Doctors & Business

June 2009

Dr. Rosalinda Ang-Hortaleza: A Franchising Success Story

Franchise! Plus 143 invest in Ideas to
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Cover Story: Dr. Rosalinda Ang-Hortaleza: A franchising success story
Survival was the main reason why we got into business. Being doctors, we would not have been able to earn enough to support our family. Having a business gave us an option for survival. In addition, my love for numbers urged me to continue with the business. A part of me always wanted to be an accountant as well as a doctor.

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[ DocNews Makati Med opens P1.2B annex Operation Smile(s) in Cebu & Davao [ Doctors Cover Story: Dr. Rosalinda Ang-Hortaleza: A franchising success story My Patient’s Near Death Experience My Hometown: Memories of Vigan [ MedDigest
A silent killer of women / TB: Still a health threat Live longer! / Health benefits of swimming

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[ Wellness Bust stress out of your life

One of many old churches in Vigan

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A no pain way to get rid of gallstones [ Business Sorry tales of unwary bank depositors How to spot a franchise scam [ Franchise Ideas Below P500,000 Franchises P500,000 to P1 million Franchises P1 million to P5 million Franchises More than P5 million Franchises

“Doctors & Business” is published by BRED Well Media Services with postal address at 776-A East St., Mandaluyong. Philippine Copyright 2009 by BRED Well Media Services ISSN 2094-067X

DocNews

Makati Med opens new P1.2B annex
A
s part of its 40th anniversary celebration, Makati Medical Center recently opened its P1.2-billion annex building to the public. Makati Mayor Jejomar Binay was, of course, the guest of honor but there were a lot of recognizable names as well. There were PLDT Group and concurrent Makati Med chairman Manuel Pangilinan, the Ayala Group’s Jaime Zobel de Ayala, and Araneta Group vice-chairman Judy Araneta-Roxas. Needless to say, there were a lot of doctors around.
Rosalie Montenegro, president of Makati Medical Center; and Dada Trillo, senior vice-president and preferred banking head of Bank of the Philippine Islands Dr. Filomena Montinola, co-chief of the dermatopathology Section of Makati Medical Center

Dr. Cristina Antonio, member of the board of directors of Makati Medical Center

Dr. Imelda Cabral-Villar, head of MCF Dermlaser and Phototherapy Center; and Dr. Rita Espiritu-Dollendo, administrative officer-in-charge of Interns Education and Research Division of Makati Medical City

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DocNews
Judy AranetaRoxas, member of the board of directors of Makati Medical Center

Manuel Pangilinan, chairman of Makati Medical Center

Dr. Manuel Fernandez, executive vicepresident and director for Professional Services of Makati Medical Center

Dr. Dennis Damaso, director for Medical Education and Research; and Dr. Jose Eduardo Rondain, head of the Nuclear Medicine Department, both with the Makati Medical Center

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DocNews

Operation Smile(s) in Cebu & Davao
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his time around, Operation Smile went to Cebu and Davao to help children with cleft palates. In Cebu, 1 volunteers, including 1 non-Filipinos, practically took over the operating rooms of the Vicente Sotto Memorial Center. In Davao, there were 7 volunteers gathered at the Brokenshire Hospital. Interestingly, there were more plastic surgeons and anesthesiologists in the Cebu leg while there were more dentists in the Davao mission. Of the 298 children screened in Cebu, 210 were treated. In Davao, 1 of the 80 children were treated.

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Doctors

Dr. Rosalinda Ang-Hortaleza:
A franchising success story
By Margaret Jao-Grey

B

Y CHOICE, Rosalinda AngHortaleza likes to be called “Doctora” by employees of the HBC retail chain of beauty care product and its mother company, the multi-billionpeso Splash Corp. That’s because she has fond memories of the career she gave up when she married another doctor, Rolando Hortaleza, while still a resident . “The first time I was called a doctor, it felt good. I was then an intern at the Lungsod ng Kabataan Hospital. And I can still remember the happiness I felt the first time I helped deliver a baby without any assistance,” she said. “I learned patience from listening to the different health problems and personal stories of patients, particularly those who had very little money. With -hour work shifts, I learned to be hardworking and to manage my time well.” Marriage changed all that. The couple used the money they received as wedding gifts to put up a business called RBH Cosmetics. They spent P,000 to buy a cuticle remover formula from a Hortaleza cousin and the balance P7,000 to buy the initial inventory of acetone, cold wave lotions, amber bottles, and packaging materials to start a repacking business. To save on expenses, the couple stayed with the older Hortalezas in Sta. Mesa, Manila. 

Rosalinda Ang-Hortaleza, chief executive officer of HBC Inc.

Survival was the main reason why we got into business. Being doctors, we would not have been able to earn enough to support our family. Having a business gave us an option for survival. In addition, my love for numbers urged me to continue with the business. A part of me always wanted to be an accountant as well as a doctor.
The couple’s business was strictly a mom-and-pop operation plus one assistant. When not busy as a doctor in a Tondo-based government hospital where he earned P7,000 a month, Hortaleza and the assistant handled the production side of the backyard business. Ang-Hortaleza gave up her own medical career to manage full time the business’s accounting and marketing. In fact, Ang-Hortaleza continued to sell her products even when she was heavy with her first child, a daughter named Allue. She recalled sometimes waiting in front of a store until the store’s owner would either take pity on her or was no longer too busy to talk to her. Then she would make her sales pitch and, hopefully, close the deal. In 198, its first year of operation, the business generated sales of P100,000, enough reason for Hortaleza to quit his hospital job and to join his wife full time in the business.

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“Survival was the main reason why we got into business. Being doctors, we would not have been able to earn enough to support our family. Having a business gave us an option for survival. In addition, my love for numbers urged me to continue with the business. A part of me always wanted to be an accountant as well as a doctor,” she said. It certainly also helped that the couple received encouragement from their entrepreneurial families. Hortaleza’s family is associated with the knife sharpening chain while AngHortaleza’s father owned the Victoria Manufacturing Corp. in Valenzuela. In fact, it was Ang-Hortaleza’s father who served as the couple’s guarantor when they took out their first bank loan. carrying products from hair to foot exclusively sourced from manufacturers here and abroad as well as free beauty consultation on skin and general body care.

Retail arm
Four years into the business, the couple put up Hortaleza Beauty Center or HBC for short as a direct and immediate response to Hortaleza’s inheriting six stores of the Hortaleza Vaciador chain from his family. Located in areas with high pedestrian traffic such as in Realistic St., Quiapo, the first stores set the tone for future HBC stores, which now number in the hundreds. From the start, it was Ang-Hortaleza’s project. “Accepting the six inherited branches was a welcome challenge for me because it has made my dream of having one million employees more realizable. Also, it was a perfect vehicle to showcase Splash products,” she said. HBC sees itself as the first Filipinoowned one-stop shop for beauty,

Any time is a good time for the business of beauty. There is what we call the lipstick theory where, during these tough times, more people tend to indulge in small luxuries like personal care and cosmetics because looking physically good will help them cope during a crisis.
Although the earlier stores are company-owned, HBC is now actively expanding through a franchise program ranging in franchise fees from P100,000 for a cart to P10,000 for a kiosk. Abroad, the company is looking for master franchisees for territories or countries. Right now, HBC is already present in Singapore and Bahrain. In the United States, it has 11 “store within a store” outlets inside Seafood City Supermarkets in California and Nevada and two other stores in Las Vegas and Los Angeles. “Our strategy is to further penetrate

Another HBC outlet is opened

the market through our business partners while we maintain operational efficiency for our existing stores. Our focus now is on our loyal customers. We need to make them happy as they will be our brand ambassadors to more customers. We are not afraid of the economic recession because we feel that any time is a good time for the business of beauty. There is what we call the lipstick theory where, during these tough times, more people tend to indulge in small luxuries like personal care and cosmetics because looking physically good will help them cope during a crisis,” she said. Despite her many successes, AngHortaleza has a soft spot for her fellow doctors, suggesting that a business subject or two in the curriculum of medical schools would be helpful even for those who choose to stay on in their profession. “ As a doctor, there will be instances when you feel you would like to do things for free. Learning business can help in managing what you have and in finding ways to attain funds to sustain your practice,” she said. Spoken like an entrepreneur who just happens to be a doctor. ( Ms. Margaret Jao-Grey writes a regular business column for Business Mirror)
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Doctors

My Patient’s Near Death Experience
By Dr. Willie T. Ong

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S A DOCTOR, you never know who will come next to your clinic. Each patient has a unique story and I take the time to get to know the person well. And so, when Joaquin came to my office, I wasn’t quite ready for what I was about to hear. Joaquin came to me for a check-up because his heart had stopped for a few minutes. “What do you mean ‘stopped’?”, I inquired. He explained, “I underwent a routine gallbladder operation and my doctors said that my blood pressure suddenly dropped for unknown reasons. I died and was clinically dead for a few minutes before my doctors revived me.” “Oh, another near death experience,” I thought to myself as I recalled other patients I’ve seen with near death experiences or so-called NDRs. Before I became a doctor, I had read voraciously on the subject, starting with the seminal book by Dr. Raymond Moody in the 1970s to several New Age book in the 1980s, up to the definitive near death experience by author Betty J. Eadie in the 1990s. As the first one to popularize NDE to the public, Dr. Moody had interviewed hundreds of patients who died but were revived. Curiously almost all of them experienced similar events with slight variations. First, it’s dying
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and leaving the physical body. Then, you may spend some time hovering over your body, watching the doctors frantically work on you. Next, you find yourself being drawn into a long dark tunnel, moving at high speed. You hear a rushing sound and, after some time, you see a glimmering light at the end of the tunnel. You move closer to the light as it becomes brighter and brighter. It warms you, soothes, and comforts you unlike anything you‘ve ever experienced. And suddenly, you are in front of a great Being of light, so bright you can barely look. You are overwhelmed beyond words. And then, you know you are in the presence of…

it, I had left my body and went through a dark place, like a tunnel. And then, I met this being…He was shining…”, he paused. “So who was he?”, I edged on my seat. “I don’t know who he was. I’m not a religious person but he was a being of light and he was very kind and loving. “What I know is that this ‘person’ told me that my death was premature. That it was not my time yet to die. He said I had a mission to fulfill in this life.” Joaquin became more excited as he continued. “So I asked this Being what kind of mission I could possibly have. I had been an ordinary hotel waiter for 20 years. I could barely support my wife and kids. At 4 years of age, just a high school graduate, there was no hope I could ever find a better job. My work does not exactly qualify as the ‘world-saving’ type.” From his words, I gathered that Joaquin, like so many others with NDE, had wanted to be with this Being of light in that heavenly place. He could not see the meaning of his apparently meaningless existence. Then, the Being of light revealed to Joaquin his purpose on earth: his mission is to take care of his two children, to raise them, and be a good

Joaquin’s words struck me like a bolt of lightning. And suddenly, I was aware of my own guilt of not giving enough time to the most important part of my life, my wife and two daughters. Here was the Supreme Being not asking for earth-shattering discoveries or sacrifices; but to simply care for my children, like the loving father that He is
“You know, doc, it’s very confusing to me,” Joaquin interrupted my thoughts. “I still don’t know what to make of it. You see, during the operation, I knew something was wrong. Before i knew

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father to them. Joaquin’s words struck me like a bolt of lightning. And suddenly, I was aware of my own guilt of not giving enough time to the most important part of my life, my wife and two daughters. Here was the Supreme Being not asking for earth-shattering discoveries or sacrifices; but to simply care for my children, like the loving father that He is. It was then that I knew God had sent Joaquin to me on an errand to wake me up and to jolt me. Consider this: Out of the thousands of doctors in Manila, why in heaven’s name did he come to me? An hour had passed and my other patients were in a heated frenzy, but they had to wait. God’s message does not come too often. I told Joaquin that I would like to help him and to contribute to his mission. Joaquin smiled but his mind was miles away. He wasn’t listening to me because he asked how much my fee was. “No, no, nothing,” I stammered. “You have paid me more than enough. You have paid me more than you can imagine.” Joaquin’s experience echoes the messages of many inspirational books, both old and new. 1. No matter how ordinary your job is, there is a God-given purpose for your work and you must do it well. 2. Spend time to improve family relationships, especially with your parents, children, and relatives. Loving the family and healing broken relationships are part of our purpose in this life. . Have faith. A big kind of faith. No matter how bad our situation may look like, there is always reason for hope. As Joaquin found out, God is constantly working in ways we can’t see. He’s in control and His immense love and compassion will see us through. (Dr. Willie Ong writes a weekly column on health and wellness for the Philippine Star)

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My hometown: Memories of Vigan
By Dr. Rudy Rabanal

V

ERY FEW PEOPLE know that Vigan was the first city in Ilocos to be occupied and colonized by the Spaniards. It was first named Ciudad Fernandina and later called Vigan, from the word bigaa, an herb that grows abundantly in Vigan. To this day, there is still a Ciudad Fernandina Hotel, a bed-and-breakfast facility for local and foreign tourists who delight in old Spanish houses situated in streets of cobblestone. I grew up in a sleepy and serene town called Pantay Laud, a barrio in the western part of Vigan City that is literally sandwiched between two rivers that empty to the South China Sea. The rivers have brackish water (a mix of salty and freshwater) ideal for breeding fishery products like crabs, tiger prawns, and bangus. I love to eat arorosep, a kind of seaweed eaten raw after being “disinfected” with vinegar. I was born and raised by my parents in the simple life—breathing fresh air, eating fresh food, and sleeping early as there was yet not so much electronic entertainment in those days. To me, these are all blessings since I had an early appreciation of the simple and uncomplicated living that prepared me for the more hectic adult life in Manila. I finished at the Ilocos Sur National High School and my parents sent me to Manila for university. Little did I know that my life in Manila
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would take me away from my beloved hometown most of my adult life. When I was still a student of medical technology at the Far Eastern University, I would go home to Vigan taking the Times Transit (now named Dominion Transit). My travel took eight to 14 tiring hours because of the heavy traffic created by the monstrous herd of Ilocanos heading for home and the long processions we encountered in the many towns along the highway during Semana Santa or Holy Week. The bus would traverse the entire stretch of the Sierra Madre Mountains on the right side (from Pangasinan to Cagayan) and the South China Sea on the left side. I had the option to take an ordinary bus (where I got to appreciate the changing breeze of the route) or the air-conditioned bus (which shielded me from the abrupt change of weather from sunny to windy and where I breathed canned air). We had very good roads in Ilocos, a legacy of the late Apo, former President Ferdinand Edralin Marcos, another true blue Ilocano. But ever since 198, when I became a doctor and finished my specialization in internal medicine—and married another doctor, a classmate from MCU (she took up pediatrics and her neurology at the Lungsod ng Kabataan, now known as the Philippine Children’s Medical Center)—I had been driving home less

and less frequently to Ilocos because we have no time. When we did go with our three boys—the eldest is now 21 years old and a fourth year pre-med at Ateneo; the second, 19 years old and a sophomore BS Psychology at the University of the Philippines; and the third, 17, a first year business management student at Ateneo—we made it a point to park in one of the twin Suso beaches (they look somewhat like woman’s breasts) for 0 minutes to breathe the fresh air, soak our feet in the water and even run around on rubber shoes along the stretches of coral reefs. Or we would just stare yonder and watch the fishermen from a distance or watch the crabs swimming near us as if calling us to join them. It was always fun. Vigan has an abundance of old Spanish architecture in its churches, ancestral homes, and historical edifices. If you really love old structures, Vigan is the place to go. I never fail to take delight in these structures and, even now, I reminisce about them whenever I find myself feeling nostalgic and homesick about Vigan. We have beaches and mountains galore. We have been pampered by these natural endowments in our youth, having grown used to being brushed by the hot breeze from the

