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Chemistry...

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It's a fascinating subject. It's not easy. It's hard work. I expect you to think. I expect you to work hard.

Why do it?
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Because life is more than parties, video games, and iPods. Life is about finding fulfillment. Sensual pleasures bring some small fulfillment, but it doesn't last.

Why do it?

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The greatest fulfillment comes from things like... Honor Duty Compassion Love (real love, not just sex) Creativity Moral “rightness” Responsibility Freedom Achievement

Your Potential

for Achievement

Teenagers Today...

Ben Franklin (1706-1790)

Ben Franklin

Born to a humble candlemaker in Boston. His father was an admirable man who was fond of music, reading, and argumentation. Age 8: Ben entered grammar school. This didn't work out. But he was fond of reading, and read the classics as a child. Age 10: Worked in his father's shop. He didn't like the candle business, wanted to be a sailor. Age 12: Apprenticed to his brother, a printer. He disliked his brother's

Ben Franklin

Age 16: He taught himself math from books. He taught himself to write well by reading periodicals and copying them, as best as he could, from memory. Age 17: Arrived at Philly, broke, but quickly got a job as a printer. He was charismatic, and so befriended influential men. One encouraged him to go to London, and in his early 20's, he returned to America as merchant's secretary.

Ben Franklin

With his help, he set up his own printing house and began printing a newspaper, The Pennsylvania Gazette. Age 26: He began to publish Poor Richard's Almanac which, over the next 25 years, spread his fame throughout the colonies and Europe. He designed an academy which later beacme the University of PA. He founded the American Philosophical Society (for the sciences). In 1748, he sold his business to devote himslef to research.

Ben Franklin

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Discovered electric charge. Invented bifocals, Modern wood stove, Lightning rod, Etc.

Ben Franklin

He became politically active at home and abroad. He played an essential role in the success of the American Revolution. He was one of the five who wrote the Declaration of Independence.

Ben Franklin
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All of this with no formal education. How? His father's influence. Reading. “Only here in America were common folk given a chance to show what they could do on their own without a master to push and order them about.” - Eric Hoffer.

George Washington

George Washington

Began school at age 11, the same year his father died. “He arrived at school already knowing how to read, write and calculate about as well as the average college student today (John Gatto).” Full literacy before entering school was typical. His studies at school: trig, geometry, and surveying. He became a surveyor at age 15 and was the official surveyor for a county in VA by age 18.

Thomas Edison

Thomas Edison

Attended school only three months— his only formal education. His mother home-schooled him from then on. When he was 12, he got a job selling newspapers, apples, and candy on a railroad. He began to lose his hearing at that time. At 15, still working on the railroad, he bought a used printing press, set it up in a baggage car, and started printing and selling his own newspaper on the

Thomas Edison

That year, Thomas saved a small boy from being run over by the train. The boys father was a stationmaster, and in gratitude, gave Thomas a job as a telegrapher. Tom used his salary to buy laboratory instruments. His first invention was an improved telegraph he developed when he was 21. He went on to invent an improved telephone and the first phonograph at age 31, and the first practical lightbulb

How did he do it?

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His father was a free-thinking entrepreneur with a large library. Tom read a lot. Hard work. “Genius is one percent inspiration and 99 percent perspiration”

Richard Branson

Richard Branson

Branson was dislexic and had poor academic performance. He left school at 16. At 15, he had begun two business ventures, both of which failed: growing Christmas Trees and raising parakeets. At 16 he started his first successful business, a magazine called Student. He bought crates of records from a discouter and started a record selling business. By age 21 he had founded the Virgin Record label, a recording

Richard Branson

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Virgin signed the Sex Pistols and Culture Club. He founded Virgin Atlantic Airways in 1984 and Virgin Mobile (a telecommunications company) in 1999. He was the 236th richest person in 2008. How'd he do it? When he was seven, he was driving with his mom several miles from home. His mom stopped the car and asked if he could find his way home.

