct (Part 2 – 30 minutes)

Have students gather around a computer equipped with the WeDo™ software. Connect the Drumming Monkey model to the WeDo software and introduce your pet again, including descriptive details about his (or her) name, appearance, disposition, where you got your pet, what the pet can do, and how you trained your pet to do this. (See the “Look What We Can Do!” worksheet for guidance.)

After you have described your pet, tell the class that your pet will now perform a trick, and use the magic wand to signal the program to start. The program should repeat a few times and end when you give a verbal command (when the magic wand is tilted appropriately).

Drumming Monkey Literacy Teacher Guide Construct (Part 2 – 30 minutes) Have students gather around a

Tell the class that today they will be teaching a new pet to do some tricks using the Drumming Monkey model and the WeDo software.

Guiding Questions:

• Is training a real pet the same as programming a robot such as the Drumming Monkey? • What is the same about training and programming? (We want a certain action to happen when we give a signal.)

• What is different about training and programming? (A real animal needs to practice many times, be given treats or affection, and so forth, while a robot needs only to be given the appropriate command.)

Divide the class into partners. Walk the class step-by-step through the program used in the demonstration and encourage them to use this program as a model for their own pets’ tricks. They may change the input speeds, wait times, or sound effects and repeat patterns in the program.

Give the students time to assemble their Drumming Monkey model, create a magic wand, and explore the WeDo software to see what tricks can be done using the software, such as making different sounds, drumming at different speeds, and so forth.

Demonstrate and remind the students that manipulation of the cams on the model will also change the way that the Drumming Monkey moves its arms.

Resources:

Drumming Monkey Literacy Teacher Guide Construct (Part 2 – 30 minutes) Have students gather around a

900097 LEGO Education WeDo Activity Pack - Sound List (page 21)

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Hints:

• Using the LEGO ® Sceneries Set to personalize and modify the appearance of the model allows for greater creative possibilities in written content and presentation (e.g., making a Drumming Dragon).

• The Drumming Monkey can be programmed to start and end a program using the Sound Sensor. You may also create a magic wand using the Tilt Sensor. A handle or magic wand can also be used to assist students with dexterity difficulties or for those who need to stabilize the Tilt Sensor by having it sit flat on a surface. For classroom situations where noise levels are elevated, using the magic wand is not recommended.

• See the LEGO Education WeDo™ Teacher’s Guide

(page 166) for different cam configurations on the model and their effect on the drumming action.

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Drumming Monkey Literacy Teacher Guide

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Contemplate (Part 3 – 60 minutes)

After exploring the creative possibilities for their programs and models, have students return to their desks and complete the “Look What We Can Do!” worksheet in order to plan their presentations. Encourage the students to use descriptive words and strong action words to make their writing and presentation more interesting.

Divide the class into small groups of three to four students and give each of them a commonly used (but not very creative) word prompt written at the top of an 8-1/2" x 11" piece of paper. Tell each group they will have three minutes to think of many different ways to say this word or something similar to it.

Suggested Challenge Headings:

• How many different ways can you say “great”? • How many different ways can you say “mean”? • How many different ways can you say “nice”? • How many different ways can you say “strong”? • How many different ways can you say “small”? • How many different ways can you say “big”?

Share the results of the descriptive language challenge and post the papers on one wall of the classroom. They may be used as a reference if students find themselves using one of the less interesting words in their writing and they need some alternatives to make their writing richer.

Give the students time to complete the two outer columns of the “Look What We Can Do!” worksheet before returning to the computer and Drumming Monkey model to finalize their program and modify their model as required.

When the program has been completed using the “My Program” tracking sheet, students may return to their desks to complete the “Look What We Can Do!” worksheet. They should convert the boxed information into a complete written composition to be rehearsed and presented to the class.

Resources:

Drumming Monkey Literacy Teacher Guide 114 Contemplate (Part 3 – 60 minutes) After exploring the creative

“My Program” tracking sheet

Drumming Monkey Literacy Teacher Guide 114 Contemplate (Part 3 – 60 minutes) After exploring the creative

“Look What We Can Do!” worksheet

Hints:

• This section can be taught as two separate lessons or one longer lesson as time permits.

• Encourage students to use a dictionary or thesaurus for this activity.

• The challenge described below can also be done verbally as a quick activity at the end of the day or to develop vocabulary when lessons are completed ahead of schedule.

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Drumming Monkey Literacy Teacher Guide

Continue (Part 4 – 30 minutes)

Give the students time to revise their descriptive paragraphs and rehearse their presentations using the Drumming Monkey model.

With the class, have students share their descriptions and demonstrate the tricks they have taught their monkeys to do.

As students present their work, encourage each student to make note of one trick they enjoyed and would like to teach to their own pet. When presentations have been completed, allow time for students to celebrate their favorite tricks. Students should be given the opportunity to share novel programming or building ideas with other students who are interested.

Have students complete a reflective journal entry about the tricks they learned today using the WeDo™ software and model.

Guiding Questions:

• What was your favorite trick that you saw today? • Do you know how to make your own robot do the same trick? • What would you like to program your robot to do? • Do you feel confident that you could do this now?

Extension Activities:

• Use the LEGO ® Sceneries Set to change the Drumming Monkey into a different creature (e.g., Drumming Dragon). Discuss how caring for this new creature would be different from caring for the Drumming Monkey. (15 minutes)

• Write a story about the challenges and rewards of training a pet at home based on personal experience with a new pet. Some students may wish to make this into a daily journal entry of progress about trying to teach a pet a new trick. (30 minutes)

• Interview a community/family member about their experience training an animal. Write the results of the interview as a newspaper article. (30 minutes)

• Complete a step-by-step instructional guide detailing how to train a new pet to sit, use a litter box, or do a new trick. This can be done as a list or an illustrated storyboard. (60 minutes)

Portfolio Suggestion:

Use the final draft of the animal profile paragraph with a copy of the creative tricks program and tell what the animal can do.

Drumming Monkey Literacy Teacher Guide Continue (Part 4 – 30 minutes) Give the students time to

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Hints:

• Final presentations may be shared with the class as a whole or within smaller groups.

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Drumming Monkey Literacy Teacher Guide

Literacy – Suggested Programming

Resources:

Drumming Monkey Literacy Teacher Guide Literacy – Suggested Programming Resources: “My Program” tracking sheet The “My

“My Program” tracking sheet

The “My Program” tracking sheet is a helpful tool for students to organize their program before actually going to the computer.

