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EXPOSURE CONTROL PLAN

FOR
OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE TO BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS

TABLE OF CONTENTS
SECTIONS: PAGE
1. PURPOSE. 3
2. SCOPE AND APPLICABILITY. 3
3. DEFINITIONS. 4
4. EXPOSURE DETERMINATION.. 6
4.1 GENERAL. . 6
4.2 EXPOSURE DETERMINATION 7
5. METHODS OF COMPLIANCE.. 7
5.1 CONTROL METHODS... 7
A. Universal Precautions.. 7
B. Engineering Controls... 8
C. Work Practice Controls. 8
D. Personal Protective Equipment.. 8
E. Housekeeping... 9
5.2 HEPATITIS B VIRUS (HBV) VACCINATION.. 11
5.3 POST EXPOSURE EVALUATION AND FOLLOW UP... 11
5.4 INFORMATION PROVIDED TO HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONAL. 13
5.5 HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONAL’S WRITTEN OPINION... 13
5.6 COMMUNICATION OF HAZARDS TO EMPLOYEES 13
A. Labels and Signs. 14
B. Information and Training. 14
5.7 RECORDS.. 16
A. Medical Records.. 16
B. Training Records. 17
C. Availability of Records.. 17
D. Transfer of Records.. 18

APPENDIX A HEPATITIS B VACCINE DECLINATION STATEMENT

SECTION 1. PURPOSE.

A. Consistent with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration


(OSHA) Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens, Final Rule, 29 CFR
1910.1030, as required by Army Regulation 385-10, Chapter 3, Safety Standards
Application. The U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command (USACIDC) has
developed a model Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure Control Plan that establishes
general responsibility, policy and procedures for safe handling of biohazardous
materials and protection of employees from occupational exposure to infectious
disease causing agents. Each USACIDC element should use this model as a guide to
establish an exposure control plan consistent with 29 CFR 1910.1030, as required
by AR 385-10.

B. The OSHA directive was issued to reduce the occupational transmission


of infections caused by microorganisms sometimes found in human blood and
certain other potentially infectious materials. Although a variety of harmful
micro-organisms may be transmitted through contact with infected human blood,
Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) have been shown
to be responsible for occupationally infecting workers who were exposed to human
blood and certain other body fluids through needlestick injuries and by direct
contact of mucus membranes and non-intact skin with contaminated blood and
materials.

SECTION 2. SCOPE AND APPLICABILITY.

A. The OSHA directive applies to all employees and job descriptions in


the Department of Defense (DOD) that have a potential for occupational exposure
to blood, or other potentially infectious materials. Occupational exposure
refers to any employee who, in the performance of his or her duties, may
reasonably anticipate skin, eye, mucous membrane, or parenteral contact with
blood or other potentially infectious materials. The exposure determination is
made without regard to personal protective clothing and equipment. Infectious
materials include human body fluids such as semen, vaginal secretions,
cerebrospinal fluid, amniotic fluid, saliva, or any other body fluids that are
visibly contaminated with blood, and those body fluids that are difficult to
differentiate between. Infectious materials also include any unfixed tissue or
organ from a human, living or dead.

B. All standards established by the OSHA directive are adopted as Army


safety standards, as required by AR 385-10, and will be complied with in
applicable Army workplaces. Army workplaces are generally comparable to private
sector workplaces but do not include uniquely military workplaces, such as a
combat or war zone environment.

C. The USACIDC headquarters and its major subordinate commands, to


include district level elements, will ensure that a copy of the exposure control
plan is accessible to all personnel assigned within their jurisdiction.

D. The exposure control plan will be reviewed and updated at least


annually. Additional reviews may be conducted whenever necessary to reflect new
or modified tasks and procedures which affect occupational exposure and to
reflect new or revised employee positions with occupational exposure.