Other Examples

The Marquis de Lafayette was only 19 when he offerred his assistance to our fledgling country, as was Nathan Hale when he gave his one life for that same cause. Alexander Hamilton was running a mercantile business at age 12 and wrote his first revolutionary pamphlet at 16. John Quincy Adams was made ambassador to Russia at age 14.

Other Examples

William Holmes McGuffey (18001873), creator of the famous McGuffey Readers (widely used elementary school textbooks), opened a school at age 14. “Stonewall” Jackson became a teacher and county constable at age 16.

Other Examples

And it was not just a few of the leaders who started early... Alexis de Tocqueville, in his 1839 work Democracy in America, observed that “In America there is strictly speaking no adolescence. At the close of boyhood, the man appears.”

Other Examples

Edward Eggleston drew similar conclusions in 1900 as he explained the reasons for American superiority in the world. He observed that first generation Americans were still crippled by their habits of dependency learned in Europe, but American young people, freed from the European social system, were free to thrive. At the age of 7, he said, Americans begin growing up.

Yep.

Scientist Robert Epstein drew similar conclusions:
“In 1991 anthropologist Alice Schlegel of the University of Arizona and psychologist Herbert Barry III of the University of Pittsburgh reviewed research on teens in 186 preindustrial societies. Among the important conclusions they drew about these societies: about 60 percent had no word for “adolescence,” teens spent almost all their time with adults, teens showed almost no signs of psychopathology, and antisocial behavior in young males was completely absent in more than half these cultures and extremely mild in cultures in which it did occur.”

So...

This is something you've known for a long time: You can do a lot more than we give you credit for. Modern American teenagers are undervalued. Modern American teenagers are stymied by societal restrictions. Modern American teenagers underestimate themselves. Modern American teenagers are missing out on their full potential.

The Potential of Youth

Take for example, the much cited relationship between age and scientific acheivement. Dr. Satoshi Kanazawa studied this relationship: “Anecdotal evidence abounds that artistic genius or productivity fades with age. “Paul McCartney has not written a hit song in years, and now spends his time painting. “Orson Welles was mere 26 when he wrote, produced, directed and starred in Citizen Kane, which many consider

The Potential of Youth

“The relationship between age and genius appears to be the same in science. “It is often said that physics and mathematics are young men’s games, and physicists and mathematicians tend to think they are over the hill at age 25 (Mukerjee, 1996). “John von Neumann, putatively the most brilliant scientist who ever lived, used to assert brashly when he was young that mathematical powers decline after the age of 26, and only

The Potential of Youth

“James D. Watson made the greatest discovery in biology in the 20th century at the age of 25, winning the Nobel prize for it, but has not made any other significant scientific contribution for the rest of his career… “Nearly a quarter (23.6%) of all scientists make their most significant contribution in their career during the five years around age 30. Two-thirds (65.0%) will have made their most significant contributions before their midthirties; 80% will have done so

The Potential of Youth
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I'm all washed up (just kidding). But you're definitely not. And you don't have to be a genius... You don't have to have a great family upbringing... You just have to decide to swim against the current. And achievement for you may not be a Nobel Prize (who cares about that anyway).

Success
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What is success? The only reasonable motivation for doing anything is to increase your own sense of fulfillment. Success is succeeding at that. And remember, I do not mean only sensual pleasure, But honor, love, freedom, courage, responsibility, and achievement. Why did Franklin do what he did?

The point is...
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Parties and games are fun, But we were meant to live for so much more. Life is more than iPods and video games. It is about living according to the purpose that is built into you, The purpose that will fill you up. Society may hinder you, But you will find fulfillment in overcoming those hindrances.

So what will it be?
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Only you can decide. You can settle for iPods and piddly fun, Or you can do great things. And live right. And live full.

BEGIN TODAY.

References
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Only you can decide. You can settle for iPods and piddly fun, Or you can do great things. And live right. And live full.