Using the Magic Wand We can program the Drumming Monkey to do tricks by using the Tilt Sensor. We can use some LEGO ® elements and the Tilt Sensor to make a magic wand that will control the Drumming Monkey. The magic wand is shown in Figure 1.

Drumming Monkey Literacy Teacher Guide Literacy – Suggested Programming Resources: “My Program” tracking sheet The “My

Figure 1

After plugging the Tilt Sensor into the USB Hub right next to where the motor is plugged in, we need to create a program that waits for the Tilt Sensor to be waved, then starts the motor, waits for the Tilt Sensor again, and then shuts the motor down. The Tilt Sensor input is shown in Figure 2.

Drumming Monkey Literacy Teacher Guide Literacy – Suggested Programming Resources: “My Program” tracking sheet The “My

Figure 2

There are different modes the Tilt Sensor can take. They include Tilt Up, Tilt Down, Tilt This Way, Tilt That Way, and Any Tilt. These modes can be accessed easily by clicking the input to toggle between different modes. We will use Tilt Up to start the motor and use Tilt Down to stop it.

These Tilt Sensor inputs will be attached to Wait For blocks. The final program should look like the one in Figure 3.

This program will wait for the user to tilt the Tilt Sensor up, and it will
This program will wait for the user to tilt the Tilt Sensor up, and it will then
start the motor. It will wait for the user to tilt the Tilt Sensor down, and it will
then turn the motor off.

Figure 3

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Drumming Monkey Literacy Teacher Guide

We can take advantage of the rest of the Tilt Sensor’s modes and have our motors spin faster or slower, depending on which way the Tilt Sensor is tilted. This program is shown in Figure 4.

This program waits until the Tilt Sensor is tilted up. When that happens, it starts the
This program waits until the Tilt Sensor is tilted up. When that happens, it starts the motors at
maximum speed and the monkey drums quickly. When the sensor is tilted that way, it slows the
motor down. When the sensor is tilted this way, the motor will spin at maximum speed again. The
program will end when the sensor is tilted down.

Figure 4

We can even use the magic wand to have the monkey make sound effects while he drums. Every time we shake the wand, the monkey can select a random sound effect. This program is shown in Figure 5.

This program will start the motors so that the monkey is drumming while he makes sound
This program will start the motors so that the monkey is drumming
while he makes sound effects. Every time the magic wand is
tilted in any direction, a random sound effect will be played. This
program can be terminated by pressing the red Stop button or by
pressing Esc.

Figure 5

Using the Sound Sensor

We can even make the monkey do tricks by talking to it. If we make a sound, the monkey will start drumming, and when we

make a sound again, the monkey will stop drumming. This program is shown in Figure 6.

This program will wait to hear a sound from the user. As soon as a sound
This program will wait to hear a sound from the user. As soon as a
sound is heard, it will start the motor. It will keep the motor on for
at least 1 second and then wait for the user to make a sound. It will
then turn off the motor.

Figure 6

Note: The Sound Sensor works most effectively when background noise is minimal.

We can say words such as “Go” and “Start” to make the monkey start drumming. Also, we can say “Stop” and “Enough” to make it stop drumming.

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Drumming Monkey Literacy Teacher Guide

Literacy – Suggested Building

Changing the Cams

We can change the beats and rhythms the Drumming Monkey plays by changing the arrangement of the cams.

Left cam

Right cam

What happens

One arm drums at a time.
One arm drums at a time.

One arm drums at a time.

One arm drums at a time but at
 

One arm drums at a time but at

a different rhythm.

a different rhythm.

For every one left arm drum,
For every one left arm drum,

For every one left arm drum,

the right arm drums twice.

One arm drums at a time,
 

One arm drums at a time,

but at a quicker pace.

but at a quicker pace.

Using the Sceneries Set to Enhance the Model

We can use the Sceneries Set to create a pair of drums for the Drumming Monkey, as shown in Figure 7.

Also using the Sceneries Set, we can create another creature from the Drumming Monkey model, such as the Drumming Dragon, as shown in Figure 8.

Using the LEGO ® Education WeDo™ Construction Set, we can create props for the Drumming Monkey, such as a baseball cap, as shown in Figure 9.

Drumming Monkey Literacy Teacher Guide Literacy – Suggested Building Changing the Cams We can change the

Figure 7

Drumming Monkey Literacy Teacher Guide Literacy – Suggested Building Changing the Cams We can change the

Figure 8

Drumming Monkey Literacy Teacher Guide Literacy – Suggested Building Changing the Cams We can change the

Figure 9

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Drumming Monkey Literacy Vocabulary

Drumming Monkey Literacy Vocabulary trick train teach learn taught practice encourage repeat perform talented LEGO, the

trick

train

teach

learn

taught

practice

encourage

repeat

perform

talented

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Drumming Monkey Literacy Student Worksheet

Look What We Can Do!

Name: ______________________________

Date: ___________________

Drumming Monkey Literacy Student Worksheet Look What We Can Do! Name: ______________________________ Date: ___________________ Use at

Use at least three interesting words to describe how your new pet looks.

1.

2.

3.

Use at least three interesting words to describe your new pet’s personality.

1.

2.

3.

What is the name of

Drumming Monkey Literacy Student Worksheet Look What We Can Do! Name: ______________________________ Date: ___________________ Use at

your new pet?

Drumming Monkey Literacy Student Worksheet Look What We Can Do! Name: ______________________________ Date: ___________________ Use at

Use three verbs to describe what your new pet can do.

1.

2.

3.

Use one adverb to describe each action.

1.

2.

3.

Where did you get this

pet?

Use at least three interesting words to describe this place.

1.

2.

3.

How did you teach your pet to do these tricks?