E. The HQUSACIDC and its major subordinate commands, to include district


level elements, will appoint on orders a Safety and Occupational Health Manager
(SOHM). The SOHM will be responsible for ensuring the plan (for each USACIDC
element within their jurisdiction) meets regulatory and operational requirements
and implementing the exposure control plan

SECTION 3. DEFINITIONS.

A. Bloodborne Pathogens. Pathogenic microorganisms that are present in


human blood and can cause disease in humans. These pathogens include, but are
not limited to, HBV and HIV.

B. Contamination. The presence, or the reasonably anticipated presence,


of blood or other potentially infectious materials on an item or surface.

C. Contaminated Laundry. Laundry which has been soiled with blood or


other potentially infectious materials or may contain sharps.

D. Contaminated Sharps. Any contaminated object that can penetrate the


skin including, but not limited to, needles, scalpels, broken glass, broken
capillary tubes, and exposed ends of dental wires.

E. Decontamination. The use of physical or chemical means to remove,


inactivate, or destroy bloodborne pathogens on a surface or item to the point
where the pathogens are no longer capable of transmitting infectious particles
and the surface or item is rendered safe for handling, use, or disposal.

F. Engineering Controls. Controls (e.g. sharps disposal containers, self-


sheathing needles) that isolate or remove the bloodborne pathogens hazard from
the workplace.

G. Exposure Incident. A specific eye, mouth, other mucous membrane, non-


intact skin, or parenteral contact with blood, or other potentially infectious
materials, that results from the performance of an employee's duties.

H. Handwashing Facilities. A facility providing an adequate supply of


running potable water, soap, and single-use towels or hot-air drying machines.

I. HBV. Hepatitis B virus

J. HIV. Human immunodeficiency virus

K. Occupational Exposure. Reasonably anticipated skin, eye, mucous


membrane, or parenteral contact with blood, or other potentially infectious
materials, that may result from the performance of an employee's duties.

L. Potentially Infectious Materials.


(1) Human body fluids which include semen, vaginal
secretions,cerebrospinal fluid, amniotic fluid, saliva in dental procedures, or
any other body fluid that is visibly contaminated with blood, and those body
fluids that are difficult to differentiate between.
(2) Any unfixed tissue or organ from a human (living or dead).
(3) HIV containing cell or tissue cultures, organ cultures, and HIV or HBV
containing culture medium or other solutions.

M. Personal Protective Equipment. Specialized clothing or equipment worn


by an employee for protection against a biohazard. General work clothes, not
intended to function as protection against a biohazard, are not considered to be
personal protective equipment.

N. Regulated Waste. Liquid or semi-liquid blood, caked or dried blood, or


other potentially infectious materials that are capable of releasing these
materials during handling or compression.

O. Source Individual. Any individual, living or dead, whose blood, or


other potentially infectious materials, may be a source of occupational exposure
to the employee. Examples include, but are not limited to, trauma victims,
clients of drug and alcohol treatment facilities, human remains, and individuals
who donate or sell blood or blood components.

P. Sterilize. The use of a physical or chemical procedure to destroy all


microbial life, including highly resistant bacterial endospores.

Q. Universal Precautions. An approach to infection control in which all


human blood, and certain human body fluids, are treated as if known to be
infectious for HIV, HBV, and other bloodborne pathogens.

R. Work Practice Controls. Controls that reduce the likelihood of


exposure by altering the manner in which a task is performed.
SECTION 4. EXPOSURE DETERMINATION

4.1 General.

A. The OSHA directive requires employers to perform an exposure


determination identifying which employees may incur occupational exposure to
blood or other potentially infectious materials. Exposure determination is made
without regard to the use of personal protective equipment (i.e. employees are
considered to be exposed even if they wear personal protective equipment). The
exposure determination is required to list all job classifications in which
employees may be expected to incur such occupational exposure, regardless of
frequency. USACIDC employees in the following job classifications are considered
to have a reasonable anticipation of contact with blood, or other potentially
infectious materials, in the performance of their duties.
(1) All special agents, military police, investigative assistants, and
personnel assigned for on the job training.
(2) All forensic and law enforcement personnel who, in the performance of
their duties, may reasonably anticipate exposure to potentially infectious
materials.
(3) All evidence custodians who engage in crime scene processing, evidence
collection, and/or evidence handling.
(4) All technical support personnel who handle or process potentially
infectious evidence.
(5) All employees who provide emergency medical response at the workplace.

