MITCH WERBELL AND ASSOCIATES | Freedom Of Information Act (United States) | Discovery (Law)

I FACTS

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ENTED FJ\ ~ ' r
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MEMORANDUM IN SUPPORT OF DEFENDANT'S
MOTION FOR ADDITIONAL DISCOVERY
n May o( l917, Defendant Franklin requested this Honorable Court
to Order the United States Government to disclose the identity of the four
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1 informants mentioned in a search warrant affidavit, whose information the
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Government relied upon in obtaining the indictment in this case. The basis
for the motion was that the Government's case was predicated on the relia-
bility, credibility and constitutionality of information obtalned from the
aforementioned confidential informants; that the Government's affidavit for
search warrant, the search warrant itself, and the charges alleged in the
indictment were all responsive to the information provided by said confiden-
tial informants; and, that the identity of the confidential informants and
the content of their communications to the government were essential to a
fair determination of this cause.
The Government resisted disclosure . In response to Defendant
Franklin 's motion, the government argued in its brief that it could not
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provide the Court with the full facts concerning the informants because disclo-
II sure could "possibly" jeopardise thei r physical well-being.
~ Government subsequently altered its position, it stood firm in refU8ing to
While the
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disclose the identity of the fourth informant on the aame grounds.
On June 7,
1977, Judge J. V. Eakenazi ordered the disclosure of three confidential
sources with the fou rth to be made available at trial.
In response to Judge Eskenazi ' s order, the Government revealed the
three eources. One was Detective Wayne Tobey of the Pompano Beach Police
Department. Another was convicted drug felon Kenneth Burnstein, now da-
ceased. The third was Oefendant l<'ranklin' s long time attorney, Robert Senor.
On the basis of this disclosure, the Defendant made a motion to
dismiss the herein indlctment, pursuant to Rule 12 of the Federal Rules of
Criminal Procedure, on the ground that the Government violated substantive
conatitutional rights of Defendant Franklin by knowingly and deliberately
arr.nging and permitting a gross intrusion into his attorney client relation-
ship by using hia attorney in the capacity of a confidential informant .nd
by using privileged information obtained from Defendant's attorney to
perfect an indictllllllllt against the Defendant. An oral hearing on the motion
is scheduled for September 12, 1977.
ARGUMENT:
This aotion ia made to request the Court to reconoider i ta order
of June 7, 1977 in view of the questionable status of the three sources
identified by the Government, and to compel the disclosure of the fourth
informant relied upon in the prosecution of this case. It is Defendant's
position that the identity of the informer and the contents of his statement
are esaential to a fair adjudication of thia cause.
As previously noted by the Defendant, the inforcuation supplied by
confidential informants is highly material to the merit& of the charges
pending against him and also to his defense. In fact, Defendant ia charged
with offenses responsive to the information provided by said informants.
(See Defendant's motion to diaclose the identity of informants, pg. 2). It
is therefore easential to Defendant's defenae of innocence that their identity
be disclosed, in order to provide. the Defendant with the opportunity to
confront his accusers and elicit exculpatory evidence.
"Where the diaclosure of an identity or
of the contents of his communication, is relevant and
helpful to the defense of an accused, or ia essential
to a fair determination of a cauae, the privilege must
give way. In these situations, the trial court may
require disclosure and, if the government withholda
the information , dismiss the acti on • " Roviaro v.
United States, 353 U.S. 53 , 60-61, 77 S. Ct. 623,
1 L. Ed. 2d 639 (1957).
By way of Court order, tlte Government has disclosed the identity
of three sources utilized in the prosecution of this case. Their credibility
is highly suspect and warrants disclosure of the fourth informant's identity.
It has come to Defendant' a at tention that one of tlle informants, Detective
Wayne Tobey, has been convicted of falsifying police reports and was recently
suspended from the Pompano Beach Police Department. Apparently Detective
Tobey lied in a police report by s aying he attended a set- up meeting with
II drug smugglers when in fact he
The Government also revealed that i t relied on information pro-
vided by one Kenneth Burns tein. This disclosure is of little help to the
Defendant in hia pursuit of exculpatory evidence . Kenneth Burnstein is dead.
Add to this Hr. Burnstein 's s tatus as that of a convicted felon awaiting
sentencing at the time the information was allegedly supplied and his
griazl y reputation as a highly successful international drug peddler,
his reliability as a confidential informant becomes hiehly s uspect.
Finally, the government revealed that it utilized Defendant
Franklin's long time attorney, Robert Senor, in the capacity of a confiden-
tial informant. This reluctant disclosure by the government sponsored
Defendant's Motion to Dismiss the herein indictment as constitutionally
void and invalid in violation of Defendant's Fourth Amendment right to
privacy, Sixth Amendment right to due proceas of law and Sixth Amendment
right to the effective assistance of counsel.
In view of the peculiar sources of information relied upon by
the Government in its perfection of this case, the identity of the fourth
informant and the content of his communication is highly material to the
issue of Defendant's guilt or innocence. The govern-.nt should not be
allowed to conceal his identity on the questionable premise that dieclosure
could "possibly" jeopardize his physical well-being. When the government
last used this defense, one of the informants, Kenneth Burnstein, was in
fact already dead.
In McCray v. Illinois, 386 U.S. 300, 87 S. Ct. 1056, 18 L. Ed. 2d
62, reh. den. 386 U.S. 1042 , 87 S. Ct. 1474, 18 L. Ed. 2d 616 (1967), the
Supreme Court reviewed the ci rcuiiUitances requiring disclosure of informants,
relying on its prior determination in Roviaro:
"The Court's opinion there carefully reviewed the
particular circumstances of Roviaro's trial, pointing
out that the informer's 'possible testimony was
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highly relevant ••• ' that he 'might have disclosed
1111 entrap-nt • • • might have thrown doubt upon
petitioner's identity ••• might have testified to
petitioner's possible lack of knowledge ••• '"
353 u.s. at 63-64.
The caae at bar requires diaclosure for similar reasons. It is Defendant's
position that disclosure could very well add exculpatory evidence .. nd
thereforr should be ordered prior to the scheduled h • .ariag on Defendant's
Motion to Dismiss.
CONCLUSION:
For all the aforet:entioned reasons and authorities of law,
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Defendant respectfully moves this Honorable Court to Order the United States
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!I Govennoent to disclosa the identity of thu fourth iuformant and t!•e content
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of his confidential colllllunication which the c:'.overnment relies on in the
prosecution of thiB case.
W. YELSKY
il OF COUNSEL:
Attorney for Defendant, Morton Franklin
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YELSKY, SINGER
340 Leader Building
Ohio 44114
781-2550
CO., L.l'.A.
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alling- u,. blamec
GreCco slaying
8)' .1111 MARINO
Oreca. 41, Ia late met t11
Bonarr"e at \be ll.aJlaa·Amerlc-
CUlaeu• Club at E. 18ht St. ud
Clair Ave., attOrcllq to w
,.--.;;...;..;_.;.;R;.;;e...-aover rctumed
Po lice aald ov Ide nee 1 how
narrt&o lhot Orocco with a
ca.llber weapon u Grecco aat In I
.. murderxellud:JL =Jk'81epta; car near Wayatde Ave. and E. l&e
115MierdSL37 !:;WMew Rd. St .. wh.lch Ia near Bonarrtao'e Cl
Both Bonarrtao and Grecco have vlew homo. -------·
been weU·k.noWD crlrnlnal ttauroe· Grecco'• blue Toyota automob
locall)'. wu dl1e0vered in 8u.mm.lt Coun
TheeuapldoolollDteUtaence Unl' Hay 311t, and hla body wae fou1
clei«Uvee about the Grecco k1lllr.a July lit, aleo in Summit Count
_..,.. outllned ln an alfldavtt and about three m1lol from the Toyota.
•arch werrant n.lod rocontly in ' a ... ft',. ef ao.arri&'
Com(Qpl\ Pleaa Court. borne, pollee rOUDd &D .-ortmeat
Aet'OrdlnJ to the a .. lllll.l1mc&er weapon, a p

.,,..,,,., .. , walkl•&alldM, .._,
lou) bu&lnalmao. Mario Durrant. meats, r111e &uae&a. addreee bool
Durrant ., .. reportedly tteat.ea Q ud a&Jaer llelal. •
'Y a.fl.er er4erlq a
wadlq mada.t.De t.akC!D eU bb preaa· ,:0
..... n.. •edl!D• bacl beee w&aUed
at Du.r,..t·a place by another poiJc' I
n,un, uaJe {lkdc:t..J) Ctat.ralao.
It wu altor th1a beatlna.
Althouah pollee fNred at th
Umo that a raah of aanaland
would hroek out erter Nardl'a doat
detec:Uvea do not feel Grecco'• deat
aald, that Bonarrlao
Grec:cn to mako the bomb. Grecoo
not only .-.ruaod • but alto
Wonned Durrant of Bonarrlao'•
intenUona, tba aiLldavlt revoalod.
Pollee .. ld 80m.e of tbelr lnlorma·
Uon camo from Oreoco'• oommon
lnw wife. Nancy Spehar, aa well .,
other eouroea.
Ma. Spehar told dfltectlvcs that
Bonarrlgo arrued wtth Grecco about
the pt.Nlod bombi.D,Il.
Ia one ot t.hom.
Investlaatora Wtead attrlbut
Orooco'aiUillna to a per-onal rH't b
twoen h1m and Bonarrlao and thos
lnvotvementa ln a wide varlet.,y <
racketeer at1o01.
Boriarrtao We ln pmon

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OrHCE' OF THE ASSOCIA ll ATTORNEY GENfRAL
Vt.ASIIINClON, LH . .!OSlO
JAN 8 I::H:;
Ur. A. J. Ueberman
Independent Research Associates
6 Bleecker Street
New York, liew York 10012
Re. Denry A. Gonzalez
Dear Hr. Heberman:
This is to advise you that your administrative appeal
to the Associate Attorney General from the action by the
Federal Bureau of Invest i gat ion on your
request for information from the files of the Department of
Justice was received by this Office on December 27, 1978
This Office has a substantial backlog of pending appeals
received prior to yours and a shortage of attorneys. In an
attempt to afford each appellant equal and impartial treatment,
we have adopted a general practice of assigning appeals to
Office attorneys in the approximate order of receipt. Your
appeal has been assigned number 8- 2720. Please mention this
number in any future correspondence with this Office concerning
Lhis specific appeal.
We will notify you of the decision of the Associate
Attorney General on your appeal as soon as we can. The
necessity of this delay is regretted and your continuing
courtesy is appreciated .
Sincerely,

Jnnice Adams
Acting Administrative Assistant
Office of Privacy and Information
Appeals
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UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION
WASHINGTON, D.(:. 20535
December 4, 1978
Mr. A. J. Weberman
Independent F.esearch Associates
6 Bleecker Street
New York, New York 10012
Dear Mr. Weberman:
F.eceipt of your payment of fees as previously
requested is acknowledged.
Enclosed herewith are copies of documents from our
files pertaining to Henry A. Gonzalez. Excisions have been
made from these documents, and other documents have been
withheld in their entirety in order to protect materials
which are exempted from disclosure pursuant to the following
subsections of the Freedom of Information Act, Title 5,
United States Code, Section 552:
(b) (2) materials related solely to the internal
rules and practices of the FBI;
(b) (3) information specifically exempted from
disclosure by statute;
(b) (7) investigatory records compiled for law
enforcement purposes, the disclosure
of which would:
(A) interfere with law enforcement
proceedings, including pending
investigations;
(C) constitute an unwarranted invasion
of the personal privacy of another
person;
(D) reveal the identity of an individual
who has furnished information to
the FBI under confidential circum-
stances or reveal information furnished
only by such a person and not
apparently known to the public or
otherwise accessible to the FBI
by overt means;
Mr. A. J. Weberman
(E) disclose investigative techniques
and procedures, thereby impairing
their future effectiveness.
In addition, a search of the index to our Central
Records System surfaced an additional investigation in which
~ r r . Gonzalez appears capt1oned along with other individuals.
Inasmuch as this investigation is pending, I must decline to
furnish any information contained in this file. Because the
release of any pertinent material at this time would be
detrimental to pending proceedings, these records remain
exempted from disclosure pursuant to Title s, United States
Code, Section 552, (b) (7) {A).
In conjunction with the protection of sources, the
symbol numbers assigned to various sources have been withheld
as an internal practice of the FBI.
Exempted by the {b) (3) provision is one paragraph
protected by Rule (6) (e), Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure,
which maintains the secrecy of Federal Grand Jury proceedings.
The names of Special Agents, other law enforcement
personnel, and Government employees have been customarily
withheld on privacy grounds. Also, certain material indicating
investigative interest in other persons has been deleted to
protect their personal privacy interests. This includes
records of arrest.
Generally, the Freedom of Information-Privacy Acts
(FOIPA) Branch of the FBI follows the policy of discretionary
release of material furnished by designated informants as
- well as other citizens who confidentially furnish information.
However, the identity of the source, including any material
from which the identity of that source could possibly be
determined is ordinarily denied so as not to discourage any
future cooperation.
The emphasis on the (b) (7) (E) exemption affords
the protection of those investigative techniques and procedures
not generally known to the public. If release of such
information were allowed, the application of these valuable
instrumente of law enforcement could easily be hampered or
circumvented, thereby losing their effectiveness in future
investigations.
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Mr. A. J. Weberman
For your convenience, the enclosed records,
consisting of 118 substantive pages, have been assembled as
the originals appear in our files, and fastened together
into three packages which correspond with the three volumes
as they also appear in our files. In addition, the application
of the exemptions has been so noted directly on each page
where employed. In those instances where documents, as well
as pages from disclosed documents, have been withheld in
their entirety, an explanatory page has been inserted.
In order to eliminate an undue burden on the FOIPA
Branch, only those files in which the subject of the request
appears in the caption of the case have been processed.
Inasmuch as our experience has shown that a majority of the
material contained in the miscellaneous references indexed
in other investigations duplicates information in the
subject file, the Deputy Attorney General has approved this
procedure. Should you, however, believe the name Henry A.
Gonzalez may also have been recorded by the FBI incident to
the investigation of other persons or some organization,
please advise us of the details, including the specific
occurrence and time frame. Thereafter, further effort will
be made to locate and process any such records.
The search for information in response to your
request was limited to those records in our central records
system which are maintained at FBI Headquarters,
Washington, D. C. During any significant FBI investigation,
all substantive information developed by one or more field
offices is reported promptly to our headquarters where it is
compiled in a single investigative file. It is from such a
file or files that the enclosed records were copied. If you
believe additional material of a minor nature exists which
may be responsive to your inquiry, and which was never
reported to headquarters, you may write directly to any
field office. You are advised that a listing of them has
been published in the Federal Register, Volume 43,
Number 141 - Friday, July 21, 1978. It would be incumbent
upon you to so designate your requests directly to each
office in which you have an interest.
In the event you may be in disagreement with any
of the exemptions as applied herein, you have thirty days
from receipt of this letter to appeal to the Associate
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Mr. A. J. Weberman
Attorney General. Appeals should be directed in writing to
the Associate Attorney General (Attention: Office of Privacy
and Information Appeals), Washington, D. c. 20530. The
envelope and the letter should be clearly marked "Freedom of
Information Appeal" or "Information Appeal."
Your patience and cooperation have been greatly
appreciated in this FOIPA matter.
Enclosures (3)
Sincerely yours,
~ ~ ~ ' : ! ~ ~
Freedom of Information-
Privacy Acts Branch
Records Management Division
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ltnittb c&tates J)epartmrnt of luutiu
OFFICE OF THE ASSOCIATE ATIORNEY GENERAL
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20530
Mr. A. J . Weberman
Independent Research Associates
6 Bleecker Street
New York, New York 10012
Dear Mr. Weberman:
FEB 5 1979
Re : Appeal No . 8-2720
You appealed from the action of the Federal Bureau of
Investigation on your request for access to records pertain-
ing to Henry A. Gonzalez .
After careful consideration of your appeal , I have decided
to affirm the initial action in this case . Mr. Gonzalez is
the subject of four Bureau main files -- Gang Murders , Imper-
sonation , Possible Destruction of Government Property and
Anti-Racketeering . Certain information was properly withheld
from you pursuant to 5 U. S . C. 552 (b) (3) , (7) (A) , (7) (C) , (7) (D)
and (7) (E) . These pertain to material exempted from release
by statute Lgrand jury matters] and investigatory records com-
piled for law enforcement purposes , the release of which would,
respectively, interfere with enforcement proceedings, consti-
tute an unwarranted invasion of the personal privacy of third
parties by revealing an investigative interest in them on the
part of the F . B. I. , disclose the identities of confidential
sources and disclose certain investigative techniques . Names
of government personnel were also excised on the basis of
5 U. S . C. 552(b) (7) (C) . None of the material being withheld
is appropriate for discretionary release .
No information concerning Mr . Gonzalez ' s possible role
as an informant in the Werbell trial appears in his main files .
The Bureau is attempting to locate this information and will
notify you if such information exists .
Judicial review of my action on this appeal is available
to you in the United States District Court for the judicial
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district in which you reside or have your principal place of
business, or in the District of Columbia, which is also where
the records you seek are located.
Sincerely,
Michael J. Egan
Associate Attorney General
/ I .
By:
<{ I () (c_> I
Quinlan ,J. ,.Shea, Jr. , Director;
Office of Privacy andAnformation ApPeals

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HIO DEPARTMENT OF
a., [),..,_ ,.._,, ---- - DIVISION OF VITAL STATISTI'IIJ s,.,.. tilt" No- /----
'''"'"'l KtJ Do:! l'\Oo __ ..:1./J. _ • 1\:u ___ _
CERTIFICATE OF DEATH
DECEASED-NAME Jmt
HENRY
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RESTAURANT
DEATH • D.r,,)r.J
JJ7]_
OF DEATH
TY, VIlLAGE 011: LOCAioON CIH liMITS E1 AND NUMHI!
(5p?E!f or "0)
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294 BELVOIR BLVD.
M01HER-MA/0[N NAMf \lui,// t
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bra in.'-''---
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wound of brain.
··----···· ------ ·
PJ.RT It SIGNIFICANT (0NOITIQN$LOTJu'II<61U to dr.uh bu/ nn/ rt/.>"d lo C.JU/t' '" f•.J•Il (.J) If YES o;rrt findl"(' '"" '''"
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AFTER '(\TH ONLY
ctnlfi( ... TION-COII'ONEk On b ... ,, of tl>r UHmin.uwn
of thr .. nJ/or tin tn/tlllf.oJIWn, in o{"""'"· .Jr ..llh
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UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION
WASHINGTON. D.C. 20S3S
April 11, 1979
Mr. A. J. Weberman
Independent Research Associates
6 Bleecker Street
New York, New York 10012
Dear Mr. Weberrnan:
This is in reference to the letter to you dated
February 5, 1979, from the Office of the Associate Attorney
General regarding your Freedom of Information-Privacy Acts
(FOIPA) appeal number 8-2720 concerning access to records
pertaining to Henry A. Gonzalez.
Please be advised that a search of the index to
our central records system revealed no information concerning
Mr. Gonzalez's possible role as an informant in the Werbell
trial.
Sincerely yours,
Thomas H. Bresson, Acting Chief
Freedom of Information-
Privacy Acts Branch
Records Management Division
Honors Denied,Singlaub
In Petty Reprisals for
,- !,-' , -. ' ., , I•
Protesting Disarmament
• 1'0 SI'IJI'Ut;HT
Edwurd Gibbon
neneral ,John K. Singlaub was denied all houurs usually act'Orded
retiring high-ranking military officPrS because lw crihci7.f'd the CariN
administwlion's sellout to the communists, according to a knowledgenhlc
authority.
"There was nothing written down. It was all don(' in a series of telephone
r:aUs,".Mitdwll WNBf'll told ThP SI'OTUniiT in an exclusive inlt>rvit•w
"Sompone would gt't a phone call <IIHI it would go something: like this: "The
boss says, get him (Singlaub) out of there quietly.'"
Thosp phone calls could only from tlw offil'l' ol llw St•crd<lry ot'
tlw Army or higher, according l<l \\'t>rHeiL "It provokes ml·lh:tl :1 hunl'h of
pd.ty (;porgia politieian.s would de.stro,v a soldipr like ./ack :-iinglauh,''
\hrHPll
TraditJI)Jlally. when a high ranking offi('er retire.s. lw is an·mded
a final horwr-a "walk-by" during which he takl'.s and returns a final s;1lule
from his troop;;. (;eneral Singlauh was refused that honor. Abo,lw was due
for <Ill award-a medal of commendation. lie didn't gPt it.
"It was a petty act, mean and vindictive," WerBell said. "In my opinion, it
is typil'al M the CartPr administration."
t;eneral Singlauh described in an (•xclusi ve interview how Carter and his
giveaway cohorts are destroying i\.mf'rica's defensive capabilities
(SPOTLIGHT, June l:ll. "What the administration is doing is
dPstroying thC image of a man who knows where the monkey sleep;;,"
said. He explained that "whPre the monkey sleeps" is an old
,\Jitchc/1 \\'crlk/1 Ill is u rmli-
/ant anlicommrullsl and
of {nr(UIIf'. i\ l'r'CO)!II/2Cd ('.lJWff Ill
E'otUtli'nn .... ur)o!t'llry 11-'rlrfan·. hr·
has as o et!l/ .... ltltant lo a
IIU/11 !JI'r of unlln!llllllllllisl n··
1-{llllt'S lllfmlf.{lwut the u·orld. Also
a expr•rl. he tht•
o11/v {u·t'l/8('d ".-.;i{('/lt'er" ill lht•
• S/alt'S Wr•rlk/1 serrted
with rlist/1/ctiim with the OSS
tlur111g \Vorld \Var II and along
rnllt (;rnernl-lohn Stng{aub INJs
dmppt'd heh111d 1'111'1/!Y hw•s to
Ol'#ll/1121' and nwrduwtc !neal
mlitlary • w the l'un(rc
ThcutN.
military exprPssion "knows
too mud1," nnd '',Jack knows
tiH) much.''
Tlw (;t•rwrul Singlauh fon·!•d n•signa·
tion and the "rptn'Pmt>nl·· of t;!•twral ol
tlw Arm.v llouglas ,\lnL\rthur hHVI'
lwt•n rornpnred. hut WE'rBPII savH thnl
l.lw <·ompari;mn is not Pxartly HI'I'Urate
ht'I',IUSI' Mal' Arthur disol,..ved a din•<'!
urd•_·r from l'n•sident ]l;rrr_\: Truman.
",1:\l'k Singlauh has alwHYS lu•e11 a
good snldit>r." Wt•rllt>ll said "lit> JH'\'I'r
disolwn•d <1 dinT! ordr•r_ All lr1· did
grvt· tllrnt-d ou\tolw
corn'('\. IJ..h·nsin•ll.lhl' ]:_:--;. ;1 had
wav. \\'p'\'1' lust nl our ll'l'ih. llu•
volunteer is a nnnpld1• flop." lu·
said.
Tlw Vllluntl•er Armv • nw ol
1\1:!\1," Wr•rB1•!1 suid, .'wlwn rn.-11 Joined
up f<)f a rnonth.thn•t• rrW;1Is·n <i;l,l'
nrH.I plan· to slt•Pp."
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l'arrer's a\'lWil lws had 11 T!':tdron
l'P\'l'I'Sl' of wlwt lw hop1•d it \\'flUid.
howt'VI'L ",\ lot of top m iIi I :n-.· ot lwns
n"Sl'lli what was dmw lo ,Ja\'k," Wl'rl\l'll
'Tht> rnomlt• of the tup U.S. tnilitnry
IIH'n is lwinK di•Hirovl'd."
Werlldl has knm\:11 (;l'Jll'ral Singlauh
for rnon· than :l() years "\\"1· were il\ the
sttml' out lit 111 tlw ):--;:--; ;1nd :--;1"'''1"1
Opcr;1tiom< in 1\"or!d \Var ll.' \\'!'r]:,•ll
sai1L ".hn·k Sinl!lauh lll'VI·r s;ty
lht•sl' things IHhout ho1' hr·
rnistn•;1led hy the ( ';Hl<'r :\dmmistr,1
!run). I'll SHY tlwm. I hough Till'.\ n-111-t
takt• 1nv pt'nf<wn aw;1_v--l don't haH'
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ltnittb 6tatts Dtpartmrnt of Justiet
OFFICE OF THE ASSOCIATE ATIORNEY GENERAL
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20530
JUN 2 5 1980
Mr . Alan J . Weberman
Independent Research Associates
6 Bleecker Street
New York , New York 10012
Re : Appeal No . 80-0981
QJS:PKD
Dear f.tr. t'leberman:
You appealed from the action of the Federal Bureau of
Investigation on your request for access to records pertain-
ing to Colonel Robert Bayard.
After careful consideration of your aopeal, I have
decided to affirm the initial action in this case . Certain
of the material pertaining to Colonel Bayard is classified
and I am affirming the denial of access to it on the basis
of 5 U. S . C. 552(b) (1). This ma terial is being referred to
the Department Review Committee for review and determination
whether it warrants continued classification under Executive
Order 12065. You will be notified if the Committee ' s final
decision results in the declassification of any information.
Other materials were properly withheld from you pursuant to
5 U.S . C. 552(b) (7) (C) , which pertains to investigatory records
compiled for law enforcement purposes , the release of which
would constitute an unwarranted invasion of the personal
privacy of third parties , in some instances by revealing
an investigative interest in them on the part of the F . B.I .
None of the information being wi ·thheld is appropriate for
discretionary release .
Judicial review of my action on this appeal is available
to you in the United States District Court for the judicial
district in which you reside or have your principal place of
business , or in the District of Columbia, which is also where
the records you seek are located.
Sincerely ,
John H. Shenefi e ld
Associate Attorney General
By:
'/
?7
nlan J . Sh ,
of Privacy and
---;: /
Jr . , Dir!ctor
Information Appeals

UNITED STATES DEPARTI\!EI\'T OF JUSTICE
FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20535
May 14, 1980
Mr. Alan Jules Weberman
Independent Research Associates
6 Bleecker Street
New York, New York 10012
Dear Mr. Weberman:
This is in response to your Freedom of Information-
Privacy Acts (FOIPA) request number 72,177 for material in
our files pertaining to the late Colonel Robert F. Bayard.
As a result of your request, a search of the index
to our central records system at FBI Headquarters was
conducted. This search revealed no information to indicate
that Colonel Bayard has ever been the subject of an investi-
gation by the FBI. However, several references in the files
pertaining to other individuals and/or organizations were
located and processed for disclosure. Based on the information
furnished, these six documents contain the only identifiable
material responsive to your request.
Enclosed herewith are copies of the documents from
our files numbered 62-587-450, 856, and 876; 62-108665-A
dated 7/6/75; 97-5435-8; and 163-37482-23. There have been
no serials withheld in their entirety. Excisions, however,
have been made from the enclosed records in order to protect
materials which are exempted from disclosure pursuant to the
following subsections of the Freedom of Information Act,
Title 5, United States Code, Section 552:
(b) (l)
(b) (7)
information which is currently and
properly classified pursuant to Execu-
tive Order 12065 in the interest of
the national defense or foreign policy;
investigatory records compiled for law
enforcement purposes, the disclosure
of which would:
{C) constitute an umvarranted invasion
of the personal privacy of another
person.
.
• • .. .. j,
.. ..

