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CE 7127 - SURVEYING WORK CAMP CANAL REHABILITATION PROJECT IN SEWANAGALA FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF IRRIGATION SYSTEM

GROUP J

GROUP MEMBERS RU/E/2010/ 012 RU/E/2010/019 RU/E/2010/044 RU/E/2010/055 RU/E/2010/069 RU/E/2010/113 RU/E/2010/134 RU/E/2010/149 ATAPATHTHU A.A.E. BOPETHTHA B.V.Y.R. ERANGI J.A.I. HERATH W.G.G.B JAYAWARDANE B.M.B.H. NAGASINGHE I.U. RANATHUNGA S.P. SAMINTHAKA S.A.M.

Figure1: Members of Group

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT This survey was carried out in relation to the core module CE 7127-Surveying Work Camp for the degree of Bachelor of Science of Engineering in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Ruhuna, Sri Lanka for Canal Rehabilitation Project in Sewanagala launched by Mahaweli Authority . First of all we express our gratitude to Dr.P.D.C.Perera, the Dean of faculty of Engineering, University of Ruhuna. And then our sincere gratitude goes to Dr.H.P.Sooriyarachchi who is the Head of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Ruhuna, Sri Lanka for the corporation of organizing survey camp. Then we would be thankful to the coordinator of the surveying camp 2013,Dr.Terrance M.Rengarasu and the moderator and Dr. N. Sathiparan for their valuable support for making a successful completion of the survey camp. Then our sincere gratitude goes to all the lectures of Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Ruhuna for their continuous guidance from start to end of the survey camp and our special gratitude goes to the instructor of Group J, Ms. W.G.P Kumari for her dedication to success our surveying. Also we take this opportunity to offer our thanks to all the staff members of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering of the Faculty of Engineering for being with us to help for the successful completion of surveying. We would be thankful to the Regional Project Manager, Deputy Project Manager, Residential Engineer, Mr.Pradeep all the engineers and staff members of Mahaweli Authority for their support. We would like to express our thanks not only the above mentioned personalities but also other various personalities including villagers who helped us in completing the surveying camp successfully.

Group J, Surveying Camp 2013, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Ruhuna.

CONTENT Chapter 1 1.0 Introduction 1.1 Introduction to the Project 1.2 Reasons Caused to the Rehabilitation 1.2.1 Human Practices 1.2.2 Natural Causes 1.3 Introduction to the Surveyed Area of Group J 1.4 Project Plan and Progress Chapter 2 2.0 Survey Work 2.1 Traverse Surveying 2.2 Detail Surveying 2.3 Leveling for Producing CS and LS of Main and Field Channels Chapter 3 3.0 Design 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Calculations 3.2.1 Water requirement for SD6 in C-8 3.2.1.1 Method 1 3.2.1.2 Method 2 3.2.1.3 Method 3 3.3 Design of Cross Section 3.3.1 Cross Section from SD5-SD6 Without Free Board 3.3.2 Cross Section from SD5-SD6 With Free Board 3.3.3 Cross Section from SD6-CT61 Without Free Board 3.3.4 Cross Section from SD5-SD6 With Free Board Chapter 4 4.0 Discussion 4.1 Comparison of Survey Results 4.1.1 Reasons for Discrepancies Between Actual and Theoretical Values 4.1.1.1 Environmental errors 4.1.1.2 Instrumental errors 4.1.1.3 Human errors 4.2 Design Overview 4.3 Problems Encountered During the Surveying and Solutions Chapter 5 5.0 Conclusion
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5 5 6 6 7 7 7