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Drumming Monkey Literacy Rubric

Name: ______________________________ Date: ___________________ Drumming Monkey Literacy Rubric Expectation: Needs Improvement Fair Good Excellent Demonstrates understanding
Name: ______________________________
Date: ___________________
Drumming Monkey Literacy Rubric
Expectation:
Needs Improvement
Fair
Good
Excellent
Demonstrates
understanding of
basic sentence
structure and
appropriate
punctuation.
/25
5 ------------------- 10
Demonstrates
a limited
understanding of
basic sentence
structure and
appropriate
punctuation.
Uses critical and
creative thinking to
select strong verbs
and adjectives
with limited
effectiveness.
11 ------------------ 15
Demonstrates
some
understanding of
basic sentence
structure and
appropriate
punctuation.
16 ----------------- 20
Demonstrates
a considerable
understanding of
basic sentence
structure and
appropriate
punctuation.
21 ----------------- 25
Demonstrates
a thorough
understanding of
basic sentence
structure and
appropriate
punctuation.
Uses critical
and creative
thinking to select
strong verbs and
adjectives.
/25
Uses critical and
creative thinking to
select strong verbs
and adjectives
with some
effectiveness.
Uses critical and
creative thinking to
select strong verbs
and adjectives
with considerable
effectiveness.
Uses critical and
creative thinking to
select strong verbs
and adjectives with
a high degree of
effectiveness.
Expresses
and organizes
descriptive details
in a logical order.
Expresses
and organizes
descriptive details
in a logical order
with limited
effectiveness.
Expresses
and organizes
descriptive
details in a logical
order with some
effectiveness.
Expresses
and organizes
descriptive details
in a logical order
with considerable
effectiveness.
Expresses
and organizes
descriptive details
in a logical order
with a high degree
of effectiveness.
/25
Applies
knowledge and
skills in familiar
contexts.
/25
Applies knowledge
and skills in
familiar contexts
with limited
effectiveness.
Applies knowledge
and skills in
familiar contexts
with some
effectiveness.
Applies knowledge
and skills in
familiar contexts
with considerable
effectiveness.
Applies knowledge
and skills in
familiar contexts
with a high degree
of effectiveness.
Comments:
/100

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Drumming Monkey:
Science
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Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide

Lesson At-A-Glance

Lesson Overview

Learning Outcomes

 

The students will research and respond to a series of questions relating to the habitat and resource needs of a particular species of primate in order to create a profile about that animal. The

• Understand and define key environmental terminology.

• Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the features of a biological habitat.

LEGO ® Education WeDo™ Materials

• “Into the Wild Part 1” worksheet • “Into the Wild Part 2” worksheet • Drumming Monkey Science Rubric • 900097 LEGO ® Education WeDo™

students will use the WeDo™ software to demonstrate an appropriate habitat for that primate based on the research conducted.

• Research and describe a particular primate in relation to its habitat.

Activity Pack - Sound List (page 21) • “Drumming Monkey Elements Inventory” tracking sheet • “My Program” tracking sheet • LEGO Education WeDo Software

Cross-Curricular

Suggested Other Materials

Suggested LEGO Elements

Connections

• General references and

• LEGO Education WeDo

• LEGO Sceneries Set 779385

• Literacy • Social Studies • Visual Arts

encyclopedias from the classroom or school library about a variety of primate species

Construction Set 979580

(optional)

• Internet access to zoo Web sites or appropriate educational Web sites

• Assorted LEGO bricks (optional)

• Large, colored images of different kinds of primates (e.g., mandrills, chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans, macaques, lemurs, aye-ayes, bush babies, and so on)

• Large black-and-white outlines of different countries where primates live (for Extension Activities)

Suggested Programming

Estimated Completion Time

Student Organization

Blocks Used

(2.75 hours + Extension)

• Part 1: Class, Small groups

• Start • Display Background

• Part 1: 30 minutes • Part 2: 60 minutes

• Part 2: Class or small groups, Individual

• Number input • Play Sound • Repeat • Wait For • Motor Power • Motor Off

• Part 3: 45 minutes • Part 4: 30 minutes

• Part 3: Individual • Part 4: Small groups, Individual

Assessment Suggestions

Assessment Suggestions Vocabulary

Vocabulary

• Completed “Into the Wild”

• primate

worksheets

• habitat

• Completed habitat presentation

• flora

program

• fauna

• Completed extension activity

• endangered

artwork

• protected

• “My Program” tracking sheet

• appearance

• Reflective journal entry

• shelter

• food

• relationship

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Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide

Connect (Part 1 – 30 minutes)

Write the word primate on the board in large, clear letters. Show the class several different examples of primates (monkeys, mandrills, chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans, macaques, lemurs, aye-ayes, bush babies, and so on).

Tell the students that these animals all look very different in shape, size, and color, but that there are still a few things they all have in common. They are all primates, which is a kind of mammal. Briefly talk about a few mammal examples and features as compared to other kinds of animals (e.g., reptiles, amphibians, insects, and so forth).

Give the students a few minutes to look carefully at the pictures and to discuss the following questions with other students. Prompt the students to think about things they already know about primates from trips to the zoo, Web sites, books, movies, or TV shows.

Guiding Questions:

• What is similar or different about the way that all of these primates look? (e.g., fur color and amount, arms, legs, hands or paws, tails, size, facial features)

• What do you know about the way each primate lives? • What do these primates like to eat? • Where do these primates like to sleep, play, eat, and so on? • Do these primates live in big families or do they live by themselves? • What are some of the dangers these primates face every day?

Divide the class into groups of three to four students.

Have the students create a “graffiti wall” of all the different kinds of primates or facts about primates they can think of. Post several pieces of paper on the walls around the room, each with the word PRIMATE written in large capital letters at the center of the page.

Have each group line up at their piece of paper and take turns, one after the other, stepping forward to write an idea they associate with the word primate before passing the marker to the next individual in line.

Tell the students that they will have five minutes to add as many ideas, words, or images as they can to the wall. Only one student may use the marker at a time, but other students in line may contribute suggestions if the student with the marker needs some help.

When the time is up, have each group share their ideas on primates with the class. After each group has presented their ideas, have a class discussion about what it means to call something a primate. Create a list of features on a large piece of poster paper and post it somewhere visible in the classroom.

Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide Connect (Part 1 – 30 minutes) Write the word primate on

Hints:

• Discussion of mammals, reptiles, insects, and so forth can be expanded into a basic classification activity using pictures and images.

• Post the primate images at various locations around the room so students can walk around freely to study them.

• Write the Guiding Questions for this activity on the board or on a large piece of poster paper as a reference for students.