,-:
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llnittb J9tpartmrnt of
OFFICE OF THE ASSOCIATE ATIORNEY GENERAL
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20530
JUN 2 5 1980
Mr . Alan J. Weberman
Independent Research Associates
6 Bleecker Street Re : Appeal No . 80 - 0981
QJS : PKD New York, New York 10012
Dear Mr. Weberman:
You appealed from the action of the Federal Bureau of
Investigation on your request for access to records pertain-
ing to Colonel Robert Bayard .
After careful consideration of your appeal , I have
decided to affirm the initial action in this case. Certain
of the material pertaining to Colonel Baya rd is classified
and I am affirming the denial of access to it on the basis
of 5 U. S . C. 552(b) (1) . This material is being referred to
the Review Committee for review and determination
whether it warrants continued classification under Executive
Order 12065 . You will be notified if the Committee ' s final
decision results in the declassification of any information .
Other materials were properly withheld from you pursuant to
5 U. S.C. 552(b) (7) (C), which pertains to investigatory records
compiled for law enforcement purposes, the release of which
would constitute an unwarranted invasion of the personal
privacy of third parties , in some instances by revealing
an investigative interest in them on the part of the
None of the information being wi·thheld is appropriate for
discretionary release.
Judicial review of my action on this appeal is available
to you in the United States District Court for the judicial
district in which you reside or have your principal place of
business , or in the District of Columbia , which is also where
the records you seek are located .
Sincerely ,
John H. Shenefield
Associate Attorney General
By' / L_,__ .,
Sh
1
Office of Privacy and
I
Jr. , Di:Lr
Information Appeals
_ MAY 16 19BD
• •
Mr. Alan Jules Weberman
The decision to withhold exempt portions of our
records is the responsibility of William H. Webster, Director
of the FBI.
For your convenience, the enclosed records,
consisting of 19 substantive pages, for which your account
has been deducted accordingly ($1.90), have been stapled
into documents as the originals appear in our files, and
assembled and fastened into one package for transmittal to
you. In addition, the application of the exemptions has
been so noted directly on each page where employed, and an
explanatory sheet has been inserted in the one document
where 22 consecutive pages have been withheld in their
entirety.
Please be advised that certain materials in the
enclosed records, including those pages withheld in their
entirety, have been considered by a Classification Officer
as being strictly exempted from disclosure by Executive
Order. Also, certain information indicating investigative
interest in other persons has been deleted in order to
protect their personal privacy interests.
The search for information in response to your
request was limited to "those records in our central records
system which are maintained at FBI Headquarters,
Washington, D. C. In certain specific instances, information
collected in our field office files is not forwarded to FBI
Headquarters. These instances include cases in which the
perpetrators of the violation were not developed during the
investigation; cases in which the United States Attorney
declined prosecution; and cases in which the investigation
revealed the allegations were unsubstantiated or not within
the investigative jurisdiction of the FBI. Therefore, if
you believe records which may be responsive to your inquiry
are located within the files of an FBI field office and were
never reported to Headquarters, you may write directly to
any field office for those materials.
If you so desire, you may appeal to the Associate
Attorney General from any denial contained herein. Appeals
should be directed in writing to the Associate Attorney
General (Attention: Office of Privacy and Information
Appeals), United States Department of Justice,
Washington, D. C. 20530, within thirty days from receipt of
-2-
Mr. Alan Jules Weberman
this letter. The envelope and the letter should be clearly
marked "Freedom of Information Appeal" or "Information
Appeal." Please cite the FOIPA number assigned to your
request so that it may be easily identified.
Enclosure
Sincerely yours,
of1J )1. I I!Wzc
"'
David G. Flanders, Chief
Freedom of Information-
Privacy Acts Branch
Records Management Division
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COMMUNICATIONS SECTION

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FBI ATUNTA
350 PM lfiG.EN LCS

? DIRECTOR AND LOS ANGELES
01'2 A TLA ITA 44-2312
..

LT. COL. WILLIAM C. PULL!M, ·u.s. ARMY CRETIRED>,
EMPLOYED AS COACH, U.S. ARMY JITERNATIONAL RIFlE TEAM,
ARfiiiY flt\RKSfi'AIISHIP UNIT, F'T. BEIINII«l, 6A., ADVISED JUNE TWELVE
LAST, ll{AT ON fi'IAY TVEIITY FOUR T HE VAS IN STOCK HOLfll,
SWEDEN, WHEN COL. ROBERT F AYAR D, COPIII"t\ NDI NG OfFICER 0;
· THE AR,.,Y UN T AT FT. CAME 10 HIM mOM
.A SHOOT IN CZECHOSLOVAKIA. COL. BAYARD ASKED PULLEM IF HE
liAD READ Ill A PAPER OR HEARD AI ENGLISH BROADCAST WHICH
BAYARD HAD HF.ARD II CZECHOSLOVAKIA THAT KEIND>Y HAD BEEN
SHOT J N 1HE IECK. PULLEfll STATED HE IIAD
OF' THIS MTURE AIID TOLD BAYARD HE 1lfOIEHT IT VAS RlKlR.
BAYARD DID IIJT RELATE SOURCE OF IM CZECHOSLOVAKIA
AIID PULLEI'I COtn.D lOT COMMENT CONCERIIIII) s'f{;.·lE.'.;{ :!:_I!;:_
--
COL. J. "· IEffllE, ACTIMG COPIMANDI E O'fJ«j\Jrl81Jti8
ARI'fY UNIT, .SA.,
nATE coL. BAYARD VAS L£AVIIG YESTERDAY
EIID PAGE 01
7 9 JUN 0 1968 c v
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Cf).VV
Kr.
llr. De to.-=h
Jlr. llohr-
Mr. Bi.lhOli-
JU.
Mr. Cal lahan..-
Kr. Conrad-
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Kr.
Mr.
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60I .:> TO ENGLAND FOR A WEEK, ADDRESS URI{NOWN. BAYARD
EXPECTED TO BE VI TH ARMY SHOTGUN TEAM AT SHOTGUN MEET
Jr1 ltii''I!JR, BELGI l1fll, JUNE IIIIIETEEN lliROI.GH TWEIITY FOUR, IEXT.
Ill: lENZI E STATED BAYARD EXPECTED TO RETURN TO U.s. AIID
PROBABLY FT. BENNING, SOMETIME AROUND Jtl.Y FOLR IEXT, BUT
COULD PlOT GIVE CERTAIN INFORMATION AS TO VHERE HE COULD
BE CONTACTED OTHER THAN THE SHOTGUN SHOOT Ill BEl.GIUftl •
ATLANTA, AT FORT BENNING. I'IAINTAIIIIMO CONTACT, AI"'U
Ulil T, FOR FLRTKER IIIFO RE LOCATION AND POSSIBLE IIITERVIEW OF
COL. BAYARD. P.
END
PBI tMSH DC
CC-lfl'&t. S f ~
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Date:

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Transmit the followlnQ In (Type u. pi,;,.,..,, or code!

(Priorily) I
---------------L------- -
AIIGELES CMAILC>
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156-156>,
SAil
A'\ITJIIIJ .JULY
Tr'<IALS.
CJL RB-:-<r F. o:i--<Y•d·J n4s ;11:, FJ"<T -3EIIIIIIIG
<. •· • -----(;;!':Jr'<Gi"'. A'\10 CJH4CTi:·J T-l':•F -lY TELEP"1J'E DoJr'<IIIG A"- .JULY
T
c
Tk'CIITYToJ TIPA ST4TES WILL dE AT
THURS0AY JULY '\IEXr.
BUREAU
/1/ LvS 156-15Al
/1/ SAN 156-132>

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3
• JUL 24 \968

'
Sent -----------"'
Per ______________ _
Aoent In Charoe

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Transmit the
F 8 I
Date:
7/29/68
(Type ;,. plointe%1 or codeJ
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AIRMAIL REGISTERED:MAIL
(Priori<y) 1
.r
------------------------------------------------L-------
} TO: DIRECTOR, FBI (62-587) R,' '.sfpit\
FRc.!: -ATLANTA (44-2412) (ROC) \.)J
( t '

Re San Antonio teletype to the Bureau 7/22/68.
For the illf ormation of the Bureau, Colonel
ROBERT Fort Benning, Qeorgia, advised on
7/23/68 that be and the aembers of his shotgun team
attended the Grand Prix de Brno in Brno, Czechoslovakia,
during 5/17 and 18/68, On one of those two dates, the
bead clerk at the Grand Hotel Brno, Czechoslovakia, related
to them that Senator ROBERT KENNEDY bad been shot 1a the
neck receiving a flesh wound but was in satisfactory
condition, This same information was obtained froa tbe
head waiter in the dining room who related the same facts,
The aembers of the unit attempted to purchase a Geraan
original source stated it was heard on the radio. They
were unsuccessful in locating it in an Bast German newspaper.
that was available in that cityin Czechoslovakia and
assumed that it was aere rumor.
Colonel BAYARD advised that this inforaa tion was
obtained from any other sources in Cz hoslovakia,

\ hJ __ Bureau
'i' Los Angeles
1 - Atlanta
g.· CPReja
(6)

t;
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(56-156) (Enc. 22)
iii JUL 801968
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Approved: ¥--LL-+-HJ----{/V__ Sent ______ M
Sp cia Aoent In Charoe
-.,61AUG 1·41968

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-11. '
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R ABAYARD 7-6 {J
NIGHT LD ' V . /
ATLANTA CUPI> --POLICE WERE TRYING SUNDAY TO TOGETHER THE
RECENT ACTIVITIES Of RETIRED ARMY COiONfi
!
EffORT TO FIND OUT WHO KILLED HII'IliiTHA 0 litiEMPfiN
AN ATLANTA SHOPPING CENTER. - · ::.- , ' A-t
THERE WERE REPORTS THAT BAYARD. VHO PION£tRED DEV!LOPMEMT UJ. . ' V
, III GMT-VISION WEAPONS USED IN VIETNAM. HAD BEEN SEEN Di THE COMPA Y. OJ' -
DISSIDENT CUBANS IN THE ATLANTA AREA RECENTLY. . ' ' -'
BAYARD. WHO RETIRED FROM THE ARMY AFTER HIS TOUR Of DUTY IN u/
VltTNAI'I. ONCE WORKED WITH THE UNITED NATIONS ARAB-ISRAELI
PEACE-KEEPING MISSION UNDER THE LATE SECRETARY GENERAL DAG .__, •;.,.. !
' RAMMERSKJOLD. BE ALSO COMMANDED THE 1ST BRIGADE Of THE 87TH l
ARMY DIVISION VHDN PRESIDENT JOHNSON SENT IT TO THE DOMINICAN 1
REPUBLIC IN 1965. . . . -
• ACTIVITIES HIS 1970 litRE IN ,
AfTER RETURNING TO HIS HOME IN NEARBY •• BAYARD VENT
10 WORK WITH ARMS DEALER
21
TCHek WERB!!L· WHO $AID SATURDAY. -ur
WAS Mr BUSI ESS PARTNER. IT UPH THE S.o.s. THAT KILLED
BOB BAYARD. I'M GOING TO KILL RIM.• .
A NATIONAL MAGAZINE SAID LAST WINTER tHAT BAYARD BAD BEEN OBSERVED
TRAINING INSURGENTS ON THE BAHAMIAN ISLAND Of ABACO. BUT BAYARD
DENIED THE REPORTS.
WERBELL SAID BE BELIEVES THE KILLING VAS POLITICALLY
-HE WAS A DAMN FINE SOLDIER. HE HAD NO ENEMIEs.• SAID
POLICE SAID BAYARD HAD WORKED AS A PRIVATE DETECTIVE AND"HAD BEEN--
A SECURITY CONSULTANT S INC! HIS lET IREI'IENT • - -
BE LEFT ROME THURsDAY AFTERNOON• TEUING liS VIFE II lAS CiOINCi: TO
t
TLANTA TO LOOK FOR A JOB. .
THURSDAY NIGHT PATRONS Of AN ANSLEY MALL SHOPPING CENTER TAVERN
ALLED POLICE AND SAID A KAN BAD BEEN BEATEN AND VAS LYING AT THE J
lEAR OF A TREE-DOTTED COURTYARD AT THE KALLo
POLICE FOUND THE BODY SHORTLY BEFORE RIDNIGHTo IT CARRIED NO
IDENTIFICATION. AND THE POCKETS BAD BEEN TURNED INSIDE OUT.
THE BODY VAS IDENTIFIED WHEN OFFICERS FOUND A COAT KATCHING
· BAYARD•s PANTS CRUMPLED ON THE FRONT FLOOR OF A CAR PARKED AT THE
l MALLo THEY CHECKED THE REGISTRATION OF THE CAR AND fOUND IT VAS
I BAYARD'S.
' POUCE SAID THE CRUMPLED COAT IHc;HT BE SIGNIFICANT BECAUSE BAYARD-
VAS •A .TYPICAL! AGING MILITARY KANo HE VAS ALWAYS CONSCIOUS OF liS
I BEARING AND •
. . UPI 07-06 12&01 PED

Afl G ·;_:::-:"fJn.. _
"'" £._ 4t: NOi RECORDED- >J
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r•· '"'"'·"•·U E-SE .. ' 192 ""u ..,,
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F 8 I
TO: DIRECTOR, FBI
FROM:
Enclosed for the Bureau, Atlanta and Miami is
ne copy (xerox) of an article entitled "The Amazin
New,Country Caper" by ANDREW ST. GEORGE which app are
he February, 1975 issue of Esquire Magazine.
The Bureau is requested to review enclosed
advise if any investigation has been conducted co c
the alleged activities of the individuals mentioned in
enclosed article.
Jacksonville
ith Jaclcsonvil

___________ w P•r------------

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It is noted that until enclosed article
came to the attention of Jaclcsonville, it vas assumed
by Jacksonville that the organization known as
Friends of Abaco had been established in the United
States to provide assistance to the citizens of
Abaco who seemed intent on seceding from the Bahamas
government; however, the enclosed article indicates
that the planned aovement for Abaco to secede from
the B a h ~ government ori,inated in the United
States and is -presently beLn' pursued in an active
and aggressive campaign within the United States
by the individuals .entioned in enclosed article.
It, therefore, appears that a violation of the
Neutrality Act rather than the Regiatr&tion Act
aay be involved.
In view of the above • 'the interview of
subject is being held in abeyance pending a review
of this aatter by the Bureau and receipt of any
background information the Bureau may have concerning
this aovement and the individuals .entioned
in enclosed article.
IDfoP&ation copies of this communication
and enclosed article ~ being furnished to Atlanta
and Miami Divisions in view of possible investigative
interest in this matter and for possible future
reference.
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LEADS
JACKSONVILLE DIVISION

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At Ft. Walton Beach, Florida
Interview of subject being held in abeyance
pending receipt of information and instructions
from Bureau,
I
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by Andrewst ALL INFORMATiON CONTAIN
\ HEREIN IS UNCLASS1FlED "" , •
Ctlpitalist revolution, the ultimalt solution DATE 3 • 5-fb BY • g -l, c:.,
!
I
f
or the flnt time in biatorr \
the auccesaful managers of
America's economy-ita u-
trepreneura, ftnanciera, mer-
ebandiaen,
talk.inr rebellion. A. kind of
rebellion, anyway. There Ia no call
to aubvert the Republic. to
abandon it. In lncrea.aing Uumbera,
America's moet a1'fluent and active
elites are threatening to withdraw
their funds, their aaseta, ultimately
even themselves and their families
from the centers of the U.S. econ-
omy, which many of them aeem to
consider done for. Nicholas YOn
Hoffman, the acerbic and preter-
naturally foresirhted columnist of
Tile Polt, found that in
eome of mid-America's best execu-
tive clubs, ""There ia talk of buyior
.,old coins and keepinr them in the
oftice aale, of owninr a piece of land
to retreat to when the trouble
•tarta." The hero of the year's moet
· durable beat aeUer, Yo111 CaR
FroM a Jl Cn.u, by Harry
Browne, ia .. Peter Panic," the quin-
tessential American arnall i.nveator.
He ia in ftight from bia own na-
tional economy. Transferring every
penny be owna from U.S. invest-
menta into Swia.a banks and South
African cold atocks, Peter Panic
practically doubles hia worth from
1970 to "73; then he ia ready to
take the moet important step-to
6nd birnaelf a aeclurled rural retreat
to weather the nation's coming
troubles.
But retreat toltert! That's the
basic problem none of doom-
aayera a-rapplea with. A aeven-
man
who pullll up lock, atock and bond
.0 ESQUIRE. n:aRUAR'Y
l
inveatznenta to move to a Mcluded
farmhouse may find there a mea-
•ure of protection from random
be may lnd. if real
trouble atarta, that in bia laolation
be'a utterly defenaeleaa.
Unleaa, of course, be baa planned
ahead- as far ahead a.nd aa care-
fully aa the oririnatora of what one
can only call. for the moment, the
Abaco Plan (it remains to be Men
by events, of course, whether the
Abaco planner& _.ere aa wiae and
prescient aa they were fanighted
and careful) . The originatora of
the Abaco idea were the first to Im-
plement the urge to abandon Amer-
ica with a concrete design, includ-
inr a destination, provision for per·
aonal and financial safety, monetary
reward and even a Utopian aocial
program. Though the men behind
Abaco are nearly the opposite of
the of the late
Sixties and early Seventies, their
objectin:a are much the aame. Tbey
.eek' a way out ud a return to
fundamental values, but their moet
fundamental value ia the propcai-
tion that each of them ahouki be
many times a mlllionaire, untrou-
bled by inflation.
By the time JOU read this, the
men of Aba{'() may have aocom-
pliahed the tint atages of their pro-
a-ram (in which cue you will have
rud about them in the newapa-
pera l--or they may have failed and
be in tht process of regroupinr.
But I'd like you to them u I
did, at a lunch in Wuhingten, D.C ..
laat May.
.. Crr 'Havoc!' aftd let 11ip lite dog•
of War"!
oewepo.,.r, C'll7 -d etete.)
/'190£
,
E.UIMI
TUle: Tl£ AHAZ'N&
• Ct»N CA""&"(
Clunoader:
.,
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No, air! }iot here to Duke Zei-
:
) · bert'• place rou don't; this weli-
J bred Washington restaurant admita
. ._ DO animals. Not even l! lltey're
! wearing eighty-dollar Church'•
·· ·t ahoea. Not even if they happen to
f. be the familiar old two-lentid war
t bound& who were made immortaJ in
·>C
London clubman. that'a ju.t
\
what he is : Robert Hamilton, Bar- ,.._ .
on of Belhaven and Stenton, a di&- • '
tinguiahed member of the House
of Lor&.
'
1· the Shakespearean line. and who
.-4. are being made fashionable again
··l this rear by the aucceaa of Fred-
In fact, a cood look at the kr-
endary Mitch WerBell-millionaire
fireann.a tycoon, designer of the
world'• best muule ailencer, ad-
venturer, friend of dictaton and
(Indicate paQe, ..... ol
••••paper, city -cs ••• ... )
•• erick Forsyth's latest book, f'Ju
-: J Dog• of War.
f Here we are in 197(, murky,
1
... ang-st-ridden, confusing old "74, and
with Forsyth's novel a beat seller,
{ hailed as "soon to be a m&J·or mo.v-

f ie," deferentially praised for ita
c .. reportorial realism," more and
· ·} • more people are talking about "tk\e
,.$ j
1
dogs of war" as if they knew what
.,. the phrase meant : an international
: \ eonapiracy or finaneiera and killer
commandos who wage mercenary
mini-wan in the quest for mui-
f j payoffs. What nonsense! Ardrink at
Duke Zeibert'a polished bar will
· «ive ua a better view of reality
· ·: t than Fred Forsyth'• eollected
.... works.
1
Take Mister Mitchell Living-ston

· j WerBell here, a rtid(f.f, joviar;- .00Ui-
chap, aipping hill prepnn-
I dial Tanqueray martini extra dry.
.- l: i_ · It's obvious that if there were any-
thing doggy or bellicose about Wer-
Bell. he wouldn't be lunebing where
f
· be I.a--.t the head of the old Duke'•
, : priu front corner table.
, , Or take the tall, well-tailored
man aitting next to WerBell. It ia
.... · -having just
1
beeban ovethrheard klaak-
·1 : plain at a glance tb.t he looka and
l.ng, .. .May ve e pic es,
plea.ae!"--.ounda like a patrician
·1!

. ··!
. !
C.I .A. arenta, manipulator of the
luck of amall natio111--end at the
seven men who are his luncheon
today reminds ua that, in
real lite. the atralei'Y of private
wars demands, first of aU. /.JUUe.
In Forsyth'• telling, "'the dop of
war" ret together only to make
hard-boiled eonversation about
.. knocking off an entire republic"
with the aid of World War II ma-
ehine pistols laboriously concealed
in oil drums. WerBell'a world ia
different. A top executive of De-
fense Services llili-
tarr Armaments Corporation and
Sionica Inc., he designs and manu-
factures his own weaponr')·, which
are recognized all over the world
as the most aophiaticated .mall
arms obtainable. Having acquired
a t.utc for irregular warfare as an _
O.S.S. commando leader behind
Japanese linea in World War ll,
\\'erBell ill rumored to have taken
a hand in a long atrin&' of mini-
wars aince then, from the South
China Sea to the CariblJean and the
Mediterranean. But WerBell frowns
on crus badinage, especially with
food. At Zeibert 's the table talk ill
mostly about ttastronomy today, in
part because the dill aoun and aoft-
ahell crabs are truly remarkable. in
part because the ho a the neigh-
boring table is Clifw n.niel, the ))
all\'er-haired W hin b
chief of The New ork Tinrrs
"*"But by tlle lime coffee and Cour-
Yoisier arrive, Daniel and"his party
dePIIrt. WerBell . Jighta a finely
veined lfontecruz double corona . .. I
talked to the island today:· he aaya,
and auddenly the table ill all atten-
tion.
Ettitioe:
Tttl•:
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:
(Mount Clipping In Spoce a.fow)
, · · No translation Ia needed. A. the
i
he lal&nd"--tbat'a • ·hat this tapes have demonstrat-
l . lunch ia .+1 abouL The iJland ed, men who ahare a aecret
· b Abaco; not )'et an in de- come to a hare a aecret language, u
: ! pendent republic, nor a ce11ter lf by oemoaia. WerBell's remarb
·1: of commerce and finance, but re'•eal that he hu had a long-dL.-
by no means a tance c:onverution this
. J c:-oral hump, either. In lact, Abaco with one of his chief operativea on
·: t i.a the landmass in Abaco, a clear phone Une-
1 tbe Abaco and i.e., a connection involving untapped
, , Little Abaco, surrounded by .a phone numbera. (If the converaa-
. ! of amall reefa and cays. tion bad not involved a key agent
over .even hundred aquare miles on Abaco, and If the phone had
of fertile tropical paradise. Mitch been , auapect., the conversation C.
WerBell and his cueata have come would have been brief.) \
to WuhinJ'lon to diecuu a project . . The on e ialand-I!MlCt
. . Ukely C. R. "Chu all, who e t1
atra1ght out of a Fonyth acr1pt: · ·ien· a.s er s ipal oper- ) ( \...
the take-over of Abaco---.n action
1
, - ative on Abaco b!" the (/
that will allow these men to l>ummer of 1974-reported that the
themselves and their money profit- ' a"Pecial courier Who oCC&.I!ionally ar:
ably out of the U.S. -,:i,·es (rom lJiami aboard a amall
To be au_re, any ruembla_nce to . ·amphitiian·-aeaplane.
popular fiction stops abort 1nth the : aignmenl8 wbich the Naaaau au-
basic idea. Commando politics b · ·· - ··- -- ---
dead. It will no do to break
open a ca.ae of hand
nades and atorm the palace. Ifl fact,
Abaco Ita• no palace. What it doea
have is aix to seven thousand native
inhabitants who lead lives
from quiet ataa-nation to mute
poverty.
thoritiea are oot suppoeed to aee,
had delivered a ahipment of blank-
aurvey forms. These
devised by a U.S. opin:-
iou-resurch firm. are to monitor
aentiment on Abaco in favor of m:
·dependence-not · just - ·once, .. but"
To be conquered, Abaco must be
4
41
-•fttaliii · eked-that fundamental upect
·week by week.-u WerBeTI's paywar
-CAmpaign unfold_, . · - --- -
- Furthermore, WerBell learned
. :
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.. t
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of territorial expansion has not
changed in four thouaand years-
but in an of llr&r-
fan, motintional ruearch, aub-
liminal and behavior
modification, the must be
different. WerBell's f\rst usault on
Abaco has. been With
skill and persuuive-
neu, the citizens of Abaco are can-
rinced, step b)· atep, that the.r must
an independent nation; that
an independent nation iJ ·
the most rewardlnJ;! thinJf
In the whole " ·Ide workl; that lr i,;
tJ.rN. the- citiunfy of AbMco, "·ho
mul't - ur.-enlly--Deed- and demarid
and for status all at aelf-J"o\·-
eminJ;! commonwealth. -- - -
··J talked to the island for almost
all hour thi11 morning." \\'erBcll re-
peoats ,-enfl>·. now that ever)·one
around the table il' • ·atc:hing him
1\"lth close attention . .. tinnily
the dia-
tributf'd half of them. make
a one-11pot run thi11 weekend 11ncl t<ee
.11ixt>· to Aixty-five pt>n.-ent."
this that a teat
focused on a aingle Abaco aettle-
ment., perhaps Manh Harbour or
Fo:t Town, had been acheduled by
.. is on Abaco for the coming
weekend. The expected
to poll between aixty and aixly-Avi
perrent in favor of intlepentience-
an impressive acore, reflecting the
fact that the covert political c:am-
paiJm of WerBell and Co. U. in ib
aixth monlh.