8 8 8 9

10 10 10 10 10 12 12 14 14 15 16 17 19 19 19 19 20 20 20

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LIST OF FIGURES Figure1: Members of Group Figure2:Regions Under Mahaweli Authority Figure3: Flow of Water of C-8 Figure4: Illicit Tapping of Water Figure5: Vegetation due to Lack of Maintenance Figure 6: Surveyed Area of Group J Figure 7:Detail Surveying Using TS LIST OF TABLES Table 1: Project Plan and Progress Table2: Reference Crop Evapotranspiration Table3: Command Area and CWR of Sugarcane and Paddy in Surveyed Area Table 4: Average Sri Lankan Evapotranspiration Values Table 5: Growth Stages and Crop Factors for Paddy Table 6: Growth Stages and Crop Factors for Cane Table 7: Summary of Design Discharges Table 8 : Summary of Existing Discharge of Canal Table9: Comparison of Results of the Traverse Survey with the Theoretical Values Table10 :Comparison of Results of Leveling Annexure Annex1:Prospection Diagram of Surveyed Area by Group J Annex 2:Primary Traverse Annex 3:Map of Primary Traverse Annex 4: Secondary Traverse Annex 5: Table of TBM Transfering
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1 5 5 6 7 7 8

8 10 11 12 13 13 14 18 19 19

Chapter 1 1.0 Introduction 1.1 Introduction to the Project Mahaweli Authority has the control of Regions named as A,B,C,D,G and H around the Mahaweli river basin and other than that there is a special separated region named as Walawe which consists of three main admin districts; Rathnapura, Sewanagala and Hambantota as shown in Figure 2.

Figure2:Regions Under Mahaweli Authority Many projects are launched by the Authority to fulfill the water requirement for the cultivation and power generation in those regions. Canal Rehabilitation Project is one of them and it consists of six numbers of blocks under the Canal Rehabilitation Project in Sewanagala costs 650 million rupees is locally funded with the intention of restoring the C-8 which carries water from as shown in Figure 3 from source. Udawalawe Reservoir Left Bank C-8 Mahagama Wawa

Figure 3: Flow of Water of C-8 The surveying in six numbers of blocks was carried out in order to get the details of existing irrigation system in left bank which consists a main canal with nine branch canals, one hundred eighty five distribution canals and one thousand twenty two field canals required to provide an effective and improved water supply system to farmers who cultivate sugarcane as it requires significant amount of water among banana and other vegetables. 1.2 1.2.1 Reasons Caused to the Rehabilitation Project Human Practices Illicit tapping of water from field canal by damaging the canal bunds. Figure 4 shows a example of human practices.

Figure 4: Illicit Tapping of Water Also waste has been discharged to the canal causes to block the sluice gates leading to spill water over the bank. Some of vegetables have been cultivated on canal bank which causes deterioration of concrete due to chemicals used in pesticides as well as accessibility for maintenance and even difficult to marking chain age for surveying.

1.2.2

Natural Causes As a result of roots of bushes and trees, bank is cracked then leading to leakage of water. Figure 5 is a real example for it.

Figure5: Vegetation due to Lack of Maintenance Deterioration of canal has being occurred for many years as this was constructed in 1980s.

1.3 Introduction to the Surveyed Area of Group J Following figure shows the aerial photograph of surveyed area of Group J.

Figure 6: Surveyed Area of Group J Surveying of SD5 to SD6 which has ten cane turn outs labeled as CT distributed from C-8 was carried out by the Group J and prospection diagram is attached in annex 1. It is expected to produce traverse map with the detail surveying and CS and LS for both main and field canals. In order to achieve that task survey work was planed as follow.
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1.4 Project Plan and Progress Table 1 shows the plan and progress of the survey of Group J. Table 1: Project Plan and Progress October 2013 8 9 10 11 12 13

Planned Activity 1.Site investigation

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2.Establishment of peg stations 3.Angular measurements and bay lengths of secondary traverse 4.Measuring bay lengths of primary traverse 5.Angular measurements primary traverse of

6.Open traverse for field canals 7.Calculations and data to excel sheet entering

8.Detail Surveying of main canal 9.Detail canals surveying of field

10.Marking TBM and chainage at 50m intervals along the main canal 11.Taking levels for CS and LS in main canals 12.Marking chainage and taking levels for CS and LS in field canals 13.Calculation and Plotting 14.Design of canal 15.Preparing presentation 16.Presentation LEGEND Plan
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report

and

Progress

Chapter 2 2.0 Survey Work Survey work was carried out in three stages as follow to provide the most accurate details regarding the irrigation system. Traverse Surveying Detail Surveying Leveling for CS and LS 2.1 Traverse Surveying Two close traverses named primary and secondary which was required to convert from known coordinates and open traverse for each field canals were carried out in order to mark the boundary of the surveyed area. Primary traverse were completed using TL while secondary traverse and open traverses were completed using TS. All the relevant traverse sheets are attached in annex 2. 2.2 Detail Surveying Horizontal angle and distance were measured with the means of TS to locate accepted detail on traverse map. Figure 7 shows doing detail surveying using TS.