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South China Sea atmospherically blended with the cool winds from the Sierra Madres. We have been used to an abundance of fresh sea and mountain breezes despite the summer heat. But when storms come, the breezes are even cooler than usual. made by workers whose skills were handed down from the first Chinese immigrants centuries back. The authentic Ilocano wine, basi, once the cause of a revolt during the Spanish era, is made by fermenting sugarcane juice, which is cooked first in a big kawa. Then, it is poured into a big burnay where secret ingredients are added to produce the much desired taste and aroma. After all the ingredients are added, the jar is closed with banana leaves tied tightly to the lid of the jar and finally sealed with freshly prepared clay on top. My lolo used to make basi for our use and he would keep it sealed for one to three years. But sometimes, we accidentally opened it prematurely and it would turn sour so we just used it as vinegar. I can still vividly remember how he prepared basi. He would buy dried tree bark (I can’t recall now what the tree is called but it is sliced finely) and my lolo would ground some of it until powdery, using the big manual grinder called bayuhan, then put them all inside the burnay together with few bundles of milagrosa rice grains to improve the taste and aroma before sealing it. I enjoy most harvesting bangus, sugpo (the tiger prawns variety) or alimango (crabs) from our fishponds. Likewise, I will never forget the pleasure and contentment of just watching fishermen do their chores while seated on the ground under a log (talisay tree) on the river bank. Once in a while, I would buy their fresh catch. The taste of the fish caught in our river is always better than those caught in other rivers of Ilocos Sur or even from the South China Sea, which includes: pompano, bacalao, baraongan and pasga ( resembles

Eating delights
We would stop by small specialty restaurants (although not named fancifully as those in Makati or Ortigas) in Agoo, which serve the fresh greencolored small circular seaweeds called ararosep but, in Manila, it is called arorosep. I ask them to disinfect the seaweeds in vinegar (particularly those with high acetic acid content to ensure against salmonella and E.coli or viruses) and, with fresh tomatoes and salt to taste, I would munch their juiciness. The best dishes for me are the simple paksiw (cooked in vinegar or calamansi, tomatoes); the inihaw na isda (whatever fish is freshly caught), the pugita (baby octopus) and talaba (again, I ask them to disinfect the oysters in vinegar). This meal, good for five persons, would cost around P1,000 to P1,00. Ilocos is known for its sukang Iloko, the brownish-colored vinegar which is normally a by-product of fermenting sugarcane juice. The juice is extracted the old-fashioned way with a carabao turning the wheels of the extractor. Our sukang Iloko is really something worth buying and bringing to Manila because you cannot find the real thing anywhere else except in Vigan. The real ones are those cultured in big jars or burnay. The jars are made in Barangay Pagburnayan. Do not miss watching how these jars are expertly

A horse-driven calesa on a cobblestoned street

Big jars or burnay are worth buying and bringing to Manila

Shopping for food
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a big milkfish). We just cooked them simply, either grilled, fried, boiled, pangat or paksiw but the tasty freshness lingers in my mind and it makes me crave for it. My aunties and my parents make sure that we feast on these delicacies every time we visit them. When you are in Vigan, look for a restaurant that serves sinanglaw, a delicacy—the Ilocano counterpart of bulalo, which is the slow-cooked beef skin and litid. Eat it hot and savor the taste as it melts in your mouth. Of course, never forget the Vigan pinakbet (those residing in Vigan town proper or the mestizas pronounce it pinakbheet while those from other towns and the farming class pronounce it pinakboet) made of small round young eggplant; kardis seeds or patani (kidney-shaped beans) and bagnet with bagoong added. We recommend the use of the rounded variety of eggplant rather than the long violet eggplants, which has a bitter aftertaste. The pinakbet is cooked with low fire for several hours and served either hot or cold without losing its wonderful taste. Famous among Ilocano gastronomic specialties is the kinilaw na kambing (especially the freshly-culled goat) or the pinapaitan (using the gallbladder
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bile or apdo squeezed and cooked with the goat skin). Like most Ilocano dishes, this has to be cooked very slowly for several hours with salt, pepper, ginger and other seasonings or herbs and vinegar until very tender and mouth-watering. Be sure to put the twalya (goat’s gut) last when you are about to serve; otherwise, it will be very gummy and difficult to chew. In kinilaw na

December, I bought several kilos of bagnet worth P20 to P0 a kilo and I gave them away to my good friends, patients, and relatives. Price varies depending on the season, Christmas being the most expensive. Our Vigan longganiza, the small sausages, can be bought in the public market at P0 per dozen. Make sure that you buy longganiza locally produced from our market and that are kept hanging by stallholders so the longganiza is aired to perfection. Our longganiza is truly something worth relishing as it has a lot of garlic and meat that, when you burp, the taste stays on in the mouth. Of course there are other Ilocano longganiza but the one made in Vigan stands above them all. If you are the adventurous type, try our jumping salad kinilaw style, which is a freshly-harvested baby shrimp (almost an inch or less in size) which are placed in bowls and still jumping even after putting in the vinegar. The sourness of the vinegar plus the sweetness of fresh baby shrimps give a delightful aftertaste to the diner. I grew up with lot of fresh vegetables and seafoods because my relatives had lots of fishponds and we could get

Part of Vigan’s charm

kambing, the main ingredient is the grilled goat skin mixed with the innards that were previously boiled or grilled, sliced thinly then finished with the apdo and the seasonings of your choice that includes siling labuyo, vinegar, salt, ginger and onion. Then, there is the famous bagnet or the equivalent of chicharon but this one is cooked/fried slowly. The best bagnet are the freshly-butchered pork chunks cooked and fried slowly and sold in the public market, which is open from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Last

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our fresh supplies from the rivers and seas. I miss those days when I could just eat them almost raw. the space between the church and the capitol In the old days, we knew families and friends from remote barangays as though we always dealt with or saw them regularly. I used to get a thrill from the thomping of horse-driven calesas on the cobblestoned streets of Vigan. But the last time I went home, I was very disappointed to note the noise from hundreds of tricycles, which also pollute the air of my city. But what can I do? The drivers also have to earn a living for their families. Still, Vigan is a very worthwhile place to go to. The old houses and churches give history and One of many old churches in Vigan richness to the landscape. Cobblestoned streets continue to be highways; and diets or eating habits used by calesas, although not as have drastically changed. Lifestyles predominantly as before. have also changed among the youth. They now go to fastfood outlets Thankfully, the old people still cook the and eat less fresh vegetables and favorite dishes and recipes that Vigan seafoods; they love going to internet is well remembered for. cafes and movies or even malling; there is little trace of the days at the (Dr. Rudy Rabanal is a diabetologistpark or beaches and maybe, none of internist and a member of the faculty my younger relatives even recognize and the corporate secretary of the me because I have been returning UERMMC- Institute for Studies on home much less often these days (just Diabetes Foundation Inc.) once a year).
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Much has changed Feasts to observe
From my youth, I always remember special feast days that we really celebrated. Of course, the Semana santa tops all celebrations as it is really the time when long solemn processions are held in the entire province complete with uniformed guards; the Passion is sang in every church; and people make time to contemplate the suffering and death of our Lord Jesus Christ. Each and every barrio has its own barrio fiesta and ours is celebrated every December 28. The highlight of our fiesta is the zarzuela (opera). The night before that, there is the grand ball, which is a fundraising activity of the barrio. In the mornings, our churches are busy with masses, baptisms and even weddings. We have the regular retail events and the bigger commercial sale events (annual fair and expos) where all products from Ilocos are sold. Displayed/advertised from baskets are food products, bedsheets and linens, towels and others. These are sold in the town plaza, or Much has changed in the culture, practices and sights of Vigan. Now, the landscape is dominated by commercial billboards; there is too much noise and the air is not as pristine as before because of the thousands of undisciplined drivers that dominate the

MedDigest
By Henrylito D. Tacio

A silent killer of women
In the Philippines, there are about ,000 new cases of cervical cancer each year. Even more alarming is the fact that there are between 10,000 to 2,000 women walking around who never know they have the deadly disease. Cervical cancer results from the abnormal growth and division of cells at the opening of the uterus or womb—the area known as the cervix. Usually, it takes about 10 years before cancer develops. Unlike some cancers, cervical cancer presents early signs. “In the early stages, cervical cancer usually causes no symptoms. It may cause spotting or heavier bleeding between periods, bleeding after intercourse, or unusually heavy periods. In later stages, such abnormal bleeding is common,” says the second home edition of ‘The Merck Manual of Medical Information.’ Other symptoms may include a foursmelling discharge from the vagina, pain in the lower abdomen, and swelling of the legs. The urinary tract may be blocked, without treatment, kidney failure and death can result. About 99.7% of cervical cases is caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), a sexually transmitted infection that is often without symptoms. In other words, the younger a woman was the first time she had sexual intercourse and the more sex partners she has had, the higher her risk of cervical cancer. While women may contract HPV when they are young, cervical cancer is most likely to develop in women  years or older. Other factors that may trigger cervical cancer among women are early age at first birth, having many births, tobacco use, prolonged use of hormonal contraceptives, and an impaired immune system, particularly related to HIV infection.

TB: Still a health threat
Unknown to many, the tuberculosis bacteria can live only in people. But there is an exception. In most developing countries, including the Philippines, a child may contract TB if he drinks unpasteurized milk from cattle infected with Mycobacterium bovis, a bacterium that can live in animals. Most people who get TB suffer from fevers, sweats and weight loss. Otherwise it depends on what part of the body it has affected. If it’s affected the lungs, you’ll have a cough, produce phlegm and sometimes cough up blood; if it’s affected the lymph glands, they enlarge; if it affects
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other parts of the body like the brain, you may slowly become unconscious or have fits. The health department’s data showed that there are 11 new TB cases for every 100,000 population in the Philippines. It is also the sixth cause of illness and death in the country. Everyday, almost 7 Filipinos die because of TB.Thanks to medical science, there are now a number of antibiotics available which are proven effective against TB. The most commonly used drugs are isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, streptomycin, and ethambutol. Some of these antibiotics have side

effects like live injury, gout, and blurred vision. Usually, two or more antibiotics are taken. Because TB bacteria are very slowgrowing, the antibiotics must be taken for a long time – usually for six months or longer. Those who fail to do so may develop a multi-drug resistant TB. With 7,000 cases, the Philippines has the second highest number of multidrug resistant patients in the Western Pacific, after China. The number of drug-resistant TB patients will rise to 14,000 in 2014, according to Dr. Thelma Tupasi, of the Tropical Diseases Foundation, Inc.

Doctors & Business

Live longer!
Through the years, people are trying to figure out how to live longer, just like Methuselah. But, on second thought, merely living longer isn’t good enough. What people want these days is not just living longer, but also living healthier lives. Dr. Steven G. Aldana, of Brigham Young University, recently revealed that a person may be able to add 20 years or more to his or her life by making several health changes. • Exercise regularly. Exercising for 0 minutes six times a week can add 2.4 years to your life, even if you don’t adequately control your blood pressure. • Don’t smoke. “Men who smoke a pack a day lose an average of 1 years of life, while women lose 14 years,” said Aldana. Every year, there are about 20,000 smoking-related deaths in the Philippines, where about 0% of men smoke. • Lose weight. A person who is 20 pounds over his/her ideal weight is 0% more likely to develop heart disease and the risk increases as weight increases. • Implement good eating habits. Eat most meals at home (restaurant food tends to be higher in calories). Drink water instead of soda (the sugar in soft drinks is a main contributor to weight gain and artificial sweeteners have not been proven safe). Don’t eat in front of the television (studies show that people who engage in “mindless” eating take in far more calories). • Watch what you put into your

MedDigest
mouth. Studies show that eating one-quarter cup of nuts five times a week can add 2. years to your life. Fruits and vegetables lengthen your life by 2-4 years. People who increase their consumption of fruits and vegetables from two to five servings a day can reduce by half their risk of many cancers, including pancreatic, colorectal and endometrial cancers. • Sleep well. The editors of Super Life, Super Health write: “The secret to staying young could simply be a good night’s sleep. Sleep rejuvenates and revitalizes your body. Human growth hormone (HGH) is produced only during deep sleep. The amount of deep sleep you get, and the amount of growth hormone you make, decreases with age. If you could get more deep sleep and, therefore, produce more HGH, you might be able to slow down the aging process.”