\
'
(lndleale pave, -• of
aewapaper, city &Dd alate.)
O.te:
£4llt&oe:
A•thot:
Etllto,;
Title:
C"aracter:
.,
Cloaal
s .. t..lluoc OU!ce:
0 Belnq : .. •••Uqat..S
how they acore. Tht·r ._•_h_i-nk_ i_l"_ll_be ________ _ j _- _- _
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r.e theae people otrio&U! They
:are indeed-not merely ae--
- rious but experienced, pow-
erful and farsighted. Three
of WerBell'• luncheon
· are former C.I.A. ca-
reer otlicers, all three recently re-
tired from its clandestine o.ervices
branch, where they acquired in-
•aluable experience in the manipu-
lation, diamantli an rearranging
of JrOVernments. Jo !lluldoopJ who
is WerBell's princ 1 . in
(
Washington, ,has o.erved as Po!Ad
.
- political Vietnam
11
l
1
and AfricR. \Waite .,S 'L l
{ -n' amuTar \luty in a urn c,... LL'"'
,
1
Asian counb·ie!ll., and ed
1

\1
, oussos, a tanned. greying ffiifl.
n a senior C.I.A. clundestjne
· aervices offic1ai m the llediterra-
\
nean IGih- the B..&lliills, above all
almost twenty years
liletore he retired last year to join,
ostensibly, the management of the
Astor, Washington's best Greek
restaurant, long owned by his
family.
These men are not war hounaa or
gunslingers. Their ethos and teloo
thrust not to"·ard violence but
toward control. They are technetron-
ic conftict managera--plannera, or-
p.nizera, and only· OfC&Sionally the
manipul•tora of violent action. Mul-
doon is a taiL pink, dee(H'heated
lriahman faithfully cut in the mold
from which moat of the chief in-
•pectora of large American police
departments -m to spring. Mack-
em looks like an Ivy Le .. gue grad-
uate instructor, blond, button-<lown,
horn-rimmed, alert, with a Hong
Kong Racquet Club tie to match
his navy blazer. The
Rous.."'S, in his llawlCJ'sly cut En-
•liah tropicala, demnnKtrateA what
the Frent·h mean when they uy
':, .. .. ---·- ·-·-----
\
I
(lndleate poqoe, -• of
aewapaper, city alate.)
-
O.te:
E4.1Uoa:
Aalhot:
E•llol':
Tttl•:
Chcuocter:
-
Claa•l Ueation:
6MblaltUaq OfUe.:
0 Belnq :n•••Uqa1.d

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rtrHO ( ne v. 7-16-63)
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Charles Boyer guc11t lll'CIIkcrR from the U.S. who ed, utterly silent, with the b uilt-In
phJnk:ed. in a RP.>= scenario, preach the go!4pcl c•oility of plugging ·a beer cnn at
nols<l much the part of Bo tre!4:1cd by a vunety of cconnmac a uuwd ynrds- "We guarantee
as his enigmnlic superior, M. AI "' and political promises- a carefully tlti.• much," aayR WerBell- and · a .
three follow Werncll'11 briefing with ) "forward lleudquar- SJ>eci<tl sighti ng device which en-
email nods and hal( smiles of ap- ler:4" ha!4 l>een set up in Miami. A ables the rifleman . to C ./
proval. large, deceptively suburban house day or night. With Gorda gro.m, &p:
WerBell pika on, his eyes on the at 1666 S.W. Twelfth Street hic.lel.i WerHcll ha.<l designed and p ucea V
pearl-grey · ash of his cigar, his a high-powered SSB radio station, the incredible Ingram. a mlniatur-
growly voice low. There's work to a "dispatch center" for handling ized submachine a-un no larger
be done- lots of il The day known cargo traflic with Abaco via a small thnn the fr\miliar .45 service auto-
as U. D.I.-that 111:the date ,when seaplane, a halfway house for mutic, eight hundred rounds per
Abnco breaks ·aw·ay ·from· the Com- promising Independence militants minult:, the whole shooting match
monwe11lth · of - the who are discreetly flown to Miami. about ll!l noisy as a very fast Ping-
t:nilateral Declaration of· Inc.lcpen- On arrival, the Independence ac· Pong match-''pac ..• pac . •. pac-
denci--ia tent.ati\·ely set for New tivist.s are either enrolled in politi- pacpac"-the barrel Ia a patented
Year's Day-of .1975. The- operations cal indoctrination courses held In WerBell silencer. There is plenty of
require<l"to selze·e-ontrol of the ia- Miami, or, having been provided "eophisticated equipment" to teat. __ _
land have been disguised as the with plane tickets under various But among visitors who have been.)
.. uprising" of an "autonomous, lo- cover names, they are flown farther Invited there more than once. the .
ully organized independence move- north to a training base near At- place-eledronic security fencing,
ment•• with such amazing skill that Janta, 'where they receive paramili- the dog patrols, the Imperious warn-
none of the world's major press has t.stry training under the command ing p!gns, the helipad for combat
spotted what is going on. A number of a for er U.S. infantry officer, chpppers, the aintripfor the com-
of seemingly local organizations Col. ' '()IJ\¥>· arjet--emong people who
and deceptively "ad hoc" groups , Col. Bayll tall, he itch by his flret name, the
have sprung up to handle thoae ac- in the Gary C cr mod, with grey ce is known as "the farm."
th;tiea that cannot be kept from \ eyea and a shock of reddish bro
public view-propaganda, organiza- 1 hair, is the officer in charge of "spe-
tion, and so forth. There are: the · cial personnel." Young, muscular,
Abaco Independence Movement unattached Abaconian independence
(known a.s A.J.M.); the Abaco De- enthusiuts, whose commitment to
nlopment Council; Friends of the cause of U.D.I. Is eapecially
Abaco; the "Prosperity '74" are given seven weeks of
bomic Conference on Abaco. ' instruction in the use
E\·ery one or the:se cover organi- of small arms, demolition devices
ution11 has been clandestinely ere- and other commando skills at the
ated. financed and managed from proving .rrounds of Mitch Wer-
\\'erBell's headquarters in Powder Bell's artru1 company. Proving
Springs, a suburb of Atlanta. To .rrounds! Well, WerBell makes
coordinate their activities-prop&· plenty of gadget.a that bear testing.
a-anda, recruitment, proeelytization. His companies produce a deadly
the importat.ion of distinguished sniper rifle, "aecurized," automat-
i
•· ainlng special personnel ia a
rigo1·ous . reJrime, and Col.
Bayard keeps himaelf in
ahape; at Zeibert'a he takes
grilled liver and a aingle
beer, and lunches in silence,
aeldom intervening in the diac:us-
sion, occasionally a-lancing at bia
·wrist chronometer-he must be
back at the farm by nightfall, and
a.s a mere colonel, he must ''fly com-
mercial"- no Learjet.a pre-warmed
on the ready strip.
Setting out the final pha.ses of
Abaco take-over campaip, Wer-
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Bell. sounds a.s amoothly ind play-
ftslly MachiaveUian u the aer("'\
accoun't e.xe<:utive of a
!\lzed ad agency plotting a tricky
but not really ttuike-o-r-break media
blitz. The of tht> local!' is
essenflal:'' To get it. we're gonna
change thetr It's easy;
)usf lis ten. We're gonna use only
Abaconians think of
1he_n:se1'9eS .•• well. as people of
modut means. In reality. 'they"Te
"Degg·ars hunkered on a of
_Bolcl:-And thu 1s by no means Mn-
other hollow hype. No psy-
lr;\r concept IS.
Stretching acroas the central and
southern reaches of Abaco there are
800,000-thrte ltundred th01uaM-
acres of undeveloped prime land,
potentially, and by no mun.s unre-
alistically, worth hundreds of mil·
Jion!l of dollars. This is virgin soil
Under British colonial rule lhHe
were crown lands, reserved for the
sovereign, and now, under the new-
ly self-governine- Com-
monwealth, administered by tt-y!
Pindhng government 1n
they're still gl)\'err.ment land, str&ct-
f Ty- ii'0'1respas:ung lor pn\'ate Citi-
zens.
' -:rust suppoae, the scenario &'oe!,
• that on January 1, 1975, old
torpid hung over "sorry-general-
the-switchboard-is-closed" New
Years Day, Great Abaco and Little
Abaco and all the lesser cays, reefs
and coralback adjacent thereto, de-
elare them.selves an independent re-
public. This vast 'firein acreaee
would be-up for grab•. Every na-
tive-born Abaconian could line up
for his divvy.
. "'Will he get it?" ulcs Ted Roua-
aos at the restaurant.
.. Ohoho, you bet your boota," aays
WerBell ... Here, aee If I can ftnd
this stuff .. . . " He flips through his
attache custom-made by Peal's
of London, pulls out aome gold-
rimmed, elaborately printed bonds.
.. Here ... the Abaco National Land
Trust Beneficiary Share Certificate.
And here's the other gi1mo, the
Land Entitlement Certifica\e._'fhi.s_
savs e\·ery native Abaconian adult
l!eh hlsOne-acre homes&te Treeim<f
- clear ·a-ftermciepenuence. An(f"Orl'
llleoen.eficiary ret some
of the major lean revenues. Here's
· the tender, laySrjt all on the line.
You bet they'll a share. Pr<>-
vided, the tend!!r says right here,
i that tht P'•litirol •itua-·
1
titm in Abnco i• j11st ond fair.'"
· t "Just and fair," says Roussos
i softly. "Of cou r!le, j nnd fair. If
· i i the Xatio"nal Land Whlltnot
r nati\'e a one-acre ht' me:-ite, it
man. wo:nan anJ
children all together, one percent of providentially, allhis criticnl. jul)C-
thelr own land. Who will decide oe In mid-1974, C.
what's fair?" _ aMociation with Mit.ehell We.•·-
"Ah .•. probably I will." Bell, otreu the driven rich an allc\--
There he Ia .• • the low voice, the native: not jul'l t some backcounlry
bony figure in the forty-nine-dollar hidey-hole, but cltizenehip and
Roberl Hall drip-dry suit, the jack- c1ence In an entirely new counlry; A
el bulge between chest and arn.pit ncwhorn commonwealth wholly ded- ·
contouring not the familiar ahoul- lcaled t.o the protection of private .
der holster but 'a Hewlett-Packard wealth •nd the survival-indeed,
minicalcul ator: Mike bliver W.·e• the revival--of the classic free-
silting at lhe far end of the table system .
with a notebook beside the butler Long before the Dow hit the five
plate. He has lunched here prullcnt- hunllreds, and coffee went up to
ly and salubriously on nothing but fifty cents a cup, long before old
cold 6,h and iced tea and with a people began eating dog food and
health-conscious frown for the va- farmers dumping their calves into
por of two-dollar cigars, staring in- ditches, Mike Oliver foreuw thal--
t.ently at every speaker in turn, now the economy was
staring at Ted Roussos over there- doomed in America. It sounded
mains of his cold jellied aalmon strange at firal, coming from Mike
with the deep-eyed concf'ntration of Oliver, thia single-minded belief in
a man wboae daimon sense.:s a ch.al- devaluation, declinr. and fall, for in
lenge. ''You have a good point, a the mid-Sixties the dollar was atilt
small point. but a good point. 'Ju11t' the fixed star of the e<:onomic firma-
and 'fair are only worcb until menl, the U.S. economy waa boom-
eomebody what they are ing, and Oliver himself seemed the
aupposed to mean. On Abaco, 1 will very embodiment of the American
That's the big point, isn't dream of sucusa: a European im-
it ?" mifrant tO the U.S. at eighteen, he
Right you are, Mike. Cht:!ty had made hia lint mlllion by thirty
Mitch WerBell and Big Jack Mul- development, cond.ruc-
doon and Smart Walt Miickem and lion) and 1965 saw him on a
Courtly Lord Belhaven in their be- charming wooded estate in Nevada
apoke three-hundred-dollar auits with a pretty wife named Belly and
and club ties and hand-rubbed three lively ehildren. Approaching
Peal's cases, anc:! Bob Bayard in his fifty, Oliver was the president of
craggy s ilence, and all the other several corporations,
N.C.P. staff (New-Country Proje<:t a ftettled, influential comraunily
is what that stand., for) &nd special leader and the employer of a rav-
personnel drawing contract pay on !shingly ae<:retary uame<t
or about Abaco are ultimately only Vicky who waa crowned
meant to enforce what Mike Oliver MiBA Nevaa, in 1970. Yet for al-
consirlna just and fair and desir- most ten ;yean, where other busi-
. able. Ted Roue&oa lmowa it, too; he neaamen and economista aaw only
: resi&'TlB from the projet"t the day .progrcu and prosperity, Oliver di-
1 after the luncheon meeting. But no 'fined a long-range trend toward de-
one else does. Why ahould theyT pression and disaster.
Mike Oliver is here, after all, not Worldwide travel and an inte.nso
just as the founder and constitu- readin,r of helped con-
tiona! creator of a perfectly aeri- vince him by 1965 that, u he told
ous AmP.rican new-country move- a visitor ;yeara later, "The)"re g<>-
ment, but in representation of a ing to screw up the money." He
powerful ayndicate of fma.ncial felt certain th"t debauchery of the
backers. It ia, above all, Oliver who dollar would leAd to political cril:i1>,
is making independence an immi- inflation, and ultimately to aome
nent reality for the citizens of SCirt of dictatonhip.
Abaco, most of whom have never .. Once l aaw that the dollar W R!l
heard his name. kaput, that whAtever the go,·ern-
But among the driven, troubled, ment did would only make matters -
questing financiers of America, worse, l dumped my atoclca and
Oliver is more th:m a ·name. To bonds and awitched to a alrong
many business leaders he's a mira- position in coins. Everyone
cle worker, a minor prophet on the laughed. u.ccpt my friends; my
crumbling walls of the city, a !tlr- !rientll' said J 'cl r.one crazy. Well,
sighted aentry registering the ap- you know, it turned oul that J'u
proach of the forces of made some pretty sharp beta in the
For a is h11untin!:" America/ moucy market, and nf C.lll·
--a new apparition of four apace-t:? in)( to where I coultl n·el
hnr.sf'mcn: lnttntion, Unemploy- aon1c piychothcrupy, my frientl :t
.. •ntl And __ callecl lo o" JXflle l..; f)
Y' •
,I • f'"D·HO (nev. 7-16· 6 3)
, '
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• c. .. 0.4)" as){ where
, I inves(menl tip!<. Anc.l,
" """l-.11<' I b<-s;ran 50011! rt•nl money
· F, ;,y • it wu:sn't bt:<"ause I had good
·1 :: r.11ncinl advicr. Juftl the opposite WfUI
! . ..__. __
0 0
, {nJc: all inv<-stmcnt advisers and (Mount Clipping In Spoce Below)
ollicers and analysts and fore- _ __: __
· and market. consultants were
: !:>.!t:ing tht othlr way, they couldn't
1 rtaJ the hnndwriting even when their
• were the wall, and so--
. f. 1 beat the market. Let. me tell you, not
'j; :::any ptOple do. And the way it. hnp-
it wasn't any tips or chnrts pr
.; folio manngrrs; whnt reall y hap-
i
,. p< nrd wns that by 196:i I'd become :a
s-:-udcnt-a di11ciplr, really--of Profe*-
. . :<or Ludwig von Mises." ;
.. J Profc!!sor von Mises, the l:>ngcst-lived
-i· , ninety-two), most prolific (nineteen
·f books) and least self-effacing economiat
vf the .Austrian School founded by
BShm-Bawerk, died in 197:i in New
S. "rorJ. City (wht:re he'd been teaching
. 1 since just. as, after a half cen·
) tary of obscurit)' and neglect, his teach-
: .,_ !::1!'5 began to enjoy a renaissance here,
• :::uch the way Karl Marx came into
·:t Togue in Eastern Europe at about. the
;, tlme the aiegl! guna of the Red Army
. { No<-ame audible in the distance.
:. t Had more people listened to Von
• in time, there would be more gold
millionaires like Oliver today, anJ ai-
r though not many did, the professor'•
I tiny coterie of admirers often compared
biru in epochnl atature to Karl Marx-
' a )[an: or ultraconservative capitAtliaue
f of course. t
\·on llises was a polymath and
-· J are complex, but aome of tlie
·. i doctrines are not difficult
.. J! Yon lliaes believed that human
fre-edom and laiase%-faire capitaliam
.-ne one and the ume thinp:. He had
":J pusionate, sacramental faith in the
market. not as a mere institution-the
sort of Yulgar "computer" seen by Key-
nettianJ which the government can tink-
er 'tl"ith whenever it. to--but u a
n1etnphyaical process which J"eJ11latea
t.!l human affairs. 'Much u one cannot
to ftx a fine watch with a bung
starter, Von 'Mises waa convinced that
could not intervene in eeo-
.t
, .. 1
.· i
. . .
t
:"oComi<" affairs, in the providential work-
ms:-s of the market, without. causing
.!amn(Z'e. "Jntervent.ioniam" wu a self-
defeat inJZ, Yic-ious circle : the 6rat gov-
t>rnnwntal intrusion into business necu-
f!tated a to the or
first, then a thirrl one to undo the
WC\rr:t ('()nM"quencea of the then
a f<>Urth intervention to alleviate the
:rauma of the third ... Von Misea de-
fjlli'N .. intervcntioniata," the whole
t•:ninlt-ss, sniveling lefty Jot of econo-
bankers, polic)' planners, IO<"iolo-
"ho advocated go•ernmentnl par-
:idpat!on in Gll/lthi* 'With an economic
n•r>e<"t ; he evl'n opposed free public
'dut'ation above the leVt•l.
A nJ \"on M i"t,'g ,_;as evuns;relicnl in hift
l,.·hcf that munkind Jcarnro to
\'alu,·. adort and defend
<Ullllulism 1111 its parnmount I'Ot'illl ays-
u ·m. It hentlr.l for and
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(lndlcole poqe, no111e of
newepoper, clly a ad a tote.)
DaY:
Edition:
A•U.or:
£dJtor:
Tille:
ClioGTGcter:
...
Cl•••lflcallon:
s .. boDttllnq Office:

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., ., · nnJ tYTanny-thut. Ia nt )like Oliver's A ahort wh provrment over t'he flrat British lobby-

Ol iver earl}' . ns Hl?5, ago, are aupporti!lg hu with 1st Ol iver attempted to ret..! in. to rtprc-
' of ''tn- money anti anythmg else that mtght be aent the of the Abaco cam- "
· .f t..r\'f':ttionrst" a nd .. Whatever _you neeu, Mike; J( '\n in London-n Scolsmnn nam«X!
·' t ct-baucher,t. That he made 1n11lions o\_ _ IJust aay the word, And the moat ..)\Mitchell with a reputation f or be-
. ' <! oliaM in gold profits along the '!'fay did • Important acquisition or Oliver's well- lng mean-t empered and overhcarinK; a
'} ,....not really Oliver, itf' merely endowed_ New-Country .Project. has late lirutena nt colonel of the
. j connrmed his premonitions. or eou.ne, ...1hCLtneeli!!K_nJl.c!.1!!e alhnnce With Mitch and Sutherland H' hlanden who was
• 1 t he vrofits helped: to people who tend :w .. _rBell nnd aervi ns: a urm in P a ment a5 a Con-
·! ; to in t erms or money-that is, mi)itary Now aE':s the aervative. -........ -
! 1 mo.it of to pro.e that lJITVer- WerBell so ·" Colin ".Mncl Mitch ' tClHill was a
J f had something. Ta r as Alii\fOisconceriicu.-sptCiaf a oc ·. roug over · o er'Bell'a At.- ·4
! j· · To tt!l the \\ orld he had, Oliver personnel arelil1miewc·d, lanl.4 estate on the usual q,-
( , a boo:O. 1n 190ti: A SntJ Gon.!t1- br :eted: Wol ler ltfUclfem"';""lhe scholarl y paid trip to aome of Abaco'a spon-
. •· • iu tloit :.;;; a .\no Cc.unCi'y. Prointeci'- ")-Oiing ex-C. I. it:""" officer Jmei'"'lortl\e sora, }t itchell turned out to be abrasin
l ; :lo:>tr nobc:_ed tn a book re- IJiif\'Il'rihrlrn til5 llrsCiss1gnmenf,IJlg and relentlessly acqui si tive. To help
1
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•. -;1e.n 'Jfonn ren
1
t.s a.dstouale '",u'heh?· Abaco a
1
1ong, hfe