Figure 7:Detail Surveying Using TS

2.3 Leveling for Producing CS and LS of Main and Field Canals TBMs were established at first in order to conduct the leveling which was carried out using rise and fall method to provide the CS and LS of main canal and field canals. Leveling was conducted as 100-200m loops with the fly back using level machine to maximize the accuracy in 20m and 50m CS on main canal and field canal respectively while 5m LS on both main and field canal but up to 500m along the field canals.
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Chapter 3 3.0 Design 3.1 Introduction Providing the water requirement for cultivations such as paddy, sugar cane and banana is the key objective of this canal system. But with the existing condition of canal system, it has been very difficult to distribute the required amount of water for cultivation properly as main and field canals are damaged due to reasons mentioned in Chapter 1.Canal Rehabilitation Project in Sewanagala was launched to satisfy the requirement of water for the cultivations and the survey was carried out in order to find out the existing CSs to calculate the conveying current water flow and compare with the requirement of water for the rehabilitation of canal system. Design of cross sections for rehabilitation was carried out based on the Technical Guide Lines for Irrigation Works published by the Irrigation Department of Sri Lanka considering the preliminary capacity of reservoir, crop water and irrigation requirement, evapotranspiration of reference crop with the requirement for land preparation as well as including farm losses and field irrigation requirement and also growth stages and crop factors with the assumptions. 3.2 Calculations 3.2.1 Water requirement for SD6 in C-8 3.2.1.1 Method 1 Assuming both sugar cane and paddy cultivated during same season, Table2: Reference Crop Evapotranspiration March April May June July August Sep 5.9 4.4 6.2 5.7 3.5 4.2 5.3

Month Jan ET0 in mm/day 4.1

Feb 4.4

Oct 4.7

Nov 4.0

Dec 4.2

According to the Table2, ET0max = 6.2 mm/day (MEA AND MASL records) and kcmax = 1.25 (FAO, 56) for sugarcane kcmax = 1.2 (FAO, 56) for paddy

ETc where, ETc ET0 kc Applying equation 1 for

= ETomax*kc

= Crop water requirement = Reference crop evapo-transpiration = Crop factor

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ETc of sugar cane ETc(sugar) ETc of paddy ETc(sugar)

= 6.2 mm/day*1.25 = 7.75 mm/day = 6.2 mm/day*1.2 = 7.44 mm/day

Table3: Command Area and CWR of Sugarcane and Paddy in Surveyed Area Field Canal Command Area of Sugarcane (ha) CWR of Sugarcane (m3/day) Command Area of Paddy (ha) CWR Of Paddy (m3/day) CT 55 CT56 4.125 3.375 CT65 13.500 CT64 7.875 CT57 10.875 CT58 8.625 CT59 7.500 CT60 3.000 CT61 3.750 CT63 6.000

320.0

262.0

1046.0

610.0

843.0

669.0

581.0

233.0

291.0

465.0

0.000 0.0

2.500 186.0

5.000 372.0

2.000 149.0

0.000 0.0

1.750 131.0

0.500 37.0

1.250 93.0

1.000 75.4

3.000 223.0

Source: Command area of sugar cane and paddy were taken from provided Annex -A-3.1 Specimen calculation for CWR , CWR of Sugarcane (m3/day)

= ETc(sugar)*A where A is Command area of sugar cane = 7.75 mm/day*10-3m/mm 4.125ha*104m2/ha = 320m3/day