Health benefits of swimming
Swimming is a great recreational activity for people of all ages. Recreational swimming is a good way to relax and feel good and it has its share of health benefits. • Swimming is an excellent form of exercise because you need to move your whole body against the resistance of the water. Without overworking the heart, swimming improves the body’s use of oxygen and increases lung function. It is also recognized as a terrific low impact exercise for those who don’t like the effects of jogging on their knees because, while in water, you are non-weight bearing. • Swimming alleviates stress. It is an ideal exercise for pregnant women, individuals with musculoskeletal problems, and those who suffer exercise-induced asthma. • Swimming can considerably reduce high blood pressure. An Exercise Science Department study of the University of Tennessee in Knoxville conducted a study on 18 participants with stage 1 and 2 hypertensive men and women for 10 weeks. The groups were selected from people with previous sedentary lifestyles, 10 being engaged in a monitored swimming exercise, while the other group of six were just present for comparison. It was noted that the swimmers` systolic pressure had dropped significantly from 10-144 mmHg, about % drop when they were seated and also about the same when they were lying down. When seated, their diastolic pressure also changed but to a lesser degree. • Swimming is great for women after a breast surgery. TheBreastcancersite.com shares this information: “Swimming after breast surgery is an excellent means of exercising all the major muscle groups, and avoiding muscular atrophy often seen in post-surgical patients who remain sedentary for prolonged periods.” ( Mr. Henrylito Tacio is a contributor of Reader’s Digest Asia )
Doctors & Business
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Wellness

Bust stress out of your life
By Framelia V. Anonas

Y

OU GET TIRED just by looking at your to-do list. You drag your feet to the office. You can’t have a good night’s sleep thinking of all your monthly expenses. Deadlines start to make you feel edgy. Simply thinking of tomorrow raises your blood pressure a bit.

eating binges and become critical of others. There are many things that cause stress in people. Drinking habits as well as eating and sleeping routines could bring about stress. The level of activity/inactivity—if we have so many tons of work to do or we don’t have anything to do—can stress us out. Physical conditions and the environment could also set off stress. On the psychological level, we get stressed out thinking of and feeling for others. Our emotional and mental state could also lead to stress. On the social realm, we get stressed by relationships, responsibilities (too many hats to wear—at home, in the office, outside, with friends, with clients, etc), socio-political events, life and lifestyle changes, and others.

Fight. Because of stress, a person
may show angry outbursts, self destructive behavior, and offensive behavior.

Fright. Because of fear and anxiety
of real or imagined events, a person becomes withdrawn and socially isolated. He also finds it hard to make decisions and tends to procrastinate.

Sounds familiar?
Everyone has been weighed down by stress at some point in their lives. According to Cecilia Batalla of Positive Psychology, stress is normal as it is the body’s response to demands of life. Your body’s reaction to stress is actually meant to protect you. However, when all your stress indicators are constantly on alert, then it takes a toll on your health. To check if you are being stressed out, watch out for these signs: • Physically, you experience dizziness, general body ache, sweat, headache, indigestion, and grinding teeth while sleeping; • Mentally, you constantly worry, are forgetful, and struggle in making decisions. • Emotionally, you undergo anger, anxiety, depression, and may even resort to crying; • Behaviorally, you go on compulsive
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Foresight. This response means
that the person has accepted the events and consequences, seeks help when needed, and communicates his feelings and thoughts with others. “It is really a matter of making a choice in perspective,” says Batalla.

How to reduce stress
You can actually reduce all the stresses and tensions you are feeling. You can choose to be happy! Perhaps you can try a couple or more of these suggestions.

How people respond to stress
A person responds to stress in four different ways, says Batalla. He/she could either run away from what’s causing the stress, wage a war, get scared, or manage it positively.

1. Slow down. Living on the fast
lane will make you want to drive even faster. Try to get on the outer lane, slow down, enjoy the view, and even smell the flowers. Cross country runners value pacing because it maximizes their effectiveness. It’s the same with life. Linger a bit and make time to determine your true priorities. You don’t have to place all of them as number one on your to-do list!

Flight. This means getting away from
it all and diverting one’s attention. The main behavior here is denial, demonstrated through grumbling, overeating, and even overspending. A person may even get into drugs, alcohol, and smoking.

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Wellness
2. Learn to say “no.” When you
have properly set your priorities after slowing down, start learning to say “no” to requests that may set you off-track. Many people don’t know how to properly refuse, so they end up with tasks that interfere with their set timetables. In the end, they simply feel resentful. Don’t feel guilty when you refuse someone’s request. Simply say that you thank the person for considering you for the task but that you can’t take it at the moment because you can’t give the attention it deserves. Try to recommend someone else equally qualified to do the task. to weight and health problems. Find ways how to do your work faster so you can free up some time to have a real healthy meal. During your work week, find time to do some aerobics, ballroom dancing, or just go to the gym. You will find that these activities are actually welcome breaks that will energize you in between weekly tasks. Moreover, set regular check ups with your physician to ensure that your body is functioning well. And if it doesn’t, you can at once see what’s wrong and have it treated. your boss would be happier looking at it tomorrow than at the close of the working day. Get out from your job’s addictive pattern and start rediscovering the joys of being at home. Playing with the kids, gardening, even sorting your cabinet, will prove therapeutic.

5. Have time with your family and loved ones. Kids grow up fast;
soon, you’re left wondering where the little ones are. When they get into their teens and find lives of their own, you’ll miss the times when they kiss you all over. When you already have your own schedules, make sure to eat at least one meal a day together. Make your mealtime together work by allowing each one to share what has been keeping him busy lately. Kids will appreciate the interest you show in

4. Stop being a workaholic.
Many people spend more time at work, perhaps uncomfortable with the thought of leaving an unfinished task come dismissal time. But think: can the task wait till tomorrow? If it’s not really urgent, then maybe

3. Prioritize your health and well-being. Sometimes we live such
busy lives at the expense of our own personal health. Fast foods save you waiting time but, in the end, will lead

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Wellness
their activities. It will also encourage them to be open. For singles, learn to value time together with your family and significant other. Many relationships have been ruined because partners just don’t have time for each other. to help us multi-task to meet all those demands. But do you really need all those gadgets? When all you actually need is to text and call, you don’t have to stress out thinking of buying that buffed up mobile phone on display with all those dazzling built in features. You don’t really need 9% of them, anyway. movies. To the more adventurous, it may be mountain climbing, cross country running, or maybe bungee jumping. Others love to collect souvenir items. Whatever it is that makes you feel cool, include it in your regular activities. You’ll find that when you do the activity often, you feel recharged. (Ms. Framelia V. Anonas is a member of the S&T Media Core of the Department of Science and Technology)

6. Simplify. Life tends to become
more complicated by the day that it becomes pretty hard to balance the many demands of our various roles. Sometimes, we depend on equipment

7. Pursue your passion. What do
you love doing? To some, it may be videoke singing, dancing, cooking, making scrapbooks, or watching

HOW STRESSED ARE YOU?
The Holmes and Rahe Life Stress Inventory rates some life events that trigger stress. Check some life events that happened to you during the last two years and add the points to obtain your final score.

Life Events Death of a spouse Divorce Separation Imprisonment Death of close family member Personal injury/illness Marriage Dismissal from work Marital reconciliation Retirement Change in health condition of family members Pregnancy Sexual difficulties Gain of new family member Business readjustment Change in financial state Death of close friend Change to different line of work Change in number of arguments with spouse Mortgage of over P4 million

Pts 100 73 65 63 63 53 50 47 45 45 44 40 39 39 39 38 37 36 35 31

Life Events Foreclosure of mortgage or loan Change in responsibilities at work Son or daughter leaving home Trouble with in-laws Outstanding personal achievement Begin or end school Change in living conditions Revision in personal habits Trouble with boss Change in work hours or conditions Change in residence Change in schools Change in recreation Change in church activities Change in social activities Change in sleeping habits Change in number of family get-togethers Change in eating habits Vacation Christmas alone Minor violations of the law

Pts 30 29 29 29 26 26 25 24 23 20 20 20 19 19 18 16 15 15 13 12 11

A score of 00+ means you are at high risk for illness, while 10-299+ means your risk for illness is moderate. If your total points are less than 10, you have a slight risk for illness.
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Doctors & Business

Wellness

A no-pain way to get rid of gallstones
By Margaret Jao-Grey

2

007 WAS A WATERSHED year for then Henkel Phils. president Cris Aquino. From being an employee, albeit a highly-paid one in a multinational company, she became an employer, putting up two companies, both of which catered to her strength as a chemist. She also found out in the course of her regular executive checkup that she had three big gallstones and several small ones to boot. Her doctor recommended immediate surgery. She opted for a noninvasive procedure instead. “A friend recommended that I try flushing. After my first session in April 2007, I flew to Germany on business and had another ultrasound. The doctor was amazed because he saw only one gallstone. I took care of that with another session in July of the same year,” she said. Aquino is several of hundreds Filipinos who have participated in the monthly wellness workshops held by The Global Vital Sources Co since January 2007.

Although the workshop covers lectures on how to eat well but healthily and how to create a life balance that makes you more happy and, therefore, less stressed, its core is the flushing or detoxification of toxins from the liver and gallbladder, which are sometimes described as the body’s janitor and his Axion and the body’s first line of defense.

The procedure starts with a controlled diet of soups, juices, and all the fruits you can eat for five to six hours to hydrate the body. This is followed by a four-hour fast that includes water. Between six in the evening and eight in the morning of the next day, each participant is given five glasses of liquids containing natural and organic elements such as Epsom salt that prompt the body to expel gallstones of different colors and different sizes. “There’s no pain involved but expect to take numerous trips to the bathroom between seven and 10 the next morning,” said Goulbourn. “About 80% of gallstones are caused by bad cholesterol, the accumulation of all those years of eating fried and greasy food that Filipinos, Chinese, and Americans like.” One happy side effect of flushing is the loss of weight as the body rids itself of excess water. The usual weight loss is between one and two pounds, although there are cases such as Carmelite nun Sr. Mary Niere who lost eight pounds overnight.

“When you flush, your body’s performance improves because you remove the clogs. Toxin build-up caused by improper diet, pollutants, and an unhealthy lifestyle lowers the immune system and increases the chances of disease to set in,” said Global Vital Source chairman and chief executive officer Jean Goulbourn.

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Wellness
“When I joined the workshop, I was  pounds overweight and in need of knee surgery because of my weight. After the initial loss of eight pounds, I lost another 28 pounds in the span of one year by eating right. Health is indeed a precious gift,” said the 78-year-nun who no longer needs surgery. In fact, the Zamboangabased nun is more active than ever, frequently traveling all around the country and abroad to lecture on contemplative praying. healthy is not expensive. For example, the lowly malunggay packs more calcium than milk and more Vitamin C than any citrus fruit. In contrast, vitamins in tablet form are only 0% absorbed by the body. cost of health,” said Goulbourn, who no longer reads newspapers at night nor listens to TV news nor makes business decisions after  p.m. to reduce stress. She also takes her dinner no later than 7 p.m. for better digestion.

Diet and lifestyle
“You can still eat what you like and be healthy. Just prepare the food differently by steaming rather than frying. Also avoid sweets and red meat because cancer cells thrive in sweet and acidic environments,” said holistic nutritionist Dale Flores. Health trends worldwide show that lung cancer is the biggest killer for both men and women. In Asia, the Philippines has the highest incidence of breast cancer largely due to a diet of high fat, high salt, and high sugar. Interestingly, Bicol has the longest life expectancy in the country because coconut is a widely used ingredient in cooking. There are three underlying causes of cancer. An unhealthy diet is one. Stress is another. Chemical intake is a third. Smoking can hurt the lungs; alcohol, the liver; and too much salt, the kidney. “Research shows that cancer patients hate vegetables and eat a lot of red meat. They also have problems with emotions because they have a tough time letting go and forgetting,” said Flores. Contrary to public perception, eating
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One happy side effect of flushing is the loss of weight as the body rids itself of excess water. The usual weight loss is between one and two pounds, although there are cases such as Carmelite nun Sr. Mary Niere who lost eight pounds overnight.
“At the end of the day, it’s important for everyone to increase their health awareness by dealing with their own ‘doctor within’. Learn to listen to your body. Take care of it. Stress that you can take at 2, your body might not be able to take at ,” said Flores. A case in point is Goulbourn, who had off-and-on-again fever and coughing over a period of 0 days two years ago. Prescribed antibiotics and steroids, she also experienced cramps and depression. It was when she consulted a naturopath doctor that her road to wellness began. She was given a therapeutic wrap and lots of soups and juices. Four-and-a-half hours later, her temperature returned to normal. She hasn’t had even a cold since.“It took me 10 months to change my lifestyle, to redesign my life. It took that much time to look into my inner body so that I could move out of the box. “Food is the best medicine. It is also important to prioritize what is important to you. When you are in your 0s, you want to achieve a lot even at the

Advocacy
Goulbourn describes herself as a natural wellness and natural medicines advocate. She is, of course, better known as the first local fashion designer to put up her own readyto-wear collection and as a producer of locally-made silk mixed with other indigenous fabrics like piña that are exported to European fashion houses such as Balenciaga. ”When I entered the wellness business, I thought that I would just bridge people to the right doctors and the right nutritionists. But after having personally experienced poor health, it boiled down to helping those who are not already ‘sick-sick’ but just suffering physical discomfort. These are the ones who easily bounce back after body cleansing,” said Goulbourn. Global Vital Source focuses on digestive clean up or DCU modules, which cover the upper digestive tract or the stomach, small intestine, liver, and gallbladder.It piloted the liver and gallbladder module sometime in the fourth quarter of 200. “We chose Bacolod for several reasons. The people there are more conscious of eating healthy. In fact, Negros Occidental Gov. Joseph Maranon has a ‘Go Organic’ program that encourages healthy eating. We also got a lot of help from Liz QuerubinAscalon in getting together 10 volunteers at the Punta Hulata Beach and Spa,” said Goulbourn.

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Wellness
The first official wellness workshop in January 2007 had 28 people. “It was a memorable group. We had seven people who each lost eight pounds. Of the seven, five have retained their new weight,” said Goulbourn. In its marketing effort, which is entirely by word of mouth, Global Vital is careful not to promise that the workshop will take away gallstones although its experience so far shows that eight out of ten participants claim some level of pain relief after flushing. Instead, the company describes the workshop as a non-medical, nonsurgical healthcare prevention that follows the protocols of a naturopath doctor. There are nurses on stand by during the entire workshop and the venue itself is close to a tertiary hospital, The Medical City.