!targ-e fee .t ••
$ly e, tn_e _m: · u1r ;; ,• vv ayette 1 1ng n ma wn ·• as tn&'· a very ee. 18 YJSI was DO a
copits tr.rocih the Ralp fcMullen is dispatched to aucceu.
1ami, alo g ith a pale, quiet former Lord Belbnen l.a dift'ertnt. Keeping
. thin&', a genuine underground ritiab intelligence officer known only an eye on Olinr, calmly but as care-
·
.'1_· •• seller. as Grant who u a communications spe- fully as the American is watching Ai"',
f. The aubtitle on the cover reads : "Baa cialiat hired to run wirele3s traffic with he decides not to e.xplain the eomple.xi-
. · the Time Come To Abandon the United the WerBeii-Oliver organuation's agent ties of lnlhencing Her Majesty's Gov-
• .._j Oliver'a aMwer ia a firm network on Abaco •. • codtd wireless ernmenl .. Oh, absolutely," be uJls Oli-
. ·' .. Yes." The book tells why, and bow. traffic, flve-dieit groups and all that er with an encou.raging smile. .. Not to
-
·f ·.· .. The t: nited States ean no longer be jan, the way a proper inullii"ence ata- t ·orry. I don't think London rtally cares
[ saved !rom severe crlsia . ••• Though tion does it. The skeptical Ted Rousaos ·" hat happena in tlle Bahamas, J'OQ
not yet ll!lder complete tYTanny, preva- i.a aoon replaced with another U.S. ex- \') ow-too many bloody miseries at
i lence o! totalitarian ideas and increased Intell igence officer who l.a not ome. I've already tabled a question on
use of atlppre:saive meuura enthusiastic, thi3 lean unr baeo for next week in the ud
the end of freedom is ln Sl&'ht [sn I char&'er named Cha , , t e11 up the pressure, I'll promise
.c · America). • • • [Only) those who ar- : best of all bltJCk; off he s to rou that. By the time U.D.I. i.a doe •• •
... • range for a timely departurt will es- among the ailent, sun-wrinkled Asher· no, I don't think we ahould WOrTJ' too
upe the coming horror." men and lobster trappers of Abaco. much about ' serious trouble from Lon-
·:
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action. If Ludwig von is indeed iine<fto en It, 0 encompass it, .. Well, U.D.I. l• all set : New Tur'a
the Karl lbr:r. of monetary libertarian- to direct 1£ all! lV no but Ol1ver under- Day," saya Oliver. His fa.ce is aoddeniJ'
ism, and Eury Browne, the best-sellinr atand:s that the clmpaagn for Abaco 11 ditrerent; the intense atare tunu into a
l
author invented Peter Panrc, per- not another lianana-re ubhc land ab, warm, almost affectionate e-rin. "'Until
cap:s its Bakunin, its prolific pan-de- t at t is is an 1 eo ugical, yes, a moral then, rood luck, everybody, and badt to
.
_:-. atructioniat, then Mike Oliver is it.s h ho l!tahs !ID n that the wo!'X. There'• lots to be done. ..
F idel Castro--the ultimate militant 1deas of free"iiiterpr1u and unfettered
.. , who t'he doctrine in terms of market cap1tiliS'iiirind • exprAS1on The men riae In aUent agreemut. The
. , total action. Browne'a book, advocating Tnevery lliinet, pamphl et or newsletter TucllgupriUII ia over : within twen-
.. retre3t homes" for safety, has anow- 'j)rOdii'Ces for diSt rtbullot)- on Abaco! niz.ation i.a bac:k in hi&h ce.ar. The path
that ael!-sutficient people withdraw to -that the Ohver-Wer Bell organuallon ty-four boun the Olive.r-WerBell org-a-r.(l.
balled inoo an all-aeuon best aeller; bat AIM DEMANDS CO!'ISTITUTtotrc eBJ("ft'cr;s to U.DJ. is lined with a thousand tub;
it'a ltl:.ke Oliver who ia about to show w.RiCs WlLL ELIMINATE THE POwtR OP eonnectioru to be coupled, mingled pa- •
them bow ;o do it. TO rameters separated, eontingenciee re-
.,The with Hlf-respect hu a ... !UCBTS! AIM DEM.Am:l3 XS iailt:= planned. .. i ies., to lie
right t.o hia life and freedom," .RJAtLEl'ID TO GOVERNMENT OWNfR!HtP .,actuated." - ')1 )L 1•1,
Oiiver'J rtasaures the rtader. "But or aUsiNr.Sift:NT£RP1USES. Robert Anthony Camncha amn-
G.e bas :0 duty to atay in a country AIW TBE £BTAJU..JSH)t£NT OP A
policin will destroy 'I.ANDDtUST!' Wnton, jets ba n on overnt
him." Do the ;nent, bare-legged men and )fttBifEI} sipping Isle of lalay Scotch iD
11:e eoontry Oliveria describing isn't women of Abaco rtally demand all thia! a front-cabin V.I.P. aeat. A fortnight or
G-.-nnany; history is a cruel joker Why aak'! Mike Oliver has it all thought ao i.a spent planning and tabling mo-
-:.!lis time around, it's the United out for them. Auteur of a remote-con- tions, and on June 10, at half past two
St.a:.es. .. )leans for effective action to trolled independence scenario, he means of tbe clock, with the House of Lords
freedom in the United States in to be a bon patron-not just the remote reassembled alter the Whitson recess,
forneeable future no longer eJCiat. manipulator, but in time the el'ficimt the Lord Chanc:eJlor on the Woolaaclr,
T':uu, the freedom-loving person bas and productive manager of the atrain tbe Biahop of Portsmouth having read
no choice: leave, or be destroyed." of Abaco. One question rtmains to be the proper prayen, Lord Belhaven risea
Fortunately, .. a number settled here at lunch. to address the peen of the realm in a __
o( near))· uninhabited, )'et quite aui:- "\Ve are aure that our special penon- voice or singular cravity:
able places for establishing a new nel will seize and hold control on Abaco "'ty Lords, J ki: kave to aak . the
try atilt exist . • • • The e:xact loc&::on • ·."!en U.D.I. comes," Oliver says, turf\- Question which alanda in my nante on
the new country cannot be re\' eLtd ir.z directly to Lord Belhaven. "What the Orc.ler Parer. The Question was as
&t 0\is time. Yet, one has but to at I 'm s:i' l worried about ia the attitude or follows : To ask Hu Majesty's Goftrn· ,
t ::e • hemiapa..t to find -;.hat ' the British government. ...l'_ht! Pil),illinc...... ment what reprnentations they intend
r :ac:H !or establishins: :a • • i!! ..... to make to the Government of the Ba-
cru· c· u still exist." • ternnt1on by the British when they re- hamu them to cease their hat· ·
.. now, that "ta:r-sizt\1 CO'!l:ltry" rassment o( of Abaco.',.' ---
t h:u found. Ita ('Onqut-St "';:hin "'\vew:lntTo"' besuretliit Lord Goronwy-Koberts, parliamenta-
··-t )like -:.::-:e:-'s reach. Ho"" tt: in1'S have dcitii\Of'iO'(epl:ice. Do underaffrt-bry of at.au, atands tort-
t :_:: :=:e yt"an smce lS?Il! .-'. _tt:1r.k - apond for tht! .. )ly Lords,
.-.. of fri.:h: entoc.l new- Lord llelh3ven is an urbane, unnap- tlte AhAco ltlanc.l$_ar:e_,n
"""'altil>' i n!luen- a.:. ule \'t' ter:an or over ten year.'! in the -_of th•· Conunonwe:Uth oL t.he.Jloili&ma.-s.,
i · · .ol wh<' v-ould have laughed at I f,,.,se of Lord!'. Hr i:s an enormous im- whit<h bc-rnme an .. nt
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on July 10, 1!173 .. lt wo'!l.<! for a shortwave set on. the blink; books Is ' ••• hirrd bv i>art icipatt f• ,. protect
1\ !,_. ':!;e_[.Qre, be Her M'a)- (Ayn Rand : For tlul\ their J"r•onal rigltu ogai?tll ' ntn7tal ,
King- pllckll ges of bumper stlchrs and Wind- aintffrlrat / f>'TCtJ and /rated.'.. .
1 tnt rryene in the int ernQ shield sticken !or panel trucks apoatro- Vhat you mean t.o uy .• . " anys U\e
I p ( the BahoOUU.:: . , phizing the Fi ndling government's In- er. •
- - LOrd Belhaven and Stenton: .. My competence and corruption, written by "Well, for Instance, you see what "e
Lords, t thank the noble Lord !or that Oliver's executive aa3ist:mt Dave Scholl; mean ll you go t.o page
n ;>l>· and what he U)"! .• •• " and bunehts or other eoo<Jin but Ol iver overrides him. "Here Article
allhougb the people o( Abaco have shipped and informally aince Twenty-seven anys-this Is Fi1cal Mat-
not. on the record, demonstrably they would only annoy the Bahamas t•,.,-that 'No. g 011n-7tl'ltnt e •ITntCJ!,
s'l:!ere-d hanssment, and Lord Belha- i!'Overnment if spotted passi ng through brarrch or lw tl •hall pan GIIJI law, reg-
:O:nows it, o &ubliminal sense t he regular customs channels. " 14tion or otl1tr rutricti<m wit• tAt tf-·
b .,..!:. :c!l it's all qaite true. To Jure the Two weeks have pRssed sinee that ta- f•et of ntabli11hin!1 a ltgcd r-ein or
into proclaiming and reit- ble d'h6le at Duke and Mike othenciu rtquimg CAt tsectpl4'1ttl •I
!!le principle of Oliver, having fl own more than twenty a1111 form of mO?Itlf, CUM"f11CJf, eoin or
in newly independent Bahan\a.s Is thousand milts, is b .. ck in Washington othtr mtdium of t%clcang•; .-xupt a•
or.e c.! the subtler ,oala ol Lord Belba· at the Gramercy I nn (single room, provided bu 11olu"ta'll c01ttracta or bJI
5trate-n. , $28.50) talki ng on the phone to Mitch mut•wl c011.1nt t wolu'lllGrilJI arri•td at
Lord Goronwy-Roberts ls densely, WerBell, who ls alao back in Washing- bet""'"' ptriO'III or I'Rtitiu.' And here, -
,-rati!yingly energetic about it all : ")ly ton but at the grand luxe Madison Ho- down at paragraph f our : 'Titt llla'lte-
Lords, this ls the ea.se of an indepen- tel (Monroe Suite, $95 daily). Ol iver is i11g of CJctivitill dell b• tse-
dtot country . ••. lly Lords, indepen- expecting an important Tisitor-impor- C(} mplillhtd bu 11olu" tarv pav-,.,.t •I
ia independence." If that dictum tant however well devised and pr.-mi""u 611 ptraonl wirhi1tg ,_ portiei-
bardens into dogma, il only by sheer executed the Abaco plan may be, it can- JXIU i11 tht •lrnlicu of gOVI'T7111flftiC.. •• .'
of repetition, the OJinr-WerBell not succeed without investors and colo- Do you foll ow what this means! Fint
orza:Uut ion will have a free hand on nists-new cifueru for an all-new eoun- off : the ,overnment of the independent
Abaco: Washington, lor ita part, il not try. This afternoo here la to be a lkpublie of Abac:o ,gu have DO powu
even to consider Intervention. In "participant briefinir" just such issue money. This is wnv important..
the Lord Belhaven hu once prospect. He is Fra o of Bnlti- ore important than ..• Frank know.
apin. u on a number of previous .l!IOre, owner of oli y pa.s, a ar- how important this i.a. Pri•ate financial
cnsiona, imprused upon the Houae of ftung physic&l-<ulture c:huln. Bond, a houaa will ia.sue all our mooey aDd
Lorch that the plucky, oppressed little' apedaeularly aucctssful young tycoon guarantee iL Then! will be no
.Abaco tuf!trl. 1 known to hold strong views, Deposit Insurance on Abaco, DO
In Powder Springs, Georgia, where has expreaud his interest in buying: a government.. loan guarantees or banking
Coi. Ba:;ard is sweating ft ve apecial per- ahare of the Abaco project, and I am regulations. Nothing like the Federal
sonr.el from Abaco down at the able to ait in on the briefing while Oli- Reserve. No central bank, u JOU
machine-gun rangl! behind the fishpond Yer explains hia dream• for the future ean aee--no central bank, no inYOlYe-
o{ )Etcll WerBell's farm, it i.a nine of Abaeo. ntent with the lnl.ernational Monetary
o·docit in the morning. Dusty, 4trained, Fran.k Bond arrivts late, after elenn Fund."
popeyed from the jabbing of rapid-fire at night, accompanied by a ahort, "The money will be badced in ..
recoils, the colonel and his boys, whOM ing lawyer and an air of coiled imps- aaya the lawyer quest.ioningly.
diurnal "duty tour' ' begins at aix a.m., tienee. Bond is young, unexpectedly .. The money will be ill cold, at leut
W:e a break. In boxy little electric carts 7oung for a self-made millionaire, alim, aome of It," aays Oliver . .. Some of ua
of the aort uaed by goiters, they roll ai- dark, dressed in a black auit which who were the Ant particip-ta ha•e
lently ael"'S3 the close-cropped lawn of Joolta rich but somehow too 7lOt£1/la". He drawn up the chart.et' for a bank, and
the WerBell estate, up to the manor has already had at least one long talk we will iuue the 'rand,' the basic unit
)loa.se where they draw "midmorning with Olinr, but the attorney, aa be containing .23 troy ounces of
bam aandwiehes, pe- puta it, .. knows from nothing" about handy medium-sized coin worth about
cold milk in fourteen-ounce Abaco. It's just as well, for assembled ftfty dollars at pruent rates. Named
Then it'a down to the rifle to g-reet the two potential participants after Ayn Rand, 700 ander-Uand, DOt
ra,:r- for three hours of marbman.abip then are Col. Bayard, lditch WerBell after the South African rand. There'll
b=-..don with a rr.markable tnining and of eoune Oliver- aynergized trio be quarters and perhapa qoint.ala, the
devised by WerBell himaell : a wound up to deliver a aocko briefing. quintal worth just about teo clollara.
aa..::.C.a..--d 7.62 N.A.T. O. military rifte The lawyer begina with the uaual Then ol courae we'll have t.o han paper
to fire .22 long-rifle question about Abaco as a potential tax money, backed eftber in cold or other
I ::-'5 a low-co•t, low-noise. practically re- ahelter, and Oti'fer ftelds it with prac- atable aasets. All fully cold-eoever\ible
e::l:i-!CH way to teach a man how to hit ticed eaae. -you want your wages in cold, 70u
a Dr Pepper can at aeventy-fivo yarda .. Keep in mind what we are building Just pay tht issuer a TisiL"
a military ftreann, and it works : on Abaco ls not a tax-shelter nation," "And if an issuer defaults • •• • aay.
-:!le men who make it through this drill he aays . .. lt' a a tax-frH oation. Han the lawyer softly.
an then!alter known, in · the apecial ,-oo read any of our planning papers! "They won't default.." Oliver.
l\" er Belli an oomenclature compounded Have you aeen my book! The conatitu- "The assets will hoYe t.o be there., CO'fer-
.from the Jingo of World War II, Korea, tion! No! Well, Frank told you" ing U\e VAlue of the iuue, and if there'•
\"ietnam, and the -the lowyer aha.kes hia bead dubious· any funny businesa, it'a long jail terma
n1ent's lnviaible war, aa .. ,niper quali- ly. "Anyhow, b.-cally what we are for everybody and his aeeount.aat--tbat
... They are, too. atrueturing on Abaco is this .•. mAybe would be flnt-degTee fraud. But of -
SU: hundred miles or so southws:'d as I better rearl it to you from the consti- eoune aelf-regulation will probably
tl:e courier plane fties, tbe tution .. • 'P"amble : .lYe, Cltt JHople .o/ . __ aug'Rftl that issuers baakruptcy
.Eell organization'• )liami he:u!cuar.e:-s 1 Abac;o' ... , an9 .. •C? on ... here' .. . tlrat J insuranee for triple
is humming with Vicky Jo I tltr __ f!!!{ll ..• fuiicliint -of' .- written Insurance, mind you."
Todd, the lonc-lene<i , • • protect tueitl:'ii'l'il"' "And public aervices-l'm of
)I iss Nevada o: 1970--.,.ho, h:sv- force eNd _ J?oliil, - a11lrlTiut - tlriirJ._ the police, the judcea, prbage
:.:.1 one of )li.:.;e Oliver's :rounv. govn-ttmntt .,-,,mct«lwllia'1fcllt'til111 tion, you Ienon• what I mean-thou w11l
u novr."l nonpro· o"n?u:· Jl.nd. =heu..P.r( "the riext - p'nge =- be financed by whom!" asks the II'W)'1!r.
as )lc)(ullen-i:S -;-Govi'T71mntt a. li111iterl · Ul- proltcliO'fc "They'll be financed by woluntary
a "packet picltup" lor · egairut force a11tf fraud, ewd wwv 'ltOt1 pn-mium,;," U)"S Oliver . .. Voluntary in
;;::-.. makts the bi"·H>kly liui- imp"" arcrt cocinl or rc-omic atn&ctur,. the aenSf' that ) ' OU .co ahoppinv. \"olun-
MD to Into the care- kpmo a"!J pn-•cncll rw • v;ithirt its tarily-aor.o.J)· r!\ttl" handcuffs at you
:--r cargo cnrtons j"ri"d,etiorc . • .' becuul4!, )'OU lift, we to oua'kr )'ou bur 1·roctriea, but huy
· .. - .. ..,. to on AhiiC'O; sp!\re pllrh !':ty hl'rt' rurth .. r dtnYn t'l :tt J.."'"'V .. rnment IIOill l." ju!lt the s:o m .. , W'Pek arur WM"k.
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who pa.r ttie 'yrnrly premiums pcncc·-keeping forces, lx-cauae thAt Ia
'1\' ill 85 'porlici r)s' and I Whllt they will tw. Abnco will ("'Vr
rhey'IJ be entitled to the 11 ' Cl\ the mnh wnr on 11notht>r land. All ..In-
government providl'll; tho..o;e " •ho don't, tnry, of JJere aolcl iera aturt out
won't b.:. Whatever service-s privntc all wrong. They arc made to swear a
- b usineu cnn provide- competitively will mortAl o11 th and 11tnnd t..n attention for
be left to private enterprise." the- nAtional Anthem. Ahnco won't hAve --------1
''Like the police!" the lawyer smi les. a notional anthem, because the StOVern-
.. ThFre'a a cute deal- if you don' t pay ment or Abaco will have no auprapcr-
)'ou r premium$, they can't nrrelll you aonal, para-legal , special powers, it will
for overtime parkin,::.'' funct ion only as the hirec.l of
.. Well, no. Not says Oliver. the pa rticipants who pay fur it. The
.. They can't arrest you. for ovcrtimll Abncu peace-kcepine volunt.Hrs won' t
parking OII JihOIIJ, bccoust thi:s govern- be made to aalute any metaphysical
ment " ·on't hnvc the right t o tell )'OU emblems, or tnl..e theist ic tbe
how long you should alof? your car at 1f0Verument has no ri,::ht to invoke;
the curb-why ahould it! But if you're they will sign a two-year or 1\ve-yrar or
rruilty of force or fraud, you'll be ar- any-year contract, aa the condit iona
rested whether you arc a pnid-up par- mAy demand, just l ike any hired craft.a-
ticipant or not. What a nonparticipnnt men. J suspect It will be a damn
won't have -.·ill be the right to conduct little foree.."
civil litigation, to aet up a aurrogate . ..Well,'' aaya the lawyer, who haa
trust, to collect damages on a tort, and , been gloncinJZ at his watch wi t h rude
eo forth." frequency. "Well, Frank, if you
"What aort of a government will it think ... .''
be, anyhow!" aaks Dond. "J mean as an "Yea," aaya Bond, too, "we
oraAnitation. How will it be run?" euttn Call you in the morning, Mike,
"Well, in some ways it' ll run just like and we'll talk."
the government here,'' aaya' Oliver. "One more que.stion," aaya the law-
.. Just like the U.S. G<lvernmttnt. The yer. "You got the nat ives, five, ten thou-
rons t itution calls for a bicamerfll aand natives .... "
lature. An assembly elected on a pro- "Seven thousand," aa)'l Mitch V.' er-
portionRI and a aennt.c. Anc1 th1•rt' , Bell, "maybe eiKht or nine At the m011t,
you !lee, the similarity stops. Abaco will if aome who are working in lhe hotels
have no foreign aervice like the State in Nassau return after independence."
Department, onl}' trade representatives "Right, aay eight thousand nat ives,"
in countries where busi ness demands it. u ya the Ja..,..·yer. "How can you be aure
It will have no publie" school system. they11 buy all this-vote for your con-
Beyond the fourth vade, there'll be atitution and all that! After all, the
only private achools, privately main- place to the natives."
t11ined.'' . "\\'ell , we' rt' training quite a few
.. No achool aystem," uys the lawyer. native:s with leadership potential ," aaya
.. Why not!" WerBell. "Pol it ical indoctrination, and
"Because what ia called the achool eo on. They'll organize a followinr,
ayalt'm in the United States is really an ma.vbe hal! the population, that' ll co
indoctrination aystem," aays Oliver. along with us, vote the way they're aup-
"lt's a system for bureaucrats to brain- post'd to. And Bob here, Colonel Bay-
wash J)t'Ople in favor of collec- ard, he'a alao trllininJt eome natives
tiviam and atAtism.'' with good potential, except he'a train-
.. And aocialiam," aaya Bond approv- ing lr i• boys how to shoot at a moving
ingly. target without ruil'sing. And Yo' e fiJrUre
.. Yes. In the high achools and col- the natives who won't buy what we tell
leJ[t's, in favor of outright aocialiam," 'em-they11 li:\t.en to Bob Bayard'a
aays Oliver. " This ia not to aay Abaro boys.''
won't have an educ11tional sysU>m of its "Fine, call you tomorrow, nice to've
O'l\' n kind, but every achool will to mc-tcha, bye ... .'' And Frank Bond and
be financed privately, by the families of hia counsel are gone. Mike Oliver ia ,
the aludenta or priv11t.c bent'facton. It depre8Jicd. "God almighty, I talk too
will mean, here and there, aome hArd- much . ... What do you think, M it.ch ! "
ahip, aonw long-term borrowing, maybe For an inl'lant, he is as drained L, an
-and that " •ill be made fl'llsibl t' at very artor after the puformanct'. ..Shoot,
low intereal, I expect- but collectively Mike, you Wt're prrat . • .. " WerBell ia
it wiU mean the aurvivnl of freedom in as ever, but Oliver ia alrt'ady
ita one essential provPnance--in the peeling otr"i• ahirt. "I' m cuing to bed.
minds of the next Becnuse, cvcryborly.''
you Oliver holtls his bun)· fiUJt'l' r Rut ut brcakfa,;t it's a different atory.
before his face to silt>nce nil interrur>- .. Fronk called h<-fore t.his morn-
.. Abaco is nul to be a nut her really turned on," &a)'s Oliver.
bannna repuWic. That'a nut the point : I "Jie'" puttin.: up ten ·thou11and eash aa
wouldn't sJwnd Hn hour'" ju!lt to a IM>rt of foothold on Abuco, he suid,
make aome mont'y that WM)'. The puint and nl'Xl WN•k we' ll talk acrioua money.
ia thut the H<'public of Abuco will be, Ht• loll"" the J)n>jl't'L"
firat of all, a ntoro.l expcrimt'nt, a plnce · "All long '"' it look a like a JrUOc.l cl <':t. l,''
• •here we'll try to kl't'Jl lnUiviuunJ fre-..•- '\\',•rR4-JI J!TOWJI inn OVI'r voiC<'.
tlom •live e-ven IC it •urvive in "That 'a what hi!' lawve-r aaicl.'' M ikl'
America.'' hnppily. "Anti I u;lcl thl' m, no, ns
" But \\·on'l you nl't'<J nn Army!" l<liYII Jon.: a:s you core- for fn'f'tlnm. lx'CDU!\t'
.l.:unu doubt.ul1,1. ' tlutf ' • the· bi.: point. A ncl you knuw
\
(Indicate paqe, Dame of
newapoper, clty and alate.)
Date:
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FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION
FOIPA DELETED PAGE INFORMATION SHEET
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Page(s) withhl'irl cntirPly at this location in till' fj](', 8110 or morP of tlw following st1WmPnt.s, whf'rc
indieat.ed, explain this dt·ll'tion.
• undl'r cxemption(s) ·------
material available for release to you.
____ with no segwgahlc
0 lnfonnation pPrtaincd only to a third part.y with no to you or the subject of your request.
0 lnfom1ation pertained only to a third party. Your name is list<cd in the title only.
0 OocumcnHs) originating with the following govf•rnment agenCj'(ies) ____ ___ ____ _ _____ _
________ _ ____ , was/wefl• forwardL•d to them for direct rcsponsc to you.
Page(s) referred for consultation to the following government agency(ies); ___ ..
_______________ as the infonnation originaU·d with them. You will
be advised of availability upon return of the material to the FBI.
Page(s) withheld for the following rcason(s):
0 For your infonnation:
CB""Thc following number is to be used for reference regarding these pages:
XXX XXX
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DELETED PAGE(S) X
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FBI/DOJ
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STATE OF FLORIDA )
COUNTY OF DADE )
ss
UNITED STATES DISTRICT COUR'I
SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA
Docket
AFFIDi\ VT'f-l<'OR HARRANT
The undersigned, be in[\ duly S\vorn, depose and say that they
believe the folloHing facts establish probable cause for issuance
of the attached Search Harrant:
,
From l9f,8 tmti 1 August 1968 the undersigned Special Ar;ent:
Zisk \vorked as a police officer ;mel dc•tective with the New York
City Police Department. His duties consisted largely of investiga-
tions of all types of crimes in York City. From August 1968
until April 1970 he worked as a United States Customs Port Investi-
gator in New York City. His duties involved patrol responsibilities
as well as investigation and detection of crime against the United
States \vithin the jurisdiction of the United States Customs Service.
From April 1970 until the present dc:1te he has \VOrked as a Special
Agent of the United States Customs Ser-vice in New York City and
Florida. His duties as a Special Agent consist mainly of investiga-
tion and detection of·crimes against the United States within the
jurisdiction of the United States Customs Service. Included in
the laws over Hhich Special Agent 7.isk has investigative and detection
duties is 22 USC §1934 (Hunitions Control), a part ot the Neutrality
Act.
to the present date the tmdersigned Special
Agent Hopgood has been a Special Agent Hith the Buroau of Alcohol,
Tobacco, and Firearms, United St.:1tes Treasury Department. His duties
include ihvestigatiqn of violati.ons of fireams laws of the United
States.
from four (4) independent, cunfidential sources that the one thousand
(1000) machine r;uns which Cunningham intended to buy from Mitchell
Herbell III Here subsequently going to he illegally exported by
Curmingham from the United States to a country or countries outside
the continental limits of the United States. They (the sources) also
.
independently stat eel ;that Ctmningham ~ v o u l d report a burglary from
D.H.I,E.R., Inc., of the machine r;uns to cover the illegal exportation.
On or about January 7 through January 9, 1976, four hundred
and eighty (480) machine p;tms, four hundred and eighty (!,SO) sup-
pressors f six (6) cases of magazines, and one (1) c:1se of technical
manuals Here shipped by Defense Service Company, t,321 MacLand Dallas
Road, Powder Springs, Georgia to D.W.I.E.R., Inc., 601 N.E. 28th
Street, Pompano Beach, Florida Mitchell Wcrbell III is a partner
in Defense Services Co. Bmvman Tr=s ortation, Inc., Miami, Florida
Has the transporter.
Records of the transfer at Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and
Firearms, vJashington, D.C. were checked and the transfer was confirmed.
In addition I obtained a copy of the bill of lading of Bowman Trans-
portation Inc. indicating the above-described transfer of firearms,
suppressors, magazines and manuals to Defense Heapons International
Engineering and Research, D.H.I.E.R., 601 N.E. 28th Street, Pompano
Beach, Florida 3344l·and signed by E. W. Dameworth.
Earl Warren :D<UI!eworth, ~ v h o on or about Jantury 9, 1976, signed
for the shipment at D.W.I.E.R., Inc., when the weapons and other items
Here delivered, was President of D.H.I.E.R., Inc. He is still the
President. Prior to on err about November 23, 1975, Cunningham \vas
the President; however, he ceased being a corporate officer of D.W.I.E.R
Inc. Hhen D:illleworth became the President of record. This information
is shown in the records of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms,
Atlanta, Georgia. Neither D.W.I.E.R .. Inc. or Cc>rald "CPrrv" U-"vn<>
Cut'l.ningham, or Earl Harren Dame\vorth, or nny other corporate officer
of D.H.I.E.R., Inc. is registered Hith the Secretary of State,
Hunitions Control, as an exporter of arms, ammunitions, or implements
of war. D.W.I.E.R., Inc. is registered as a corporation in the
National Firearms Registration :md Transfer Record, but Gerald "Gerry"
Wayne Cunningham, Earl Warren JD:rmeworth, and the present corporate
-3-
'
officers of D.W.I.E.R., Inc. arc not registered
a
,.
' v individuals, as
dealers, manufacturers, importPrs, or exporters of firearms.
Following receipt of the firearms by D.\J.I.E.R., Inc. at.
601 N.F. 78th Street, Pompano Reach, Florida, Special Agent
\vas again advised by confidential sources that Cunningh:J.m still
'
to a country or cotmtries outside the continental limits of the United
that Cunninr;h= to purch;tse over fLve hundred (500) addi-
tional machine gtms from Her bell's company, De fcnse Service Company,
'
Powder Springs, Georgia, ancl export them illegally.
On January 30, 1976, umlr,ccovcr Datle County Public Safety
Department officers, Mike Martinez and Robert Gonzalez, met Ct.mningham
and 'Dame worth at the Day's Inn Restaurant, Hillsboro Boulevard, Deer-
field Beach, Florida. After some conversation the officers left the
restaurant and Cunningham told the officers to follmv his brown Chevrp-
let El Camino (1976 Florida tag lOW-221565) in their own car.
The two
cars proceeded west on STate Road 810 to about l/2 mile west of
Powerline Road, just \vest of a residence, 'Dmneworth rmlocked a
chain link gate and both cars drove to a location about one hundred
(100) yards north from State Road 810. The vehicles stopped and the
officers and Cunningham discussed the sale to the officers of bet"lveen
fifteen hundred (1500) to seventeen hundred (1700) Ingram machine guns
\vhich "t.;ould be exported outside the continental United States_
Cunningham inquired Hhethcr the machine guns Here going outside
the United States and, after an affirmative reply by officers Martinez
and Gonzalez, Cunningham asked v1here in South America the machine guns
were going and if the
officers replied that
dcstin:1t ion \vas Colombia in particular. The
where exactly the guns Here going \vas not Cunnin
ham's business but it was not Colotnbin. Cunninp,ham stated that was go
because he didn't \.Jant the tn:tchine guns going to Colombia, South Arneri
because things Here hot for him there. Cunningham said he wanted the!.
underc<.· .-<er officers to purchnse the 1000 machine r;uns avnilable to Gun
anc1 not just the 500 machine guns Cunningham already had becau
Cunningham can only report one burglary. The officers said they wante
to keep one of the machine guns in the United States. Cunningham told
them that all the machine gtms had to go out of the cotmtry because Cu
ningham did not want the machine guns traced back to Cunningham. Cunn
ham offered to deliver the machine guns to them by aircraft outside th
United Stntes, shm.;ing the officers his aircraft landing strip behind
house and told the officers Ctmnin!cham had cleJiverecl.guns out of the
Unit.cd States before using the1t aiL·cra[t lcmdLng
-- t, --
.... /'
Cunningham told the officers, among other things,
that since the machine r;uns were being sold illego.lly the
price per machine gun \vould be three ( 3) times the normal
retail cost.
..
''Darneworth took several briefcases out of the
Chevrolet El Camino, and Cunningham offered to demonstrate
the machine guns which Here for sale. He took a (M.A. C.)
M-10 (Ingram) machine gun from one of the briefcases ;md
fired it. He gave it. to both officers to fire it and they
did so. Also, Cunningham penni.tted the officers to fire the
machine gun with a suppressor which he also took out of a
briefcase. The machine. gun ejected cartridge casings.
Cunningham also produced a smaller .9 mm machine gun with no
"
visible serial number, and labeled ""Defense Weapons ?
_ _..:. __ _
and permitted them to fire it also. It too ejected cartridge
casings. He told the officers he had manufactured this
smaller machine gtm and it had not been registered with the
Federal Government. He said he could give a good price on
the model. He then took from inside his :shirt a Browning hi-
pmver . 9 nnn pistol which \vas fully automatic =d which the
officers also test fired. The Browning ejected cartridge
casings. The officers believe the Browning's serial number
was T-171986. All three (3) types of weapons were fired into
a mound of dirt.*
..
o"•A search of the National Firearms Registration and Transfer
Record indicates no registration for a Browning hi-power .9mm
pistol in automatic condition bearing Serial #T-171986 to
D. H. I.E.R., Inc. or any individual.
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machine gun from :1 smnller box Lnr,ide box 61 for inspection.
After the machine :-!t Cunningh:urr' s request,
the officers inspected n suppr0r;;;or from :1 diff0rent box.
From another location CunninghJm and D.:tmeworth gave· the
off·icers a technical mnnual :mel oth0r literature d0scribing
the HC'npons.
Cunningham also shm-I<'cl a black, target-type Ruger
. 22 caliber semi-automatic pistol Hith n silencer to Officers
,
Martinez and Gonzalez and said he had shipped "a lot of
these" out of the United States as a target gun. The Ruger
was in a box on top of a filing cabinet.
After further discussion the officers \vere again
blindfolded towels n.nd taken in the Mercedes hack to their
car at the Days Inn. The towels were left in the Mercedes.
Special Ar;ent Hopr,ood has on Jtme 27, 1975, personally
observed the premises of D.H.I.E.R., Inc., 601 N.E. 28th Street,
Pompano Beach, Florida, and thus knows the room described
above by Officers Martinez and Gonzalez to he identical to
the premises of D.H.I.E.R., Inc., 601 N.E. 28th Street,
Pompano Re:1ch, Florida.
Attached hereto as Attachment II is a photograph
of the outer door of the premises known personally to Special
Agent tiopgood to be the premises of U.\V.l.!LK., lnc. Attach-
ment II, has been idenj::ified by both Officers Martinez and
Gonzalez as identical to the door tbey entered on FPbruary
4, 1976, Hith Cunningham and 'Dc:umnvorth. The door itself
is known to Special Agent Hopgood to have the designation
"601 E". 601 N.E·. 28th Street, Pompano Beach, Florida, is the
sole licensed premises of D.H. I.E .R., Inc., and thus the only
authorized fireanns storar;e location of D.H.I.E.R., Inc.
The undersigned Special Ar;ents know from their
experience Hith their rcspcctivC' that the present,
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----------------·----......... __ ... ____ . __ .. ___ _
. '
,,
After test firinp; the \veapons Cunninp;ham put the
Bro\Vning on his person and th<: m::lchine guns, suppressor,
and briefcases back into the Chevrolet El Camino automobile.
The officers ar;reed to ner;ot:i::lte further with Cunningham
and · Dame\vorth about buying the weapons.
Cunningham mentioned
to the officers that the iller;al sale of the >veapons could be
covered up by a fie titious report of a burr;lary.
Investigation by Special Agent Zisk nnd Special
Agent Hopgood has det:ermined that the area '\vhere the Heapons
,.;rere test fired is the same area tvhich appe:1rs circled in
the photograph, Attachment I. Officers J:!artinez and Gonzalez
have circled the area in Attachment I as the area where the
weapons Here test fired on January 30,1976.
On February 4, 1976, officers Martinez and Gonzalez
met Crnmingham and :.::Oameworth at a Days Inn Restaurant,
Pompano Reach, Florida. The officers had prearranged to meet
Cunningham and ···name1mrth to view and inspect four hnndred and
eighty (480) machine guns and four hnndred and eight (480)
suppressors which Cnnningham said could be bought i=ediately
as four hundred and eighty (lf80) tmits at eight hnndred and
fifty ($850:00) dollars per tmit.
rt1e officers got into Cunningham's Mercedes auto-
..... • 1 -- 1
\...• UlHLLllt;Lidill d.l.LU
D .. ame1vorth blindfolded the officers '\vith tmvels.
The blind-
folds Here not removed until the Hercedcs stopped at e1 building.
The room inside the buildi.ng Has about 12' x 19' in dimension.
It had a long table in the room.
Stuffed heads of animals
were on the Halls: A model of a building on one of the
walls. Around the room Here approximately one hundred (100)
cardboard cases '\·7hich all appeared to be numbered.
At Cunningham's request D::1me1vorth opened a box
marked Number 61 and Cunningham removed a (M.A.C.) H-10 (Ingram)
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l