Total CWR of Sugarcane (m3/day)=320+262+1046+610+843+669+581+233+229+291+465 =5320m3/day Total CWR of Paddy Total CWR of Sugarcane and Paddy Assuming losses of 30%, Total CWR of Sugarcane and
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=186+372+149+131+37+37+93+75.4+223 =1266m3/day = 5320 m3/day +1266 m3/day =6580 m3/day

Paddy

= 6580 m3/day *(100/70) =9408.6 m3/day

Total CWR of Sugarcane and Paddy = 9408.6m3/day /(3600*24s/day) Total CWR=0.1089m3/s 3.2.1.2 Method 2 Total commanded area of Sugarcane Total commanded area of Paddy

= 7.5+8.625+10.875+7.875+13.5+3.375+4.125+3.000+3.75+6.000 =17ha = 2.5+5+2+1.75+0.5+1.25+1+3 = 68.625 ha

Water requirement for Sugarcane = (17 *104*5*25.4) / (1000*7*24*3600) = 0.035697 m3/s Water requirement for Cane = (68.625 *104*5*25.4) / (1000*7*24*3600) = 0.1441 m3/s Total water requirement =0.035697+ 0.1441 = 0.17980 m3/s But we have to consider the 10% losses due to evapotranspiration and seepage. Water Discharge = 0.17980 m3/s* 1.1 = 0.19778 m3/s 3.2.1.3 Method 3 According to the average Sri Lankan theoretical values. (Reference: Technical Guide Lines For Irrigation Works by A.J.P.Ponrajah) Crop water requirement, ETC = ET0 x KC In this design we consider the Yala season.

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Table 4: Average Sri Lankan Evapotranspiration Values Month January February March April May June ET0 (inch/month) 4.7 5.0 6.2 5.9 6.4 6.9 Month July August September October November December ET0 (inch/month) 7.5 7.6 7.5 6.2 4.3 4.5

Source: Technical Guide Lines for Irrigation Works by A.J.P.Ponraja, Table 5.4 Table 5: Growth Stages and Crop Factors for Paddy

Source: Technical Guide Lines for Irrigation Works by A.J.P.Ponraja, Table 5.5 Crop Factors for cane, Table 6: Growth Stages and Crop Factors for Cane Stage Crop Factor Initial 0.4 Mid 1.25 Late 0.75

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In this design we select the month of August due to the highest evapotranspiration values. And also it is maximum at the mid stage of the growth. Water requirement for paddy , ETC = = = Water requirement for cane , ETC = = ET0 x KC
1000 x 30 x 24 x 3600

7.6 x 25.4 x 1.20 x (17 x 10000 )

0.0152 m3/s ET0 x KC


7.6 x 25.4 x 1.25 x (68.625 x 10000 ) 1000 x 30 x 24 x 3600

= Total Water Requirement = =

0.06389 m3/s 0.0152 +0.06389 0.07909 m3/s

But we have to consider the 10% losses due to evapotranspiration and seepage.

Water Discharge

= 0.07909 m3/sx 1.1 = 0.08699 m3/s

When considering the above discharges calculated from three different methods we can see that the field data are more suitable for the design work.

Table 7: Summary of Design Discharges Method 1 2 3 Discharge 0.1089m3/s 0.19778 m3/s 0.08699 m3/s

According to the above Table 7, Design Discharge = 0.1089m3/s

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3.3 3.3.1

Design of Cross Section Cross Section from SD5-SD6 Without Free Board

1.8m

h=0.72m

b=0.45m 0.72m
x

x=( 0.722+0.6752)0.5= 0.99m

0.675m Manning's co-efficient, n = 0.015 Let Bed slope = 5.58*10-4 For the channel of trapezoidal cross section, A = (1.8m + 0.45m)*0.72*0.5m P = 0.45+2*0.99 R = A/P = 0.81m2/2.43m = 0.81m2 = 2.43m = 0.33m

Using Manning's equation for the uniform flow condition, v = 1/n*R2/3*S01/2 = 1/0.015*(0.33)2/3*(5.58*10-4)1/2 =0.757m/s Using continuity equation, Q = AV Q= 0.81m2*0.757m/s Q=0.61317m3/s
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3.3.2 Cross Section from SD5-SD6 With Free Board Assuming Free Board of 0.15m