Bright plans
More than a year into the venture, the company has already received buyers’ interest, all of which have been turned down. “Acceptance has increased. It’s easier to talk to the younger ones up to 40 because they’re open to new ideas. Men find it harder to join but they need to because prostate cancer is foodrelated,” said Goulbourn. There is also corporate interest. A Binondo-based company with 400 employees and the Rustan’s Group have signed up and will be sending employees in batches of 0 to a bigger venue in Fray Clemente Center behind the San Juan de Dios Hospital. The rate per person is half that at

Discovery Suites. The company has also opened an information center at the fifth floor of Rustan’s Makati where enrollment is accepted and where wellness lectures are held every six weeks.The major source of future income for Global Vital Source, however, is expected to come from the production of organic food. “This is a difficult project because the food we will produce has no preservatives and, therefore, has a short shelf life,” said Goulbourn. Right now, though, Goulbourn and her partners at Global Vital Source are more interested in advocating good health rather than making money out of it.

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Business

Sorry tales of unwary bank depositors
manager was, however, absent that day so the retiree asked the help of the assistant manager. That was when the retiree learned that his deposits were never registered.

Illustration by: Emmanuel Garcia

The case of the unrecorded deposit
A RETIREE has been regularly doing business with the savings and loans association for policemen because it offered an interest rate that is at least three times that of any commercial bank. His problem began when the SLA set a lower time deposit ceiling, which meant that the SLA quarterly released P00,000 to him until his balance reached the lower deposit ceiling. With that much cash in hand, the retiree shopped around for a bank where he could put his excess cash. Resigned that he wouldn’t get the same high interest rate as his SLA, the retiree decided he wanted to do business with a small but senior citizen-friendly bank. He finally decided on one where the bank manager gave him the personal touch. He never had to line up like everybody else inside the bank; he sat inside the bank manager’s office and was served coffee while the manager did the paperwork for him. When he couldn’t go to the bank, the manager personally went to his home and picked up his cash deposit. Needless to say, the retiree was very happy with the bank manager. In fact, he remembered the bank manager during his last trip abroad and bought her a souvenir. One day, the retiree went to the bank for some much-needed cash. The
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Bangko Sentral red flags that indicate bank fraud
• Off-site transactions (inside the office of the manager and at home) • Dealing with only a single individual • No validation mode

The manager said he talked to the owners about how good a bank client he was and the owners wanted him as a minor partner. The depositor, however, wasn’t interested, saying he was a low-profile businessman and he wanted to stay that way. Another time, the bank manager told the depositor that he could earn a “guaranteed” higher interest rate with an investment management account or IMA. Attracted by the higher interest rate, he agreed, accepting an unsigned note as “guarantee”, which he, of course, kept in the same place as his original certificate of time deposit. Later on, the bank was sold to another group, which declined to accept its liability on the IMAs. It seems the IMAs were invested in a sister company of the old bank or in non-performing assets. The depositor was left holding an empty bag.

The case of the converted time deposits
THE SECURITY GUARDS know him by sight. He goes to the bank, always wearing a not-too-clean white shirt and slippers and a canvas shopping bag that has seen better days. Bank personnel also know him by sight as well as by his big time deposit, which he continued to augment with more money coming from inside his shopping bag. Since he kept his first certificate of time deposit safely at home, the depositor did not ask for similar certificates every time he rolled over his time deposits and added more money to it. One time, the bank manager approached him and asked him if he wanted to convert his time deposit into shares of stock.

Bangko Sentral red flags that indicate bank fraud:
• Unusual interest in his deposit

• The offer of high interest rates • Bank is in dire need of capital from depositors Similarity in corporate names and logos of the bank and its related company Unsigned guarantee

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Business

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2

Business

How to spot a franchise scam
By Erlinda S. Bartolome

F

RANCHISING has made great inroads in the Philippines because of the increasing number of people succeeding in business through this route. But franchising has a downside: it has given rise to scams. Franchise scams have indeed, been on the upswing but it hasn’t reached crisis proportions as it had in the United States in the 1970s (considered franchising’s “dark ages”) when countless individuals were duped into investing in non-existent franchises. The situation became so bad that the US government had to step in to regulate the franchising sector. We haven’t reached the boiling point yet but we may well be on our way if we do not take steps to stop franchise scams in their tracks. Unfortunately, we are on our own in this, as no government agency exists to regulate franchise operations in the Philippines. But we can start by advocating responsible franchising. It doesn’t mean we’re promoting “perfect franchising,” because nowhere in the world would one find a foolproof system. Each franchise system is fraught with problems and challenges and it is vital for one to know how to distinguish between a responsible franchiser and a con artist. The first will readily admit that his
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system is imperfect but he’s committed to helping the franchisees achieve the same level of success he did with company-owned branches. The latter will rave about his franchise but will gloss over its imperfections. He’s out only to collect the fees and is not the least interested in helping the franchisees. Despite the obvious difference, many people can’t tell one from the other. Being able to spot a franchise scam is the best way to avoid losing one’s shirt. The following are the red flags to look for to keep from falling prey to swindlers:

franchise fees will go up tomorrow or lure you into getting their buy-one, get-one franchise-free offer. This tactic not only trivializes a franchise but also deprives you of your right to do due diligence. A franchise often entails a major investment and those not wanting you to do some background checks are those with skeletons to hide.

Evasive answers to questions about the franchise. Franchisers
or their representatives should know their franchise like the back of their hand. They should be able to answer whatever questions you may have. And if they cannot answer right away, at least they’re eager to get back to you as soon as they have it. Your alarm bells should sound once you ask how long the franchise has been around or how well the franchised outlets have been doing and they answer by hyping their profits instead, A con artists is one who paints a rosy picture of his franchise: how profitable all the franchise outlets have been and the short time before you can get your investments back.

Promise of good returns. Like a
suitor who would vow to give heaven and earth, you will know the franchiser is pulling your leg if he promises toogood-to-be true profits even with little or no effort from you. Responsible franchisers do not guarantee specific rate of returns. All they will offer is a business system that has worked for them and, if followed to the letter, would also work for you if you were hands-on with the business. Good franchisers lay their cards on the table and know how to manage your expectations. They are successful because they’ve worked hard to build their system and are committed to growing it through franchising.

Franchiser doesn’t have a track record. A business concept that
has not been tested in the market or a franchise with no companyowned branches is one indication of a franchise scam. For a franchiser to be considered legitimate, he should have been in business at least a year and is overseeing at least a couple of

High-pressure tactics. Be wary of
people who pressure you into parting with your money now because the

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Business
successful company-owned outlets. Responsible franchising means the franchiser is making available a business system that he has operated successfully. What model can he hold up if the franchiser has not proven that his system is actually working? How can the franchiser share a successful experience if he has none? should have the chance to meet with the franchiser and the broker should be willing to schedule a meeting. If the broker turns down your request for an staff. You should be able to meet the franchiser in person.

Lack of a franchise organization.
Check if the franchiser has put an organization in place that will guide you when you operate your franchise. If there is none, it means you will be on your own when you operate your franchise. Bona fide franchisers design an effective system that will help you make your franchised branch a success. These are but a few of the warning signs to watch when buying a franchise, although the best way to protect us from falling victims is still to do our homework. We should neither allow ourselves to be stampeded into buying a franchise nor be lured by attractive sales pitches. Invest time instead in verifying franchise offering that catch our interest and in making sure these franchises have solid track records in the industry. Talk with as many people as possible: with the franchisers, with the middle management of the franchise organization, and most important, with the franchisees themselves. You will then be contributing towards stemming the tide of franchise scams in the country. Unscrupulous franchisers erode the credibility of franchising and discourage others from using this expansion route that has changed the world of business. (Ms.Erlinda S. Bartolome is a certified franchise executive)
Doctors & Business
2 Illustration by: Emmanuel Garcia

Steep start-up fees. Any
franchise investment can be broken down and each fee justified. There is a formula for computing the fees that franchisers follow when franchising their business. Responsible franchisers are wise to set a reasonable franchise investment because the sooner the franchisee recovers the investment, the better for the business and the franchiser’s reputation. A swindler will tend to charge exorbitant fees because he is more interested in raking in money than in the franchisee recouping his investment. A true franchiser cares about how you will recover your investment and is upfront with how your payment will be used in the franchise.

Talking to the franchise broker instead of with the franchiser.
While franchise brokers may be of help, their involvement ends at some point in the application process. You

appointment, it is time to look for other franchise offerings. A franchise is fraudulent if the only people willing to sit down with you are the brokers or the marketing

Franchise Ideas
Below P500,000 Franchises
BAYAD CENTER
Type of business: Service Vice president and operations head: Mr. Francispito Quevedo Company name: CIS Bayad Center, Inc. Address: Business Solution Center, Meralco Complex, Ortigas Ave., Pasig City Telephone: 914-210; 122-20 Fax: 914-210 E-mail: msroa@cis.com.ph; www.bayadcenter.com Total capital investment: P487,000.00 Franchise fee: P10,000.00 No. of outlets: Company-owned:4; Franchisees: 192 Royalty fee: None Marketing/Advertising fee: 2% Terms of renewal:  years Oranbo, Pasig City Telephone: 2-7741; 2-079 Fax: 2-7741 E-mail: info@candycorner.ph www.candycorner.ph Total capital investment: Between P0,000 and P00,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: 0; Franchisees: 27 Franchise fee: P10,000 Royalty fee: 4% Marketing/Advertising fee: 1% Terms of renewal: 4 years No. of Outlets: Company-owned 18; Franchisees:  Royalty fee: % of gross sales Marketing/Advertising fee: % of gross sales Terms of renewal:  years

INKRITE INK REFILLING STATION
Type of business: Retail Owner: Mr. Joseph Anthony Luna Company name: JH Office Solutions Inc. Address: 2 Aurora Blvd., San Juan, MM Telephone: 724 421; 724 44 Fax: 721 1 E-mail: psicom@info.com

CHICHARIFIC BY LAPID’S
Type of business: Food President: Ms. Erlinda Lapid Dioquino Address: Room B, Ground Floor, ECM Bldg., Town and Country Commercial Arcade, Marcos Highway, Cainta, Rizal Telephone: 4-79 Fax: 77-847 E-mail: chicharific@yahoo.com

KISS KING OF BALLS
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Melchor Flores Company name: KISS King of Balls, Inc. Address: 110 Mindanao Ave., Quezon City Telephone: 929-42; 44-8; 44-0 E-mail: kkbi@pacific.net.ph

BUY THE BUCKET
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Jorge Noel Weineke III Telephone: 89-042; 89-019 Fax: 89-004 No. of outlets: Company-owned: 9; Franchisees: 4; Joint venture: 1; Dealership: 1

FRUITAS
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Lester Yu Company name: Lush Enterprises Address: 2-E Agno St. corner D. Tuazon St., Barangay Dona Josefa, Quezon City Telephone: 71-888; 41-748 Fax: 71-9778 E-mail: lushent@yahoo.com

LOTS’A PIZZA
Type of business: Food Vice president and treasurer: Ms. Teresita Ngan Tian Franchise director: Mr. Robert Ngan Tian Company name: Lots’a Pizza Franchise System Inc. Telephone: 87-84 Fax: 87-8414; 872-9122 E-mail: info@lotsapizza.com.ph

BUY THE LITER
Type of business: Retail Owner: Mr. Michael Yao Company name: Buy the Liter Enterprises Address: F Northridge Plaza, #2 Congressional Ave., Proj. 8, Quezon City Telephone: 490-8; 972-179 Fax: 927-278 E-mail: buytheliter@gmail.com No. of outlets: Company-owned: 1; Licensees: 4 Terms of renewal: 4 years

HBC HOME AND BEAUTY EXCLUSIVES
Type of business: Service President: Dra. Rosalinda Ang Hortaleza Company name: HBC Inc. Address: 48 Mindanao Ave. corner Quirino Highway, Novaliches, Quezon City Telephone: 984- loc. 141 Fax: 4-08 E-mail: franchise@hbc.com.ph www.hbc.com.ph Total capital investment: Between P0,000 for cart and P4 million for full store Franchise fee: Between P100,000 and P70,000

MAGIC MELT
Type of business: Food President/chief executive officer: Ms. Carolyn Go Company name: Magic Melt Foods Inc. Address: 1242 Salbellano St., Puerto Princesa Labangon, Cebu City Telephone: (02) 21-0297 Fax: (02) 22-22 Email: magicmelt@mozcom www.magicmelt.com

CANDY CORNER
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Ricardo Andres Company name: Candy Corner Franchising Corp. Address: 1 Saint Augustine Street, Brgy.
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MR. SOFTY
Type of business: Food

Doctors & Business

Franchise Ideas
Franchise manager: Mr. Vernon Perea Company name: Mr. Softy Franchise Systems, Inc. Address: 74 Tangerine St., SSS Village, Marikina City Telefax: 941-81; 94-8007 E-mail: mr.softlyphil@hotmail.com P00,000 and P00,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: ; Franchisees: 40 Franchise fee: P10,000 Royalty fee: None Marketing/Advertising fee: None Terms of renewal:  years

3M PIZZA PIE
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Duke Sage Company name: Supremo Food Corp. Address: 77 Evangelista St. corner Malvar St. Quezon City Telephone: 49-4 Fax: 421-1489 E-mail: sagem@yahoo.com; www.mpizzapie.com.ph Total capital investment: P20,000 Franchise fee: P10,000 No. of outlets: Company -owned: 4; Franchisees: 19 Royalty fee: % Marketing/Advertising fee: 1% Terms of renewal:  years

PICK & MIX BY CANDY MIX
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Edison Mariano Company name: Candy Mix Plus, Inc. Address: GCW-2 Guanio Compound, C. Raymundo Ave., Maybunga, Pasig City Telephone: 28-2298 Fax: 41-998 E-mail: candymix_9@yahoo.com Total capital investment: Between P0,000 and P00,000 Terms of renewal: Between 4 and  years

POTATO CORNER
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Jose Magsaysay, Jr. Company: Cinco Corp.. Address: 89 Katarungan St. Brgy. Plainview, Mandaluyong City Telephone: 4-84 to 4 Fax: 4-849 E-mail: cincofranchise@yahoo.com www.cincocorporation.com.ph