,
fair market value of a (H.A.C.) H-10 machine gun
'vil:h a suppresE;or is approximatc•ly three hundred ($300.00)
dollars, without tax, ancl not eight hundred and fifty
dollars, the price offered by Cunningham and lDameworth to
Officers Martinez and Gonzalez.
Officers Martinez and Gonzalez state that the
photor,raph on page 6 of D.H. I.E.R., Inc. literature entitled
Operation Turn-Key is identical to the m.:1chine gun test fired
- '
by them on January 30, 19/G, after they had test fired the
(H.A.C.) N-10 (Tngram) machine E;lln on the same date. A copy
of the photograph of page G is attached hereto. It is
Attachment III ..
On February 10, 19/6, Officers Martinez and Gonzalez
met Cunningham to discuss further the planned purchase of the
four hundred and eighty (!,SO) (M.A.C.) M-10 (Ingram) machine
guns. Cunningham stated he could not sell these machine guns
until after the first Honday in March but he would in the
interim sell D:venty (20) Rr01vning fully automatic pistols.
Cunningham said he would have to wait until after a Government
audit of D.W.I.E.R., Inc.'s machine gtms before he could sell
the machine guns; he said if reported a theft of the guns
before the audit the Government <Vould suspect a coverup. After
turther discussion a price for the Browning fully
pistols was agreed UtJ.On. It vas further agreed the sale would
occur in about a wc•ek.
The undersigned affinnts knm-1 of no such planned
"audit" and can only irtfcr as to why Cunningh.:1m appears to
be delnying a sale of the mnchinc guns to the undercover
officers.
On February lJ, 19/6, and agnin on February 16, 1976,
the officers cliscuc;sr>d Hith Cunningh::1m <Vhen th,, of the
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... ··--.. , ...... -... ..
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Browning fully automatic pistols would occur. In the conversation
of February 16, 1976, Cunningham set up the sale for Thursday,
February 19, 1976.
Undercover Dade County Public Safety Department officers
Martinez and Gonzalez told me of the above-stated facts continuously
during consultations in the period January 30, 1976 to the present
date of this affidavit.
,
Neither D.W.I.E.R., Inc., or Gerald "Gerry" Wayne Cunningham,
or Earl Warren Dameworth , or any present officer of D.W.I.E.R., Inc.,
has filed written application as required by 26 United States Code,
Section 5812, for the transfer of any firearm to Officer Mike
Martinez or Officer Robert Gonzalez under their real names or
undercover names which are Mig uel Flores and Roberto Garcia.
Neither D.W.I.E.R., Inc., or Gerald "Gerry" Wayne Cunningham,
...
or Earl Warren Dameworth, or any other corporate officer of D. W.I.E.R.,
Inc . , has ever r equested the Secretary of State, Munitions Control,
to be registered as an exporter of arms, ammunitions, or implements
of war.
On the evening of February 19, 1976 at 2041 N.W. 14lst Street, ·
Miami, Florida. I observed Gerald "Gerry" Wayne Cunningham in
possession of three automatic pistols one of which had its serial
number ground off. I know h im to be presently undeE__a Federal__
felony indictment. approximately the same time and place Earl
Warren Dameworth 18 fully a utomatic 9mm Browning machine
guns to Offi cers Mike Martinez and Robert Gonzalez for s hipment
to South America.
SWORN to before me and
subscribed in my presence
this day of Fe br uary, 1976.
NOTARY PUBLIC
My Commission Expires
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A?P?.QVtD FOa P.flfJ,S£ 1
CtA HISTORICAL REV12!l
FILE NO. 75 149-1820 DATE
1 __ _
SYNOPSIS
At Atlanta, Georgia and vicinity

• • c:3 • r. . f"
. l.ot:u.cs, Ino a, PoP er Spr1 ngs ,eorg•a, a
he claims is making a superior fireorms silencers and
which firm is licensed by the U. S. Government. The
firm is under . contract with the U. s . Air Force, U.s.
Army and he believes with the C. I. A. One o f the too
men at the firm is NITCHELL L. WEREE:L III.
-
_ _ &t the plant in Powder J
Spring s .......... l "t has overheard bits of conversation
seemed to associate WERBEL. and two 6thers, at least,
with prior anti-Castro activities from Hiami, the Carib-
b n-and that to officials of Haiti. The other
two men are EDWARD MERGER and an Army captain, ROBERT
_
MERGER is a former practicing to!'ney of Co lur:l-
bus, Georgia and presently head of a technical school at
Columbus. Captain BROWN was in Columbus from Ft. Dra3g ,
North Carolina, but is presently in or enroute to Viet
Nam. BROWN was the one who seemingly was most currently
knowledgeable about current anti-Castro affairs onj hint-
ed a "hot" ship, the "Venus", now in the Hiami River,
1-Iiami, Florida (exact place once heard, but not
was to leave for Havana, Cuba Wednesday 28 February 1968
on a mission, with equipment and personnel not cle ar to
informant.
telephoned the C. I. A. in Washing ton
1
24 February 1968 about the above persons and information. ·
(continued)
I 125
REPORT NO. __ ---:--_
AlrlACll Pa(YIOUS IDITI OMO OP
roao .. I 125 A•O 1125A WMICM Aal
0880LITI.
tlOI
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.··
..
!U:.PKOVLLI:.V Al !HI:. l
r
,_
FILE NO
DATE
SYNOPSIS
He judged from some conversations that HERBEL '• HERG<::R
and BROWN were possibly connect with the C. I. A. He
claimed that his motivation for furnishing such informa-
tion was that if these people were really engaged in
extra-curricular activities of an anti-Castro nature, he
was in favor of them, but if such' activities were against
the interests of the United States, he believed they
should be reported.
claimed that all information he received
was piecemeal and not fully understood or connected. He
was thanked and assured his information would be taken
in the good faith in which he to express it.
REPORT NO. ___ _
1125
-- -
Al !He
t
s 149-1820
\
; was contacted by telephone on
27 February 1968 _ ·,h. , Powder
Springs, Georgia. He wss told that the call wns in res-
ponse to his telephone call to Washington, D. C. on the
24th. He advised at first · that he could get off an hour
most any time, but on more considerotion said it would be
better to meet at 6 PM at the Beefeaters Restaurant, 3384
Shallowford Road, Chamblee, Georgia.
He was later contacted and agreed to meet during
the lunch hour in front of the hardware store at the .
Westside Shopping Center, Powder Springs Road and Sandtown
Road, South of Marietta, Georgia at 12:30 PM. He at all
times declined to give the exact address of his plant.
was met at 12:30 PM in front of
the hardware store above. A conversation was hod Hith
him on the sidewalk and concluded· briefly in a restaurant
and outside for ·a total of about an hour. He is a man
Be be3nn
by saying that he had some reservations abqut msking the
call to the C. I. A. in Washington on the 24th of February ,
because he was somewhat sensitive securi ty-,..rise about · ·
-4- - /MITfljELL \IERBEI:r , , Hho is a top man \·1i th
SionicJ:-Inc. He said tnat the Sionicn, Inc. is
a firm in informant's opinion, a superior firearms
silencer, constructed on a nel-T and improved method of
cons true tion.
- - - -- The firm is licensed
by the U. s. Government for firearms and manufac-
turing. · It only silencers and has contracts with
-2-
...
SQ 'l, HEPHUULLt.U Al !tit. t\A11UrtAL AKL.111 \' t.';) {;::
, .. :
;.49-1820
;he U. .. ond informnnt bdjeved
.,rith the C. I. A. '. · ·. · ·. ··
• , _::- · · t I f· ·; , ...
·from
from
from
that he had bit1; oJ: informat:ic·n
conversations he has overheard both u t the plant: -
HERBEL: chiefly, but also from a few others and alr.o
two other men·.
MERGER '"as a former
practi · attorney mbn , according to information
. __-informant learned. He had given up the practice and wos
c,r head of a new technical school at Columbus.
. . { Captain BROWN .
A was to return to Ft. llragg; and
would by now be in or enroute to Viet Nam. Captain
; V...· seemed to be the one most knowledgeable about current
,L •
_ cL. anti-Castro affa1.rs.
0'7 ..... _
I '!lr"'*""',... .
"1·-.:·1"\ ..,.;.t"· Captain BROWN hinted that a "hot" ship, "Venus"
.... now in Miami River, Miami, Florida (exact place ''as heard,
but not recalled) was to leave for Havana, Cuba l''ednesd.uy
28 February, mission, equipment and personnel not clear
to informant from the conversations.· •
The conversations also referred at times to an
older woman who operates a rooming and boarding house in
Miami and who is known as ''Mother Hubbard." It seems
that "Hother Hubbard" is a headquarters for Cuban P,efug•"e.s
- and they live there and keep much equipment there. Also
there was talk about another ship, which was converted
into a gun boat and had seen considerable action in the
Caribbean efforts against Castro. The conversations alGo
included the name of several officials of Haiti, includ-
ing DUVALIER.
From some of the plant talk
. . informant gained the
impression that WERBEL, HERGER and BROWN, ot least \Jere
connected in some way with the C. I .A. BRO\·IN hod previous-
ly written a book published by a Denver llou:::c,
which was critical of the C. I. A.'s failure to support
the anti-Cuban effort.
\
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4,.,' ,•
''
_,_...,.l'f.
·". ·.·.;_i r:. 't.
·-
. '.·
said he could not understand or connect
,,
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. i
I



RlPRUULCtU Al ltlt
(
all of the bits of inl:omstion learnccl by the n:Lcce<n 'al
process. He said that his motivation for furnic;hin;;
this inforwation to the C. I. A. wac; pnt:-i.otic. Il<! :e;_t
that if such extra curricular intcrco.t::: <Jild "ctivil:i'"
on the part of WERBEL ., MERGER and Bf,Ol-1)1 ''ere trull' Tnti·-
Castro, he favors such efforts, but if EJUch activiti;!s
are against the interests of the United States, he t":tou:;ht
that they aould be reported.
was assured that his informntion ,.,ould be
taken in the good faith he seemed to CKpress. It WAs
agreed that there ;wuld, at present, be no need for furtner
contact, but he was willing if necessary.
The current Atlanta Metropolitan Telephone Dir-
ectory listed MITCHELL L. WERBEL." III, Hac Lnnd-Dallas
Road, Powder Springs, Georgia, telephone 9435075 •
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RlPRUUUClU Ai !Kt
J.IEMORANDIDf FOR THE RECORD
SUBJECT: Kalter Josef
SFil90 639
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21 1976
.. .

1. Subject is a former Agency employee ,.,as "riffed"
by the DDO in October 1973. During with staff
. .
employee [ Jon 19 Nay 197 6, it Has
reported Subject has been assoc1ated with Mitchell L .
..
, · }\'ERBELL ,!_!_Land Andre\.; ST. GEORGE.
-
2. s security file reveals that this Office '"as
previously e\\are of the fact that 1-lf\.CKEN had been associated
,.,ri th h'ERBELL' s operation kno'm as "The Friends of Abaco" and
that he was working as a private investigator for the Washington
Office of c· RBELL's
1
"Central Investigative Agency." Ho'"ever,
during the intervie,.,, it ,,•as brought out that
had been c sely a5sociated with ST. GEORGE. (ST. GEORGE is a
free-lance journalist r publis4ed sensational and erroneous
stories about the Agency.) )indicated that ST. GEORGE
had indica ted to th he had con ta{s and that he
could find some type of work for him. was aware of
ST. GEORGE's background and had ,.,a rned tACK.t:.N, u t }.JACKEl-! did
not heed these warnings. ST. GEORGE, of course, would not be
a hove using s knO\vledge of the Agency to gather material
for future articles.
3. In regard to it should be noted that he was
"riffed" by the Agency; that he had been found to have approxi-
mately 75 Agency documents in his safe at the Drug Enforcement
Administration, where he was detailed shortly before his
termination; that a Civil Service Commission investigation in
1973 had disclosed that he was sleeping with the wife of a
Post reporter; that he was connected lvi th l'iERBELL' s
"Frien s of Abaca" operation '-.rhich '"as designed to bring about
the independence of that small Carribean Island for use as a
haven for gambling and other nefarious purposes; and finally
that l-fACKEM was a ke)f suspect in a 1975 FBI extortion in\·esti-
gation. (The outcome of this investigation is unknown.)
E2 IHPDET
CL BY 063994

________ ___:_- - -
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4. The purpose of this memorandum is to document the
relationship between MACKHI, WERBELL, and ST. GEORGE. No
additional action is contemplated at this time.
cc: 1\'ERBELL File
ST. GEORGE File

M. Reardon
2

!
------;==:::;;: __ AI lt!l:. NAl AKI..Nl
MEl
SUBJECT
OFFICE ANO
Cleared in
eapons
a

AF
Probe tb;; ..
2-
2Z·X::
-
1
the
guns stayed at the Air
1
Foree base.
Reports of the air
Coree in-
Air Force officials said yes
terda'· that thev have cleared
a at Eglin
Air Force Base in Florida of
··any illegal or unauthorized
actions'' in connection w i t h
shipments to the base of weap
ons captured in Vietnam.
! vestigation surfaced last !\o-·
j vembcr along with charges
/that the ·weapons were intend-
· ed (or distribution to militant
The announcement was made
in a terse statement by Col
Abner B. Martin. commander
of the secret armamenl Jab
! right-wing groups. In his state-
iment yesterday. Col. Martin
. i s.aid that ''no evidence had
rbeen developed at that point
· un November} to substantiate
! the publi.shed allegations" He
-
oratory at Eglin.
He made no mention qC the
reported rote of an Atlanta
firm, Sionics Inc., whoe offi
<.:iats said they arranged the
shipments.
The firm's vice president
Mitchell L. WerBell III. said
in December that he had the
guns "shipped back to this
country· to present to the Air
Force for use in museums as
a presentation from Sionics.'
WerBell said he made the
arrangements while working
with the Air Force in
ing Sionics' new gun-silencing
equipment in South Vietnam
•Air Force spokesmen in Wash
ington, hov.•ever. said the Air
Force bad no interest in si
)encers. and Defense Depart·
rnent orficials said Sionics has
never had any contract with
the Air Force.
ln his announcement. Col.
Martin dwelt only on the in·
volvernent of Lt. Col. Paul A.
Mariott.. the arrri.3:iilerifTabora·
chief assistant for srs·
terns support. and this without
spelling out Mariott's connec-
tion. .
Col. Martin said simply that
he ordered an investigation
last July when the arms. in·
eluding Russian-designed AK·
13 submachine guns, "arrived
at Eglin without apparent evi-
dence that applicable import
rules and regulations had
been complied with."
After a check by the Air
Force Office o! Special loves-
ligations which "'centered" on
lHariott, the lieutenant colo-
nel's "activities ln the incident
were found clear of any illegal
or unauthorized actions on his
part, and no disciplinary. or
administrative actions .have
been or will be taken."
Martin said ''the weapons at
Elgin" -would be used for
"'evaluation, experiment and
display purposes In the anna
did not say what the evidence
developed since then sug-
gested.
SIGNATURE
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19511

ment laboratory ... He made no
mention ·of any that Sionics
L
., ·Jnay have gotten. WerBell has
__ l!la! _!>nlr. some a!
I
l
E.llCLUDED IMIO .. AlTTO:.M•TIC
D0"'""0.ADI,.O ... ,
oi:ClJ.sstnc.oTI<,.,
___ __..-------------

...
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KEPIWULU:.U AI lt!t 1\Al
·•
,
Gu11 Shipment Figures
Played Drantatic Roles
B.v Bruce GaJphin r the attorney general" ffiamsey I an official for an American de-
1\'uhincton Pcost Stdt Writer Clark). The federal attorney, j velopment corpoi-ation.
ATLANTA, Dec. 2--Tbe 1wo I William A. Meadows Jr., said At one point ·during the
"top officials o! an Atlanta firm/ he could not make any further fighting, he said a few days
d .1 ti t. f "I comment on why the charge afterward be and .some 200
un er nves . ga
100
or receJv- was being dropped, other AO:ericans were ::'lined
lng guns shipped from V1et- ·werBeU commented wryly up against a wall" by armed
nam through Eglin Air Force that he was unhappy because revolutionaries at a Santo
Base in Florida are no stran£· I "I've lost my one claim to no- Domingo hotel.
ers to controversy or dramatic:. toriety." . . j He said the rebels were
5
·tuar ns • :A.t the timE" of the indtct- looking for Cuban nationalists
1 10
• ! ment, \\·'erBell was quoted by' th h d " '
One was actively involved in. . . I and at e manage to Sup
• ! the Atlanta Constitution as ad- inside the hotel, where Ameri-
plans to set up an anti-Castro: mittlng an "extremely combat- can embassy officials negoti·
base in Haiti, and both were j ant role" in the anti-Castro a ted safe conduct. He was
in the Dominican Republic, base plans. . . evacuated by helicopter to a
durin the 1965 American b-; The federal In_dJctment U.S. warship.
g ; alleged a consp1racy to sh1p ,, . ·
tervention to pu.t down a rev- d "t· fr At The Commumst movement
1 guns an mum 1ons om ·
1
d
1
d · f"
olution. 1 ta d N y k t M" . has actual y e eate 1tsel !
1\fitchell Livingston WerBell But WerBell told a reporter .. Yt odrCJ t h f' li ..
,'f'S:::;;=""'=:;;,;;.;::r.;,r,o;;;s:2'j . . o a op sue a u-rn po cy,
an an ew or o taml. b f ·ng the United States/
. _-ru. vtce preSJ en of Sionics. at the time of commented at the time.
an Atlanta weapons research that he had hJs Both the Dominican fi htin
- - . . I support from the Hatttan base g
and manufactunng ftrm. was la wh "t ed t b and the Marathon ·-raid oc-
/P n en t appear o el d b f W B 11 d
indicted 2% years ago on j"headed toward direct military curre e ore . e an
charges of violating a federal I action. /Brown founded Stomcs.
law forbidding preparatio. n o(jr "'If I'm called upon again to E A
1
.•
1
Air Fdorceln at
· f' ht c · · h g In s un er ves ga on
a military expedition against a/ tg ommumsts In t e west- h.-- i .. .. th ___ .. h" ts
. . ern hemisphere, I'll do it," he for 1s ro e tn ree s t_pmen
fnendly nation from said. "Anything I've done has of small from Vietnam.
territory. the best interest of the WerBell dented .that
United States." the we_apons_ were rn_tended
Bell and six others was
"I've been involved in arrtJ. for
communist activities a long/ an_d satd he htmself.
time:• he s.aid. "'I've helped wh1le In Vtetna. m. had had the_
the Dominican government capture_d to At-
Fla., where they seized a •.•.••.
1
,,"'" the Communists." __ , lanta v1• E&!lln
:-·- research. . ·. .
Alded Newsman · ··
icans.

Not on Island
WerBeH himself was not
the island at the time of the
four weeks

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time. as
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SUBJECT: Mitchell Livingston WerBell
1. Subject is a 52 -year -old, native -born American who served
on military assignment with the Office of Strategic Services from
approximately July to December of 1945 with primary service:_in the
China-Burma-India theatre. Following his military /OSS service,
Subject entered into a variety of short-term business activities, most
of which were characterized by his unorthodox business practices.
There is no indication that he has ever been employed by the Agency.
2. There is considerable evidence in Subject's file that he was
looked upon with strong suspicion by several Government agencies,
including the Bureau of Customs and the Federal Bureau of Investigation
for alleged arms smuggling in a number of South American countries,
as well as his apparent involvement with several revolutionary groups
and Castro assassination schemes. Office of Security records disclose
that Subject is generally categorized as a con man, unscrupulous, a
wheeler-dealer and a promoter of grandiose schemes. - ---
3. In July 19 59 Subject apparently volunteered his services to
th:restern Hemisphere Division and was seriously considered for
[
us .J During the penod that Subject'{_ J
JNas being processed, he volunteered several pieces of
information, all of which were judged to have little value. In
October 1959, WH Division decided tq drop all operational interest
in the Subject since they became convinced that his real aim in working
for CIA was to use Agency funds to promote his personal interests.
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KEPKUlJUU:.lJ Al !Ht AKl-nl v -
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4. In February 196 7 the Domestic Contact Service advise_d that
Subject frequently volunteered information to their Miami Offic-e and
was going to be asked to respond to certain OSI requirements pertaining
to the Dominican Republic, Haiti, and other selected areas. However,
it is not known that Subject was approached in this regard, and the DCS
was provided with information relating to his dubious character.
5. In August 196 7 Subject came to Agency attention when he
attempted to interest a group of military officers in a weapon silencer
he had supposedly developed for the M-16 rifle. One of these officers
was actually a representative of TSD 3ervicing under cover wno
reported that Subject had no reservations about imposing himself on
anyone in order to achieve his aims. ·
6. Subject was mentioned extensively in an article on independent
arms dealers appearing in the January 1968 issue of True magazine,
.
and he reportedly made statements that the CIA and the DIA would
protect him in case he got into difficulty. Based on Subject's statements,
the Munitions Control Board asked the Agency whether we had any
interest in him. The case was summarized for the benefit of the
Deputy Director for Support on 11 January 1968, and the reply to the
Munitions Control Board was provided by the Office of Logistics.
7. Offic-e of Security records reflect that a Department of
Defense representative reviewed Subject's security file in March 1968,
at which time we continued to receive reports that Subject was
representing himself as a CIA employee. In May 1969 information
was received from an Air Force OSI representative in Miami,-.Florida,
that Subject was undergoing a security clearance check as a result of
his being employed by a company with a Government contract. At
about the same time Saigon Station requested a Headquarters "bona
fides" check on Subject, who was then employed by Sionics, Inc.;
and he advised OSI that he was affiliated with CIA. The Station was
informed of Subject's background as an unscrupulous con-man.
8. On 26 May 1969( ""1enerated a cable with
extensive distribution i;hhe Far East Subject's activities

!<.EPKUULLtLJ Al 1Ht. !V:'oAL AKLt11Vt..,:,.r:
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in his atged 1pacity as Chief of CIA in Thailand. It was mentioned
that th ad been plagued for some weeks by Subject, Vice
Presid and irector Research and Development for Sionic'S., Atlanta,
Georgia. Subject reportedly describes himself as a counter-insurgency
expert, has a variety of weapons to display and claims to be a retired
Colonel. He normally implies United States Government connections
and he presents a demonstration of a variety of exotic weapons that
never fails to impress. Reportedly Subject had visited Vietnam in
order to provide General Abrams with such a demonstration of weapons,
and it was stated that he planned on setting up a sniper training program.
9 •. The Washington Post of 3 December 1969 contains an_ extensive
article on Subject, who was under Federal investigation for receiving
guns shipped from Vietnam through Eglin Air Force Base in Florida.
The article mentions that two years previously Subject was indicted
on charges of violating a Federal law forbidding the preparation of a
military expedition against a friendly nation from American territory.
10. The Washington Post of 22 February 1970 contains an article
which indicated that Lt. Colonel Paul A. Mariott of Eglin Air Force
Base was cleared of any illegal actions in connection with the shipment
of captured weapons from Vietnam. The Subject is quoted as having
said that his firm, Sionics, Inc., had arranged for the shipment to
the United States through Eglin Air Force Base, supposed for Air
Force use in_museums.
II. The Washington Evening Star of 26 February 1970 contains a
story dealing with the charges that the Columbia Broadcasting System
had contributed $80,000 to a 1966 plot to invade Haiti. Subjeet was
identified as one of the "leading figures" in the deal, and he was
described as a munitions dealer linked to clandestine operations in
Latin America. He reportedly was hired by CBS as a consultant for
the invasion story, receiving $1, 500. 00 as a down payment.
12. True magazine of Aprill970 contains an article by Andrew
St. George entitled, "The Mafia vs the CIA", which alleges to be
the story of the struggle of two invisible governments for the control
of Haiti. Subject is mentioned in the article as a "munitions merchant"
who cooperated with the investigation being conducted by the magazine.