1.8m h=0.72m

0.15m

b=0.45m 0.72m
x

x=( 0.722+0.6752)0.5= 0.99m

0.675m

Manning's co-efficient, n = 0.015 Let Bed slope = 5.58*10-4 For the channel of trapezoidal cross section, A =2* (0.534m + 0.45m)*0.57m*0.5 P = 0.45+(2*0.78) R = A/P =0.562m2 /2.01m = 0.562m2 = 2.01m = 0.28m

Using Manning's equation for the uniform flow condition, v = 1/n*R2/3*S01/2 = 1/0.015*(0.28)2/3*(5.58*10-4)1/2 =0.674m/s Using continuity equation, Q = AV Q= 0.562m2*0.674m/s Q=0.379m3/s
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3.3.3

Cross Section from SD6-CT61 Without Free Board 1.8m

h=0.72m

b=0.45m 0.72m
x

x=( 0.722+0.6752)0.5= 0.99m

0.675m Manning's co-efficient, n = 0.015 Let Bed slope = 0.013 For the channel of trapezoidal cross section, A = (1.8m + 0.45m)*0.72*0.5m P = 0.45+2*.99 R = A/P = 0.81m2/2.43m = 0.81m2 = 2.43m = 0.33m

Using Manning's equation for the uniform flow condition, v = 1/n*R2/3*S01/2 = 1/0.015*(0.33)2/3*(0.013)1/2 =3.65m/s Using continuity equation, Q = AV Q= 0.81m2*3.65m/s Q=2.9565m3/s

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3.3.4 Cross Section from SD5-SD6 With Free Board Assuming Free Board of 0.15m

1.8m 0.15m h=0.72m 0.57m b=0.45m 0.72m


x

x=( 0.722+0.5342)0.5= 0.78m

0.534m Manning's co-efficient, n = 0.015 Let Bed slope = 0.013 For the channel of trapezoidal cross section, A =2* (0.534m + 0.45m)*0.57m*0.5 P = 0.45+(2*0.78) R = A/P =0.562m2 /2.01m = 0.562m2 = 2.01m = 0.28m

Using Manning's equation for the uniform flow condition, v = 1/n*R2/3*S01/2 = 1/0.015*(0.28)2/3*(0.013)1/2 =3.25 m/s Using continuity equation, Q = AV Q= 0.562m2*3.25m/s Q=1.8265m3/s

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Table 8 : Summary of Existing Discharge of Canal Discharge without Free Board Cross section from SD5-SD6 Cross section from SD6-CT61 0.61317m3/s 2.9565m3/s Discharge with Free Board 0.379m3/s 1.8265m3/s

Discharge of design section > CWR = 0.1089m3/s Therefore design section is satisfied the requirement.

Chapter 4 4.0 Discussion Planned survey work and progress was as shown in 1.4 and could end up with successful completion. 4.1 Comparison of Survey Results There were some deviations between the theoretical and actual values in the calculations regarding survey can be shown as follow in Table 10 and 11. Table9: Comparison of Results of the Traverse Survey with the Theoretical Values Theoretical Values Actual Values Line Angular Linear Angular Traverse Survey 1.Primary Traverse 3060000'03" 30600 2.Secondary Traverse 9000 Table10 :Comparison of Results of Leveling Theoretical Values Actual Values ( rise - fall) ( rise - fall) Leveling 0mm 0-10mm Allowable Limit = 13-24mm depending on the no. of instrument stations 4.1.1 Reasons for Discrepancies Between Actual and Theoretical Values Reasons for Discrepancies between actual and theoretical values can be categorized as follow. Environmental errors Instrumental errors Human errors

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4.1.1.1 Environmental errors Temperature is the significant factor that affects to all most all the readings given by the instruments used as they have in calibrated in different temperatures than they were used. Wind is the other critical factor causes to the readings specially while using the TL for angular measurements due to swaying of the plumb bob. As a result of mirage, it is difficult to take the readings far away from 100m using level machine. 4.1.1.2 Instrumental errors Measuring angles using TS creates some inaccuracies as it gives reading where it reflect on prism. 4.1.1.3 Human errors Mistakes can be occurred while reading and recording in field books. While installing the instrument such as TL, TS, leveling machine as well as target prism on tripod and centering the plumb bob to the center of the peg leads to inaccuracy. 4.2 Design Overview

