.

            .

do this with pent and equilateral frames 7. Both  the pentagon and hexagon triangles have one side that is the same length. Draw very accurate pent and Equilateral triangle on a piece of ply 2. The moldings are then placed on  the jig (square edge inside) then glued and screwed together using 60mm No 4 screws.      Jig making and testing triangle frames. make one triangle on  each jig and check that they fit together before making all the triangles. See diagram below for noggin detail) 3. Because the triangle frames are equilateral triangles a frame can be flipped over  along the vertical axis and should still fit the jig perfectly. The equilateral triangles should fit snugly any way round.Triangle construction/ making jigs                                       All the triangles in a dome frame use basically the same construction method. . Fix angled timber very accurately on the lines ( I screw them to the ply to stop them moving) angle on outside. three lengths of  chamfered molding have the appropriate angles cut on one end. you may need to nip them up with cramps but there should be no gaps at the centre of the pentagon. The  protruding ends are then cut off to form the finished triangle frame. it should fit back on the jig perfectly 6 make test triangle with your jig.5mm should be possible with careful  manufacture. accuracy of 0. Remove outside triangle frame and flip over its central axis. They should fit together nicely. 8. Finally take 5-pent frames and join them together to form one pentagon. Fix square molding inside the frame you have made and screw to ply to make jig 5. Take an equilateral frame and a pent frame and join them together to check that the base of each triangle is exactly the same size. Using a jig ensures that all  the triangles are accurate and the same size. if there are any gaps when this is done  your jig will need to be adjusted. Double check all measurements 4.    1.

  Base beam detail.    .

      .

  .

Side door detail                                  .

                            .

        The side panels are cut from ½” birch faced external grade ply or marine grade ply.  The doors have 2” X 1” frames that are covered before being inserted into the doors  The door posts are cut from 3” X 2” then trimmed to make the doors fit nicely (there should be no need  to adjust or plane the actual doors) see exploded view above for more details:                              .

    Windows can be fitted on any horizontal struts. flashing is fitted above the window to stop water  ingress and a T section is fitted to brace the frame and to fit a window opener. See sectional views below for more detail:    Window construction details      .  The window frame is  made using a standard hex or pent frame that is turned around to fit against an identical frame of the  dome.

 Getting an even tension without any folds can be quite tricky so take your  time.  polythene expands quite a lot when warmed so if you cover the frames on a cold day the polythene may  pucker or sag on a hot day.    Stretching and stapling instructions  .  The pentagon panels have a  top section of two panels covered  separately from the bottom three panels and a hexagon is  covered in two separate three triangle  panels. For speed and  efficiency we will be covering three pre joined panels at a time as this is the most you can cover without  getting any creasing in the polythene. When cutting the polythene you will need to leave about 3” (75mm) around the edges to allow  for stretching and stapling to the frame.Use good quality 5‐season horticultural grade polythene to cover the dome panels.          To get a nice drum tight cover over the frame it’s best to do the covering in a warm environment. use the diagram below to help get an even tension. see diagram below.

        . If you cover the frames in a cold environment  the film may expand when warm weather comes causing the polythene to become loose on the  framework.    Avoid excessive pulling of the polythene over the frame with your hands.    Pull the cover as tight as you can without tearing it and staple every 2’ – 3” down the edges (when the  dome goes together the staples are covered) trim any excess polythene off when you have stapled all  the way round.      Tips:  Cover the frames in a warm environment. There are about 35 frames to cover and using your  hands to tension the polythene can result in repetitive stress injuries to your fingers. Use colored tape or something similar to mark the outside of  the sheet when you cut covers from the roll for each frame.    Some polythene covers have special treatments like anti‐fog coatings etc and are marked  showing which side is to go outside. also keep the roll of polythene film in a warm place for  24 hours before you attempt covering the frames. use canvas pliers or  wide mouthed mole grips were possible. wrists and  forearms. using a cheap stapler can result in staples not being fully driven into the wood  which would require taping in with a hammer later.     Use a good quality staple gun (preferably electric or air powered) you will be putting hundreds  of staples in.

It is very important to fix the dome tunnel  firmly to the ground. particular attention should be given to the door area so that the door doesn’t deform.  Below is a diagram showing fixing methods to soft surfaces like grass or dirt and also hard surfaces like  tarmac or concrete. If the dome is not properly fixed down it can deform or blow away in very  strong winds.  Fixing to the ground    . the dome structure gets its incredible  strength from this union.

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer for students: Only $4.99/month.

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Cancel anytime.