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MEMORANDUM FDR
SUBJEcr
REFERENCE
RlPRlJUl:LUJ Al ltlt. W.\AL .• .• :

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7 July 1969
DC/SRS
WERBELL, Mitchell Livingston
#0-7686
l
66602) 26 May 1969
1. In accordance vith your request based upon the attached
reference, OS traces were conducted and produced overt and covert files
#0-7686.
2. Security files contained a CABLE SAIGON 8251 (in 53602)
dated 8 May 1969 Yherein Headquarters Yas advised OSI (Saigon) Yas
conducting an investigation on Subject in order to establish his
bona fides. Subject had claimed employment Yith CIA.
3· DIR CABLE 02534 Saigon Subject Yas never employed by
CIA, however, he was granted a( ln 1959 but interest Yas quickly
terminated. It YaS recommended local OSI request parent office
to conduct NAG's.
4. On 15 May 1969, the Miami Field Office of the Domestic
Contact Service (DCS) was visited by an OSI representative in connection
vith WERBELL. It Yas suggested that the OSI representative direct his
query through channels via OSI's agency liaison officer in Washington.
5. As a result of the foregoing, the undersigned Yas contacted
by Colonel Daniel MCGUIRE of OSI. MCGUIRE Yas advised that WERBELL
had never been employed by CIA, however, he had served in OSS from
June through December 1945.
6. Colonel MCGUIRE stated that WERBELL Yas under investigation
by the OSI Internal Security Division and also by the -ccrntr.act
Fraud Division.
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- (eel · '_r:/ ·
J' \._ \__
- C/'WJl3/ SRS . - ·
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ATr J
Copy of information passed to OSI/ Air
55:0111'

llt1ia&ndill ani
··· leo:lut!!lcO:t"
- ....
REPRODUCED AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES
SUBJECT: Mitchell Livingston WerBell
1. Subject is a 52. -year -old, native-born American who served
on military assignment with the Office of Strategic Services from
approximately July to December of 1945 with primary service in the
China -Burma -India theatre. Following his military /OSS service,
Subject entered into a variety of short-term business activities, moat
of which were characterir.ed by his unorthodox bueinesa practices.
There is no indication that be has ever been employed by the Agency.
z. There is considerable evidence in Subject'• file that he was
looked upon with strong suspicion by several Government agencies,
including the Bureau of Cuetoms a.nd the Federal Bureau of Investigation
for alleged arms smuggling in a number of South American countries,
as well as his apparent involvement with several revolutionary groups
and Castro assassination schemes. Office of Security recorda disclose
that Subject is generally categorized as a con man, unscrupulous, a
wheeler- --dealer and a. promoter of grandiose schemes.
3. In July 19 59 Subject apparently volunteered his services to
the Western Hemisphere Divhion and was seriously considered !or
use as an informant on revolutionary activities in Cuba. and the :
Dominican Republic. During the period that Subject's Operational
Approval was being processed, he volunteered several pieces of
inforn£ation, all of which were judged to have little value. In
October 1959, WH Division decided to drop all operational interest
in the Subject since they became convinced that his real aim in working
for CIA was to use Agency funds to promote his personal interests.
I
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~ ~ ~ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ~ - - - - - - - - - - - -
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REPRODUCED AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES ..
4. In February 1967 the Domeatic Contact Service advised that
Subject frequently volunteered information to their Miami Oflice and
was going to be asked to reapond to certaln OSI requirement. pertaining
to the Dominican Republic. Haiti, and other selected areae. However,
lt is not known that Subject was approa.ched in thla regard, and the DCS
was provided with information relating to hla dublnua character.
S. In Auguat 1967 Subject came to Agency attention when he
attempted to interest a group of military o!Ciceu in a weapon allencer
he had auppoaedly developed for the M-16 rifle. One of theae oflicerli
c J
reported th&t Subject had no reservations about hnpo.tng hlmaelf on
anyone in order to achieve hla alma.
6. Subject waa mentioned extenalvely in an article on Independent
arm• dealer a appearing in the January 1968 iuue of ~ magadne,
and he reportedly made atatementa that the CIA and the DIA would
protect hirn in caae he got into difClculty. Baaed on Subject'• atatementa,
the Munition• Control Board aaked the Agency whether we had any
interest in him. The caae was eummarhed for the benefit of the
Deputy Director for Support on 11 January 1968, and the reply to the
Munitions Control Board wu provided by the Office of Logbtlca.
-1. -Office o{ Security recorda reflect that a Department of
Defenae repreaentatlve reviewed Subject's security file ln March 1968,
at which time we continued to receive report. that Subject waa
repreeenting himael{ a• a CIA employee. In Uay 1969 information.
wae received from an Atr Force OSI repreeentaUve In Miami, Florida,
that Subject waa undergoing a aecurity clearance check ae a reault of
hie being employed by a company with a Government contract. At
about the eame time Saigon Station requested a Headquarteu "bona
fide a" check on SubJect, who wae then employed by Sionice, Inc. 1
1
and b. advhed OSI that he waa affiliated wtth CIA. The Station wae
informed of Subject'• background as an unacrupuloua con-man.
8. On 26 May 1969 (. . .J generated a cable with
extenalve dletrlbutlon In the Far Eaat outlining Subject'• actlvitlea
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REPRODUCED AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES
in hia alleged capacity a• Chief of CIA in Tha.iland. It waa mentioned
that thef _)ad been plagued lor some weeka by Subject, Vice
Preaide'iit and Director Reeearch and Development for Sionice,
Georgia. Subject reportedly describe• himaell aa a counter-in.urgency
expert, hae a variety o! weapon• to display and claim• to be a retired
Colonel. He normally impliee United Statea Government connection•
a:z:td he preeenta a demonstration of a variety o! exotic weapon• that
never fail• to imprea 1. Reportedly Subject had vidted Vietnam in
order to provide General Abrama with such a demonstration oC •eapon•,
and lt waa ata.ted that he planned on aetting up a sniper training program.
9. The' Wa1hlngton Polt of 3 December 1969 contal.11.1 ,an extensive
article on · who waa under F•deralinve•tlaation for r•ciivina
aun• a hipped from Vietnam through Ealln Air Force Baa e ln Florida.
The article mention• that two year• previoualy Subject wae indicted
on chargee of violating a Federal law forbidding the preparation o( a
mllltary expedition againat a friendly nation from American territory.
10. The Waehlngton Poet of ZZ February 1970 contalna a.n article
which indlcat ed that Lt. Colonel Paul A. Mariott o! Eglin Air Force
Baae waa cleared of any illegal action• in connection with the 1hipa1ent
o! captured weapons from Vietnam. The Subject il quoted a1 having
said that hh firm, Sionic•• Inc., had arranged for the 1hipment to
the United States through Eglln Air Force Base, euppo1ed for Air
Force use ln muaeum•.
11. The Waehington Evening Star of Z6 February 1970 contal na a
•tory dealing with the chargee that the Columbia Broadcaating Syetem
had contributed $80,000 to a 1966 plot to invade Haiti. Subject-waa
identl£ied ae one o( the " leading figure•'' in the deal, and he w&l
de1cribed a• a munition• dealer linked to clande.tine operation• in
Latin America. He reportedly wa• hired by CBS a• a coneultct for
the invaalon •tory, recelvi,ng $1.500.00 a• a down payment.
1 z. True magazine of 1970 contains an article l»y Andrew
St. George entitled, "The Mafia v1 the CIA'', which alleges to be
the stor y of t he struggle of two inviaible governments for the control
of Haiti. Subject h mentio:1ed in the article •• a "munitions merchant "
who cooperated with the investigation being conducted by the magaz ine.


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REPRODUCED AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES
(
TO
FAOH
SUBJECT
REQUEST FOR INVESTIGATION AND (OR) NAME"CHECK
Deputy Director of Security
~ t t n t Mr. CURTDf
Chief, CI/Operational Approval
and Su ort Division
c
7878S
NO .
I
J . INDICES IIESULTS REQUESTED IY
28 J
19S9
S· AII[A OF SUIJ[CT•s ASSI'"W[NT
WH/3/Cuba, DoJidnkan
I · USE OF SUIJ[CT
Jntor.nt
U . I . eo VI. ••• I. T .. , ...... .
I · IIESULTS OF TRACES
FIELD TIIACES
Ill TIIACES
10 ·
I I . IIEWAIIKS
EXPEDiTE
7
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DATE
Z· W[THDD OF HANDLING
l&llti.Dt Tl
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COVER SU&&ESTEO FOil INVESTIGATION
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REPRODUCED AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES.
..-szCRE!
BIO DATA
Mitchell Livb.gaton WerBell m
D(Jl: 8 March 1918
FCI!: Fhiledelphia, Pa.
Father 1 John M. WerBell (deceaeed) b. 22 Aug 89, JIIC
Mother:
Wife I
Rea Godiah (deceased) b. 25 Aug 95, Waterbury Conn.
HUegarde Elhebeth Hemmerich (date or marriage: 4 Sept 42)
Ch1ldren1 2 male aDd 4 teuale
Educationl 1924 - 19.30
1932 - 1936
1937
Ste'ftna School
l<n"k Union MU1tary Academ;r
1MI
1939- 1941
CIIU. Morrill Prioe School
Emplaymmt1 Feb - •OY 1939
JiOY39 IF 1942
Apr.l,2 .... pr4)
Feb.46-luly49
S1noe 49
........ A L'.lgion, m-. •• ar,. co., l'bUsdelphia
St.rawbridp lc Clothier Dept. staoe, Fbiladelph1a
Belmar Radar Dewlopuent Iab., Belmar I.J.
Rich's Dept Stare, Atlanta,
Selt employed in sewral Ad'\lertising lo P.R. firms,
most reoent ot which vas Mitchell \ler!Mll Fublio Relations
& Advertieillg Co. ot Atlanta Ga. - nov bankrupt.
Subj 111 also a consultant tor following f'1rme 1
Paper Co. .lt.Unta Ga.
Mllad Pacng1ng Co. •
Rudd Co. Batbaro Fa.
Irwin lambeth Co. !hCIDUv111e x.c.
vt1 16o eyws1 blue hairs brown, balding
1n ms 1n dur1nc lolloiii
. I . /
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CIA HISToRlCALiiEVIEW PROGRAM
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REPRUVLLEV AI !Ht
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19 September 1977
MH10RANDUM FOR THE RECORD
FROM: Michael E. Schneeberger
Security Analysis Group
SUBJECT: LA ROUCHE, Lyndon Hermyle, Jr. (U)
aka "Lyn 1-IARCUS"
1. (C) Lyndon Hermyle LAROUCHE, Jr., born 8 September
1922 at Rochester, is currently Chairman of the
National Caucus of Labor Committees (NCLC) and its political
arm, the U.S. Labor Party. During the last U.S. Presidential
election, LA ROUCHE ran for the Presidency on the U.S. Labor
Party ticket.
2. (C) LA ROUCHE attended Northeastern University
when he dropped out just prior to World War II. He was a
conscientous objector at the start of the War but later
joined the U.S. Army and saw service in the Far East as a
medical corpsman. He was divorced from Carole LA ROUCHE
several years ago and lived with Carol SCHNITZER until 1972.
According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, LA ROUCHE
is currently living with Vivian FREYERE who is also a member
of NCLC. Although his writings and conversations are replete
with computer terminology and psychological phrases, LA ROUCHE
has had no formal training in those areas. However, his
professional career reportedly included work as a management
consultant, systems designer, and computer LA
ROUCHE's health is said to be poor and he is apparently
subjected to long periods of illness caused by severe head-
aches.
3. (C) LA ROUCHE's political career appears to have
originated in 1948 when he joined the Socialist Workers
Party, of which he was a member until the early 1960's.
Subsequently, LA ROUCHE became involved in a number of
leftist causes, including the Students for a Democratic
Society (SDS) and the Maoist Progressive Labor Movement.
The NCLC formed by LA ROUCHE in 1969, originated as an SDS
splinter'group. NCLC is currently headquartered in New York
City and reportedly has a staff of some sixty members. The
FBI characterized NCLC as a violence-oriented,
4" .... \ t'"""'
'"" .... -\:o .J.

E2 HlPDET
CL BY 007472

- .....
· revoluntionary organization which aims to replace democracy
in the United States with a communist form of government.
As early JS June 1974, LA ROUCH£ openedly advocated the
overthrow of the U.S. Government by the NCLC by fomenting
mass strike actions through control of labor'groups. He
also stated that at the appropriate time he will take
control of the U.S. Government by force, if necessary.
4. (U/FOUO) The .political philosophy of NCLC, as
reflected by LA ROUCHE's statements, centers around an
anti-Rockefeller/anti-CIA bias. Briefly, LA ROUCH£ per-
ceives Rockefeller and the CIA as collaborators in sub-
verting world democratic institutions through brainwashing,
torture, and assassination. The purpose of this subversion
is said to be in support of Rockefeller's dwindling financial
empire. Recently, LA ~ O U C H E stated that the CIA is planning
his assassination through manipulation of terrorist groups
such as the Baader-Meinhof Gang. As a result, LA ROUCH£ has
recently hired the services of Mitchell Liyjngston WERBELL,
a Georgia-based arms manufacturer, -as a bodyguard.
).fichael E. Schneeberger

2
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CQNFIIJHJTIAl OS
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Al 1Kt
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A?PHO.J[D nttf.ASE
DF!I!!:W
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2 September 1976
MEt-10RANDUM FOR: Director of Security
FROM Jerry G. Brown
Deputy Chief, Security Analysis Group
SUBJECT WERBELL , Mitchell Livingston, III
SF#27 686
1. As you are aware , Mitchell Livingston Werbell III who
has no Agency affiliation is being in Miami, Florida,
by the Justice Department for conspiracy to violate narcotics
laws . Attached for your information is an article from
Newsday, 30 August 1976, concerning this trial .
2. According to Mr. Walter Lloyd, Office of General
Counsel, who is representing the Agency's legal position at
the tr ial, Werbell and his attorney, Edwin Marger, originally
suggested that they would introduce evidence Werbell was
acting at the behest of this Agency . Mr. Lloyd has recently
advised that Werbell and Mar ger have apparently backed down
from this tactic and are now prepared to offer the general
defense that Werbell was acting at the behest of the U. S.
Government in general. Mr . Lloyd will keep the Office of
Security apprised of developments.
3. As you are aware, on 1 September 1976 Mr. Lloyd met
with Mr. Knoche, Mr. Shackley, and others and it was decided
that certain sanitized material from the Agency
1
s Werbell
related holdings would be made available to Mr. Lloyd to
take to Miami on 2 September for a discussion with the trial
judge. The purpose would be to support the Agency's testi-
mony that Werbell is not affiliated with the Agency and was
not in any way acting at Agency direction . Mr . Lloyd will
produce the material for the judge only in the event it is
mandatory .
4. During the early evening of 1 September, the writer
met with Mr. Lloyd to review the Werbell Office of Security
file. Mr. Lloyd examined the documents in the file and
E2 IMPDET
CL BY 063994
Al 1Hl NA11UNAL
selected those items he felt necessary to take to Miami .
Mr. Lloyd had at hand the completed Office of Security
portion of a privacy request which he had received from the
Information and Privacy Staff . This privacy request material
was compared with those documents in the Werbell Office of
Security file Mr . Lloyd had selected and it was found that
only two documents were not contained in the sanitized
privacy request material, to wit:
Operational Support TWX , dated 26 February 1968
Operational Support Report, dated 1 March 1968
5. Mr . Lloyd explained that he- required sanitized
versions of these two documents because the documents pertain
to a ship, "Venus," to which Werbell hcts claimed access in
connection with his alleged Agency endeavors . Attached to
instant memorandum are sanitized versions of the above two
documents prepared by the undersigned on 1 September 1976.
6. Mr . Lloyd was provided with one copy of these two
sanitized documents. He stated that he intended to have the
complete Agency privacy request file (and the two documents)
copied by DDO privacy request personnel who were also working
on their materials and leave the originals at Headquarters.
Mr. Lloyd stated he would only carry sanitized material with
him to Miami.
7. This is for your information. A copy of instant
memorandum, with attachments, will be provided to Mr. Edward
Duffy, Chief/Information Review Group/Office of Security.
Jerry G. Brown
Atts
cc: C/IRG
2
N.l:.l' N.U UlJt. t. U A 1 1 H t. l!U -;::::;--------------
.... -(It ·
.... .., , ... IJ)rTtaf't
c;SA ,,. ... (•t c;Plll) tO\•U ..
STATES GOVERNMENT
- A1emorandum -
Chief, Personnel Securit y Division, OS
DATE: 4 nt:.
2 February 17V7
TO .
ATr Hr. Leland Bunn
FROM Director, Domestic Contact Service
(Chief, Services Division)
SUBJECT: WERBELL, Mitchell L.
Communication from Cbet GRAY
re Alleged Assassination Attempt
Against Foreign Diplomat --- FBI
Interest ·
REF DCS z::emorandum dated 21 February 1967, seme subject
1. Please forward a copy of the enclosed self-explanatory
Diary Item to Mr. Sam Papicb. Mr. Papich vas informed of this
matter by phone on 23 February 1967.
2. Any questions pertaining to this memorandum should be
directed to l-1rs. Virginia Thorne, ElCt . 2738.
\
. '
Enclosure: As stated above
CC: Mr. Sam Pai>ich
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.. -
DATE {/ {lji:J. ; .
.......
r ·-
RI:.PRUUL;U:.U AI AKl-tilVD £·:
......
DIA.r:Y, 23 February 1967
Str!JJECl': Mitcbel.l. Werbell/Chet Gra;r
/
APPROV[O full
R£VlH'l PROGRAM
call.ed to say that \Jerbell bad helmi frllll Gray both ,_terday
end the dey bet'ore ex;presaing concern over tbe f'act that DO one had contacted
him coocerni:ng the alleged aaaaadnat1on attesllpt aga1nat a 1'ore1p Mplraat.
Gray atated that unl.ua be bea:rd :rrca. • one hnM'etely be voul4 r;o to the
Governor Of' Cal.Uomia, 23 February. Th1a 1Df0rlllation YaiJ peaaed to Saa Papich
by phone.
ce: Ch1e1', M1ml1 0!'1'1ee
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AgencyNumber
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Recseries
Agfileno
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Title
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Document Date
Who from
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Daterev
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Comment
Keywords
NARA IDENTIFICATION AID
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1993.07.21.15:39:42:400280
JFK
80T01357A
JFK27
F36
SUMMARIES OF ACTIVITIES OF WERBELL AND OTHERS.
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WERBELL
SUMMARIES
PATRICK, JERRY
INDEPBNDENT
REPEARCH
ASSOCIATES
POB 2091
NY. NY 10013-2091
..
JIX: fil"• "" ,., tt 11
... ' ' ',_ ........ '.
Reported . bvf
Anselllli to $:.:gro ·is· 1!lg ·for Wer:seu •. · Allegro and. one .
!'Jerry Patrick'.'. are ·reportedly carrying CIA identification and telling
Cubans in Miami that they and WerBell are CIA. Repordedly had a business
on 8th Street and sold gm guns.
Letter from J!.li'llin Ma.rger re: clarification of WerBell
1
s 201 request, dated
30 Dec 1975 sa;t;s that MW was in "Cuba :tat the time of the Castro Military
Operation", Dominican Rupublic during military operation, Thailand and
1
Vietnam.
FOIA re,:ruest routiru>: lsill. dated 17 Allril. 1Q7'i s"vs thA.t
Dispatch from Chief of JMWAVE to Chief of WH dated 13 J\ln 1966:
"According to his file WerBell appears to be a low level, would=be con man
who has a history of being involved in Castro assassination schemes and of
prqyessirur_;l;o be connected, or at least in contact with KIJBARK. According
to ._ .J, j/1 I "• 1 "'cgxwtw
1
li vingtson
1
was involved with Antonio Veciana 's
alleged assassination ploy and he was masquetMinu RjsKIJ.BARK officer ••••
2. "Livingston' has as yet failed to onl he had promised
Cogs"Well in New York City." signed byL _ . _
Dispatch no deyte , j J:
James Cogs"Well. :btis a NY attorney ixxwixeri mentioned in connection with
raising :f'unds for Eloy Gutierrez Menoyo.
" b. Antonio Veciana Blanck (201-312966) - Born 18 October 1928 in Havana.
He is a public by profession. He is titular head of Alpha 66
and a member of MRP and SFNE. He lives in Puerto Rico. He has a cryptonym
and is of marginal ipterest to JMWAVE CI Branch as a source of
information obtained by_ .-J for the CUIS." date is probably around
same time as preivious as has same subject heading and concerns same
people operation, etc.
Contact report \l.ated 25 April 1966:
"Cogs'lrell told tla t he was expecting Antonio Veciana at that IOOment.
Veciana, Cogswell saidil, was in a plan to assassinateri Figel Castro. Details
of the plan "Were lacking. Beciana wanted Cogs"Well. to introduce him to a man
known andl.y as FNU Livingston, form
1
Wintson, Massachusetts.' Cegs"Well.'s
sister, mane unknown, who works in Washington, De-presented liviggston to
Cogs"Well. about a ponth ago. Beciana shoved up while Cogsell and,.._ :Jwere
talking. veciana. surprise at seenig{_ ....Jwas astounding. In private, Veciana
.••• Cogsewll told,__,_ on Sunday night, 17 April, he had introduced
veciana to Livingston. The latter two had spoken in private after which
veciana came away very pleased byt did not disclose anything except that he had
a plan to assassinate Castro."
Cogswell "'Will be remembered as being inVlilved in fund raising for the
1
Prince-
Pelaez: plot to kill Castro."
MW requested CIA permission for an attempt of Fidel in January , 1966.
The permission was requeseted in December 1965.
MW reported he was taking a group of about 6 Cubans in to get Fidel and
Raul at a big rally in Havana.'
MW also discused plan with one Richard Phillips, PUblic Ai'fairs Officer,
Department of State. His boa\ W8.9:J;.quiped .'IIi th mortars.