Using Technical Guide Lines for Irrigation Works published by the Irrigation Department of Sri Lanka as a reference while considering the preliminary capacity of reservoir, crop water and irrigation requirement, evapotranspiration of reference crop with the requirement for land preparation as well as including farm losses and field irrigation requirement and also growth stages and crop factors with the assumptions, flow rate was calculated. But this value can be varied due to illicit tapping of water and lack of maintenance with a long period of time. And calculations were carried out only for paddy and sugar cane as if the water requirement for paddy which requires lager amount of water is sufficient, water requirement of banana is already satisfied. These calculated values may be varied if these areas are permitted to cultivate sugar cane only in the future. 4.3 Problems Encountered During the Surveying and Solutions Accessibility was difficult to some of the areas when establishing the peg stations for the traverse and they were marked using red color flag to identify as well as to avoid miss them. Measuring internal angles of the traverse by the means of TL gives more accurate measurement than TS resulting for mismatches of calculations. In the case of marking chainage for levels required to produce CSs and LSs was difficult due to muddy then arrows were used to eliminate that difficulty.

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Temperature variation directly affects to the readings of the TS,TL and level machine therefore umbrella was used all most all the time to maximize the accuracy of the reading and temperature was updated with the variation in the case of TS. Strong wind affects to readings of both TL and TS. Large number of stations results increasing errors therefore leveling was carried out as 100m-200m loops with the fly back to increase the accuracy of readings.

Chapter 5 5.0 Conclusion Experience of real application of surveying was gained through the survey camp 2013 in Monaragala under Canal Rehabilitation Project in Sewanagala launched by Mahaweli Authority which is important to be a smart engineer in the field rather than a . Adaptation to a new environment with in short period of time and carrying out a task according to the fixed time frame with the maximum accuracy to achieve given goal while learning how to work as team and how to deal with the other external personalities who are affected due to the survey for a instance villagers and how to cooperate them to end up with successful completion. This opportunity provided us to apply the theories which learnt in the lectures and be responsible on the work done. Evaluation and night viva cause to eliminate the difficulties and errors occurred during the surveying and office work including calculating, plotting and preparing report with the guidance of lecturers. And the continuous dedication of the instructor lead us to a successful completion. Our sincere gratitude is expressed to all. 6.0 ABBREVIATIONS CS Cross section CWR Crop Water Requirement LS Longitudinal section SD Sub Division TL Theodolite TS Total station REFERENCES Banister, A. and Raymond, S. (1998), Surveying, Prentice Hall, Seventh Edition Roy, S.K., Fundamentals of Surveying, Second Edition Ponrajah, A.J.P., Technical Guidelines for Irrigation Works

7.0

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8.0

ANNEXURE

Annex1:Prospection Diagram of Surveyed Area by Group J

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Annex 2:Primary Traverse Table:11 Primary Traverse