WAFFLE TIME ROYAL CARIBBEAN JAMAICAN PATTIES
Type of business: Food Marketing manager: Ms. Beatrix Reyes Company name: Nine Dots Corp. Address: 24 Berbenia St., Tahanan Village, Parañaque Telefax: 842-80; 772-1941 E-mail: ninedots@edsamail.com.ph Type of business: Food Chief executive officer: Mr. Johnny Que Company name: Waffle Time Inc. Address:  San Luis St. Pasay City / Door 4 QHP Bldg., Arsenal St. Iloilo City Telephone: 0-9912; (0)-002 Fax: 2-9208; (0)-002 E-mail: customerservice@waffletime.com; www.waffletime.com Total capital investment: P00,000 Franchise fee: P0,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: 219; Franchisees: 141 Royalty fee: % Marketing/Advertising fee: % Terms of renewal:  years

PIZZA PEDRICO’S
Type of business: Food Managing director: Mr. Kervin Tan Company name: Pizza Pedrico’s Food Corp. Address: 8 B. G. Araneta Ave., QC Telephone: 71-28 Fax: 71-28 E-mail: kerwin.tan@jiggsthomas.com www.pizzapedricos.com Total capital investment: P 00,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: 4; Franchisees: 2 Royalty fee: P100,000 renewal period Marketing/Advertising fee: % Terms of renewal:  years

SAM’S EVERYTHING ON STICK
Type of business: Food President/chief executive officer: Mr. Reymont Chouchuy Company name: Noble House Business Brokers Inc. Address: 0 Cement Compound Congressional Ave. Quezon City Telephone: 4-29 to 40 Fax: 92-17 E-mail: xtishellmunoz@yahoo.com www.noblehouse.ph.com Total capital investment: Between P10,000 and P400,000 Franchise fee: P90,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: 2; Franchisees: 0 Royalty fee: % Marketing/Advertising fee: None Terms of renewal:  years

ZEN ZEST
Type of business: Retail President: Ms. Michelle Dula Asence Company name: Zen Zest Lifestyle Product Address: 4 B & C E. Rodriguez Ave. Marikina City Telephone: 9-1201 Fax: 9-1202 E-mail: zenzest@yahoo.com Total capital investment: P00,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: 40; Franchisees: 49 Doctors & Business
27

POTDOG YUMMY YES DELIGHTS
Type of business: Food President and chief executive officer: Ms. Lenny Lyn Ang Company name: Happy Delights Inc. Address: Grand Central Rizal Ave., Caloocan City Telephone: 72-04 Fax: 742-9 E-mail: lennieang@yahoo.com Total capital investment: Between

Franchise Ideas
Franchise fee: P100,000 Royalty fee: None Marketing/Advertising fee: 1% Terms of renewal:  years P800,000 and P1.2 million Franchise fee: P100,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: 2; Franchisees:  Royalty fee: -7% gross sales monthly Marketing/Advertising fee: % Terms of renewal:  years P00,000 and P00,000 Franchise fee: P20,000 (Luzon); P00,000 (Visayas & Mindanao) No. of outlets: Company-owned: ; Franchisees:  Royalty fee: None Marketing/Advertising fee: None Terms of renewal:  years

P500,000 to P1 million Franchises
AQUA 2000 WATER
Type of business: Service President: Mr. Alberto Alejo Company name: Aqua 2000 Water Tech Inc. Address: 78 Mindanao Ave. Quezon City Telephone: 44-780; 920-7224 Fax: 44-787 E-mail: aqua2000@pacific.net.ph; www.aqua2000ph.tripod.com Total capital investment: P00,000 Franchise fee: 40,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: ; Franchisees: 200 Royalty fee: P4 / gallon Marketing/Advertising fee: 2% Terms of renewal: 7 years

BINALOT FIESTA FOOD
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Rommel Juan Company name: Binalot Fiesta Foods, Inc. Address: 8 Sun Valley Drive, Sun Valley Subdivision, Parañaque City Telefax: 824-7014; 821-009 E-mail: ilovebinalot@gmail.com

CRYSTAL CLEAR WATER STORE
Type of business: Service President: Mr. Jose Antonio Soler Chief operating officer: Mr. Cyd Bascar Company name: Solerex Watch Tech. Address: 9 Dr. Sixto Antonio Ave. corner. Sandoval Bridge, Maybunga, Pasig City Telephone: 42-448 ; 42-2974 Fax: 42-81 E-mail: solrex@pldtdsl.net; www.crystalclear.com.ph Total capital investment: P900,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: 9; Franchisee: 0 Franchise fee: None Royalty fee: P1/mtr. gallon of water dispensed Marketing/Advertising fee: P0.0/ gallon of water purchased Terms of renewal:  years

BREAD & BUTTER
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Guidon Dela Cruz Company name: Bakers Dream Franchise Corp. Address: 0 Osmeña Ave. Kalibo, Aklan Telephone: (0) 00-7777 Fax: (0) 28721 E-mail: macciri@runbox.com; www.macciri.com Total capital investment: Between P700,000 and P1million Franchise fee: Between P10,000 and P200,000 No. of outlets: Company -owned: 8; Franchisees: 20 Royalty fee: 1.% of gross sales Marketing/Advertising fee: 1.% of gross sales Terms of renewal:  years

AQUA SOFT WATER
Type of business: Service President: Ms. Hope Lee Company name: Aqua Soft Water Systems, Inc. Address: F King Cater Bldg., 7 Sgt. E. Rivera St., Quezon City Telephone: 4-9 Fax: -8171

FIORGELLATO
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Ricardo Cuna Company name: Milkin Corp. Address: 12 Gen. Luna St., Ermita, Manila Telephone: 24 -084 Fax: 24- 08 E-mail: kiosk12@yahoo.com; www.fiorgellato.com Total capital investment: Maximum of P90,000 Franchise fee: P10,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: 2; Franchisees: 27 Royalty fee: None Marketing/Advertising fee: None Terms of renewal:  years

BIG APPLE EXPRESS SPA
Type of business: Service Chief executive officer: Mr. Karlo Nisce Franchise director: Mr. Victor Fernando Company name: Pranav Global Ventures Corp. Address: rd Level West Wing, Robinsons Galleria Ortigas Ave., Mandaluyong City Telephone: 1-197 Fax: 1-197 E-mail: victor.fernando@pranavglobal.com; www.pranav.global.com Total capital investment: Between
28

BUNS & PIZZA
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Reginald Robillos Company name: Buns & Pizza Inc. Address: B L0-2 ACM PH9 Columbia Heights, Alapan 1 A1, Imus, Cavite Telephone: 04-87-204 Fax: 700-1 E-mail: buns_and_pizza@yahoo.com; www.bunspizza.com Total capital investment: Between

Doctors & Business

Franchise Ideas
FRUIT MAGIC
Type of business: Food President: Dr. Alfredo Escalona Company name: Fruit Magic Inc. Address: 27 Rizal Ave. Grace Park, Caloocan City Telephone: 4-21; 4-927 Fax: -294 E-mail: edocunanan@fruitmagic.com.ph www.fruitmagic.com.ph Total capital investment: P700,000 Franchise fee: P00,000 plus value added tax No. of outlets: Company-owned: 47; Franchisees: 12 Royalty fee: % Marketing/Advertising fee: 2% Terms of renewal:  years Terms of renewal:  years Royalty fee: % Marketing/Advertising fee: 2% Terms of renewal:  years

MINUTE BURGER
Type of business: Food President: Ms. Judy Guevara Company name: Leslie Corp.. Address: 4 Dama de Noche St., UPS IV, Parañaque City Telephone: 82-2 Fax: 77-79 E-mail: minuteburger@leslie.com.ph Total capital investment: P00,000 Franchise fee: P0,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: 2; Franchisees: 47 Royalty fee: P7,000/month /store Marketing/Advertising fee: P1,00.00 Terms of renewal: 2- years

PIXIE’S SINUGBA
Type of business: Food Franchise manager: Mr. Jose Maria Rey Valencia Company name: Pixie’s Sinugba Inc. Address:  Road 1 Brgy. Bagong Pag-asa, Quezon City Telephone: 920-87 Fax: 920-89 E-mail: jp@pixiessinugba.com Total capital investment: P00,000 Franchise fee: P100,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: 24; Franchisees: 1 Royalty fee: % Marketing/Advertising fee: % Terms of renewal:  years

GOTO KING
Type of business: Food Chairman and chief executive officer: Ms. Teresa Dula Laurel Company name: Cater King Food Corp. Address: 19 Kamias Road Ext., QC Telephone: 922-20; 928-971 loc. 14 Fax: 922-20 E-mail: momrosa@vasra.com Total capital investment: Between P00,000 and P2. million Franchise fee: Between P280,000 and P420,000

MISTER DONUT
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Mauro Agustines Address: 7/F Ramcar Center, Mister Donut Phils., 80-82 Roces Ave., Diliman, QC Telephone: 7-0 / 791 / 201 Fax : 7-124 / 01 / 7-791 E-mail: bdd@misterdonut.ph; www.misterdonut.ph Total capital investment: Minimum of P00,000 Franchise fee: P120,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: ; Franchisee: 49 Terms of renewal: 4 years

PLATO WRAPS
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Antonio Seen Company name: Panadero Antonio Address: 01 Crisologo Compound, Tapuac District, Dagupan City, Pangasinan Telephone: (07) 1-792 E-mail: platowrap_2000@yahoo.com

RIBBON FRIES
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Peter Nathaniel Carrillo Company name: Ribbon Fries Food Concepts Inc. Address: 0 P. Aguilar St. San Francisco del Monte, Quezon City Telephone: 74-108 Fax: 74-108 E-mail: ribbonfries@gmail.com Total capital investment: P00,000 Franchise fee: P20,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: ; Franchisees: 22 Royalty fee: % Marketing/Advertising fee: 2% Terms of renewal: 4 years

K2 DRUGSTORE
Type of business: Service Proprietress: Ms. Rebecca Bucad Company name: K2 Drugs, Inc. Address: 9 Emerald Commercial Center, J. P. Rizal, Project 4, Quezon City Telephone/Fax: 91-7271 E-mail: k2drug@yahoo.com Total capital investment: Depends on the store size Franchise fee: P00,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: 11; Franchisees: 8 Royalty fee: 4% Marketing/Advertising fee: % of gross sales

MRS. FIELDS
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Gerwyn See Company name: Ababa Corp.. Address: 4072 Gen Mascardo St., Bangkal, Makati City Telephone: 887-111; 84-4822 Fax: 84-4822 loc. 10 E-mail: gerwyn.see@ababacorp.com; www.mrsfields.com Total capital investment: P1 million Franchise fee: P00,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: 10; Franchisees: 9

Doctors & Business

29

Franchise Ideas
THE GENERICS PHARMACY
Type of business: Retail President: Mr. Benjamin Liuson Company name: The Generics Pharmacy Franchising Corp. Address: 49 Quezon Ave., Quezon City Telephone: 711-9 Fax: 712-4921 E-mail: comments@thegenericspharmacy. com; www.thegenericspharmacy.com Total capital investment: Between P700,00 and P800,000 Franchise fee: P170,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: 1; Franchisees: 180 Advertising fee: 1% Terms of renewal: years Royalty fee: 10% Marketing/Advertising fee: 2% Terms of renewal:  years Telephone: 72-9910; 41-022; 72-9919 Fax: 72-9910; 41-022 E-mail: abc@bioessencephil.com; www.bioessencephil.com Total capital investment: P million Franchise fee: P1 million No. of outlets: Company-owned: 20; Franchisees: 4 Royalty fee: 10% Marketing/Advertising fee: % Terms of renewal:  years

AQUA BEST
Type of business: Service President: Mr. Carson Tan Company name: GQWest Inc. Address: 88-C Quezon Ave., Brgy. Sta. Cruz, Quezon City Telephone: 412-92 to 4 Fax: 410-0142 E-mail: aquabestlife@yahoo.com; www.gqwest.com Total capital investment: P1 million No. of outlets: Company-owned: 1; Franchisees: 447 Franchise fee/Royalty fee: None Terms of renewal:  years

BLUEWATER DAY SPA
Type of business: Service President: Ms. Mary Simisim Company name: Bluewater Day Spa, Inc. Address: Nature Wellness Inc. Unit 290 Atlanta Center Annapolis St. Greenhills, San Juan Telephone: 484-020 Fax: 84-020 E-mail: president@bluewaterdayspa.com; www.bluewaterdayspa.com Total capital investment: Minimum P1. million Franchise fee: P29,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: 2; Franchisee: 2 Royalty fee: % gross revenue Marketing/Advertising Fee: 2% Terms of renewal:  years

Between P1 million and P5 million Franchises
ACT ELECTRONIC CENTER
Type of business: Service President: Mr. Alberto Co Tenedero Company name: JCMB & IBT Franchising System, Inc. Address: Alcajat Bldg., 91 Banawe corner G. Roxas, Quezon City Telephone: 1-747 Fax: -879 E-mail: franchise@actelectronic.net

BAYO
Type of business: Retail President/general manager: Mr. Ferdinand Agustin General manager: Ms. Pinky Estribillo Company name: Lyncor Inc. Address: 8C Mercury Ave.corner E.Rodriguez Ave., Libis, Quezon City Telephone: 421-228 to 1 Fax: 421-204 E-mail: franchise@bayo.com.ph; www.bayo.com.ph Total capital investment: Between P2 million and P million Franchise fee: P00,000 plus value added tax No. of outlets: Company-owned: ; Franchisees: 20 Royalty fee: None Marketing/Advertising fee: 1% Terms of renewal:  years

AHEAD TUTORIAL & REVIEW CENTERS
Type of business: Service President: Ms. Rossana Llenado Company name: Ahead Learning System, Inc. Address: 7 Katipunan Ave., Loyola Heights, Quezon City Telephone: 920-2900 Fax: 4-900 E-mail: aheadfranchise@gmail.com; www.aheadph.com Total capital investment: Between P2 million and P million Franchise fee: P2 million in Metro Manila; P1million in the provinces No. of outlets: Company-owned: ; Franchisees: 2 
0

BUGONG ROAST CHICKEN
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Jerry Erquiza Company name: Bugong Franchise Systems Address: 408 Vega Center, Los Banos, Laguna Telephone: (049) -248 Fax: (049) 8-0088 E-mail: bugong@laguna.net

BIOESSENCE FACIAL & SLIMMING CENTER
Type of business: Service President: Dr. Emma Beleno Guerrero Company name: Bioessence Philippines Address: 7 West Ave., West Triangle, Quezon City

CALIFORNIA NAILS & DAY SPA
Type of business: Service President: Ms. Leslie Matta Company name: California Nails & Day Spa, Inc.