B. The OSHA directive also requires a listing of job classifications in


which some employees may have occupational exposures. Since not all employees in
these categories would be expected to incur exposure to blood, or other
potentially infectious materials, tasks or procedures that would cause these
employees to have occupational exposure are also required to be listed in order
to clearly understand which employees in these categories are considered to have
occupational exposure.

4.2 Exposure Determination. Each USACIDC element will identify specific job
descriptions or classifications in which assigned personnel in those positions
have a reasonable anticipation for contact with blood or other potentially
infectious materials. For each support personnel identified, the specific tasks
and procedures that may cause the occupational exposure will be identified in
the exposure control plan. This information will be provided to the SOHM within
10 working days of the implementation date of the exposure control plan.

SECTION 5. METHODS OF COMPLIANCE.

5.1 CONTROL METHODS.

A. Universal Precautions. All USACIDC assigned personnel will observe


universal precautions when exposed to human blood and body fluids. Universal
precautions require that all assigned personnel assume that all human blood,
body fluids, or other potentially infectious materials (see definitions) are
infectious for hepatitis and HIV and that appropriate protective measures are
taken to avoid direct contact with these materials. Human body fluids include
such substances as blood, semen, vaginal secretions, saliva, or any other body
fluid that is visibly contaminated with blood. Under those circumstances in
which differentiation between body fluid types is difficult or impossible, all
body fluids shall be considered potentially infectious materials.
B. Engineering Controls. Each USACIDC element will ensure that
appropriate controls are in place to reduce exposure of assigned personnel to
bloodborne pathogens by isolation or removal of the biological hazards from the
workplace. Engineering controls include, but are not limited to, appropriate
handwashing facilities, gloves, and puncture-resistant containers for the
disposal or shipment of contaminated needles or other sharp instruments.
Leakproof containers, with appropriate labels, will be used for the collection,
handling, processing, storage, transport, or shipping of all potentially
infectious evidentiary materials. For example, all evidentiary specimens of
blood, or other potentially infectious materials, will be placed in an
appropriate container, which prevents leakage during collection, handling,
processing, storage, transport, or shipping. The specimen container must be
closed and appropriately labeled before being stored, transported, or shipped.
Special care must be taken in the collection and preservation of all bodily
fluids to prevent contamination or degradation of the specimen. The supporting
crime laboratory should be contacted to obtain further instructions and
procedures for transporting or shipping infectious evidentiary materials for
forensic analysis. Each USACIDC element will comply with normal procurement
guidelines to purchase all equipment and supplies necessary for compliance with
the exposure control plan.

C. Work Practice Controls. Eating, drinking, smoking, applying cosmetics


or lip balm, and handling contact lens are prohibited in work areas where blood,
or other potentially infectious materials, are likely to be present. Food and
drinks will not be stored in refrigerators, freezers, cabinets, or other areas,
such as counter tops, where blood, or other potentially infectious materials,
are present. All procedures involving blood, or other potentially infectious
materials, will be performed in a manner to minimize splashing, spraying, or
aerosolization of the substances. Mouth pipetting or suctioning is prohibited.