Corrected Angle Station K5 J15 J16 J17 J1 J2 J3 J4 J5 j6 J7 J8 J9 J10 J11 J12 J13 J14 K1 Line deg K5-J15 J15-J16 J16-J17 J1-J17 J1-J2 J2-J3 J3-J4 J4-J5 J5-J6 j6-j7 J7-J8 J8-J9 J9-J10 J10-J11 J11-J12 J12-J13 J13-J14 J14-K1 K1-K5 16 172 172 191 140 154 202 215 156 128 45 211 152 157 167 208 212 187 166 min 26 26 9 30 54 10 48 9 4 53 12 51 27 5 36 40 8 33 49 sec 50 22.5 15 51.5 15 50 25 47.5 25 37.5 55 10 45 43 40 25 10 27.5 15 In degrees 16.45 172.44 172.15 191.51 140.90 154.18 202.81 215.16 156.07 128.89 45.22 211.85 152.46 157.10 167.61 208.67 212.14 187.56 166.82 3060.00 Corrected Angle 16.45 172.44 172.15 191.51 140.90 154.18 202.81 215.16 156.07 128.89 45.22 211.85 152.46 157.10 167.61 208.67 212.14 187.56 166.82 3060.00 Adjusted W.C.B. in degrees 218.22 210.66 202.81 214.33 175.23 149.41 172.22 207.38 183.46 132.35 357.57 29.42 1.88 338.98 326.59 355.26 27.40 34.95 21.77 W.C.B in rad 3.81 3.68 3.54 3.74 3.06 2.61 3.01 3.62 3.20 2.31 6.24 0.51 0.03 5.92 5.70 6.20 0.48 0.61 0.38 Measured Length 54.22 152.57 38.63 58.56 336.53 235.14 176.56 106.07 129.08 21.78 127.00 95.56 128.29 161.39 144.37 343.96 138.92 128.87 28.86 2606.35 Partial C0ordinates N -42.60 -131.24 -35.61 -48.36 -335.36 -202.43 -174.93 -94.18 -128.85 -14.67 126.88 83.24 128.22 150.65 120.51 342.78 123.34 105.63 26.81 -0.17 E -33.55 -77.80 -14.98 -33.02 27.97 119.65 23.90 -48.79 -7.78 16.10 -5.39 46.94 4.21 -57.90 -79.50 -28.42 63.92 73.83 10.71 0.09 Correction Lat -0.00357 -0.01004 -0.00254 -0.00386 -0.02216 -0.01548 -0.01162 -0.00698 -0.00850 -0.00143 -0.00836 -0.00629 -0.00845 -0.01063 -0.00950 -0.02265 -0.00915 -0.00848 -0.00190 -0.17160 Dep 0.00190 0.00535 0.00135 0.00205 0.01180 0.00824 0.00619 0.00372 0.00452 0.00076 0.00445 0.00335 0.00450 0.00566 0.00506 0.01206 0.00487 0.00452 0.00101 0.09136 Corrected Coordinates N -42.60 -131.25 -35.61 -48.36 -335.38 -202.44 -174.94 -94.19 -128.86 -14.67 126.87 83.24 128.21 150.64 120.50 342.76 123.33 105.62 26.80 0.00 E -33.54 -77.80 -14.98 -33.02 27.98 119.66 23.91 -48.78 -7.78 16.10 -5.39 46.94 4.21 -57.90 -79.49 -28.41 63.93 73.84 10.71 0.00 Drawing Coordinates y 45848.60 45806.00 45674.76 45639.15 45590.79 45255.40 45052.96 44878.02 44783.83 44654.97 44640.30 44767.17 44850.40 44978.61 45129.25 45249.75 45592.51 45715.84 45821.46 x 71259.66 71226.12 71148.32 71133.35 71100.33 71128.30 71247.96 71271.87 71223.09 71215.31 71231.40 71226.02 71272.96 71277.17 71219.28 71139.78 71111.37 71175.30 71249.14