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MW contacted "occasionally at headquarters" before his..-:- -i...voked.. It vas
revoked because "it vas determined that he had no information to
o:trer nor vas he able to devel.op any. He vas assessed by Headquarters as a
'wheller dealer' type With considerable intelligence ¥unable to realize
much success in :jlromotion work and that his +.o JWBARK were designed
prj.mar1.ly to obtain financial support." D:l.spatchL. ..J dated 28 Sept 1965.
also sats t)rat in May or 62 was in Managua as vice president or Col!lliUilicattions
International Ltd attempting to sell surplus arms. Was also attempting to sell
an "International Investigation Service". Attempts were unsaccess:fllu.
In December or 64 was reported in Dominican Republic inassociation With
Finca/Frutas intercontinentales, cm?or A.
- ---- r" "
Cable :f'ropl,_ tll (Wave C1 te "' ,.)) dated 28 Sept 65:
l . .J siud t118.t WerBell was a crew member on Venus and worked With
u JURE Groupu •
D:l.spatc\.. 2;0 Sept 1965 reportst MW's connection With:· _J
a.nd his group. -
l
]si*ter contacting her uncle, Emilio Nunez Portuondo to help !iince
....Jhas been captured by GOC.
Cable tot Jrom DIR (12828) dated 16/8/62 says "Relationship ;::9(With MW)
term:l.natecr' on rriendly basis October 1959· 1lmKI1BARK opinion EWerBell Wished
use KUBARK :f'und.s to promote his personal interests. His intel not highly
regarded." Cabled released by J.C.King, Authenticated by William K. Harvey.
Cross rererence to a doucument (c _ ) ) that sez MW back in Guatamala
and is presing GOG to make Organizations :for Liberation or CUba
the basis :for Exile governement in Dec. 1962. Pressure being through
Ydigoras son.
Memo :for file, Dated 18 February 1963 reports WerBell and Arthur L. Smith
were attempting to Get Guatemala , Nicaragua, and El Salvador to recognize
a de :facto CUban government in exile caled "United Organization 0f:for the
Liberation o:f CUba: " head or organization was Mario Garcia Kohly (provisional
president) WerBell reportedly o:f:fered $100,000 to Nic Govt. Also associated
w1 th group were Frank M. Austin, Marshall R. Diggs, Manuel Fuego (aka Firestone)
and Col. John F. Kieffer.
Unless subsequently noted this is theonly document :for 1963.
0002.120
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• • • • • • • • • - 4"' • •·• .. -I • • •
.......... - ......... ................... "··-·-··
Mayor o:r Miami Robert K1ng aJ.so involved in trying to unite Cuban exiles, was
meeting ·and ·was backing group _called Consejo Reolucionario
r -·-· ... ...... • ._, __ ,,..
Verona visits President Rivera on 21st. Reports Kohly has been a rival
o:f Miro Cardona and Varona elema.nts. Admits Kohly Anti-Castro but lJ says he
is probably :l:rying to Varona's e:f:forts or "gain ascerxlancy".
- J dated Aug 22, 62 reports WerBells arrival and that he is accompanied
by on Lucy Luchien.
Wave 7169 dated 17 Aug 1962 says:
":files rel:fetc Mario Garcia Kohly previour mAneuvers over long period to
obtain :financial support :from K\lbark turned doJm
basis un:fourxled claims. Detailed investigation e by Mr. Robert Andre>rs.
" ri1'--Jf{
DIR dated 17 August 1962:
"Garcia Kohly, WerBell, and Sm1 th are well known K\lbark H<ts and considered to
be wheelers and dealers, schemes, and unscrupulous.
Garcia Kohly is well aware of\_ . opposition to Cuban Govt in exile as
result his_persistent tho e:f:forts sell sel:f and Govt in exile
concept teL_ , usinessmen past two years."
[ ]dated,i21 1962: uS. J:s.G.
reports :x:WerBell involved in an earlier e:f:fort to sell arms and provide
anti-commie mercenaries to Guat.
16 Aug 62, __J reports that group planning invasion :for mid-august.
Organization in Cuba called JUnta Civica Militiar Cristiano(JCMC) and the
exile chief is one Colonel Jose Pinerlro pa.z. Thsi cable reports that
Nic 'lla.Ilts to sign the proto cal. (they eventmally o:f course don't)
k·. .:Jdated 15 Aug 62:
Smith bhas cards shoWing him as Vice President of Faraday Techinical Corp.,
228A SW 2nd Ave., Miami. Reports ·that on :x; J.A. ExKane aond Josi Euleterio
Pedraza Cabrega • WerBell and Kane were in Guat in May 62 offering to sell
small arms and mercenaries.
DIR 29811 dated 14 Aug 62 reports tht MW travelled to Dominican Republic in
1959 and became involved With Anti Castro plotters. Smith, as of June 60
was a member of Jones and Handy Marine Archi teet Firm, Miam1. Sm1 th travelled
to Cuba several times between Jamuary 1959 and March 1960. Firm waas 'WOrking on
a steel mill in Oriente province. One "Piner
"Pineiro" is allegedly involved in plot. HQ can't ID an exile With that name
who may be travelling to GuaJ;. Reports that "Major Manuel Pineiro Losada is
Assistant Chief Cuban G-2 aDd -well no'Wll member Castro's entonrage" but unlikey
that this is the one invoJved because the difficulties he would have in
traveling to Gue:t;.
Wave 6830 dated Aug ll, 62 reports thta MW :txx was involved in Plan to ship
arms to Ecuador '',!or attem1Jted +.l:leJe by CP." this according to one
[. 3 At time cos in,__
- -::Jreports that MW and Simth are in Guat awaiting the arjval of one
&.,-Colonel Pini_ero, e.ka " date'Jl 9 Aug
..
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v'-· (.(10.2.122
Jateed 2l Mey 1962 says that MW aDi Manual Firesotne trying to sell
SUrpluss weapons.
(_. MemD for Record dated 13 October 1959: MW called him on 9/25
to la report a li!'g meeting of "heavy financiers of the opposition to Castro"
to be hel.d. in DC during week of 9/28. involved: Jorge Bethart Fml...Sanchez
NUnez. MW asks that CIA his attendance of meeting. . j
recOI!Dilen4s to C/WH/III that "ve either terminate Subject or :put im tO work"
termintated for folloWing reasons:
"a. his tOOti.vation is obviously to use the Agency as llJI[ll source of financing
for his personal business schemes.
b. AB an Alnerican his access to full information on CUban revolutioana.ry
activities will alswa;ys be limited. This is borne out by the fact that his
information, while indicating some access, has been incomplete and obviously
or third hand."
:lagain talked to MW on 10/2:
'I told Subject that after due consideration of the risks to him, the const
in time and effort to him, and the risks and expenses involved for the Agency,
balanced against assets generally available throughout the intelligence community
and his access to additional information, it had been decided not to give him
any operational tasks at this time,. I suggested that since the bulk of the
matters which come to his attention in connection With the CUban matter ta.ke
place in the united states, he should report such information to the FBI. Subject
appeared to understand that ve would not use him and exPressed his regret. The
conversation ended on a friendly note."
::_ j me100 for the record dated 23 Sept 1959: reports that "Joe
Merola and a number of others have been discussing the counterfeiting of United
States CUban pesos for use in connection With CUban revoD.utiona.r
activities." _..Juggests he tell FBI and MW says be Will. MW reported bacj:
that FBI referred him to SS. Xlw•n
- J metOO for record dated 5 Aug 59:
....,Althoguh i:he has been evasive and obviously not completeJ.i frank \lith us,
it appears tha does have access to information of interest on CUban
and Dominican Revolutionary activities aimed u against the castro Government, a
and that he is -well conencted \lith the underworld elements operating in the
Miaxni area. " _
Memo also notes that._ has learned of....._ .J
_jne100 :for Q_te Record dated 5 August 1959: .
'Report troll{_._ -1 that William Morgan is involved in a plot to assassinate
Castro. (Subjectis telephone conversations With "Reicbhardt".) also has
this paragraph: "Reichl!ardt said tha t he was out of touch also With Nunez
Portuondo. He said he had tried to phone Nunez on a number of occasions
but the phone was not answered. Discreet inquires in Mimai also iniicated
that Nunez' location is unknown at this time. Reichahrdt said he is still
holding the letter from Col. King to Nunez."
Documents also indicate that werBell was providing information on A "General
Pedraza "Who was in the Dominican Republic in 1959 trying to organize anti-
Castro activities. Involved with Pedraza was Rolondo Masferrer.
MW was reporting that Mas ferrer was one of Pedraza's contacts in the US.
Undated memo for .on "call from Mr. Dick Phillips
(state) regarding the Arrest of........ -.:i
,...
!
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,
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,
'Sf • ' .. . _ ..
. .._ ...
. - -· ... . -. 5 . . .. . . . . .. ... . ..
, .... - ... ...... '- ... ... '-
!''fho +hj . · Cuban& that Werl3ell reported •Rabel NUnez
• •· Gi·lberto- .... These- men were- crew· membP.-rs .. of
-
'tne JURE mothel'-v:esseJ.. ·Venus From. .JMWAVE. ·reports it appears that
vas attempting to e:xfiltrate his family, using the Venus, when he wa-s
by Cuban security for11es on 3 September 19;65.
Various memos show that MW reporting on Joe Ma.r9la.
0002.123
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NARA IDENTIFICATION AID
1993.07.23.15:37:12:370280
JFK
80T01357A
JFK41
F2
' FBI INVESTIGATION OF EXTORTION/LETTER BOMB CASE
(INFORMATION CONCERNIN
N
6/24/1976
SCHNEEBERGER, MICHAEL E.
N
CHIEF, SECURITY ANALYSIS GROUP
N
4
CIA
07/23/93
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PAPER
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EXTORTION
FOX, B.A.
LETTER BOMB
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REPRODUCED AT THE NATIONAL
24 June 1976
MEMORANDilli FOR: Chief, Security Analysis Group
SUBJECT FBI Investigation of Extortion/Letter
Bomb Case (Information Concerning
Alleged Links Between... "B. A. FOX"
and the CIA) ·
1. The following is a brief sununary of pertinent
information concerning the FBI's investigation of the massive
extortion case involving some 196 American firms in the latter
part of 1975 and the current letter bomb case. The FBI has
linked the two cases insofar as the two cases share the same
victims, and the FBI has been. investigating several suspects
who have hai previous ties to this Agency. In this regard
reference is made to the attached 18 June 1976 memorandum to
the DCI from T. Falkiewicz, Assistant to the DCI;
subject: Contacts with the Press, wherein page two reflects
an inquiry by Sandy SMITH of Time Magazine who advised that
according to a Justice Department source the mailer of the
letter bombs appears to be an ex-CIA (employee) named B. A.
FOX or FOXWORTH.
2. In the latter part of 1975 and early 1976, the FBI
conducted an extensive investigation regarding the extortion
letters received by 196 U. S. firms in which one "B6 A. FOX"
of the "B. R. Fox Company, 2701 Fairview Drive, Alexandria,
Virginia," demanded huge amounts of money under the threat of
sabotaging their products and operations. Recently, some of
these same victims received "letter bombs" and "tick letters."
The FBI believed that the same person (or persons) were
responsible for both the extortion attempts and the letter
bombs. FBI investigation of the B. R. Fox Company revealed
that the firm was started by Bernard Bates SPINDELL and was
engaged in the manufacture of sophisticated electronic sur-
veillance equipment . at both the above address and
through an office in New York. The FBI's interview of
Mr s . Barbara Ruth SPINDELL revealed that her late husband
named the firm after her maiden name (FOX) and resulted in
her deni a l of any information relative to either the extortion
case or recent letter bombings.
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CIA HISTORiCilt REVIFN PROGRAM ·
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3. During the interview of Mrs. SPINDELL, the FBI
learned that she became a partner with Michael John MORRISSEY
(SF#465 462) in May 1972 until March 1974 when they mutually
terminated their partnership. She said that MORRISSEY con-
ducted the business under the name of the B. R. Fox Electronics
Company until December 1974 when the business folded.
Mrs. also advised the FBI that from l>larch to December
1974 MORRISSEY conducted B. R. Fox Company business in office
space of the Central Investigative located at 1028
Connecticut: Avenue," NW, Washington, D. C. , where. MORRISSEY
was acquainted with John Patrick MULDOON (SF#l34 816) and
Mitchell h"ERBELL (SF#2 7 686).
4. Subsequent investigation by the FBI (and previous
independent Office of Security analysis) established the links
between MORRISSEY, MULDOON, Lucien CONEIN (SFII5 025). and
Walter Josef MACKEN (SFII190 639) --all having a common denomi-
nator through their association with Mitchell WERBELL III and
the Central Investigative Agency. The FBI requested and
received pertinent background information regarding WERBELL,
MORRISSEY, l>lliLDOON, and MACKEM from the Office of Security on
10 November 1975 by Leo J. Dunn, Chief of Operations/PSI.
5. As of November 1975 the FBI believed that WERBELL
may have been the "brains" behind the extortion operation.
However, M . .\CKE!vl continues to engender strong suspicion by the
FBI. l>IACKHI, a graduate of Reed College, recently attended
a Reed College Alumni meeting and apparently procured a
brochure listing the names and addresses of Reed College
graduates. It appears that many of the extortion letters
have been addressed to Reed graduates who now occupy important
positions in private industry. However, FBI laboratory
evidence has so far failed to link MACKEM as the writer of
the extortion letters. It also appears that based upon the
FBI's psycholinguistic analysis of the extortion letters
MACKEM would not fit the FBI's profile of B. A. FOX.
6. The above is provided for your information in antici-
pation of possible treatment of the B. A. FOX/CIA angle by the
media as evidenced by Sandy SMITH's inquiry to this Agency.
Att
2
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Michael E. Schneeberger
Security Analysis Group

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chael John MORRISSEY, SFN465 462
MORRISSEY became of interest to this Agency in July 1965
when his employer, Welex Electronics (a division of Halliburton
Company, Silver Spring, Maryland), requested a contractor secu-
rity c}earance for his use. MORRISSEY was investigated with
generally favorable results and a contractor security clearance
was issued in December 1965. MORRISSEY held this clearance
until 10 June 1966 when he left Welex Electronics. Reportedly
s duties involved contact with NPIC. This Agency
had no contact with MORRISSEY since Welex in June 1966.
John Patrick MULDOON,,SFI134 816
MULDOOU is a former GS-12 Operations Officer, DDO/FE, who
retiredC... ...Jin "larch 1972. He was involved in h'ERBELL's
"Friends of Abaca," which was apparently an organization formed
by WERBELL for the purpose of "liberating" the island-of Abaca
in the Bahamas. Currently, MULDOON is believed to be the Wash-
ington, D. C., representative of Security Consultants International,
a subsidiary of WERBELL's Central Investigative Agency.
Walter Josef MACKHI, __ SFH190 639
who was(_
[.
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is a former DDO Operations Officer
_J He was detailed to c_
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..JMACKHI
of Abaca" operation
the Central Investi-
was also connected Wlth WERBELL's "Friends
and last believed to have been employed by
gative Agency in Washington, D. C.
Mitchell Livingston WERBELL III, SF#27 686
liERBELL is an international arms dealer based near Atlanta,
Georgi a, who was briefly connected with J).SS during World War II
where he served. He has been of
considerable interest to this Agency FBI due to his
claims that some of his operations have been sponsored by this
Agency.
Lucien Emile CONEIN, SFHS 025
CONEIN is currently the Chief of DEA's Special Operations
Division who was formerly assigned to this Agency in military
status from 1943 until 1961 and as a Contract Type A from 1961
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Jntil medical retirement in 1968. CONEIN has received much
publicity in connection with his career in Vietnam and the
Far East, due to his personality and drinking problems. His
file was annotated with the statement that the Domestic
Operations Division could not utilize CONEIN in any capacity.
CONEIN is known to have had contact with l-IORRISSEY, WERBELL,
t-lACKEI-f,
2


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l, Gt::ORGE KENNY, FOI SPECIAL IN ATLANTA, HAS
ADViSt::D[_ ...)·rHA'i' HOI-lARD GIBSON HeAD OF A'i'LANTA BASE CENTRAL
INVEST!GA'i'IVE AGENCY OFFICE IN WASHINGTON AND FORMER SU8UR8AN
ATLANTA <COBB COUNTYl tOP ADVISED HIM BY TELEPHONE THAT
HASHINGTON OFFICE SUBLEASED BY HIM TO DRUG ENFORCEMENT
AGENC'I BEING l'SED BY C..!/'r AS ELEC'i'RONIC SURVEILLANCE. LP,
GIBSON CLAIMS OFFICE IN CHARGE C llf OFFICER WHOSE;.
GARBLED ON PHONE, KENNY BELIEVES NAME t1AY BE CONEEN,
. .--
1 S LOCATED 4 0 R 5 BLOCI<S rnOH WHITE 11ousE, KENNY WILL A 'i'iEl1PT
OOTAIN ADDRESS.1r
2, CENTRAL INVESTIGATIVE AGENCY IS
\IOf18F! I , I OCAL GUN RUNNER AND PRIVATE EYE ON DCD HAS
...--
REPORTED. WORBELL AND GIBSON cunRENTLY IN LITIGATION FOR UNKNOWN
FBI AGENT KENNY STATES GIBSON PROBABLY CAPABLE SPREADING
PAr1A l S'i'ORY WIDELY AS MEANS Et19ARRASS lleRBELL.
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REPRODUCED AT THE NAT •
17 August 1976
MEMORANDUM FOR THE RECORD
SUBJECT: Unknown Subject
B. R. FOX - Extortion
1. Commencing in the summer of 1975, the FBI initiated
an extensive investigation to identify the Unknown Subject
responsible for a series of letter bombs (tick letters) ex-
tortion demands levied against many U.S. corporations and
individuals. FBI investigation centered on certain person-
alities having knowledge of or connections with the B. R.
Fox Company formerly owned by Bernard SPINDEL, 1342 001-S,
and his wife Barbara Fox SPINDEL.
2. During the FBI investigation, several persons inter-
viewed made reference to the Central Investigative Directive
Agency, aka: Central Investigation Directive Agency, Central
Investigation Agency, Central Investigative Agency. All of
these references are to a company named, "Central Investiga-
tive Agency, Inc." Basic documents concerning this company,
which is in no way· connected with this Agency, are located
in OS file 1347 079.
3. During the FBI investigation, certain individuals
commented as follows concerning the Central Investigative
Agency, Inc. :
In March 1976, Mrs. Barbara Fox SPINDEL
advised that Michael John MORRISSEY took over
the B. R. Fox Company and ·that between March
and December 1974, MORRISSEY conducted a portion
of the B. · R. Fox Company business at 1028 Connecticut
Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. She further stated
that MORRISSEY conducted the business in the office
space of the Central Investigative Directive Agency"
and she furnished the names of Howard GIBSON,
Mitchell WERBELL and John Patrick MULDOON as
employees of the
APPROV£0 r9R RELEASE 1993
CIA PROGRAM

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-----
On 20 October 1975, John Patrick MULDOON
stated that he had known Michael John MORRISSEY
for about one and one-half years. About early
1974, MULDOON associated with MORRISEY in
"Security Consultants International," located in
the La Salle Building, Connecticut Ave., Washington
D. C. According to MULDOON, the parent
of Security Consultants International was the "Central
Investigation Agency," Atlanta, Georgia. The Central
Investigation Agency was operated by Howard GIBSON,
Mitchell WERBELL, IV, and others. The Central Investi-
gation Agency was to pay certain bills of Security
Consultants International but failed to do so. There-
fore, in June 1974, MULDOON terminated his association
with Security Consultants International.
On 20 October 1975, Howard Ray GIBSON stated that
Michael John MORRISSEY moved the B. R. Fox Company
from the Alexandria address to the Central Investiga-
tive Agency in Washington, D.C. GIBSON stated he met
John Patrick MULDOON in Washington, D.C. in 1973
through a contact, because GIBSON needed some help in
and out of the United States. GIBSON would not reveal
the identity of his contact, but stated that Michael
John MORRISSEY helped him a couple of times and then
the contact requested GIBSON to set up a Central
Investigative Agency office in Washington, D.C. and
to allow MULDOON to be present as an GIBSON
further advised that in 1973 and 1974 he conducted a
business, Central Investigative Agency, Suite 212,
6650 Powers Ferry Road, Northeast, Atlanta, Georgia.
His partners were retired Colonel Robert BAYRD (sic)
who was killed on 5 July 1975 in Atlanta, Georgia; and
Mitchell John Livingston WERBELL, III and IV. In 1974,
GIBSON sold out his interest in the Central Investiga-
tive Agency to WERBELL, IV.
On 17 October 1975, Lucien Emile CONEIN, Drug I
Enforcement Agency, advised the FBI that in June 1974, .
he was contacted by John Patrick MULDOON, a former
Central Intelligence Agency Agent, who at that time
was employed as a sales representative by an Atlanta,
Georgia based company known as Central Investigative
Agency. CONEIN further advised that DEA was interested
in purchasing sophisticated electronic surveillance
equipment from the Central Investigative Service
(Agency) which was owned by an individual known to
CONEIN as Mitchell WERBEL. CONEIN stated that it was
2
SECRET
REPRODUCED AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES
his understanding that WERBELL had purchased his
electronic equipment from the B. R. Fox Company
located in Alexandria, Virginia and that he (WERBELL)
or his representative had also attempted to send this
equipment to an unknown number of unidentified foreign
countries. CONIEN stated that during his contacts
with MULDOON, he was introduced to Michael John
MORRISSEY, who at that time was an employee of the
B. R. Fox Company.
4. Attached to · instant memorandum is a copy of a .. memoran-
dum in the name of the Central Investigation Agency, Inc.
(1347 079), dated 10 April 1975. This · attachment, in paragraph
6, makes reference · to a cable (IN 304568), dated 11 July 1974,
containing information provided by Howard GIBSON to the FBI.
5. According to the information in the attachment, as of
December 1973, the officers of the Central Investigative Agency,
Inc. , were:
Att :
As stated
JGB : hjd
Robert F. BAYARD, President
Howard R. GIBSON, Executive Vice - president
Mi tchell L. WERBELL , IV, Vice-president
Jerry G. Brown
Deputy Chief
Security Analysis Group
3
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•••• · REPRODUCED AT THE NATIONAL ,
.......
........... . ,......... ----- . '
"'ll II' t t. .. t l! uU\ Ll\.t.ML:H .
Memorandum
TO
Chief, Security Analysis Group
DATE: 10 April 1975
l'ROM
1
Jerry G. Brown
SUBJECT: Central Investigation Agency, Inc.
........
aka: Central Investigative Agency, Inc.
aka: "CIA" •
#347 079
1. Reference is made to CIRA-0371-74, dated 27 June 1974,
directed to the FBI in the name of Mitchell Livingston WERBELL, III,
a copy of which has been placed in Subject file, .containing information
concerning the a'ttempts of Mitchell Livingston WERBELL, III t In-
voir three former A c mr/J.oyees in the activiti.J:.,s__Qf th "
of aco" and th Abaca Inde Jndence Movement AIM to w':i-:f''t-----
l ohn Patrick # 134 816l
Walter Josef MACKEM #190 639
2. The referenced CIRA further reflects that as of June 1974,
John Patrick MULDOON was employed as the Washington (D. C. ) repre-
sentative of the firm·, Security Consultants International, a subsidiary of
the Atlanta (Ga.) detective agency, Central Investigative Agency.
3. The Central Investigative Agency of Atlanta, Georgia, is
further identified in OS file #347 079. This file contains a letterhead
of the Central lnve.stigative Agency, Inc., 6650 Powers Ferry Road,
Suite 212, Atlanta, Georgia, identifying the officers as:
It is believed that Mitchell L. WERBELL, IV,
is the son of Mitchell L. WERBELL, III, the
subject of the referenced CIRA.
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4. Reference is also made to a 24 March 1975 memorandum
in the file of the above mentioned former Agency employee, Walter
Josef MACKEM, specifically suggesting MACKEM's recent involve-
ment in paramilitary activities- -which would appear to coincide with
the activities of "Friends of Abaco
11
-- at a place in Georgia, not far
from Atlanta. This memorandum also relates that MACKEM is cur-
rently employed as a private investigator in the Washington, D. C. area.
n ra Investigative
I
y, · Inc . , is involved
6. The Central Investigative Agency, Inc., file also contains
\
a copy of a cable (IN 304568 ), dated 11 July 1974,( J
:- }eporting in substance that informahon had been received
the FBI originating with Howard GIBSON (believed identical with
the aforementioned Howard R. GIBSON), that the Washington# D. C. office
of the Central Investigative Agency, Inc., had been sub-leased to the
Drug Enforcement Administration and was being used by the Central
Intelligence Agency as an electronic surveillance listening post. GIBSON
claimed that this activity was headed by a Central Intelligence Agency
officer, one CONEEN (phonetic) .
.
. believed identical with former Staff employee
\ CONEIN ho was last known to be working with the Drug
The file of the aforementioned Walter
Josef M CKEM reflects that he was detailed by the Agency to the Drug
Enfo rcebent Administration from February 1972 to October 1973; and
that as of September 1973, CONEIN was an associate of MACKEM.
8. It is believed that the empbyment of former Agency employees
by "CIA" and the backing of "C.IA" of the Abaco Independence Movement
could cause future concern for this Agency •
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NO DISSEM ABROAO -- ·
·- ----- -·- ----------
:::... UNlRY Republic
ATE Or
JFO_ Nov 65
C'ATE DISTR.
; 10. PAGES
1
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...ACE &
ATE ACQ. Snnto Domingo - Nov 65
)URCE:
THIS IS UNEVALUATED INFORMATION
US national with wide travel experience in Latin America. He epeaks some
Spanish, and has many social and business contacts in the Dominican Republic.
[This report was developed by a representative assigned to the office of
preparation.)
1. In November 1965 while I was in the Dominican Republic, I heard a rumor
from several Dominican Army officers that the boat owned by David
Stephens and his brother, Claudio Stephens, Haitian exiles, was under inves-
tigation on suspicion of dope and arms running from to the Dominican
Republic.
2. The Dominican Army officers stated that David and Claudio were close friends
of Juan Dosch, former President of the Dominican Republic, and were
friendly with the Dominican Rebels.
3. 1 was further told that the "Zaida" is currently captained by a US .:,- .... ::;::
national named (fnu) Bird. and that the previous captain of the boat up to
early November 1965 was (fnu) Volaire, a Haitian national.
, .:,
-end•
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or d" '><'W .,.,," poroqroph I of OCIO 117, II mor be rolt1>1W to lho•• component• of 1/o• f1•porlmonlt ond "· ,0"'"'•\ "" uo • CO<tlro//rd ,
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-.olln7 In tloo pro<lucfloa ol tlalloJ>oJ fai•Uiv-c:fl. 11 SffltU 110'1 Bt: DISSCMIHitT£0 fO COHri!AC'TI)JIJ olllb • , ..,._,,...,,., dlrrocllr .
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CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY
SUBJE.::T
Armed Forces Coup d'Etat Planned
DATE DISTR.
NO. PAGES
REFERENCES
DATE OF
NO DISSEI.I ABROAD
00-B-3'}.1/00782-66--
20 Jan 66
l
CIRL C-DC5-52374
INFO. 12 Jan 66
PLACE &
DATE ACQ ---fl2 Jan 66
SOURCE,
1.
2.
THIS IS UNEVALUATED INFORMATION
US national vith wide travel experience 1n Latin America. He speaks some
Spanish, and baa many social and buainess contacts in Latin America, but
his realiabUity is not o:f the highest.
/fuie report was developed by a Navy representative assigned to the of':f'ice
o:f prepe.re.tion.J .
On 12 Jan 66 Miguel1to Ydigoras Laparra, son o:f the former President of
Guatemala, told me that Guatemalan Armed Forces were planning to overthrov
Colonel Dlrique Peralta on 15 Jan 66. Ydigoraa told me that if the OOUp
was not carried out on l5 January, it would be executed as soon as possible
thereafter.
YcUsoras wuld not tell me the names ot the individuals leading tha coup,
but stated that "all of the Armed Forces vill be involved."
- end-
.
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\8. y S C 79) and 79A. the • or rt•tlol!on ol wh•ch in any monnet to on vnovtho•oled pe.,on i1 p•oh.b.ted by Ia,.,
:mHROllED D!SSEM s __ AD
:ouNTRY f"'iti/!Xainicao RepubUcj Bahamas
REPORT NO.
00- B-3'n/17879-66
7 Nov 66
U3JECT Planned Invasion or Haiti baween
5-13 llov 66
DATE DISTR.
NO. PAGES
. n'"t'l':rr•: 1n ... 1
APPROVtD fOR hl: i:.1 ..
1
'lliis report was previouely
disseminated aa TD-CX:lB-
ATE OF
28
O.::t
66
<FO.
C\A \\\SlOR\CPtl UE'J\f.WllROGIOOII .
321/17879::-66
LACE &
ATE ACO. ··-1 Nov 66
CIRL C-DC6-52851
1.
2.
4.
THIS IS UNEVALUATED INFORMATION
US national. 'llith vida travel experience in Lntin America, Ha speaks some
Spanish, e.nd baa many social and business contacts in the D:Jminican Republlo,
['lll1s report "Was developed by a Navy representative assigned to the office ot
prepe.retion.]
On 28 O.::t 66 I spoke vith Rolando Maafcrrer Rojas, n Cuban exlle
1
and he told
lll<l that he baa organized a military :force of approximately 250 tnen to iDvade
Haiti. invasion force consists or CUban and Haitian exiles residing in
the us, the Bahamas, and the D:lmiuican Republic. 'ilia invasion vill
be launched from the Domtntcan Republic sometime between 5 and 13 NoveCber
and the target 1a Port-au-Prince. The invasion :force 'llill strike in the
early hours ot the morning selected. It is well armed, and 'llill have ai.r
cover; the presidential palace v1ll be bombed.
!l.asferrer stated that L. Maxlm1l1 en
1
Haitian Consul. in M1ami
1
Florida,
is aware ot the invasion, but he has no kllowledge of the invasion date.
!l.e.ximllien is presently in Haiti informing President D.lvalier that the !Dvasion
can be prevented by pe.y:J.ns off $200,000 to Mas:ferrer. Maxiiilillen v1ll return
to the US on 3 November and he has agreed Vith. Masferrer that it D.lvalier
e.groee to the pe.y-oU
1
Maximilian v1ll receive- $50
1
000 and Masrerrer $150,000.
!1.3s:ferrer told me that the invasion 'llill take place in any event and the
$150
1
000
1
it received, vould be used to :f'Urtber lltlppOrt the invasion,
!l.asferrer stated that be !ll<lt vithin the past 10 days 'llith several diasidant
Haitian officers and he had received their lltlpport. The Haitian e.r;;ry
officers told Masferrer that they would revolt as soon as informed that the
invasion bad cQI::I!llenced. 'lliey do not knov that the target vill be Port-au-
Prince; they believe that it v1ll be in the cap Baitien area.
Hasferrer stated that h11 wa5 contident that the invasion 'llill succeed, and it
succesatul-
1
Father Jean Baptiste Gaol]ee vould be appointed provisional.
president. Masferrer stated tJ:mt Co nel Rene Leon, Haitian exlle
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'Ifill
participate in the invasion •. ·! - -· _ : ...
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COilTROllED DJSSE.'>I
___
COUNHY
s· 'SJECT
DATE OF
INFO.
PlACE &
DATE ACQ.
R(I'ORT NO.
F!lise or .. JJ1VB.s:t"Jn/R2pcrt(>!1
Chan ee of l'Jan.9
DA 1 E DIS !R.
28 Hov 65
NO PAGES 1
. APPROVED ron ntt£1\S£ 1993
REFERENCES TI1ie report wns ure·;touoly
C!JI fiiSTOFIJCAl l110GRfJ:1 dis Geminated as TD-OO-B-321/l9ob7-66
22 Nov 66
--/22 Hov 66
THIS IS UNEVAlUATED INFORMATION
US national, soldier of fortune type with wide experience in Latin
America. He is closely associated with Rolando Masferrer.
/J'nis report was devel$'ed by a Navy representative assigned
office of
to the
1. As of 22 Nov 66 in spite of widespread press reports, no invasion
of Haiti has taken place.
5
4
3
2
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2.
4.
6.
Rolando Hasfer:rer Rojas who is sponsoring the alleged invasion, has
been telling Cuban exiles that his group hoe secured the airport at
Port-de-Paix and. they should be prepared to leave at any time.
Masferrer has given up the idea of moving his group, which consists
of approximately 300 Cubans and 100 Haitians, by boat and is trying
to rnalce arrangements for chartering eleven aircraft, including acme
DC-3
1
s. One of' the IX:-3' s would carry Colonel Rene Leon
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Masferrer,
and !"ather Jean Batiste Georces. --
The M/V Hudson is to be used to carzy part of' the weapons. Tile
Masferrer group is well armed and haa plenty of·weapons. Tiley have
three tons of C-3 dynamite, and also have some C-2 and C-4.
%e Henrietta II will carry photographers •.
In spite of the above I believe that the "invasion" is a fat'ce and
is falling apart. Hasf'errer is merely trying to cover up for the
:funds he has received f'or the invasion. It is believed that V.asferrer_' a'
life will be in danger if he does not make sane ostensible effort.
. ..,;·'"'
fUll tEXT COPY
DO . MOl Rtlmt
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_____________ _;
.. ___________ _
-------------------
CENTtU,L iNTELLIGENCE AGENCY
Tr-.l ,.; . c>Jn•O•"I onfo-mor,on offcc••ng N·JioOn'll of rhe Un•ted Srotu rhe meon.r.q of lt-e fi,:1•0"0•Je low1.
18. USC Xo 79J and 794, lhc- ltonH,•UoOn or of '" any rnunner 10 on vnovrl-,o•.ul penon •• • b, 1-:lw.
COmROllED DISSEM
____ _
NO DISSEM /.BROAD
C01TRY
SUBJECT
DATE OF
INFO.
PLACE &
DATE ACQ
--------
Eaiti
REPORT NO. 00- B-321/19ll2-66
Proposed Invasion cancelled
APPROVED fOR REW\SE Wl3
CIA HISTORICAl REVIEW PROGRF.nl
23 Nov 66 and earlier
--- 23 Nov 66
DATE DISTR.
NO. PAGES
REFERENCES
THIS IS UNEVALUATED INFORMATION
30 Nov 66
1
This report vas
disseminated as
19112-66
US national, soldier or :rortune type 11ith 11ide expcorience in Latin America.
He is closely associated with Rolando Mast'errer.
[This report was developed by a representative assigned to the orrice
or preparation.)
1. furing the night o:r 22 Nov 66 a decision 11a11 reached to call o:r:r tbe proposed
invasion o:r Haiti by tho group sponsored by Rolando Masferrer, Tbe invasion
is off indefinitely.
2.
<j
Father Jean Baptiste Georges and Colonel Rene Leon have been arguing with
1-'.aat'errer which bas caused confusion and disorganization 1n the moveoent.
Cubans scheduled to participate have pulled out end military cbiet'
Napoleon Villaboise (sic), a Cuban nationa.l and alleged mi11 tacy expert
1
bas resigned because o:r dissension 1n the group.
It is believed that US Government agencies have inriltrated tbe movement
and the leaders :rear that all 11eapona and equipment lloul.d be cont'iscated if
plana t'or tbe invasion proceeded.
-end-
IAL
s
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S-YES U-YES
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DISicM :\&POt,D