D. Personal Protective Equipment. Appropriate protective barriers such


as, but not limited to, gloves, lab coats, face shields or masks and eye
protection, in the form of chemical splash goggles or glasses with solid side
shields, will be available and used by assigned personnel to prevent exposure to
blood, body fluids containing visible blood, and other fluids to which universal
precautions apply. Each USACIDC element will ensure that such protective
equipment is readily available in an appropriate size for all assigned
personnel.
(1) Gloves should be worn when assigned personnel have the potential for
direct skin contact with blood, or other potentially infectious materials.
Gloves should always be worn if there are cuts, scratches, or other breaks in
the skin. Gloves that have been soiled, torn, punctured or that are unable to
function as a protective barrier should not be used. For those allergic to the
normally provided gloves, hypoallergenic gloves, glove liners, powderless
gloves, and other similar alternatives will be provided. All protective
equipment will be removed prior to leaving the work area or crime scene.
Protective clothing used while processing a crime scene will not be used in
another crime scene. If it is a reusable item it will be cleaned and sanitized
prior to reuse to preclude cross contamination. When removed it will be placed
in an appropriately designated area or container for storage, washing,
decontamination, or disposal. If a personal garment is penetrated by blood or
other potentially infectious material, the garment will be removed as soon as
possible and placed in the designated container for laundering or disposal. Any
personal clothing soiled at a crime scene or while processing evidence will be
removed prior to the individual handling other evidence or entering another
crime scene.
(2) Supervisors will ensure that the appropriate protective equipment, as
required by this regulation, is used by assigned personnel in work areas where
occupational exposure is present.
(3) Under extraordinary circumstances, USACIDC personnel may temporarily,
and briefly, decline to use personal protective equipment when its use would
prevent the delivery of health care or public safety services or would increase
the safety hazard to the worker or co-worker. When this occurs, the
circumstances will be investigated, documented and reported to the SOHM to
determine whether changes can be instituted to prevent such an occurrence in the
future. Supervisors will ensure that personal protective equipment is cleaned,
repaired or replaced as needed to maintain its effectiveness.

E. Housekeeping. Specific written procedures and schedules will be


developed and implemented by each USACIDC element for the cleaning and
decontamination of the work areas where contamination by human blood or body
fluids may occur.
(1) Work surfaces should be decontaminated with an appropriate
disinfectant immediately after completion of a procedure; or as soon as feasible
when surfaces are overtly contaminated; or after any spill of blood or
potentially infectious material; and at the end of the work shift, if the
surface may have become contaminated since the last cleaning.
(2) Protective coverings, such as plastic wrap and aluminum foil, should
be removed and replaced when contaminated or at the end of the work shift, if
they may have become contaminated during the shift.
(3) Equipment that may become contaminated with blood, and other
potentially infectious materials, shall be checked routinely and decontaminated
as necessary. Equipment will be decontaminated, both inside and outside, prior
to servicing or shipping. If decontamination is not feasible, a readily
observable label shall be attached stating which portions remain contaminated
and this information will be conveyed to all personnel who need to know, prior
to handling or shipping.
(4) Inspect and decontaminate, on a regular basis, reusable receptacles
such as bins, pails, and cans that have a likelihood for becoming contaminated.
When contamination is visible, clean and decontaminate receptacles immediately
or as soon as feasible.
(5) Broken glassware which may be contaminated will not be picked up
directly with the hands. It will be cleaned using mechanical means, such as a
brush and dust pan, vacuum cleaner, tongs, cotton swabs, or forceps.
(6) Evidence specimens, such as blood or other potentially infectious
materials, will be collected as appropriate to preserve their evidentiary value.
Prior to being stored or shipped they will be placed in a closable leakproof
container and labeled or color-coded prior to being stored or transported. If
outside contamination of the primary container is likely, then a second
leakproof container that is labeled or color-coded according to this document
will be placed over the outside of the first one and closed to prevent leakage
during handling, storage, or transport. If a puncture in the primary container
is likely, it will be placed in a leakproof and properly labeled, puncture-
resistant secondary container.
(7) When disposing of, transporting, or shipping contaminated sharps, they
should be placed in containers that are closable, puncture-resistant,
appropriately labeled or color-coded, and leakproof on the sides and bottom.
Sharps containers should be easily accessible to employees and located as close
as feasible to the immediate area where sharps are used or can be reasonably
anticipated to be found. Sharps containers also must be kept upright throughout
use, replaced routinely, closed when moved, and not allowed to overfill. Never
manually open, empty, or clean reusable contaminated sharps disposal containers.
(8) The selection of procedures for disposal of infective waste is
determined by the relative risk of disease transmission and application of local
regulations, which vary widely. Federal, state, and local regulations must be
consulted prior to implementing disposal procedures.
(9) Contaminated laundry will be placed and transported in bags that are
labeled or color-coded. Whenever this laundry is wet and presents potential of
soak through or leakage from bag, it will be placed and transported in soak and
leakproof bags. The contaminated laundry will be cleaned and laundered in such a
way that any infectious agents present are inactivated or destroyed. If the
contaminated laundry is shipped off site to a second facility not utilizing
universal precautions in the handling of all laundry, it must be placed in bags
labeled and color-coded. (This paragraph does not refer to items of evidence.)