Linear Error = e/l= 1/5000= 0.000146519 <

54162.48042 21.46393519 0.0002 0.0002

Error is in allowable range

Annex 3:Map of Primary Traverse

Figure: 9 Map of Primary Traverse

Annex 4: Secondary Traverse Table:12 Secondary Traverse


Station I18 K5 K6 K2 K3 K4 I17 Line deg I18-K5 K5-K6 K6-K2 K2-K3 K3-K4 K4-KI17 I17-I18 79 159 207 30 177 140 103 895 900 Corrected Angle min 53 36 33 30 53 39 52 296 sec 58 21 1 39 19 52 42 232 In degress 79.90 159.61 207.55 30.51 177.89 140.66 103.88 900.00 79.90 159.61 207.55 30.51 177.89 140.66 103.88 900.00 Corrected Angle Adjusted W.C.B. in degrees 194.45 174.06 201.61 52.12 50.01 10.67 294.55 W.C.B in rad 3.39 3.04 3.52 0.91 0.87 0.19 5.14 Measured Length 141.149 98.048 28.8645 104.2405 94.4265 76.85 146.389 689.9675 Partial C0-ordinates N -136.68 -97.52 -26.84 64.01 60.69 75.52 60.83 0.00 E -35.23 10.15 -10.63 82.28 72.34 14.23 -133.15 0.00 Lat -0.000554868 -0.000385435 -0.000113469 -0.000409778 -0.000371198 -0.000302104 -0.000575467 -0.002712 Correction Dep -0.002113769 -0.001468313 -0.000432259 -0.001561048 -0.001414079 -0.001150863 -0.002192241 -0.010333 Corrected Coordnates N -136.68 -97.52 -26.84 64.01 60.69 75.52 60.83 0.00 E -35.23 10.15 -10.63 82.27 72.34 14.23 -133.16 -0.01 Drawng Coordinates y 46082.81 45946.13 45848.60 45821.77 45885.77 45946.46 46021.98 x 71284.74 71249.51 71259.66 71249.03 71331.31 71403.65 71417.88

Linear Error = e/l= 1/5000= 0.000146519 <

54162.48042 21.46393519 0.0002 0.0002

Error is in allowable range

Figure:10 Mapof Secondary Traverse


1

Table: TBM Transfering


BS 1.100 1.680 1.680 1.760 1.660 IS FS 1.880 1.740 0.950 1.680 1.480 1.100 Rise Fall 0.780 0.060 0.730 1.570 Reduce Leval 65.654 64.874 64.814 65.544 64.814 65.094 65.654 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 C/R/L 65.654 64.874 64.814 65.544 64.814 65.094 65.654 Remarks TBM01/CT 52 TBM02 TBM03 TBM04/CT55

0.730 0.280 0.560 1.570

TBM01/CT 52

0.86 1.57 1.4 1.165 1.575 1.625 1.5

1.69 1.605

1.355 1.540 0.750

0.235 0.220 0.085 0.750 1.290 0.520 2.180 2.700

0.830 0.035 0.410 1.275 0.465 1.041 1.210 2.716

65.544 64.714 64.679 64.914 64.504 64.724 64.809 65.559

0 0.00375 0.0075 0.0075 0.0075 0.01125 0.015 0.015

65.544 64.710 64.672 64.907 64.497 64.713 64.794 65.544

TBM04/CT55 TBM05 TBM06/CT56 TBM07 TBM08'1

TBM04/CT55

0.535 0.405 0.57 1.780 2.905

1 1.446 1.26 0.725

64.497 64.032 62.991 61.781 62.301 64.481

0 0.00533 0.01066 0.01066 0.016 0.016

64.497 64.037 63.002 61.792 62.317 64.497

TBM08'1 TBM08'2 TBM09 TBM10/CT58 TBM08'1

1.05 1.235 0.47 0.805 0.45 1.710 2.13 2.29 3.11

1.675 2.46 1.96 2.46 1.085 0.54 0.545 0.8

0.625 1.590 1.745 2.310 6.270 0.265 1.205 1.780 3.250

0.625 1.225 1.490 1.655 1.260 6.255 0.810 1.675 0.420 0.335 3.240

61.792 61.167 59.942 58.452 56.797 55.537 56.162 57.752 59.497 61.807

0 0.002142 0.004285 0.006426 0.008568 0.008568 0.01071 0.012852 0.015 0.015

61.792 61.165 59.938 58.446 56.788 55.528 56.151 57.739 59.482 61.792

TBM10/CT58 TBM11 TBM13 TBM15/CT63,59 TBM16 TBM17/CT60

TBM10/CT58

0.82 0.65 1.04 1.26 0.995 1.93 2.49

1.63 2.325 1.46 1.33 0.725 0.71

55.528 54.718 53.043 52.623 52.888 52.553 53.758 55.538

0 0.002 0.004 0.006 0.006 0.008 0.01 0.01

55.528 54.716 53.039 52.617 52.882 52.545 53.748 55.528

TBM17/CT60 TBM18 TBM19 TBM20/CT61

TBM17/CT60

Figure 9 :Typical Cross Section