Doctors & Business

Franchise Ideas
Address: 2nd Flr. Unit  Emmanuel Commercial #22 J. Elizalde St. BF Homes, Parañaque City Telephone: 809-77; 842-149 Fax: 842-274 E-mail: calif_nailsdayspa@yahoo.com; www.cans1.tripod.com Total capital investment: Between P million and P4 million Franchise fee: P700,000 plus value added tax Royalty fee: 7% Marketing/Advertising fee: 2% Terms of renewal:  years Royalty fee: 2% Marketing/advertising fee: 1% Terms of renewal: - years Mr. Micah Castillo Address: Unit 12, Promenda Bldg., 198 Wilson St., San Juan, Metro Manila Telefax: 72-208; 72-901 Total capital investment: Between P1.2 million and P1. million Franchise fee: Between P00,000 and P00,000 Marketing fee: 2% of gross sales plus VAT Service fee: % of gross sales plus VAT Terms of renewal:  years

COMPUTER ASSISTED LEARNING
Type of business: Service President: Mr. Leo Riingen Assistant vice president: Ms. Josephine Manalad Company name: CAL Holding Phils, Inc. Address: 2nd Flr. Security Land Bldg. 727 Ayala Ave. corner Rufino St. Makati City Telephone: 87-289 Fax: 810-09 E-mail: maldover@caleduc.com; jmanalad@caledu.com; www.caleducation.com Total capital investment: P1. million Franchise fee: P70,000 Royalty fee: 10% gross annual income Marketing/Advertising fee: 2% Terms of renewal:  -10 years

FOLDED & HUNG
Type of business: Retail Director for marketing and operations: Mr. Alan Vianzon Company name: Adenip, Inc. Address: 122 FH Bldg., Quezon Ave. Brgy. Sta Ana, Quezon City Telephone: 74-1001 Fax: 74-100 E-mail: alan.vianzon@foldedandhung.com; www.foldedandhung.com Total capital investment: Between P million and P million Franchise fee: P00,000 No. of outlets: company-owned: 27; Franchisees:  Royalty fee: P120,000 Marketing/Advertising fee: 2% gross sales Terms of renewal:  years

CARTRIDGE WORLD
Type of Business: Retail Chief executive officer: Ms. Jocelyn Decena-Newfield Company name: Cartridge World Islands Philippines, Inc. Address: G/F 110 Alvion Center, Rada St. Legaspi Village, Makati City Telephone: 89-7012 Fax: 89-797 E-mail: babylyn@cartridgeworld.com.ph; www.cartridgeworld.com.ph Total capital investment: P 2.87 million Franchise fee: US$8,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: 1 Royalty Fee: % Marketing/Advertising Fee: % Terms of renewal:  years and over

DERMALINE FACIAL & SKIN CARE CENTER
Type of business: Service President: Ms. Dina Stalder Officer-in-Charge: Mr. Alan Herradura Company name: Dermaline Inc. Address: KAVI Bldg. Acropolis Libis, Quezon City Telephone: 7-970 Fax: 1-04 E-mail: a.herradura@staldergroup.com.ph; www.stalder.com.ph Total capital investment: P1 million Franchise fee: P20,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: ; Franchisees: 20 Royalty fee: % of gross sales net of value added tax Marketing/Advertising fee: % of gross sales net of VAT Terms of renewal:  years

FRUIT MAGIC
Type of business: Food President Dr. Alan Escalona Franchise manager: Mr. Jose Eduardo Cunanan Company name: Fruit Magic Co., Inc. Address: 27 Rizal Ave. Ext., Grace Park, Caloocan City Telephone: 4-927; 4-21 Fax: 4-94 E-mail: contact@fruitmagic.com.ph

CELINE
Type of business: Retail Chief executive officer: Mr. Chan Kok Bin Company name: Celine Marketing Corp. Address: 101 Centerpoint Bldg. Julia Vargas Ave. Ortigas Center Pasig City Telephone: -791 Fax: -9777 E-mail: franchise@celine.com.ph; www.celine.com.ph Total capital investment: Between  million and P million Franchise fee: Between P00,000 and P2 million No. of Outlets: Company-owned: 4

FUZION SMOOTHIE CAFÉ FEET FOR US
Type of business: Service President: Mr. Christian Oliver Chua Franchise and operations manager: Type of business: Food Managing director: Ms. Meredith Ngo Franchise manager: Mr. Rico Orosa Company name: The Smoothie Co. Doctors & Business 
1

Franchise Ideas
Address: 904 Raffles Corporate Center, F. Ortigas Ave., Ortigas Commercial Center, Pasig City Telephone: 91-007 Fax: 914-109 E-mail: meredith.ngo@fuzionphils.com Total capital investment: Between P1.2 million and P million Franchise fee: Between P00,000 and P800,000 Royalty fee: Between % to 8% of gross sales Address: 10 San Vicente Road, Brgy. San Vicente, San Pedro, Laguna Telephone: 808-017 to 1 Fax : 88-199; 808-017 loc.29 E-mail: hernandez.ruel@gmail.com; www.gloriajeanscoffee.com.au Total capital investment: Between P2.1 million and P4.2 million Franchise fee: Between P880,000 and P1.4 million No. of outlets: Company-owned: ; Franchisees: 27 Royalty fee: 8% (full store); 8% (kiosk); 8% (cart) Marketing/Advertising fee: % Terms of renewal: 10 years International: 7 (Indonesia); Franchisees: 8 Royalty fee: % Marketing/Advertising fee: 2% Terms of renewal:  years

JULIE’S BAKESHOP
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Virgilio Espeleta National franchise development manager: Mr. Manny Viado Company name: Julie’s Franchise Corp. Address: C. Padilla St., San Nicolas, Cebu City / 4 Amang Rodriguez and Ortigas Ext Avenue, Rosario, Pasig City Telephone: (02) 21-7117 to 19; 4024; 474 Fax: (02) 21-2; 4024 E-mail: manny.viado@juliesbakeshop.com. ph; www.juliesbakeshop.com.ph Total capital investment: P2 million Franchise fee: P20,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: 4; Franchisees: 487 Royalty fee: % Marketing/Advertising fee: % Terms of renewal: 10 years

GAL’S BAKERY
Type of business: Food Chief operating officer: Ms. Elena Orosa Company name: Baley Ventures Corp. Address: Multi-Castle Bldg., Marcos Highway, Antipolo, Rizal Telefax: 47-192; 82-900 E-mail: eorosa200@yahoo.com

GOODAH!!!
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Jose Antonio Soler Company name: Del Sol Foods, Inc. Address: 9 Dr. Sixto Antonio Ave. Cor. Sandoval Bridge, Maybunga, Pasig City Telephone: 901-1978; 40-427 Fax: 40-4908 E-mail: contact_us@goodah.com.ph Total capital investment: P1.8 million Franchise fee: P00,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: 4; Franchisees: 2 Royalty fee: % of gross sale Marketing/Advertising fee: 2% Terms of renewal:  years

GENETIC COMPUTER INSTITUTE
Type of business: Service President: Mr. William Tan Franchising manager: Ms. Rebecca Ramos Company name: Genetic Holdings International Inc. Address: Unit 0-0 Computer Graphics Bldg., Aurora Blvd. corner Gilmore, New Manila, Quezon City Telephone: 722-04; 72-48 Fax: 72-14 E-mail: quezoncity@genetic.edu.ph; www.genetic.edu.ph Total capital investment: Between P million and P million Franchise fee: US$18,000 Royalty fee: None Marketing/Advertising fee: 1% Terms of renewal: 1 years

KAMERAWORLD
Type of business: Service Executive vice president: Mr. Diogenes Gueco Company name: Kameraworld, Inc. Address: U814, West Tektite Tower, Philippine Stock Exchange Center, Ortigas, Pasig City Telephone: 000 loc. 10 Fax: -74 /47; 892-899 E-mail: info@kameraworld.com; www.kameraworld.com.ph Total capital investment: P2. million Franchise fee: P20,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned:  Royalty fee: 2% Marketing/Advertising fee: 2% Terms of renewal:  years

HOTSHOTS FLAME-GRILLED BURGERS
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Carlo Alexis de Guzman Vice President: Mr. Carlito Decena Company name: Ultimate Burgers, Inc. Address: Unit 1 Warehouse Dolmar Bldg.,  EDSA Ortigas, Mandaluyong City Telephone: 744 042; 720171 Fax: 72804 E-mail: hotshotsmarketing@yahoo.com; www.hotshotsburger.com Total capital investment: Between P4 million and P million Franchise fee: P70,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: 7;

GLORIA JEAN’S COFFEE
Type of business: Food Director for franchising and business development: Mr. Ramon Balingit Jr. Company name: Specialty Beans Phils, Inc. 
2

METROPOLE LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANING
Type of business: Service

Doctors & Business

Franchise Ideas
Vice president: Mr. Dominador Asis III Company name: Metropole Laundry Corp. Address: 8 Valencia Hills Commercial Complex, Valencia Hills and N. Domingo Street, Quezon City Telephone: 4-702 / 0 Fax: 4-1244 E-mail: dryclean@ibahn.net www.metropole.com.ph Marketing/Advertising fee: 2% Terms of renewal:  years P22,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: 97; Franchisees: 8 Royalty fee: % Marketing/Advertising fee: 1% Terms of renewal:  years

MOTECH
Type of business: Service Franchise Manager: Ms. Emile Canlas Company name: Motech Automotive Education Center, Inc. Address: 21 McArthur Highway, Pulongbulo, Angeles City, Pampanga Telephone: (04) 888-470 Fax: (04) 887-4794 E-mail: motech_aeci@yahoo.com; www.motech.com.ph

NET SURFERS CLUB
Type of business: Service President: Mr. Emer Rojas Company name: Net Surfers Club, Inc. Address: U, Parian Center, Commonwealth Avenue, Quezon City Telephone: 44-2222; 91-; 91-4444; 91-99 Fax: 91-1888 E-mail: franchise@nsclub.net; www.nsclub.net

MOCHA BLENDS
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Florante De La Cruz Company name: Mocha Blends Corp. Address: 9 Brgy. Lagging Handa, Tomas Morato, Quezon City Telephone: 7-2889 Fax: 74-8108 E-mail: info@mochablends.com; www.mochablends.com Total capital investment: Between P2. million and P4. million Franchise fee: P 70,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: 2; International: 2 (Jeddah, Indonesia); Franchisees: 4 Royalty fee: % of gross sales Marketing/Advertising fee: 2% of gross sales Terms of renewal:  years

MR. QUICKIE
Type of business: Service Managing director: Mr. Emilano Caruncho IV Company name: Mr. Quickie Corp. Address: Banner St. corner Danny Floro St., Bagong Ilog, Pasig City Telephone: 71-942; 910-88 Fax: 71-941 E-mail: management@mrquickie.com; www.m.quickie.com Total capital investment: P1 million No. of outlets: Company-owned: ; Franchisees: 19 Franchise fee: P200,000 Royalty fee: 4% of the gross sales Marketing/Advertising fee: % of the gross sales Terms of renewal:  years

NEW HORIZONS COMPUTER LEARNING CENTER
Type of business: Service President: Mr. Michael Bangayan Director for Sales: Ms. Josephine Co Company name: New Port Learning Center, Inc. Address: 10th Flr. Robinsons Summit Center, 78 Ayala Ave. Makati City Telephone: 840-000 Fax: 840-000 loc. 11 E-mail: chris.filoteo@newhorizons.com.ph; www.newhorizons.com.ph Total capital investment: Between P million and P4 million No. of outlets: Company-owned:  Royalty Fee: 10% gross Marketing/Advertising fee:10% Terms of renewal: 10 years

MONGOLIAN QUICK STOP
Type of business: Food President/chief executive officer: Ms. Mercedes Gil Chief operating officer: Mr. Jerome Lim Company name: Mongolian Quick Stop, Inc. Address: 17 Aquirre Ave., BF Homes Parañaque City Telephone: 82-4 Fax: 82-4 E-mail: mongolianquickstop@yahoo.com Total capital investment: P. million Franchise fee: P70,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: ; Franchisees: 9 Royalty fee: %

NETOPIA INTERNET CAFÉ
Type of business: Service President: Mr. George Tan Company name: Digital Paradise, Inc. Address: Unit 0 Centerpoint Bldg., Garnet Rd. corner Julia Vargas, Ortigas Center, Pasig City Telephone: 8-742 Fax: -4181; 4-018 E-mail: info@netopia.com.ph; www.netopia.com.ph Total capital investment: Between P1.8 million and P2. million Franchise fee: Between P10,000 and

PLAINS AND PRINTS
Type of business: Retail President: Mr. Ericson Farillas Franchise and business development manager: Ms. Pauline Gomez Company name: Raffco International Treading Corp. Address: 21 Mapalad Street, San Francisco Del Monte, Quezon City Telephone: 72-190 to 92 loc. 117 Doctors & Business 

Franchise Ideas
Fax: 72-189 E-mail: franchise@plainsandprints.com www.plainsandprints.com.ph Total capital investment: Between P2 million and P. million Franchise fee: P00,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: 2; Franchisees: 1 Royalty fee: None Marketing/Advertising fee: 2% Marketing/Advertising fee: % monthly gross sales Terms of renewal:  months to 2 years Total capital investment: P2.7 million No. of outlets: Company-owned: 12; Franchisee: 20 Franchise fee: P 4,000 Royalty fee: % gross sales (1st year ); 7% gross sales (2nd year); 10% gross sales (rd year) Marketing/Advertising fee: P90,000/ month Terms of renewal:  years

ROTO ROOTER
Type of business: Service President: Mr. Victor Puyat Company name: Roto Rooter Phils Drain Cleaning and Plumbing Services Address: 7F Makati Executive Center. L.P. Leviste corner Rufino Streets, Salcedo Village, Makati City Telephone: 812-1000 Fax: 812-9009 E-mail: rotophil@info.com.ph www.rotophil.com