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Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide

Construct (Part 2 – 60 minutes)

Tell the class that today they will be choosing one of the primates they’ve seen in the pictures around the room. They will learn about the primate and its habitat and share their knowledge with the class. When they have become an “expert” on that primate, they will use the WeDo™ software and elements to share some of the information they have gathered about their primate and its habitat with the class.

Define the following terms and discuss examples (local and global) with the class. This can be done as a class or in small groups of three to four students.

Key Terms:

Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide Construct (Part 2 – 60 minutes) Tell the class that today

• habitat (home environment) • flora (plant life) • fauna (animal life) • shelter (housing, a safe place to live or sleep) • appearance (the way something looks) • endangered (in danger of extinction) • protected (efforts are being made to prevent this organism from becoming extinct)

When key terms and ideas have been introduced, hand out the “Into the Wild” worksheets and give students time to use classroom or Internet resources to locate and record information for their presentation.

Resources:

Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide Construct (Part 2 – 60 minutes) Tell the class that today

“Into the Wild Part 1” worksheet

Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide Construct (Part 2 – 60 minutes) Tell the class that today

“Into the Wild Part 2” worksheet

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Hints:

• As a class, discuss the relationship between an organism and its environment. Focus on the concept of interdependence and provide examples of the ways that local animals have adapted to life in their environment. (e.g., Squirrels rely on trees to build their homes and for food. Those trees rely on the squirrels and other animals to carry and plant their seeds.)

• Part 2 Construct can be divided into two shorter lessons if necessary.

• Students may be assigned a particular primate, choose their own, or draw a primate name from a hat.

• Define vocabulary on a large piece of poster paper for future reference.

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Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide

Contemplate (Part 3 – 45 minutes)

When students have gathered their information to complete the “Into the Wild” worksheets, walk the class step-by-step through the creation of a habitat program. Demonstrate the programming options as outlined in the Drumming Monkey Science Suggested Programming and Building Guide.

Show the students how to adjust the sounds and display backgrounds and create an appropriate representation of the habitat in which their primate lives. If possible, a primate call impression may be recorded on Sound Input 1 and added to the presentation.

Give the students time to prepare their written presentation and program their habitat program. The students should record their program on the “My Program” tracking sheet.

Resources:

Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide Contemplate (Part 3 – 45 minutes) When students have gathered their

“My Program” tracking sheet

Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide Contemplate (Part 3 – 45 minutes) When students have gathered their

“Into the Wild Part 1” worksheet

Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide Contemplate (Part 3 – 45 minutes) When students have gathered their

“Into the Wild Part 2” worksheet

Hints:

• A printed or illustrated image of a primate’s head may be attached temporarily to the Drumming Monkey model while the standard Drumming Monkey program is used simultaneously with the Habitat program to give presentations a little extra flair.

• To manage the number of students using computers, have half of the class convert their collected information into a written paragraph as the other half of the class completes the programming component of the presentation.

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Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide

Continue (Part 4 – 30 minutes)

Divide the class into groups of three to four students, making sure that no two students within that group have researched the same primate.

Each group will be given a large piece of poster paper and a magic marker.

Each student has now become an “expert” on a specific primate and will share his or her findings and demonstrate the habitat program created in Part 3 Contemplate. When the presentations have been completed, the group will record similarities and differences between the different primates they have learned about, using the provided poster paper.

Suggested Sentence Starters:

• All of the primates

. • Some/One of the primates

. .

. .

.

Have students complete a reflective journal highlighting the most interesting facts they’ve learned about primates, the habitats they live in, and the name of another primate they would like to learn more about.

Extension Activities:

• Use the Sceneries Set or the LEGO ® Bricks Set to replicate the shape of the country in which the animal lives. (15 minutes)

• Organize and run a Library Scavenger Hunt for specific books or information to further develop research and library skills. (30 minutes)

• Create a world map on large mural paper and mark where each student’s primate lives. Make the map 3-D by putting the map on the floor or a large table and adding geographical and environmental features to the map using the LEGO Sceneries Set. (60 minutes)

Portfolio Suggestion:

Create a Primate Profile poster out of the information collected for the “Into the Wild” worksheets

and presentation. Include images of any visual elements created using the Sceneries Set and the “My Program” tracking sheet as evidence of research.

Resources:

Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide Continue (Part 4 – 30 minutes) Divide the class into groups

“My Program” tracking sheet

Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide Continue (Part 4 – 30 minutes) Divide the class into groups

“Into the Wild Part 1” worksheet

Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide Continue (Part 4 – 30 minutes) Divide the class into groups

“Into the Wild Part 2” worksheet

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Hints:

• Presentations of animal profiles and habitat programs may also be done for the class as a whole or shared with other classes or students.

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Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide

Science – Suggested Programming

Resources:

Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide Science – Suggested Programming Resources: “My Program” tracking sheet Habitat Images

“My Program” tracking sheet

Habitat Images and Sounds

The “My Program” tracking sheet is a helpful tool for students to organize their program before actually going to the computer.

Sound effects are incorporated using the Play Sound block shown in Figure 1.

Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide Science – Suggested Programming Resources: “My Program” tracking sheet Habitat Images

Figure 1

Backgrounds are displayed using the Display Background block shown in Figure 2.

Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide Science – Suggested Programming Resources: “My Program” tracking sheet Habitat Images

Figure 2

You can use the Display Background block as well as Wait For blocks with the Repeat block to show the different habitats of the monkey, such as in the program shown in Figure 3.

This program displays habitats where other primates live, such as the savannah, the grasslands, the beach
This program displays habitats where other primates live, such as the savannah, the
grasslands, the beach by the sea, or the caves where the monkeys might go for shelter.

Figure 3

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Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide

You can program sound effects and backgrounds in one program to match the primate’s habitat, using time delays and the Repeat block to make sound effects play and background display when desired. A sample program is shown in Figure 4.

This scene displays the forest background while playing the sounds of the forest. It includes the
This scene displays the forest background while playing the sounds of the
forest. It includes the sound of frogs near a pond, sounds of thunderstorms
and rain, as well as sounds of birds chirping and lions roaring.
output
Figure 4

You can also record yourselves making sound effects for the primate’s habitat and use them in your program. This microphone control is located at the top-left portion of the screen in the Connection tab. It is shown in Figure 5.

Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide You can program sound effects and backgrounds in one program to

Figure 5

The circle button is used to record. Click it and then speak or make a sound. After you have created a sound effect, click the square to stop the recording. To hear a recorded audio, click the triangular play button, and your sound will play. To use this recorded sound together with other sounds in your programs, all you need to do is adjust the input number on the Play Sound block to be Sound Effect 1 whenever you would like to hear your recorded sound. An example program is shown in Figure 6.

Your recorded sound Figure 6
Your
recorded
sound
Figure 6

Note: You can only have one recorded sound at a time. It will be stored as Sound Effect 1. Any other recording will also be saved as Sound Effect 1, but it will override the previously recorded sound clip.

Note: If you are recording a custom sound effect, this recorded clip can only be a maximum of five seconds long.

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Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide

Science – Suggested Building

Building a Habitat

Habitat build ideas for the Drumming Monkey are shown in Figure 7.

Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide Science – Suggested Building Building a Habitat Habitat build ideas for
Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide Science – Suggested Building Building a Habitat Habitat build ideas for

Figure 7

You can use LEGO ® bricks to create a map of a country that primates live in, such as India, as shown in Figure 8.

Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide Science – Suggested Building Building a Habitat Habitat build ideas for

Figure 8

Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide Science – Suggested Building Building a Habitat Habitat build ideas for
Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide Science – Suggested Building Building a Habitat Habitat build ideas for
Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide Science – Suggested Building Building a Habitat Habitat build ideas for
Drumming Monkey Science Teacher Guide Science – Suggested Building Building a Habitat Habitat build ideas for
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Drumming Monkey Science Vocabulary

Drumming Monkey Science Vocabulary relationship primate endangered habitat protected appearance shelter flora food fauna LEGO, the

relationship

primate

endangered

habitat

protected

appearance

shelter

flora

food

fauna

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Drumming Monkey Science Student Worksheet

Into the Wild Part 1

Name: ______________________________

Date: ___________________

My primate is a Is this primate endangered? ____________________________________

.

________________________________________________

Appearance

What color(s) is this primate? Draw and color a picture of this primate.

Drumming Monkey Science Student Worksheet Into the Wild Part 1 Name: ______________________________ Date: ___________________ My primate

How big (or small) is this primate? Draw a picture of another object or animal that is about the same size as your primate.

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Drumming Monkey Science Student Worksheet

Into the Wild Part 2

Drumming Monkey Science Student Worksheet Into the Wild Part 2 Name: ______________________________ Habitat Where does your

Name: ______________________________

Habitat

Where does your primate live?

Date: ___________________

Describe the kind of habitat your primate prefers. (e.g., soggy wetland; dry, hot desert; warm, humid rainforest; cold, dry tundra; and so on)

What kind of flora (plant life) grows in this habitat? Draw pictures with labels or make a list.

What kind of fauna (animal life) lives in this habitat? Draw pictures with labels or make a list.

Is your primate an herbivore, a carnivore, or an omnivore?

Draw and label a few of your primate’s favorite things to eat.

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Drumming Monkey Science Rubric

Name: ______________________________ Date: ___________________ Drumming Monkey Science Rubric Expectation: Needs Improvement Fair Good Excellent 5 -------------------
Name: ______________________________
Date: ___________________
Drumming Monkey Science Rubric
Expectation:
Needs Improvement
Fair
Good
Excellent
5 ------------------- 10
11 ------------------ 15
21 ----------------- 25
Demonstrates
understanding of
key terms (e.g.,
primate, habitat,
endangered, and
so forth).
/25
Demonstrates
a limited
understanding of
key terms (e.g.,
primate, habitat,
endangered, and
so forth).
Demonstrates
some
understanding of
key terms (e.g.,
primate, habitat,
endangered, and
so forth).
16 ----------------- 20
Demonstrates
a considerable
understanding of
key terms (e.g.,
primate, habitat,
endangered, and
so forth).
Demonstrates
a thorough
understanding of
key terms (e.g.,
primate, habitat,
endangered, and
so forth).
Uses critical and
creative thinking
to represent
habitat features.
Uses critical and
creative thinking
to represent
habitat features
with limited
effectiveness.
Uses critical and
creative thinking to
represent habitat
features with some
effectiveness.
/25
Uses critical and
creative thinking
to represent
habitat features
with considerable
effectiveness.
Uses critical and
creative thinking to
represent habitat
features with a
high degree of
effectiveness.
Expresses
and organizes
research into
complete, logical
sentences.
Expresses and
organizes research
into complete,
logical sentences
with limited
effectiveness.
Expresses and
organizes research
into complete,
logical sentences
with some
effectiveness.
Expresses and
organizes research
into complete,
logical sentences
with considerable
effectiveness.
Expresses and
organizes research
into complete,
logical sentences
with a high degree
of effectiveness.
/25
Applies
knowledge and
skills in familiar
contexts.
/25
Applies knowledge
and skills in
familiar contexts
with limited
effectiveness.
Applies knowledge
and skills in
familiar contexts
with some
effectiveness.
Applies knowledge
and skills in
familiar contexts
with considerable
effectiveness.
Applies knowledge
and skills in
familiar contexts
with a high degree
of effectiveness.
Comments:
/100
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Drumming Monkey: Social Studies LEGO, the LEGO logo, and WEDO are trademarks of the LEGO Group.
Drumming Monkey:
Social Studies
LEGO, the LEGO logo, and WEDO are trademarks of the LEGO Group. ©2010 The LEGO Group.

Drumming Monkey Social Studies Teacher Guide

Lesson At-A-Glance

Lesson Overview

Learning Outcomes

 

The students will listen to a variety of drumbeats and rhythms from different traditions and complete a chart to describe each beat and the context in which it is played. The students will choose one beat to explore further and present it to the class, using

• Understand the role of music and musical instruments in a variety of cultural traditions (e.g., Native American, African, East Asian, Celtic, North American).

• Identify and describe resources used to create cultural artifacts.

LEGO ® Education WeDo™ Materials

• Completed Drumming Monkey model • “The Beat Goes On” worksheet • Drumming Monkey Social Studies Rubric

the Drumming Monkey model and programming to simulate the rhythm. All models will be connected using a communication feature in the WeDo™ software and will help in the creation of a group drumming circle at the end of the lesson.

• Make comparisons and personal connections to the use of drums in cultural practice.

