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Barefoot: Strategic Management Plan Part 2

4. School library services overview: a) Circulation policy for students Students may visit the library before, during, and after school. All grade levels have the same procedures for checking out books and have same access to materials. Students may check out two books at a time for a time period of two weeks. If students have overdue books, they are supposed to pay a $.05/day fine. However if the book is turned in, the fine is waived. Students must pay for lost books. Again, if the book is found and turned in, money is refunded. Students are also responsible for paying for damaged books. Staff may also check out books and there is no time limit for their check out. If an item is checked out for a long duration and another teacher needs it, an email is sent asking if they are done using it. Teachers are not asked to pay for lost or damaged books. Parents may not check out books unless checked out under their child’s number. Currently the only items available for check out are print materials, including some periodicals. We do not have eBooks available at this time. This is due to lack of Wi-Fi and copyright laws (according to our media specialist). The media center does have 8 desktop computers available for use. If a teacher has signed up to specifically use the computers for class, they have first priority. If there are open computers, students who are not with a teacher may use them. Teachers are allowed to send up 5 students at a time to complete work independently or collaboratively. Teachers must specifically state, on a pass, the reason the student will be using the computer. Students and teachers using the computers primarily have access to the internet, Microsoft Office, and OPAC. They do not have access to printers, unless the media center specialist deems it necessary for them to print. The school also has two I pad carts available for check out. Each cart holds twenty Ipads. Students may not check these out. Teachers who are teaching SPED or ELL have first priority with checkout of the Ipads. Other teachers may check them out, but they have to be trained on the handling and safety of the computers. I do not feel that we address the needs of the 21st century learner. Many of our methods seem antiquated. In doing a search for popular web 2.0 tools to use in the classroom, I only saw 2-3 tools that are being utilized by our students. They often use Prezi, Slideshare, and sometimes Moviemaker. However, due to filtering Slideshare is no longer accessible. These web 2.0 tools are also not “promoted” by the media specialist. Even if she does not incorporate them into lessons in the media center, it would be nice to receive “helpful tips” emails showing teacher what resources are available to students. b) Scheduling: Our media center is open from 7:10-3:00. The students are required to be at school by 7:30 and are dismissed at 2:40. This leaves a relatively short window of time before and after school for the students and parents to utilize the media center. Teachers may sign up for media center use via calendars on the circulation desk or the Microsoft Outlook calendar. Sign-up is based on a first come, first serve basis. Most teachers sign up for a time slot every two-four weeks. However, we do have a few teachers (one in particular) that come every week to conduct research or view videos on the projector. Students may come to check out books on these days with a teacher pass, but no other classes are allowed to come for check out. On most days, students are allowed to come on their own as long as they have a pass from their teacher. Parents are allowed to access during the hours of operation, as long as they have signed in as a visitor.

Barefoot: Strategic Management Plan Part 2

However, in my ten years working at my current school, I have never seen a parent using the media center. c) Services: Our media center does not currently have many programming and services for our students, teachers, staff, and parents. Once a year, the media center holds a book fair. This is to be used as a fundraiser. The school receives 30% commission in cash for every $5000 sold. They also receive books and posters as part of their commission. Parent volunteers are not requested. Students are generally chosen to assist in the running of the book fair. Every few years, the media center will conduct a book club. Attendance and meeting dates can be very sporadic. The media center is also responsible for running the school store. Profit from the school store goes into a separate account from book fair monies. Students may purchase jump drives, pencils, paper, etc before and after school. Students primarily use the media center for checking out books, computer use, and small group projects. In the morning, students do congregate and socialize. The media center does not host special programs for students and services are general media center services. Special programs are also not available for teachers, staff, or parents. Teachers and staff may check out materials and use computers at their own convenience. Instructional materials are available for check out, such as math manipulatives, videos, and instructional books. Teachers may request research/video viewing space for large classes. They may also request lessons or tours be conducted by the media specialist. The copiers and paper for the school are also located in the media center and are open to teachers at all times. Staff, such as cafeteria workers and custodians, can be frequently seen checking email or surfing the internet on the available computers. Parents also have access to books, periodicals, and computers, but must sign in. The media center does not do any type of outreach program for parents or the community. We do not currently have any services for diverse patrons. The media center can be easily maneuvered around in and computers are low enough for someone in a wheelchair to have access. We do not have special auditory devices or visual devices to aid in the use of the media center. We do have “books on tape” available for student check out for particular novels. BYOT is allowed within the media center. However, Wi-Fi is not provided. Classes have yet to use the media center and BYOT collaboratively. Also, web 2.0 tools are not introduced. Students use tools that they are familiar with from home, not tools that have been taught in the media center or classroom setting. I think it would be beneficial to teachers and students for mini-lessons or tutorials to be available on possible tools to implement in assignments.

