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Why and how are condenser tubes made of different inner dia (or thickness) ?

Dear All, I once visited to take the report of ongoing condenser cleaning activity during overhauling, where the person told me about the different tubes (of different internal diameters) which were cleaned and yet to be cleaned. It then struck me a question as to why these condenser tubes are made of varying thickness. I noted that the CW inlet tubes to condenser (which are at bottom) are thicker than the CW outlet tubes (which are at top). Correct me if I am wrong. 7 days ago

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Muhammad Aijaz UmerUnfollow Follow Muhammad Aijaz Umer Muhammad Aijaz Umer Umer To maintain same velocity of around 2.2 m/sec to avoid deposition of biological growth. As per equation of continuity velocity of fluid is inversely proportional to the area of tubes for constant flow of fluid 7 days ago Unlike Like

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BradUnfollow Follow Brad Brad Buecker When I began my career at my first power plant in 1981, I worked at a facility with a number of steam generating units, in which different condensers contained tubes of admiralty metal, 90-10 copper-nickel alloy, and stainless steel. All tube diameters were 0.75 inches. The admiralty metal tubes were the thickest because the material had the highest heat transfer coefficient of all three, but also was softest. Thus, the greater thickness was chosen to provide an erosion allowance but still with good heat transfer. As I recall, the wall thickness for the admiralty tubes was 0.049 inches. The wall thickness for the 90-10 copper alloy was 0.035 inches, and for the stainless steel, 0.028 inches, if I remember correctly. The heat transfer coefficient for 316 SS is less than half of that for admiralty. Copper alloy tubes are often not recommended any longer for steam generators, and especially not for feedwater heater tubes, in high-pressure units, as at pressures above 2000 psi or so, copper will carry over with steam and deposit on turbine blades. Also, copper deposition in the boilers themselves increases the complexity of chemical cleanings. 6 days ago Unlike Like

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AnkurUnfollow Follow Ankur Ankur Verma Dear Brad Buecker, What you are talking may be true about metal thickness of tubes. But I'm asking about inner dia of tubes. Kindly explain if otherwise. Many Thanks, 6 days ago Unlike Like

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NawinUnfollow Follow Nawin Nawin Lal Dear Brad hats off to yr memory . I really go thru yr comments on various topics of power plant .yr analysis is great 6 days ago Unlike Like

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BillUnfollow Follow Bill Bill Torrance Ankur - same thing! A TUBE is defined by its outer diameter, and different thicknesses lead to different inner diameters/bores. Different thicknesses are often used for (eg) areas around the periphery of the tubenest upper side to allow for erosive wear from the steam flow. 6 days ago Unlike Like

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RahulUnfollow Follow Rahul

Rahul Raghavan @ankur: i guess the inlet tubes are made thicker because they have to handle water at higher pressure (from CW Pump discharge) when compared to outlet end as pressure drop takes place in the condenser tubes. 5 days ago Unlike Like

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ManmohanUnfollow Follow Manmohan Manmohan Sobti Usually, higher thickness tubes are used in the upper section which is subjected to steam impingement. Higher thickness provides greater erosion margin thus increasing tube life. Design criteria specify higher tube thickness in steam impingement zone along with baffles to prevent direct impingement 3 days ago