• “Drumming Monkey Elements Inventory” tracking sheet • “My Program” tracking sheet • LEGO ® Education WeDo Software

Cross-Curricular

Suggested Other Materials

Suggested LEGO Elements

Connections

• Collection of stories and nonfiction

• Audio and/or video clips of

• LEGO Education WeDo

(optional)

• Music • Literacy • Visual Arts

reference materials about different kinds of drums and their origins (e.g., Celtic or Irish drum, Cuban bongos, African Djembe, Native

Construction Set 979580 • LEGO Sceneries Set 779385

• Assorted LEGO bricks (optional)

American hand drum or frame drum, Japanese taiko drum, or snare drum used by a marching band)

different kinds of drumbeats and instruments

• Images of or real-life examples of different drums and percussion instruments from around the world

 

Estimated Completion Time

Student Organization

Suggested Programming Blocks Used

• Start On Key Press • Motor Power, Motor This Way, Motor Off • Wait For • Number input and Random input • Repeat • Send Message and Start On Message

(2.5 hours + Extension) • Part 1: 30 minutes • Part 2: 45 minutes • Part 3: 45 minutes • Part 4: 30 minutes

• Part 1: Class • Part 2: Class, Small groups • Part 3: Small groups • Part 4: Small groups

Assessment Suggestions

Assessment Suggestions Vocabulary

Vocabulary

• Completed “The Beat Goes On”

• compare

worksheet

• celebrate

• Presentation

• communicate

• Interview

• storytelling

• tradition

• rhythm

• beat

• tempo

• instrument

• percussion

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Drumming Monkey Social Studies Teacher Guide

Connect (Part 1 – 30 minutes)

On the board or on a large piece of poster paper, write the numbers 1-5. Have the students make a similar list with considerable room to record personal observations and predictions in a journal or on a lined piece of paper.

Tell the students that they are going to hear four different pieces of music. Prompt the students to focus on the sound of the drums if there are other instruments played in the piece.

Encourage the students to sway to the music as it plays. When the piece has been heard once or twice, have the students try to simulate the rhythm and tempo of the beat by tapping their hands on their desks or their feet on the floor.

Guiding Questions:

• How does this music make you feel? • What adjectives can we use to describe the drums in this music?

• Where do you think this music comes from?

• Why do you think it comes from that country? (e.g., personal experience, have heard it before, heard music in a movie set in that country)

• From which materials do you think this instrument is made?

• How do you think this instrument is played? (e.g., with hands, with one stick, with two sticks, and so forth)

• In what kind of situation would you hear music like this? (e.g., a celebration, a funeral, a warning, something to help a group of people work together)

Record student observations and guesses on the board or on chart paper.

Tell the class that drums were some of the earliest instruments ever made. All over the world they are used for different purposes. Sometimes they are used for entertainment and celebration, sometimes they are used for communication and organization, and sometimes they are used for healing or meditation.

Tell students that today they will be learning about different drums from around the world, including where they come from, materials used to make them, and the different situations in which they are used. They will use the WeDo™ Drumming Monkey model and software to create their own beat. The whole class will use the models and programs created to have a Drumming Monkey circle.

Hints:

• It is valuable to have students of different cultural backgrounds share their own experiences and heritage with music and drums.

• Alternatively, this activity may be completed in a circle with observations recorded exclusively by the teacher.

• Many music teachers will have resources of this nature collected for classroom use.

• Audio and video clips can easily be searched online.

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Drumming Monkey Social Studies Teacher Guide

Construct (Part 2 – 45 minutes)

One instrument at a time, show students real-life examples, videos, or images of the drums they heard in Part 1 Connect. Refer back to the observations and predictions recorded on the board or poster paper in the previous activity.

Divide students into small groups of four to five students. Assign each group one type of drum. Have them complete the “The Beat Goes On” worksheet to learn the drum’s origins, materials from which it is made, how it is played, and common situations in which it is used.

When students in the group have completed their worksheets, give the group a large piece of paper to collect and record their responses and share their expertise with the class.

Drumming Monkey Social Studies Teacher Guide Construct (Part 2 – 45 minutes) One instrument at a

Resources:

Drumming Monkey Social Studies Teacher Guide Construct (Part 2 – 45 minutes) One instrument at a

“The Beat Goes On” worksheet

LEGO, the LEGO logo, and WEDO are trademarks of the LEGO Group. ©2010 The LEGO Group.

Hints:

• Local musicians or heritage groups are often willing to make drumming presentations to classes or welcome classes to community events where students can gain diverse cultural experience firsthand.

• The worksheet in Part 2 Construct and the programming activity in Part 3 Contemplate can be done at the same time by allowing one or two expert groups to work on their programs as the other groups complete the worksheet and poster, or vice versa.

• Where possible, use video clips to show ceremonies, celebrations, or general situations where drums are used in context.

• Define vocabulary on a large piece of poster paper for future reference.

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Drumming Monkey Social Studies Teacher Guide

Contemplate (Part 3 – 45 minutes)

Have each student in an expert group (see Part 2 Construct) listen carefully to the audio clip of the drum they are studying. Encourage them to simulate the rhythm and tempo of the beat with their hands on their lap.

Tell them they are going to use the Drumming Monkey model and WeDo™ software to make their monkey drum like the musician who is playing the drum they are studying.

Walk the group step-by-step through a basic program to make the Drumming Monkey model drum at a slow speed. Show them how to increase the speed of the drumming, how to add a pause if necessary, and how to stop their program.

Demonstrate how to change the cams on the model to create different beat patterns.

Guiding Questions:

• Look at the Drumming Monkey’s arms and think about how your drum is played. Should

your monkey be playing with one arm or two arms? • How many drums will he need? • Does your Drumming Monkey need sticks or can he play with his hands? • Does he need to drum quickly or slowly?

• Does the tempo need to stay the same speed? Can your monkey speed up or slow down during the piece of music he plays?

• Should he pause? • For how long should the monkey drum?

Give the students time to experiment with their program and model to simulate the drumming style and tempo in the sample they have heard. Students may share programming and building ideas with each other.

If available, use the Sceneries Set to create instruments for or to personalize the model.

Demonstrate and assist the students in adding the Start Send On and Start Message blocks in their programs so that each of their models will play in succession during their group presentation. Have the students record their programs on the “My Program” tracking sheet.