Barefoot: Strategic Management Plan Part 2 5. School library facilities

a) Description of the facility Our media center is fairly large compared to other media centers that I have seen. However, the media center houses copier machines and three teacher “offices” as well. This takes up room that could be used for small group work, media presentations, or a student lounge. The media center has 4 work areas, not to include teacher offices: “lounge,” computers, books, and research tables. It currently has a small couch and two chairs, often used for reading and conversation. We have 8 computer workstations and approximately 15 tables and chairs. The computer workstations are often used for games in the mornings before class starts and used for research, including OPAC, during school hours. The students are not allowed to print. The tables and chairs are used for conducting research, reading, and small and whole group instruction. Students also gather at these tables to view presentations from the projector that is mounted on the wall. The climate is usually conducive to learning. The computers and tables used for research seem to be the most successful areas. The media center staff is knowledgeable and friendly. This encourages the students to visit often. We do not have wireless access and the online resources available to students at home are limited, as I mention below. It is well lit and generally quiet enough for others to work. There is not a moisture or temperature issue. I believe that all areas are accessible. The books are separate by wide aisles; the computer desks are low and accessible to the wheelchair bound. The space between all works areas allows congestion to be eliminated. b) Virtual Facility The links provided on the media center’s webpage are nettrekker, Augusta Chronicle, Galileo, SIRS Discovery, Georgia Career and Information Center, and World Book Online. Upon exploration, I discovered that Galileo, World Book Online, SIRS Discovery, and nettrekker all required a username and password. There was not a link anywhere on the site where students and parents could obtain the usernames and passwords. The majority of these links only provide students online resources while at school with teacher assistance, making it hard for students to actively conduct research independently of the school and instructor. On the homepage of the media center, students are not able to access OPAC. However, while at school, students may pull up OPAC through any computer using an icon on the desktop. I feel that the virtual facility is not adequate in allowing students to have media center resources at home. Right now, the virtual facility only provides book fair information.

Students are very restricted by the filtering software. They are not able to access YouTube, Wikipedia, and most blogs and forums. Teachers have been given access to YouTube. In order for a teacher to access Wikipedia, blogs, and forums, they must enter their county username and password. Although the students are blocked from several “questionable” websites, they know how to get around the roadblocks. Many know of different ways to type in the address or access the sites. Although the filtering software does help with regular computers within the school, we have recently adopted BYOT. We do not currently have Wi-Fi for the school; therefore when students access the internet via phones and personal computers, teachers have no way of limiting

Barefoot: Strategic Management Plan Part 2

the content that they are viewing. It often takes much threatening and close monitoring to make sure the students stay on assigned sites. The school’s web address is http://www.edline.net/pages/Grovetown_Middle_School/Media_Center c) Needed Changes: Some of the positives of the media center are the inviting atmosphere and the openness of the layout. The facility is attractive. Students have access to computer, books, magazines, and reference materials. However, I feel that the media center that my school currently has is very similar to the media center that I was accustomed to in school, twenty years ago. While our environment is warm, the resources that we are providing are not meeting the needs of our 21st century learners. Our resources are very limited. Students are not provided the tools they need to be competitive in high school or the working world. Using Prezi and Power Point should be the bare minimum of what we are asking our students to use. In order for them to use them though, they have to be aware of them. Our school needs more workshops, tutorials, and how-to mini-lessons to get our students excited about creating. While our space is open, we are still very limited as to how many activities can go on at once. It would be hard for a whole group lesson and small group lessons to be going on at the same time. Also, when students are checking out books, they are disturbing the students who are working in groups at the tables. The book shelves are also not set up in manageable way. The media center specialist cannot see down the book aisles and often have the front office calling over to tell them of behavior issues they can see through the glass windows. Our reading area is right next to the entrance/exit doors. This traffic creates a disturbance for the readers every time someone enters or exits. 6) Budget sources: The school media budget is determined by our school system. The money allocated is based on the number of students enrolled (FTE). Special monetary allocation is given based on the School Improvement Plan. 85% of the media center’s budget must be used on books and the media center specialist must ensure that for every one student, there are ten books. (“Columbia County Schools Media Manual,” 2013).The books fairs and school store provide supplemental income for the media center as stated above. Our media center seems to be fairly up-to-date on the types of books offered. However, because such a large percentage of the budget must be used towards books, a small percentage is left for technology and other items. Although we have the school book fair, a large majority of our students do not purchase in high quantities. I feel that other fundraisers or events need to be done to raise more funds. Updated computers, available ipads, readers, Wi-Fi, and other items could be purchased with these funds. There is not a lot of community outreach done by our media center. The use of parents and the community can also create a better and more productive learning environment.

Barefoot: Strategic Management Plan Part 2

References Columbia county schools media manual. (2013 ). Retrieved from http://www.ccboe.net/files/_TDAdO_/66dac750d32100e43745a49013852ec4/CCBOE_ Media_Manual_Final3.pdf