PR GAZ HAUS
Type of business: Service Chief operating officer: Mr. Siu Ping Par Company name: PR Gaz Franchising Corp. Address: 1th F Orient Square Bldg. Emerald Ave. Ortigas Center Pasig City Telephone: 87-177/ 4 Fax: 87-017 E-mail: franchise@prgazhaus.com; www.prgazhaus.com Total capital investment: Between P980,000 and P1 million No. of outlets: Company-owned: 0; Franchisees: 4 Franchise fee: P10,000 plus value added tax Royalty fee: None Marketing/Advertising fee: 1% Terms of renewal:  years

More than P5 million Franchises
ARCE DAIRY
Type of business: Food President: Ms. Arlene Arce Company name: Arce Dairy Ice Cream Address: 102 Don Ramon Arce St. Selecta Compound, A. Bonifacio Ave., Balintawak, Quezon City Telephone: 4-20; 42790 1-7; -1882/ 8 Fax: -188/ 4-9 E-mail: arcedairy@pacific.net.ph

7 - ELEVEN
Type of business: Retail President: Mr. Vicente T. Paterno Business development division manager: Mr. Francis Medina Company name: Philippine Seven Corp. Address: 7F & 11F, Columbia Towers, Greenhills, San Juan, M.M. Telephone: 70-200 to 20 Fax: 70-229 E-mail: franchising@7-eleven.com.ph; www.7-eleven.com.ph Total capital investment: Minimum of P million Franchise fee: P00,000 plus value added tax No. of outlets: Company-owned: 1; Franchisees : 191 Royalty fee: 4% of gross profit Marketing/Advertising fee: % Terms of renewal:  years

ARCON FRANCHISE SYSTEMS
Type of Business: Service President: Mr. James P. Concepcion Company name: Arcon Franchise Systems Address: Sunnett Tower, Makati corner Durban Street, Makati City Telephone: 811-00 Fax: 811-014 E-mail: alexjavier@arconcentral.com; www.arconcentral.com

REYES HAIR CUTTERS
Type of business: Service President: Mr. Celestino Reyes Company name: Reyes Hair International Corp. Address: 2nd Flr., Ammiraglio Bldg., Tomas Morato corner E. Rodriguez, Quezon City Telephone: 72-084 Fax: 727-90 E-mail: reyeshaircutters@yahoo.com; www.reyeshaircutters.com Total capital investment: Between P1.4 million and P2.4 million No. of outlets: Company-owned: 19; Franchisees: 247 Franchise fee: P0,000 Royalty fee: % monthly gross sales 
4

ARISTOCRAT RESTAURANT
Type of business: Food President and chief operating officer: Mr. Raymund Reyes Company name: Roxas Food Ventures, Inc. Address: 42 San Andres St., Malate, Manila Telephone: 2-0497; 78-24 Fax: 2-402 E-mail: mktg@aristocrat.com.ph www.aristocrat.com.ph

YSTILO
Type of business: Service President: Mr. Federico Moreno Company name: Ystilo Salon Corp.. Address: Unit B, Gil Preciosa Bldg. 2, No. 7 Timog Ave. South Triangle, Q.C. Telephone: 927-72; 927-708 Fax: 927-7 E-mail: ystilo01@yahoo.com; www.ystilosalon.com

Doctors & Business

Franchise Ideas
BARE ESSENTIALS
Type of business: Service President and general manager: Ms. Marie Anne Topacio Company name: Bare Essentials Corp.. Address: Space 9, 2nd Flr. Atrium Bldg. Araneta Center, Cubao, Quezon City Telephone: 99-0848; 91-41 Fax: 99-0848 E-mail: bareessentials_alimall@ yahoo.com; www.bareessentials.com.ph Address: 01 A. Bonifacio Ave. Balintawak, Quezon City Telephone: 4-2227 loc.100 Fax: -279 E-mail: victor_tan@yahoo.com.ph; www.crolificgarments.com.ph Fax: 898-29 E-mail: franchise@viamare.com www.viamare.com.ph

CALTEX EXPRESS LUBE CENTER
Type of business: Service General manager: Mr. Shibly Latiff Address: th floor, 70 Ayala Ave., Makati City Telephone: 8411000 loc. 12; 841-187 Fax: 8411021 ; 841-171 E-mail: balatorre@chevrontexaco.com; www.caltex.com

BREAD CONNECTION
Type of business: Food President and general manager: Mr. Angelito Trias Address: 298 M.H. Del Pilar Street, Palatiw Kanan, Pasig City Telephone: 42-008 Fax: 42-008 E-mail: alt_be@yahoo.com

BENCH
Type of business: Retail Chairman: Mr. Ben Chan Franchise Export Manager: Mr. Bryan Oliver Lao Company name: Suyen Corp. Address: 2214 Tolentino St., Pasay City Telephone: 887-211 loc. 120 Fax: 844-810 E-mail: emillie.burias@benchtm.com www.benchtm.com

CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION
Type of business: Service President and chief executive officer: Professor Nelia Cruz- Sarcol Company name: Center for International Education Global Colleges, Inc. Address: 1 Pres. Magsaysay St., Kasambayan, Cebu Telephone: (02) 2-200 loc 109 Fax: (02) 2-222 E-mail: franchise@cie.edu www.cie.edu

BROTHER’S BURGER
Type of business: Food President: Ms. Marinel Jose Vice president for allied business development and marketing: Mr. Martin Katigbak Jose Company name: Brother’s Burger, Inc. Address: Units 2 &  V & O Bldg., Don Bosco St. Pasong Tamo, Makati City Telephone: 8107; 812114 Fax: 89-277; 81072 E-mail: franchise_brothersburger@yahoo. com; www.brothersburger.com.ph

BIGG’S DINER
Type of business: Food Vice president for marketing: Mr. Carlo Buenaflor Address: Zone 2 Fausto Drive San Felipe, Naga City Telephone / Fax: (04) 20-8091 E-mail: cbuenaflor@pacific.net.ph

CHOWKING FOODS CORP.
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Erwin Elichicon Company name: Fresh N Famous Foods, Inc. Address: th Flr. Jollibee Plaza, F. Ortigas Avenue, Ortigas Center, Pasig City Telephone: 4-1111 Fax: 4-1182 E-mail: franchise@chowking.com; www.chowking.com Total capital investment: Between P12 million and P1 million Franchise fee: P1 million No. of outlets: Company-owned: 12; Franchisees: 248 Royalty fee: % Marketing/Advertising fee: 4% Terms of renewal: 10 years

CABALEN BLUE BOZ WATER REFILLING STATION
Type of business: Service President: Ms. Jasmin Pineda Company name: Blue Boz Water Treatment Tech Address: Unit 107 Parc Royale Condo, Jade St., Ortigas, Pasig City Telephone: 4-1207; 4-842; 2-02 Fax: 87-089 Type of business: Food Business development manager: Mr. Ian Tiongson Address: JP Rizal and Aguado, Marilag, Project 4, Quezon City Telephone: 91-28 Fax: 911-9884 E-mail: it0@yahoo.com www.manganrestaurant.com

CAFÉ VIA MARE & OYSTER BAR BOBSON
Type of business: Retail President and chief executive officer: Mr. Victor Tan Company name: Crolific Garments Type of business: Food Chief executive officer: Ms. Glenda Barreto Address: 70 Bagtikan St. San Antonio Village, Makati City Telephone: 897-800

Doctors & Business 

Franchise Ideas
CONSOLIDATED BUILDING MAINTENANCE
Type of business: Service President: Mr. Salvador Ortañez Address: Jovan Condominium, Shaw Boulevard, Mandaluyong City Telephone: -42; 2117 Fax: 194 E-mail: cbmserve@cbm.com.ph; www.cbm.com.ph Ms. Cecile Macaalay Company name: Dencio’s Food Corp. Address: 2nd flr. Lapanday Center, 22 Pasong Tamo Ext., Makati City Telephone: 894-2000 Fax: 894-8 E-mail: dfsi@dencios.biz; www.dencios.biz E-mail: fressanbakery@myrealbox.com; edzelv@yahoo.com

GENERAL NUTRITION CENTER
Type of business: Retail Chairman: Mr. Jose Vito Borromeo Address: 2nd flr. Belson House cor. Connecticut EDSA, Mandaluyong City Telephone: 721-27; 7247140 Fax: 721940 E-mail: jsa@skyinet.net; www.shop.gnc.com

DIPPIN’ DOTS
Type of business: Food General Manager: Ms. Lucy Co Company name: Oyster Marketing Corp. Address: Unit 10, Valencia Hills, Valencia Cor. N. Domingo Street, Quezon City Telephone: 410-98 Fax: 72-921 E-mail: dippindots@mindgate.net www.dippindots.com

COMPREHENSIVE BUSINESS ADVISORS INC.
Type of business: Service Vice president for finance: Ms. Filomena Abalado Address: 10th Flr. Rufino Pacific Tower, Ayala Ave. Makati City Telephone: 81-449; 811-0110 Fax: 811-002; 81-2 E-mail: fiducial@arconcentral.com; www.arconcentral.com

GOLDILOCKS BAKESHOP
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Freddie Go Sr. Franchise manager: Ms. Lin Deres Company name: Goldilocks Bakeshop, Inc. Address: 49 Shaw Boulevard, Mandaluyong City Telephone: -4087 Fax: -49 E-mail: lin.deres@goldilocks.com.ph; www.goldilocks.com.ph Total capital investment: Between P million and P1 million Franchise fee: Between P800,000 and P1.2 million No. of outlets: Company-owned: 11; International: 18; Franchisees: 11 Royalty fee: 4% for bakeshop; 8% for food shop Marketing/Advertising fee: 2%

FREEWAY
Type of business: Retail Chief executive officer: Ms. Sheree Goduaco Company name: Elle Garments International Inc. Address: 99 Pablo Ocampo Sr., St. Malate, Manila Telephone: 2-082 Fax: 21-71 E-mail: shiela@elitegarments.com; www.elitegarments.com.ph Total capital investment: Between P million and P10 million Franchise fee: P800,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: 24; Franchisee:  Royalty fee: % Marketing/Advertising fee: % Terms of renewal: 10 years

COSMOPOLITAN FUNERAL HOMES INC.
Type of business: Service Chairman: Mr. Renato Dychangco Jr. Address: 1-18 Junguerra St., Cebu City Telephone: (02) 2-0491 to 94; (02) 21-0721 Fax: (02) 2-22; 21-40 E-mail: keropleen@yahoo.com, dirfranchise@consmofuneral.com

CRAVINGS FOOD SERVICES
Type of business: Food General manager: Ms. Marinela Trinidad Address: 287 Katipunan Avenue, Loyola Heights, Quezon City Telephone: 42-4828/ 29 Fax: 42-84 loc. 10 E-mail: franchise@cravingsgroup.com www.cravingsgroup.com

GREAT IMAGE
Type of business: Service President: Mr. Robert Palomo Address: Unit 709 AIC Gold Tower, Ortigas Compound, Pasig City Telephone: -199 Fax: 8-0870 E-mail: rlpalomo@yahoo.com; vpbelgar@yahoo.com; www.greatimage.com;

FRESSAN BAKERY
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Jon Cashel Chua Company name: Pine Forest Foods, Inc. Address: Unit , Arcadia Square, J.P. Rizal St., Guadalupe, Makati City Telephone: 82-1418/ 2-97 Fax: 4-127

DENCIO’S BAR AND GRILL
Type of business: Food Chairman: Mr. Martin Lorenzo Director for corporate planning: 

GREENWICH PIZZA
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Ariel Fermin Company name: Fresh N Famous

Doctors & Business

Franchise Ideas
Foods, Inc. Address: 4th Flr Jollibee Plaza, F. Ortigas Avenue, Ortigas Center, Pasig City Telephone: 4-1111 loc. 410 Fax: 87-981 E-mail: franchising@greenwich.com.ph; www.greenwich.com.ph Total capital investment: Between P million and P10 million Franchise fee: P800,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: 12; Franchisees: 111 Royalty fee: % Marketing/Advertising fee: % Terms of renewal: 10 years Ms. Vivien Catherine Go Company name: ICCT Computer Education System, Inc. Address: V.V. Soliven Ave.II, V.V. Soliven Center, Cainta, Rizal Telephone: 249-1049 to 0; 249-4228 Fax: 249-1049; 722-40 E-mail: info@icct.edu.ph; www.icct.edu.ph 88-7208 Fax: 88-712 E-mail: malu.santos@jollibee.com.ph; www.jollibee.com.ph Total capital investment: Between P1 and P0 million Franchise fee: P1.2 million, exclusive value added tax No. of outlets: Company-owned: 01; International: 2; Franchisees: 27 Royalty fee: 9% of total gross sales Marketing/Advertising fee: 9% of total gross sales Terms of renewal: no assurance of renewal of new license upon expiration

INFORMATICS
Type of business: Service President and chief executive order: Mr. Leonardo Riingen Marketing manager: Ms. Katrina Monsod Company name: Informatics Holdings Phils Address: Unit 12, I-cite Bldg., Libis, Q.C. Telephone: 7-09 E-mail: info@informatics.com.ph; www.informatic.edu.ph Total capital investment: Between 8 million and P10 million No. of outlets: Company-owned: 10; Franchisees: 27 Franchise fee: P.4 million Royalty fee: 1% Marketing/Advertising fee: % Terms of renewal: 10 years

GYMBOREE PLAY & MUSIC
Type of business: Service Managing director: Ms. Ann Tan Company name: Gymboree, Inc. Address: 17 Mc Kinley Road, Forbes Park, Makati City Telephone: -240; 817-091 loc. 21 Fax: 910-040 E-mail: franchising@gymboree-ph.com www.gymboree.ph.com Total capital investment: P10 million Franchise fee: P20,000 No. of outlets: Company-owned: 2; Franchisees:  Royalty fee: % of gross sales, net of VAT Marketing/Advertising fee: % of gross sales, net of VAT Terms of renewal: 10 years

KAMISETA
Type of business: Retail President: Mr. Gonzalo Roque III Franchise manager: Ms. Irene Dimson Company name: Shoppes Manila, Inc. Address: Style Bldg., 1 Rolling Lane, Filinvest Rd., Batasan Hills, Quezon City Telephone: 91-949 Fax: 91-971 E-mail: www.kamista.com; kamisetagirl@ kamiseta.com