Resources:

Drumming Monkey Social Studies Teacher Guide Contemplate (Part 3 – 45 minutes) Have each student in

“My Program” tracking sheet

Hints:

• Emphasize to students that every musician has a slightly different style. Their Drumming Monkey will not play his drums in exactly the same way as the musician playing the drums they are studying. The goal of this activity is to make the model and the beat similar and to explain one’s choices.

• When adding text to the Start Send On and Start Message inputs, use student names so it will be clear whose model will play next.

• The worksheet in Part 2 Construct and the programming activity in Part 3 Contemplate can be done at the same time by allowing one or two expert groups to work on their programs as the other groups complete the worksheet and poster, or vice versa.

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Drumming Monkey Social Studies Teacher Guide

Continue (Part 4 – 30 minutes)

When expert group posters have been created and drumming programs have been written, give students time within their groups to assign presentation roles and rehearse the presentation of their poster.

Have each group share their expertise about a particular drum and its origins. Groups can then play their Drumming Monkey program individually or as a collective sequence for the other groups. Have students verbally explain some of their programming and building choices. (e.g., “I added one drumstick to my model because the Celtic drum is played with one stick.” “The beat my monkey plays is very slow because this drum is used in a serious healing ceremony.”)

Have students complete a reflective journal entry connecting personal experience with what they have learned today.

Guiding Questions:

• What are three interesting facts that you learned today? • Do you play the drums? What kind of drums do you play? • When do you hear drums in your life? • Do you ever use drums for celebration, communication, or healing? • Would you like to learn how to play one of the drums you learned about today?

Extension Activities:

• Use the Sceneries Set to build artifacts of the same origins as the drum being studied or to create a representation of a feature of life within that culture. (e.g., the floor plan of a home or a tool or vehicle that is used in daily life) (15 minutes)

• Use found materials to create and decorate a replica of the instrument studied in the lesson. (30 minutes)

• Discuss the similarities and differences between celebrations or holidays in other regions of the world in comparison with celebrations or holidays in a local city or state where the students live. (30 minutes)

• Create a large global map on a piece of mural paper. Have students color specific countries or add features and note where different percussion instruments come from by finding or printing images and attaching them to the map. (60 minutes)

Portfolio Suggestion:

Include the completed “The Beat Goes On” worksheet with the “My Program” tracking sheet

outlining the program created for the Drumming Monkey.

Resources:

Drumming Monkey Social Studies Teacher Guide Continue (Part 4 – 30 minutes) When expert group posters

“My Program” tracking sheet

Drumming Monkey Social Studies Teacher Guide Continue (Part 4 – 30 minutes) When expert group posters

“The Beat Goes On” worksheet

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Hints:

• This activity makes an excellent presentation to showcase students’ creative programming capabilities for other classes or for parents’ night.

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Drumming Monkey Social Studies Teacher Guide

Social Studies – Suggested Programming

Resources:

Drumming Monkey Social Studies Teacher Guide Social Studies – Suggested Programming Resources: The “My Program” tracking

The “My Program” tracking sheet is a helpful tool for students to organize their program before actually going to the computer.

“My Program” tracking sheet

Creating Different Rhythms and Music

We can program the Drumming Monkey to drum at different speeds, and we can control those speeds from our keyboard, as shown in Figure 1.

In this configuration, the greater the number on the input, the higher the speed of the
In this configuration, the greater the number on the input, the higher the speed of the motor. If we press the number 2 on
our keyboard, the motor will spin at speed 2. If we press 5, the motor will spin at speed 5, and so on. The only problem
arises when we want the motor to spin at its maximum, which is speed 10. We do not have a single key to represent the
speed of 10, so here we have allocated number 0 to tell the motor to spin at speed 10.

Figure 1

To have the speed of the Drumming Monkey change by itself, we can program the motor to spin at different speeds with timers. A sample program is shown in Figure 2.

This will start by setting the speed of the motor to 5 for 2.5 seconds. It
This will start by setting the
speed of the motor to 5 for
2.5 seconds. It will then have
the motor spin at its maximum
speed for 2 seconds. It will
then go back to speed 5 for 3
seconds, and then the motor
will stop.

Figure 2

We can use the Random input to have the monkey drum at random speeds and create different beats. This can be done using the program shown in Figure 3.

This program will have the monkey play a new, randomly selected beat every two seconds. Its
This program will have the monkey play a new, randomly
selected beat every two seconds. Its execution can be
terminated by pressing the red Stop button or by pressing Esc.

Figure 3

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Drumming Monkey Social Studies Teacher Guide

Sending Messages Between Computers

We can even create a program that starts everyone’s Drumming Monkey at the same time so the monkeys are drumming all at once. To do this, we will use a feature of the WeDo™ software called Messages. One block sends a message with a word, and another block receives that message, if the word is the same, and starts the program connected to it.

Note: In order for this to work on different computers, the computers must be connected to the same network.

Messages can be sent using the Send Message block shown in Figure 4.

Drumming Monkey Social Studies Teacher Guide Sending Messages Between Computers We can even create a program

Figure 4

The Send Message block can be put anywhere in the code, but we will put it in a program by itself so that it sends a message to everyone’s monkey for them to start drumming. If we edit the phrase on the Send Message block and call it “All Go,” as shown in Figure 5, we will use that same phrase to receive a signal.

Drumming Monkey Social Studies Teacher Guide Sending Messages Between Computers We can even create a program

Figure 5

Now we will use the Start On Message block shown in Figure 6.

Drumming Monkey Social Studies Teacher Guide Sending Messages Between Computers We can even create a program

Figure 6

If this block receives messages, it starts the program connected to it. Earlier, we used the Send Message block to send the phrase “All Go,” so now we must use that same phrase in this block if we want to start this program. We can edit the phrase on the Start On Message block to be “All Go,” as shown in Figure 7.

Drumming Monkey Social Studies Teacher Guide Sending Messages Between Computers We can even create a program

Figure 7

Now if the Send Message block with the phrase “All Go” is run in a program, it will give a signal to all of the Start On Message blocks with the phrase “All Go” to start the program to which they are connected.

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Drumming Monkey Social Studies Teacher Guide

The program that will send the message for everyone’s monkey to begin drumming is shown in Figure 8.