5.2 HEPATITIS B VIRUS VACCINATION.

A. Medical Surveillance Program. A medical surveillance program should be


in place for all USACIDC personnel covered by the exposure control plan. All
medical evaluation procedures will be performed under the supervision of a
licensed physician and all laboratory tests will be conducted by an accredited
laboratory. All evaluations, procedures, vaccinations, vaccination series, and
post-exposure evaluation and follow-up, including prophylaxis, will be provided,
without cost to USACIDC personnel, at a reasonable time and place.

B. Hepatitis B Vaccination. The HBV vaccination will be offered to


USACIDC personnel. USACIDC will not require the HBV vaccination if a person has
had a previous HBV vaccination; or antibody testing revealed that the person is
immune; or the vaccine is contraindicated for medical reasons. If a person
assigned to USACIDC initially declines the vaccination but, at a later date
while still covered under this document, decides to accept the vaccine, it will
be provided at that time. Should booster doses be recommended at a future date,
such booster doses will also be provided. The USACIDC personnel who decline the
vaccination must sign a declination statement (see Appendix A).

5.3 POST EXPOSURE EVALUATION AND FOLLOW-UP. Any USACIDC personnel who experience
an exposure incident, such as a needlestick or a blood splash in the eye, must
immediately report their exposure to their supervisor. When any USACIDC
personnel reports an exposure incident, they will be offered a confidential
medical evaluation from a licensed health care professional with appropriate
follow-up. The circumstances of exposure will be recorded and kept as part of a
confidential medical record. The relevant information contained in the post-
exposure medical evaluation should include, at minimum, the following:

A. Route(s) of exposure, the activity in which the person was engaged at


the time of exposure, the extent to which the appropriate work practices and
protective equipment were used and a description of the source exposure will be
recorded.

B. Identification and documentation of any source individual, living or


dead, whose blood or other potentially infectious materials may be a source of
occupational exposure to the USACIDC personnel. Examples include, but are not
limited to, trauma victims, clients of drug and alcohol treatment facilities,
human remains, and individuals who donate or sell blood or blood components.
(1) The source individual’s blood will be tested as soon as feasible, and
after consent has been obtained, to determine HBV and/or HIV infection. If
consent is not obtained, USACIDC will establish that the legally required
consent cannot be obtained. When the source individual's consent is not required
by law, the source individual's blood, if available, will be tested and results
documented.
(2) If source individual is known to be infected with HIV or HBV, testing
need not be repeated.
(3) Results of the source individual's testing shall be made available to
the USACIDC personnel exposed and the USACIDC personnel will be informed of
applicable laws and regulations concerning disclosure of the identity and
infectious status of the source individual.

C. Any USACIDC personnel experiencing an exposure incident will have


blood collected as soon as feasible and tested, after consent is obtained, for
HBV and HIV serological status. If the individual(s) affected consents to
baseline blood collection, but does not give consent at that time for HIV
serologic testing, the sample will be preserved for at least 90 days. If, within
90 days of the exposure incident, the individual(s) affected elects to have the
baseline sample tested, such testing will be done as soon as feasible.