KENNY ROGERS ROASTERS ISLANDS SOUVENIRS
Type of business: Retail President: Mr. Jay Aldeguer Franchise manager: Ms. Cristine Costelo Company name: Islands Souvenirs Inc. Address: Nasipit, Talamban, Cebu City Telephone: (02) 22-147 ; 4-7104; (02) 99-78 Fax: (02) 4-017; 4-489 E-mail: jaldeguer@skyinet.net; franchise@islandsouvenirs.com; www.islandsouvenirs.com Type of business: Food President: Ms. Bernadine Siy Company name: Roasters Phils Inc. Address: F 797 Ayala Ave. corner Herrera St., Salcedo Village Makati Telephone: 89-07; 89-102; 89-98 Fax: 89-01 E-mail: bernadinesiy@roasters.com.ph; www.roasters.com

HAP CHAN TEA HOUSE
Type of business: Food General manager: Mr. Kwok Man Wah Company name: Hap Chan Trading & Management Corp. Address: 97 EDSA South Triangle QC Telephone: 411-18 ; 410-4009 Fax: 412-080 E-mail: franchise@hapchan.com; www.hapchan.com

KENTUCKY FRIED CHICKEN
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Jesus Montemayor Address: 80+F28-82 Roces Avenue, Diliman, Quezon City Telephone: 7-124 loc. 02 / 002 Fax: 7-910 E-mail: mdtorres@ramcar.com www.kfc.ph

JOLLIBEE
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Ernesto Tanmantiong Company name: Jollibee Foods Corp. Address: 9th Flr. Jollibee Plaza, F. Ortigas Avenue, Ortigas Center, Pasig City Telephone: 4-1111 loc. 747; 4-112;

ICCT COMPUTER EDUCATION
Type of business: Service President/chief executive officer:

Doctors & Business 

7

Franchise Ideas
KRISPY KREMES
Type of business: Food Chairman: Mr. Jimmy Fuentebella Company name: The Real American Doughnut Co., Inc. Address: 4th Flr. Salustiana D. Ty Tower, Paseo de Roxas corner Perea St. Legaspi Village, Makati City Telephone: 840-94; 812-9 Fax: 81-91; 892-8 E-mail: www.krispykreme.com.ph Address: /F Max’s Baclaran Bldg., Roxas Blvd, Parañaque City Telephone: 82-1991 Fax: 82-442 E-mail: rmallari@maxschicken.com.ph; www.maxschicken.com.ph Total capital investment: Minimum of P9 million Franchise fee: P2 million No. of outlets: Company-owned: ; Franchisee: 49 Royalty fee: % of gross sales Marketing/Advertising fee: .% of gross sales Terms of renewal: 10 years Franchising manager: Mr. Jose Alberto Arellano Company name: Monterey Foods Corp. Address: 17F JMT Corporate Condominium, ADB Avenue, Ortigas, Pasig City Telephone: -2484 Fax: 914-870; 7-8172 E-mail: cdelapaz@smg.sanmiguel.com. ph.; pperez@smg.sanmiguel.com.ph; www.sanmiguel.com.ph

LOYOLA MEMORIAL PLANS
Type of business: Service President: Ms. Jesusa Concepcion Address: 849 Loyola Building, A. Arnaiz Avenue, Makati City Telephone: 892-01 Fax: 817-74 E-mail: evillanueva@loyolaplans.com www.loyolaplans.com

OLIVER’S SUPER SANDWICHES
Type of business: Food General manager: Ms. Ruth Velasco Co Company name: Oliver’s Super Sandwiches Phils. Address: 2401 B, West Tower, Phil. Stock Exchange Center, Exchange Road, Ortigas, Pasig City Telephone: 1-0077; 1-0109 Fax: 1-0074 E-mail: www.olivers.com.ph

MCDONALDS
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Kenneth Yang Director for real estate, asset management & franchising: Mr. Luke Tan Company name: Golden Arches Development Corp. Address: 17/F, Citibank Center Bldg., 8741 Paseo de Roxas, Makati City Telephone: 81-4708/ 87-297 Fax: 81-44 E-mail: luketan@ph.mcd.com; www.mcd.com.ph

MALDITA
Type of business: Retail General manager: Mr. Enrique Caeg Company name: Maldita Marketing Corp. Address: 7 South AA Brgy. Paligsahan Quezon City Telephone: 71-142 Fax: 71-144 E-mail: malditasore@yahoo.com; www.malditastore.com

PADI’S POINT
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Vince Padilla Company name: Padi’s Point, Inc. Address: 291 P. Guevarra Avenue, San Juan, Metro Manila Telephone: 727-14 Fax: 724-447 E-mail: vincepadilla@padispoint.com; www.padispoint.com Total capital investment: Between P million and P12 million Franchise fee: P1 million No. of outlets: Company-owned: 8; Franchisees: 7 Royalty fee: % Marketing/Advertising fee: 1.% Terms of renewal:  years

MICROTEL INN
Type of business: Service President: Mr. Jose Mari Del Rosario Address: 2/F, PHINMA Bldg., #1 Salcedo St., Legaspi Village, Makati City Telephone: 71-7171 Fax: 71-7172 E-mail: franchise@microtelphilippines.com; www.microtelphilippines.com Total capital investment: P1. million per room (hotel investment excluding land) Franchise fee: $1,000 per room Royalty fee: 4% gross room revenues Marketing/Advertising fee: 2% gross room revenues

MANELS
Type of business: Retail Chairman: Mr. Manuel Siggaoat Company name: Manels Leathergoods Corp. Address: Unit 20 Jollibee Plaza Bldg., F. Ortigas Ave., Ortigas, Pasig City Telephone: 7-171 Fax: 8-79 E-mail: mmsiggaoat@manels.com; www.manels.com.ph

PANCAKE HOUSE
Type of business: Food Chairman: Mr. Martin Lorenzo Director for corporate planning: Ms. Cecile Macaalay

MAX’S RESTAURANT
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Robert Trota Company name: Max’s Franchising, Inc. 
8

Terms of renewal: 20+10 years

MONTEREY FOODS
Type of business: Food

Doctors & Business

Franchise Ideas
Company name: Pancake House, Inc. Address: 2F, La Panday Center, 22 Pasong Tamo Ext. Makati City Telephone: 894-2000 Fax: 894-8 E-mail: phi@pancakehouse.biz; www.pancakehouse.biz Fax: 911-07 E-mail: tejerero@pizzahut.com.ph; mktg@pizzahut.com.ph; www.pizzahut.com.ph

SEAOIL
Type of business: Service Chairman: Mr. Francis Yu President: Francis Glenn Yu Company name: Seaoil Philippines, Inc. Address: 22nd Flr. Taipan Place F. Ortigas Ave., Pasig City Telephone: 97-1010 loc. 82 Fax: 97-1011 E-mail: rey.jimenez@seaoil.com.ph; www.seaoil.com Total capital investment: Between P million and P10 million Franchise fee: P0,000 plus value added tax No. of outlets: Company-owned: 4; Franchisee: 110 Royalty fee: None Marketing/Advertising Fee: None Terms of renewal: 10 years

RAI RAI KEN
Type of business: Food Executive vice president: Mr. Herbert Joey Garcia Company name: Rai Rai Ken Foods Corp. Address: 1942 Donada St. cor. San Juan Pasay City Telephone: -002 Fax: 22-94 E-mail: herbertjoey@yahoo.com

PENSHOPPE
Type of business: Retail President: Mr. Bernie Liu Company name: Golden ABC Address: 2 Old Samson Rd., Balintawak, Quezon City Telephone: -711 to 8 Fax: 1-4111 E-mail: dino.sagun@goldenabc.com; www.goldenabc.com

RED RIBBON BAKESHOP
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Joseph Tanbuntiong Company name: Red Ribbon Bakeshop, Inc. Address: F Missouri Bldg., Missouri corner Connecticut Street, Greenhills, San Juan, Metro Manila Telephone: 724-81 loc. 02 & 0 Fax: 724-4892 E-mail: mayette.vargas@; redribbonbakeshop.com.ph; www.redribbonbakeshop.com Total capital investment: Between P million and P8 million Franchise fee: P1 million No. of outlets: Company-owned: 120; Franchisees: 81 Royalty fee: % Marketing/Advertising fee: % Terms of renewal: 10 years

PIER ONE BAR
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Francis Juan Company name: Pier One Bar & Grill Holding Corp. Address: 14TH Flr. Unit 2 Centerpoint Bldg., Ortigas Center, Pasig City Telephone: -17 Fax: 809-74 E-mail: franchise@pierone.com.ph; www.pierone.com.ph Total capital investment: Between P8 million and P17 million Franchise fee: Between P1 million and P2 million No. of outlets: Company-owned: 1; Franchisees: 7 Royalty fee: % of gross sales Marketing/Advertising fee: % Terms of renewal: -10 years

SHAKEY’S
Type of business: Food Chairman: Mr. Leo Prieto Jr. Franchise and business development director: Ms. Annie Manzano Company name: Shakey’s International Family Food Services Address: 2/F, Sample Shop Building AFPRSBS Industrial Park, Km 12 East Service Road, C South Superhighway Taguig, Metro Manila Telephone: 89-01; 89-0011 to 20 Fax: 89-012 E-mail: asmanzano@shakeyspizza.ph; www.shakeyspizza.ph Total capital investment: Between P7 million and P8 million Franchise fee: P1. million No. of outlets: Company-owned: 11; International: 22; Franchisees: 2 Royalty fee: .72% Marketing/Advertising fee: .% Terms of renewal: 10 years

SARI SARI
Type of business: Retail President: Ms. Ma. Nimia Ocampo II Company name: Sari Sari Group of Companies Address: 2nd Level Bldg. B SM Megamall, Mandaluyong City Telephone: 87-0972 Fax: 87-0972 E-mail: marni@sari-sari.com www.sari-sari.com

PIZZA HUT
Type of business: Food President: Mr. Jorge Araneta Chief operating officer: Mr. Lars Peterson Company name: Progressive Development Corp. Address: 1/F, Aurora Tower, Araneta Center, Cubao, Quezon City Telephone: 912-1921; 912-217

SHELL
Type of business: Service President: Mr. Ed Chua Company name: Pilipinas Shell Doctors & Business 
9

Franchise Ideas
Petroleum Corp. Address: 1 Valero Street, Salcedo Village, Makati City Telephone: 814-89 Fax: 81-11 E-mail: jojo.conde@shell.com www.shell.com General manager: Mr. Antonio Apostol Company name: TCE Franchise Corp. Address: 112 B. N. Domingo Ave. Brgy. Horse Shoe Cubao, Quezon City Telephone / Fax: 72-779 E-mail: machrisgaetos@yahoo.com Address: B Scout Borromeo South Triangle, Quezon City Telephone: 71-87; 410-1111 Fax: 74-8 E-mail: rv_unica_hija@yahoo.com

UNIOIL TOBY’S SPORTS AND HOBBIES
Type of business: Service Franchise manager: Mr. Kenneth Pundanera Company name: Unioil Petroleum Phils, Inc. AddressS: 2701B, West Tower, PSE Center, Exchange Road, Ortigas, Pasig City Telephone: 1-20 E-mail: unioilretail@overseas.ph www.unioil.com.ph Type of business: Retail Chairman: Mr. Roberto Claudio Company name: TSF Systems Address: 14 Pasig Boulevard, Pasig City Telephone: 71-97 to 9 Fax: 711; 71211 E-mail: info@tsf.ph; www.tobys.com

SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTE
Type of business: Service President: Mr. Monico Jacob Company name: Systems Technology Institute, Inc. Address: /F, Phil First Bldg., 74 Ayala Avenue, Makati City Telephone: 887-8447 Fax: 891-74 E-mail: rnemsingh@stihq.net; mdelrosario@stihq.net; www.stihq.net

TOKYO TOKYO
Type of business: Food Managing director: Mr. John Amante Company name: Tokyo Tokyo Japanese Restaurant Address:  Pioneer St. Mandaluyong City Telephone: 74-2429 Fax: 74-2141 E-mail: tokyotokyocircle@gmail.com www. tokyotokyo.com Total capital investment: Between P8 million and P10 million Franchise fee: P1.1 million No. of outlets: Company-owned: 4; Franchisees: 2 Royalty fee: 1% Marketing/Advertising fee: % Terms of renewal:  years

VIVA VIDEO CITY
Type of business: Service President: Ms.Ms. Teresita Cruz Company name: Viva Video City, Inc. Address:  & 7 Flrs., East Tower, PSE Center, Exchange Road, Ortigas, Pasig City Telephone: 87922; 87-2791 Fax: 879112 E-mail: jsingian@videocity.com.ph; www.videocity.com.ph

TERIYAKI BOY
Type of business: Food Chairman: Mr. Martin Lorenzo Director for corporate planning: Ms. Cecile Macaalay Company name: Teriyaki Boy Group Inc. Address: 2nd Flr. La Panday Center, 22 Pasong Tamo Ext. Makati City Telephone: 894-2000; 812-01 loc: 172 or 17 Fax: 894-8; 894-8 E-mail: myrareyes@pancakehouse.biz; www.pancakehouse.biz

WELL-FAMILY MIDWIFE CLINIC
Type of business: Service President: Dr. Warlito Vicente Address: 402 Trans Orient Maritine Bldg. Timog ave. Quezon City Telephone: 42-7947 Fax: 42-790 E-mail: wpfi_headoffice@yahoo.com; www.wellfamily.com.ph

T.G.I. FRIDAY’S
Type of business: Food President and chief executive officer: Mr. William Stelton Company name: T.G.I. Friday’s Inc. Address: 217 Primo Rivera St. La Paz, Makati City Telephone: 899-44; 89-7277 Fax: 89-94 E-mail: abba@bistro.com.ph; www.fridays.com.ph

TONG YANG
Type of business: Food Chairman: Mr. Roberto Garcia Address: 49 Oppen Bldg. Sen. Gil Puyat Ave. Makati City Telephone/Fax: 89-128

WENDY’S HAMBURGER
Type of business: Food President: Ms. Elizabeth Orbeta Company name: Wendy’s Phils Corp. Telephone: 809-0 loc. 411 Fax: 807-294 E-mail: wenphil1@hamburgers.ph; www.wenphil.com

UNICA HIJA
Type of business: Retail President: Mr. Rolando Villon Company name: RV Franchise Ventures, Inc.

THE COFFEE EXPERIENCE
Type of business: Food
40

Doctors & Business

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