Drumming Monkey Social Studies Teacher Guide The program that will send the message for everyone’s monkey

Figure 8

To have everyone’s monkey start drumming together, we need everyone’s programs to have a Start On Message block with “All Go” as their input and their program attached to it, as shown in Figure 9.

Drumming Monkey Social Studies Teacher Guide The program that will send the message for everyone’s monkey

Figure 9

One class’s example is shown in Figure 10.

Teacher A teacher can create the first program to send a message to everyone’s computer to
Teacher
A teacher can create the first program to send a message to
everyone’s computer to start their monkeys. The students will
receive that message and their programs will be connected to
the Start On Message block and will run.
Group 1
Group 2
Group 3
Group 4

Figure 10

We can also create programs that run one by one so that each group’s Drumming Monkey will drum separately.

To make this work, a Send Message block needs to be at the end of each group’s program and a Start On Message block needs to be at the beginning of the next group’s program. For example, we can make a Drumming Monkey program like the one shown in Figure 11.

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Drumming Monkey Social Studies Teacher Guide

Drumming Monkey Social Studies Teacher Guide Figure 11 All we will do is add the Send

Figure 11

All we will do is add the Send Message block to the end and edit the input attached to it. Let’s use the word “Cool,” as shown in Figure 12.

Drumming Monkey Social Studies Teacher Guide Figure 11 All we will do is add the Send

Figure 12

The group that will go after will put the word “Cool” in their Start On Message block and put that at the front of their program. This is shown in Figure 13.

Drumming Monkey Social Studies Teacher Guide Figure 11 All we will do is add the Send

Figure 13

If this group is the last one to go, they will leave their program like this. If there is a group after them, they will put a Send Message block with a certain word. The group after them will put that same word in their Start On Message block. An example of a classroom using this feature is shown in Figure 14.

First group Second group Third group Fourth and last group
First group
Second group
Third group
Fourth and last group

Figure 14

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Drumming Monkey Social Studies Teacher Guide

Social Studies – Suggested Building

Changing the Cam Configuration to Alter the Beat Pattern

We can also change the beats and rhythms the Drumming Monkey plays by changing the arrangement of the cams, as shown in Table 1.

Left cam

Right cam

What happens

One arm drums at a time.
One arm drums at a time.

One arm drums at a time.

One arm drums at a time but at
 

One arm drums at a time but at

a different rhythm.

a different rhythm.

For every one left-arm drum,
For every one left-arm drum,

For every one left-arm drum,

the right arm drums twice.

One arm quickly drums at a
 

One arm quickly drums at a

time.

time.

Table 1

Creating Props and Instruments

We can use the Sceneries Set to build a percussion instrument for the Drumming Monkey, such as the one shown in Figure 15.

Drumming Monkey Social Studies Teacher Guide Social Studies – Suggested Building Changing the Cam Configuration to

Figure 15

Representing Cultural Artifacts and Features

We can even use the Sceneries Set to create a floor plan of a Native American longhouse to represent a cultural artifact using

LEGO ® elements, as shown in Figure 16.

Beds Table Doorway Fire Beds Figure 16 144
Beds
Table
Doorway
Fire
Beds
Figure 16
144

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Drumming Monkey Social Studies Vocabulary

Drumming Monkey Social Studies Vocabulary percussion compare instrument celebrate tempo communicate beat storytelling rhythm tradition LEGO,

percussion

compare

instrument

celebrate

tempo

communicate

beat

storytelling

rhythm

tradition

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Drumming Monkey Social Studies Student Worksheet

The Beat Goes On

Name: ______________________________

Date: ___________________

This instrument is called a

 

.

This instrument is from

 

.

Which materials are used to make this instrument?

How is this instrument played?

Drumming Monkey Social Studies Student Worksheet The Beat Goes On Name: ______________________________ Date: ___________________ This instrument

How does the music you are hearing make you feel?

Describe the music you are hearing. Use colors, shapes, lines, adjectives, or similes to describe it. (e.g., “It’s very fast.” “It sounds like thunder.”)

Why do you think this music is being played on this instrument? Describe the situation.

Have you ever heard music like this before? Where? When?

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Drumming Monkey Social Studies Rubric

Name: ______________________________ Date: ___________________ Drumming Monkey Social Studies Rubric Expectation: Needs Improvement Fair Good Excellent 5
Name: ______________________________
Date: ___________________
Drumming Monkey Social Studies Rubric
Expectation:
Needs Improvement
Fair
Good
Excellent
5 ------------------- 10
11 ------------------ 15
16 ----------------- 20
21 ----------------- 25
Demonstrates
understanding of
the role of music
and musical
instruments in a
variety of cultural
traditions.
/25
Demonstrates
a limited
understanding of
the role of music
and musical
instruments in a
variety of cultural
traditions.
Demonstrates
some
understanding of
the role of music
and musical
instruments in a
variety of cultural
traditions.
Demonstrates
a considerable
understanding of
the role of music
and musical
instruments in a
variety of cultural
traditions.
Demonstrates
a thorough
understanding of
the role of music
and musical
instruments in a
variety of cultural
traditions.
Uses critical and
creative thinking
to demonstrate
the use of an
instrument in
cultural practice.
/25
Uses critical and
creative thinking
to demonstrate
the use of an
instrument in
cultural practice
with limited
effectiveness.
Uses critical and
creative thinking
to demonstrate
the use of an
instrument in
cultural practice
with some
effectiveness.
Uses critical and
creative thinking
to demonstrate
the use of an
instrument in
cultural practice
with considerable
effectiveness.
Uses critical and
creative thinking
to demonstrate
the use of an
instrument in
cultural practice
with a high degree
of effectiveness.
Expresses
and organizes
observations and
experiences.
/25
Expresses
and organizes
observations
and experiences
with limited
effectiveness.
Expresses
and organizes
observations
and experiences
with some
effectiveness.
Expresses
and organizes
observations and
experiences with
considerable
effectiveness.
Expresses
and organizes
observations and
experiences with
a high degree of
effectiveness.
Applies
knowledge and
skills in familiar
contexts.
/25
Applies knowledge
and skills in
familiar contexts
with limited
effectiveness.
Applies knowledge
and skills in
familiar contexts
with some
effectiveness.
Applies knowledge
and skills in
familiar contexts
with considerable
effectiveness.
Applies knowledge
and skills in
familiar contexts
with a high degree
of effectiveness.
Comments:
/100

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