D. Any person assigned to USACIDC who has had an occupational exposure


will be provided post exposure prophylaxis, when medically indicated, as
recommended by the United States Public Health Service.

E. Counseling and evaluation of reported illnesses will be provided to


any USACIDC personnel who have had an occupational exposure.

5.4 INFORMATION PROVIDED TO THE HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONAL.

A. The SOHM will ensure the licensed health care professionals


responsible for HBV vaccination of USACIDC personnel are provided a copy of 29
CFR 1910.1030 and AR 385-10.

B. The SOHM will ensure the licensed health care professional evaluating
any

USACIDC personnel after an exposure incident is provided the following


information:
(1) Copy of 29 CPR 1910.1030 and AR 385-10.
(2) Description of the exposed person’s duties as they relate to the
exposure incident.
(3) Documentation of the route(s) of exposure and circumstances under
which exposure occurred.
(4) Results of the source individual's blood testing, if available.
(5) Any other medical records relevant to the appropriate treatment of the
individual, including vaccination status, not maintained at the treatment
facility.

5.5 HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONAL'S WRITTEN OPINION.

A. Each USACIDC element must designate a supervisor responsible to obtain


and provide assigned personnel with a copy of the evaluating health care
professional's written opinion within 15 days of the completion of the post-
exposure evaluation. The health care professional's written opinion concerning
HBV exposure will be limited to whether vaccination is indicated for the exposed
USACIDC employee(s) and if the employee(s) have received such vaccination. The
health care professional will specifically limit the written opinion for the
post-exposure evaluation and follow-up to indicate if the employees have been
informed of the results of the evaluation. The report will also indicate if the
personnel have been told about any medical conditions resulting from exposure to
blood, or other potentially infectious materials, which require further
evaluation or treatment. All other findings or diagnoses will remain
confidential and will not be included in the written report.

5.6 COMMUNICATION OF HAZARDS TO EMPLOYEES.

A. Labels and Signs.


(1) Warning labels will be affixed to all containers or packages of
regulated waste, to include all blood and body fluid evidence. This includes
refrigerators and freezers containing blood or other potentially infectious
material(Appendix C).
(2) Warning labels required by this section will include the biohazard
symbol.
(3) These warning labels will be fluorescent orange or orange-red with
lettering or symbols in contrasting color.
(4) Warning labels will be affixed in such a way as to prevent their loss
or unintentional removal.
(5) Red bags or red containers may be substituted for labels.
(6) Warning labels will be required for contaminated equipment and will
state which portions of the equipment remains contaminated.
(7) Regulated waste that has been decontaminated need not be labeled or
color-coded.

