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Focus Standards: ELA10RL2 The student identifies, analyzes, and applies knowledge of theme in literary works and provides

evidence from the works to support understanding. e. Compares and contrasts the presentation of a theme or topic across genres and explains how the selection of genre affects the delivery of universal ideas about life and society. (Archetypal Characters, Archetypal Patterns, Archetypal Symbols, and Universal Connections) ELA10RL4 The student employs a variety of writing genres to demonstrate a comprehensive grasp of significant ideas in selected literary works.

Fairy Tale/Children’s Book Re-Do with Dickens in Mind
Find a children’s book or fairy tale that you and your partner want to re-write. Decide which characters from A Tale of Two Cities will be characters in your retelling of the children’s book or fairy tale. Prewriting: Brainstorm a list of settings in which your fairy tale/children’s book could take place. For instance, do you want your fairy tale to be the typical damsel-in-distress story, or do you want something far more creative and original? How will your story progress from beginning to end? What will it take to get your characters from point A to point B? Outline the basic plot of your story, keeping in mind that the characters you choose will change the storyline. That is, your characters might put a feminist slant on the story, they might change the plot because of choices they'd make, etc. Remember to fit the story to your chosen characters' personalities. You should make the characters sound like the characters from A Tale of Two Cities. You can use modern slang as long as it “fits” your characters. Revision: Exchange your fairy tale/children’s story with another group. Proofread each other’s stories. First make sure to point out the parts of the story that the writer has done well. Make suggestions about areas in which you think other writers could improve their stories. Remember to help them find and correct grammar mistakes throughout the story. Refer to grammar books if you need help. Make comments in the margins of the draft wherever you feel they would be helpful. Feel free to discuss the story with the writers, but remember to Stay Positive and Be Specific! You must have pictures for your story. These can be drawn, computer generated, or taken from magazines. Make the pictures appropriate for both the story and the characters.

Here's what you'll turn in: Final copy of the story in blue/black ink or typed We will make these into storybooks (I’ll show you). In addition to the storybook, you’ll also turn in the analysis sheet (characters, archetypes, plot, etc.) that’s on the back of this page. You may answer these questions on your own paper, if needed.

Focus Standards: ELA10RL2 The student identifies, analyzes, and applies knowledge of theme in literary works and provides evidence from the works to support understanding. e. Compares and contrasts the presentation of a theme or topic across genres and explains how the selection of genre affects the delivery of universal ideas about life and society. (Archetypal Characters, Archetypal Patterns, Archetypal Symbols, and Universal Connections) ELA10RL4 The student employs a variety of writing genres to demonstrate a comprehensive grasp of significant ideas in selected literary works.

Fairy Tale Re-Do Analysis Sheet 1. Think about the archetypes that we discussed before reading A Tale of Two Cities. (You may want to look at your Archetypal Bingo sheet.) Analyze your story for any archetypes that you and your partner see. Explain them below.

2. Outline the basic plot of your story. Tell me when all of the plot elements occur (exposition, inciting incident, climax, resolution, setting, and main conflict).

3. Characterize the people in your story. Are they flat or round? Static or dynamic? Give a full description, telling me why you feel they are as you describe.

4. List any other literary elements that you found in your story.