B. Information and Training


(1) The SOHM will ensure that all assigned personnel with occupational
exposure to bloodborne pathogens participate in a training program.
(2) Training will be provided to assigned personnel at the time of initial
assignment to any position where occupational exposure may take place. Follow-up
training will be provided at least annually thereafter.
(3) Annual training for all assigned personnel will be provided within one
year of their previous training in accordance with the annual Command Training
Implementation Guidance.
(4) Additional training will be provided when changes, such as
modification of tasks or procedures or institution of new tasks or procedures,
affect the assigned personnel's occupational exposure.
(5) Material appropriate in content and vocabulary to the educational
level, literacy, and language of the assigned personnel will be used.
(6) The training program will contain, at a minimum, the following
elements:
(a) An accessible copy of the 29 CFR 1910.1030 and AR 385-10 and an
explanation of their contents.
(b) A general explanation of the epidemiology (the study of the causes and
transmission of disease) and symptoms of bloodborne diseases.
(c) An explanation of the modes of transmission of bloodborne pathogens
with examples of procedures which may expose assigned personnel to blood or
other potentially infectious materials.
(d) An explanation of the exposure control plan and the means by which
assigned personnel can obtain a copy of the written plan.
(e) An explanation of the appropriate methods for recognizing tasks and
other activities that may involve exposure to blood and other potentially
infectious materials.
(f) An explanation of the use and limitations of methods that will prevent
or reduce exposure, including engineering controls, work practices and personal
protective equipment(Appendix D).
(g) Information on the types, proper use, location, removal, handling,
decontamination, and disposal of personal protective equipment.
(h) An explanation of the basis for selection of personal protective
equipment.
(i) Information on the HBV vaccine, including information on its efficacy,
safety, method of administration, the benefits of being vaccinated, and that the
vaccination will be offered free of charge.
(j) Information on the appropriate actions to take and persons to contact
in an emergency involving blood or other potentially infectious materials.
(k) An explanation of the procedure to follow when an exposure incident
occurs and the post-exposure evaluation and follow-up that USACIDC is required
to provide for the assigned personnel following an exposure incident.
(1) An explanation of the signs and labels and color-coding.
(m) Information on special handling procedure for items of evidentiary
value. Proper methods of collection, preservation, documentation and packaging
for both storage and shipment.
(n) An opportunity for interactive questions and answers with the person
conducting the training session.
(o) The person conducting the training will be knowledgeable in the
subject matter covered in the training program as it relates to the workplace.

5.7 RECORDS

A. Medical Records.
(1) Each USACIDC element will coordinate with their supporting medical
facilities to ensure the required documentation is filed in the treatment
records maintained at their facility. This record will include:
(a) A copy of the assigned person's HBV vaccination status including the
dates of all HBV vaccinations, and any medical records relative to the assigned
person's ability to receive such vaccinations.
(b) A copy of all results of examinations, medical testing, and follow-up
procedures required as a result of an occupational exposure to bloodborne
pathogens.
(c) The assigned persons copy of the health care professional's written
opinion regarding any occupational exposure.
(d) A copy of the information regarding occupational exposures provided to
the healthcare professional.
(2) USACIDC elements will ensure that all required assigned personnel
medical records are kept confidential, and are not disclosed or reported
without the assigned person's expressed written consent to any person within or
outside the workplace except as required by 29 CFR 1910.1030 and AR 385-10, or
as may be required by law.
(3) Each USACIDC element will arrange for supporting medical facilities to
maintain, the medical records required by exposure control plan for at least the
duration of employment plus 30 years consistent with 29 CFR 1910.20, as required
by AR 385-10.

B. Training Records.
(1) Each USACIDC element will maintain training records with the following
information:
(a) The dates of training sessions.
(b) The contents or a summary of the training
(c) Names and qualifications of the person(s) conducting the training.
(d) Names and job titles of all persons attending the training sessions.
(2) Training records will be maintained for a minimum of 3 years from the
date on which the training occurred consistent with 29 CFR 1910.20, as required
by AR 385-10.

C. Availability of Records.
(1) The SOHM will ensure that all records required to be maintained by the
exposure control plan shall be made available upon request to the Assistant
Secretary, Department of Labor for OSHA and the Director, National Institute of
Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), for examination and copying.
(2) Individual(s) training records will be provided upon request for
examination and copying to the individual, to civilian employee representatives,
to the Director, NIOSH, and to the Assistant Secretary, Department of Labor for
OSHA consistent with 29 CFR 1910.20, as required by AR 385-10.
(3) Individual(s) medical records pertaining to an occupational exposure
incident will be provided upon request for examination and copying to the
individual, to civilian employee representatives, to the Assistant Secretary,
Department of Labor for OSHA and to the Director, NIOSH consistent with 29 CFR
1910.20, as required by AR 385-10.

D. Transfer of Records. Upon departure from the unit, the individual's


medical and training records will be transferred to the gaining USACIDC element.
If there is no gaining USACIDC element the records will be maintained for three
years prior to destruction.