Request for Arms
i:
B- 32l1/ll1167-67
27 Apr 67
l
LA CIRL C-DC6-5Jl34
>.': o; 1'-'''· Apr 67 and earlier
--:{J\pr _ 67 and_earlier
UNEVALUATED INFORMATION
SOURCE US national, soldier of fortune type, with wide experience in Latin America,
5
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2
l. In April 1967 I was approached by a prominent Venezuelan whom I prefer not
to identify. He asked me to arrange procurement of 150-300 9 nun sub-machine
guns, with 1-2000 rounds per gun. Delivery was to be "as soon as possible".
2, He did not identify the group for whom they were being obtained but
indicated it was a "right wing operation".
3. I told him I was unable to be of assistance.
-end-
1\PPROVED FOR RELEASE 19n
CIA HISTORICAL REVU.W
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tiiPl - 110 tt01

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Ic1pending Flight of Batista/
DATE DISTR
Pedraza Expeditionary Force
NO. PAGES
1
REFEReNCES
DATE OF
INFO.
Jul 59 and earlier
APPROVED FOR RELEASE 1993
CIA HISTORICAL REVIEW PROGRAM
PLACE &
DATE ACQ.
SOURCE,
Ciudad Trujillo/Jul 59
THIS IS UNEVALUATED INFORMATION
US national, of doubtful reliability.
Source claims to have extensive business interests 1n the Dominican
Republic and to be in close contact with Dominican officials, as well
as with General Jose Pedraza. He purports to have access to infonnation
concerning Batista's to skip the Dominican Republic. He appears
to be a complete op:pJrtunist and admits that his princip],e source of
income is derived from manip.llation of Cuban pesos. - Lll).
l. As of 24 Jul 59 it is expected that fanner President Batista of Cuba
momentarily will make an effort to flee :from the Dominican Republic
and come to the US. Batista is thoroughly scared, He :fears :for his li:fe
because· none o:f his guards in the Dominican Republic are pennitted to
carry any sidearma 'Which could be used in protecting him :from attempts
at assassination. There will be no attempt to use the DC-4 1.n 'Which
Batista arrived in the fuminican Republic because it is kept under close
surveillance. It is expected that an attempt will be made to bring him
to the US Via PBY
1
'Which will land in the Vicinity o:f Ft Lauderdale.
Batista 'WOUld be picked up by the PBY :from a vessel on 'Which he would be
ostensibly taking a i'1 sh1ng trip. The pilot will be a US national.
2. After arrival in the US it is expected that Batista will establish head-
quarters in the penthouse suite oi' a l.Jiami hotel 'Which was purchased by
Cuban interests in Jun 59 for a re:pJrted 9 million pesos. It has also
been re:pJrted that the penthouse suite is undergoing extensive modi:fications,
including the installation o:f very thick steel doors at the entrance to
the suite.
3. l'here apparently is little, i:f any, love lost bet-.reen :Satista and Gen Jose
Pedraza, 'Who is expected to lead an expeditionary :force in an invasion of
Cuba. Pedraza has available 3000 Cubans and 1000 Spaniards made available
by Franco. I:f needed, elements of the Lbminican armed services would likewise
be used. As oi' 24 Jul 59 the expeditionary force is not ready.
-end-
fULL TEXT COPY "" DO NOT RELEASE
/
- .

APPROVED FOR RELEASE 1933
CIA HISTORICAL REVIEW PROGRAM
- Tuesday, 6/18/ 74, 11:30
I had hea rd a rumor tha t , I thought at the t i me tha t these guys , these i dic:s
can't be doi ng this again, but in the last week I have picked up a great deal of
informa tion tha t I think needs to be known at this location that involves the
Werbell gr oup out of Po\vder Springs . Are you familiar with that name? [No, I'm
handling all of that and I just don't abo':lt it,
can give me what information you have and I will pass it on
but Bill has been handling that entirely and we work different
accounts and I'm sorry to say that I em totally unf amiliar with it.] Well, let me
put it to you this way. Is there any way at all that you will be in touch with
Bill, so that I could get this information to him by phone. [Well, he is up in
Tennessee and we can get in touch with him, yes. I could give him a call.] Well
let me give you a brief synopsis so that you can a t least pass that on to him.
And in the process, I'll have to give you a bit of background on this subject. I
consider it very important, not from the s t andpoint of the fact that what these
----- -·----· --------------------=-
people are involved in now is starting to but I think it is extremely
- ----- ·- ·- ------- ---------- ·- - ----------------------,-
important that this gets something in to indicate that their contact let s
____________ ___ _ _ __ /.Jief! !lt: t...__ _____ _
them know what is going on. Mitchell is A gun dealer basically. He has
-----------
what is called a farm out at Powder Springs, Georgia." Basically, it is a piece
------- - - ----- -.- - -· - -- - - - - ·- ··-· --- ------ -- ·----- ------
of property with a lake and a firing range And a big house and a gun shop below
---------and- -a-·vault - with about- Ingram- submachine guns and other assorted
. ------ weapon8-.- Now Weibell hai; been inan(f .out ·c;t ·all Yindso [ thTn-g5:"- He pops up all
---·· -----over:--He loves publicity and he loves to imply a ·-rel"ation.ship- wfl:nt he- Agency-.- r,--
-------Now·; -aboiJC a-· year agcf "they were- iiivolved- wi"th -s ome -people- from--Britarn1rCa n
-··-· · --·-·· · attempt to set up a : secession of "the Island of Abaca; ·at the "time· the· Bahamas ·were--
··---······granted ·their independence . Now this was a very serious ·· thing; ·· there were- people -·--
including members of Parliment from London that came over here and they were - going ---
to have a small army on Abaca and the local settlers on Abaca were- all · for-·this---- ---
because· they were mostly white and the thing never got off
Ho,,·ever, i t was known, there were newspape rs articl es written about it. --· Lyndon - -----
----- -----P"'ndling, - the--Prime -Minister of Bahamas was . this.-whole- - -
, f o ., • • I I" I ' • , ._
basically, if you could think of anything that would be the bes t inter est -----
______ oLthe .US a nd . the Agency. and everybody, it .would be some idiotic_scbeme
·-·- _______ Non _a_few .. weeks ago , _!..Jleard a . xumor_from _a _source _
(
2
suddenly grown bigger. And to be more specific about this, when I say that, I
can tel l you t hat it i s a fac t that last Thur s day night the new Ambassa dor from
the Bahamas in Was hington got Congressman Andrew Young to one .side at _a reception
and they disc ussed this matter with grave seriousness. OK, now, therefore I ao
positive that within certain circles in Washington this matter is being discussed
at this !lloment. Now I also learned that l,ast week the whole group of the Warbell' s
and their associa tes were in Washington and I'll give you the names that I know of
for sure: Mike Oliver, who is a key figure in this. He represents wealthy
Americans a nd llritishers who have long had n dr eam of havtng their mm island and
establishing their own country. Now this sounds like . s_omething. __
fiction; however, it is a fact. I have met Mike Oliver. And there are about six
individuals, one of whom I think lives in the Bahamas, I believe two are
in England, one of them I think is Lord Bellhaven who is a member of Parliament.
He has been over to the farm recently and in Washi.ngton a few weeks ago with them .
.. · -· --·- -·-- - ·-·--- ·-·--------- ·----- - -
About three wealthy Americans, all older fellows with many millions. Now this
. .. - -·· ·- ··- ---- - ------ ----· -- - - -------
thing came up once before about eight years ago when they bought a boat and Oliver
1
went out into the and laid claim to the coral reef in the Samoan Islands I
- -- ·----· --- --- ---·-- ------------
think it was and planted a flag on it and established the free soverign sta te of
Life Magazine had a spread on this. And that lasted for about a week
. ·- -. ·- - --------- ---·-- ---------
until the King of Samoa, or somebody, some Tribal King sent
[end of side of tape]
--·-- --------- ---------
putting aside a piece of Nicaraguan soil and giving it
and I know _they have money. To make a long story . , _ _____ . ·-
this. He came in, I understand, two weeks after the Bahamas g?t
and said we've got the money for the Abaca operation. Now I have it on good
source from a n informant in their organization that a month or so ago a U-Haul truck
came up from Fort Lauderdale in the middle of the night and loaded up a bunch of
guns and explosives and took them to Fort Lauderdale. The name of the man who
-- ·- ····- -·-- -. ___ ... .. -· -· - -----
drove the truck was Wally Gillis. He is a fr eeiancer soldier of fortune type and
l-larbe11 knows a lot of these people. He also, I understand, is .. of skippering .-'
- 4--·· - 4 _, .._, ·-·, -·- . --.. -··- -:· ......... , _ .. ___ --.-- --...-- ·· ,.,._. ____ _____ _ --· ... - ··-···---·· ·-· -·-·-···-- - ··
a boat - you a good s ized cruiser; can go to the Bahamas or wherever.
Suppos edly this material went to a warehouse in Fort Lauderdale but WerbeU is also
•• 0 · - - · · - · · · - · · · ·-- - - · . ..... ... ------ 0 - ·-· - · - ---- · - - - ---· -- ----- · - - --- ·- ----- -----
being invol ved down there with a fellow named Ken Burnstine. Burnstine is
to narcotics people; he is a pilot and has airplanes and every now and then one
of them crashes with
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week was )like Oliver, Hitchell Werbell, III, retired Colonel Robert llayard, US
Army who also lives in this area and is associated with Werbell and a fellow
named Chuck Hall who is a resident of the Bahamas in Nassau, who is a key part
of this operation. And I don't know who else but they were staying for several
days at the Grarnmercy Inn, It is my understanding that they made I
contact there with a former agent of y0ur organization, with an offer of __ -_ !
substantial amounts of money for him to recruit covert types, para-military
types, technicians - in effect, mercenaries. And I have reason to believe that
he is reporting this information. I hope so. So again h t I
, . , '" a . am
showing you is that I think stuff is coming into Washington right fast. Now
.. --------- --------------
Werbell has been known to drop Mr, Colby's name to me and to many other people
because he \Yangled - Werbell originally \Vas in the OSS you know. So he has a
- --- ---- -- - -------------- --
____________ friends who are OSS types in those days __
old boys did have dinner wi.th Colby and Werbell wangled his way into it a couple
---------------- ------------------- --- ---- ---- --- -------
of months ago in Washi.ngton, So, that is all he needs to start droppi.ng names
----------- ---------- -------------------
like mad, He does know some people in and former people. Now I understand that'
------------------ -- ----------------- ------ --- ---- ---------
they have also made contacts in Miami recently with two companies IYho manufacture
------------------------ . --------- ----- . - - ... ----- . ---------------------- -----------
electronic equipment and used the name of another former Agency man who is now
/
----- n;h- in- washi;,gton. Again,- I have -an -infoi-ffiimi-iii- fheorganJzatJ.on -whO----
- --------- -i-sabo-;:,t- ready-tob-reak with 'i:hem-arici he has -"told ·rr;e-alr this:--!lewas-in the _______ _
· --- - - --- --equi"pmen t · ·is illegal· and using· the name ·of-this- foriner-Ag€!ncy-·man ·Tn-tne --- ----
{
- ----------- DEA"and- indicating· that -they would -like to see the .. equipment ,-that ·he' 11-·probably·----
arrange to buy some, that type of· thing.· And I know for a fact that-that-i.ndividual--
knows about- this· nol¥ and he is a good man· and in· good-standing -with- everybody-,---
But· to summarize this, the- point is this - the whole thing is idiotic scheme- by--
a bunch of fools. It is financed by some wealthy idiots, you know, who-have----
money- and are behind. the scenes and these fools - in other. words, .. :l.f .. someone.came. ____ _
<t..,..,.ft,,
in• .. to me and offered me a million dollars to get involved. in a scheme_like _this I _____ _
. wouldn' t. touch .j_t_ .:lt .

__
of both governments involved. _Even the slightest _leak on it .can
__ ____ _ ___ dipl.omatic problem, __ y_ou_know, regardless __ of_ how t_js_, __ __
--------- ___ inyp_l,yment __ of__this __ __ comes out, the first
I
__ i_s_g():l,11_g to be _
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is that it?] Y'es. Yo th B h I d ' k
u see e a amas - on t now how familiar you are with
them, but they don't have an army or anytl1ing, They have a small police force
and they have some small police boats, little 30 foot jobs that run around the
Islands, and they are talking about establishing
. [Aren't they still under
the British protection for foreign troops?] I would certainly think so, but
there are no troops stationed there; you follow me? But what I am trying to say
is the implications of this thing which I know now are known in Washington by
people, When you have the Bahamiarn Ambassador, the new Ambassador, getting a
black American congressman from Georgia aside ·- you see these people talk a lot,
that is another-reason - anybody involved with them is crazy. They have all kinds
of these mercenary types and they make calls all over in Miami and all over the
world and talk about their schemes and it has broken somewhere, you know, along
the line; probably in the Bahamas or Miami, [Well do we know now what the essence
of the conversation was between the Ambassador and Young?] I think it expressed
-------- ..
grave concern about this situation, I think some names were given of the people.
You see they know who Werbell is because in fact, one time made a very·
tough speech about this type of thing with the American intervention in the affairs
of the Bahamas and the name We:cbell is an international soldier of fortune. I
-- .. ----- ------ -
am concerned about one thing: No, l, I know it isn't going to get off the ground
now. I knew it never would. It might have got off the ground but the thing is
the either side would love something like this so they. could- caid.taliie' on it- forever -
and ·attempts to ·establish a base- in· the Bahamas. A ·good ·propagandfist'-·cot.i1a ·Just ..
have·a field day with this. So I have a feeling.that ·unless I am really crazy I
think people in your organization are aware at this moment of this thing surfacing
in Washington. And that is why I am calling this office because I have given· -
information here before on these people and ·I think that--it's important that if .. - .... - ..
somebody says - Hey, have you guys heard anything about ·them and you fellows say -
no, we haven't heard anything---·you·'kllow.-· [Well you-feel-·in·your own ..
this--is something that will ·come about· in the very near-future,--this-attempt?] ..
_ ... - ......... No,. I- would have to say-Ichave.a .feeling now .. the. attempt .. will.not.. come.about .. at all __ __
... ______ .If_ enough .. people..in...Was hing ton. start:.... asking .. ques tions .. and .. they_ do .know .. the _names·---- t
.. ______ of.. these people .and_iLthe.former .. agent _up __ there _goesJn_and. /
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they round up everybody and interrogate them and say where dd you get the guns and
they find Ingrams and Ingrams only come from Herbell and then you have State.
Department you know, saying what is this, do you know who, down here trying to
overthrow our government. And since Prado, by the way was leader of the trorps
@. "'- '' ,. '"-,_ '-<'/>"
that captured Shay Dravarro (ph) then once again you get iHKB a good left-wing
journalist can really weave a nice little story of that big bad Agency down there
doing things again. So he is like a mosquito in that he doesn't accomplish
anything but he is very dangerous in my opinion to our relations. Bad enough to
mess up good things. [I <dll pass this on to Bill. ] Well tell him this; that
I was in Hashington last week and let me emphasize again that I would be the most
surprised person in the world if Senior Officers at Langley aren't aware as of
the Friday, of this situation and through the Washington surfacing there, you
follow me? And really I like Bill and what I'm trying to do, I'm putting myself
in his position and this is his area and I know tpat reports, because I have
•.
talked to him before about them and I am sure that this has been made a matter
of record. And I just think it would be nice for Bill to be able to say yes, my
informant has given me information- this information, Because it will all i:J.e
in, You might mention too that within the last two months Werbell has visited
-- .... ---- --- -
Vesco· in Costa Rica and after that visit a Vesco associate named Marino came up
people and writers and he does imply and use names that' he is not authoriZ'ed ·to -
use and shouldn't use,· I know that he is not ·an ·affidal cir urfofficial or-anything
else connected with your Agency but this is the way he is surviving. · ·people are
dealing with him thinking that really he is - there are enough problems happening
as it is but all we need is one good left-wing newspaper man to get hold of ·this
type of thing and get it in Jack Anderson's column or some place like that and
have an official blast. from the government of. the· Bahamas -and -then everybody -in
the world is going to think that the Agency was behind this and got caught •.. The
reason I appreciatoi'. this_,. I J:hink. timing_ is important .... :L think. the end of next
week is going to be a little bit late because there might even be_some·pub].ic __
. _________ surfacing of this. So I. think it _is important _that. they know_ that_this office __ _
____ _c,!oes_have access .. to _information. ____ I __can_l>e. reache_d at_my_!l_u!Jlber __ here _ _>,hich -"'s
. _______ : ___
(
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'·'· .. \ ____ A--_, ___ _
.----'"-------"- ·- - . _ __:.;_ --
DlS
p A J ( H _ AL
••
Chi c.f, •11 • • •

__________________ • • .. ).'•111::)
1-o .(.:(• •
REFEJU;XCES: N1 6031,
.l.}2S097
1
26 )lay 1966 .
6 llay 1966
"'(•; ... ,., 01:,..0
(•., i.v ... '"':.! "'""'
1. In r_espouse to Referee co A' a request for Jl.r'liAVE' s views on
tho possibility that !nu o! Ro!oronce B mar too identical
with WARDELL III, wo feel that thoro is little
doubt that is in !act WARDELL. to his file,
'WARDELL· to be a low level would-be man who has a history
o! 'i.nvOlvcd in CASTRO assassination schemes .and of profesSing
(.
o at ·Jea.st_ in .contact -with KUDARK. According to
1"LIV!NGSTON" was involved with Antonio VECIANA' s · ;-
plot -nd he was as a KtmARK .ott1cor. It
WARDELL's present actiVities aro as fruitful ns his past business
ventures, JYWAVE believes that ho poses no threat to any seriOus KUBARK
activit los.
2. has as yet tailed to cnll
promised COGSWELL in Now York City;
L
....
on
-
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]as ho had
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3 - WIVC
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M'PROVm FOJUlfl.fAS£1994
CIA HISTUIDCAL Rf'ii£\V PROGRAM
•. $!.--.
j 1 I 1 .. ,,_fiT __
REPRODUCED AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES
6 Julr 1959
Sllll.n.:T 1 lU tcboll l. lll:.'ll!ILL
1. r..,ner&l Cabell phoned "" at noon on 5 Julr 1959 t4
I 0d\. ACl'J
"-' ''.t<:X- '1- t);;;
re;>ort on • call he had receln<l !"rom Subject, • tortA&r OSS M.D,
oov 1D l'llblio RelatioLS Vol'k at Povdor Sprin,s, C..., telephone
5075 (out or tho Atlanta
2. report..:! bo bad Juot roturned trc.. • trip to
tbe D.».in.ican Republic vberd he b&d been approached br General
Pedraz.a a.r.d his croup as vall a• aoma Dan1o.1c&..DJI includir.c }'.anuel
do l!oT& IU>i EdtW-do Rodrigue•. had asked blm (lo'Eil!!ELL) to
vnr\ vHC them to retla'n to CuM. 1LJ &]11pat.hot1c to tholr
help ti:G or not. He vant.s adT1U !n tbia iw& .. :tru:u ad:ed
if tho gro"l) had been ill vlt.h CIA. 'lbor oald no, but i:oplled
tbe7 are t.ry1n,, or vnu.ld aoon JUke contact.
J. said he 1ntel11cenca on the
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REPRODUCED AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES
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dl.aa pick up thh bill.
4. Genera! (' ... bell oo COU!lli W.snta of aey kind, but.
told !oceone vouJ.J be in touch vi th hita, pr.Jbablr on
5. Genora1 C. bell aai;l ''!! haJ lba ball on tllia. Ha vould
ll.h t.o knov vhA rooul t..o !ron. .1 t.
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OAII ' 17 August
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1962
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NO I DOP, ADOP, C/CA Z, C/C :, C/fl z, ·C/'riH 5. S/C 2
:x..tT61041
TO
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2. GARCIA J.:OBLY, YER BELL, AND SWint A!Ut ';IKI...L IJfOYN
J.:l7B.utX A.'ID CO!iSIDER.X.D TO BE WUE.Ill.E.RS AND DEALKRS, PEDDLERS
OF SOJ!I)!X3. AND UNSCRUPULOUS. CARCU I:OliLY IS fiLL

A'IAU OT [_ .JOPNSITION TO CUD.AN COVT IN EXll.E AS RESULT HIS
PE..RSISTENT THO m<SUCO.:S::UUL hFFORTS SELL SKLl GOVT IM KXILX

OOKCEPT .-l"")A..\""0 PRlVATEf PAST TWO
3. PASS PA..RA 1 [ JFOR GUIDANCE. P.\SS INFO P.UA :Z.
· AT YOvn OISCRETION.
4. [ ...J lltONI-
TOR AND .REPORT TO ACTIVIT.':]o;S OF GAUCIA K.OHLY, WEB BELL, JrrC.
KND OF I(ASS4GE

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REPRODUCED AT THE NATIONAL
MESSAGE ..,
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lOUTN
PA G X T ... 0
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•Requested guidancer-
and act1vit1e;rr
'=uball l
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C/TF'f/PA-PROP f" d r 1 .f -1.
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K. UAltVJIT
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\
liEMORA!!DlJM TO: W/C/OFS
Call from Mr.
·Regarding the
Dick Ph1l?Jis
Arrest of
·-
,. .. __
. 1. Mr. Dick Philips add that he call fr01a
Mitchell L. WER-BELL about the &rr.eat ofC _) Tha
follQ1#ing information h contained fn CIA file5 regarding
Mr. \lER,BEI.L:
'"Subject was born March 1918, in l'hiladelphia.
P.e served in the OSS during World War II and later opened
a public relations and advertising firm in During
the paat three yeara he has various import/export
ventures in.Latin America and He waa in the
Dominican Republic during. the past summer. He is well-known
to this Agency and is categorized as unacrupulous and a
promoter with grandiose schemes. Although he has
to work for us, he has never been used. He claims
friendship vith m&ny Latin American political and military
figures.
11
_) The three Cubans that WER-BELL reported
are r . .
.1 These men ·wen:: crew me1nbers ".c cne ')
JPOther ,., •• eli.._ "') From JMWAVE reports it • fuac
r attempting to cxfiltratc his family, using the
L
1-hen he was caught by Caban security force5 on
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Fffil



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Arthur L. S:cith and WER-Bt:LL arrived Guat. about. ten
uays ago. Smith involved vith Emmanuel Firestone (US
of Cubaa.eztraction).· They claim to have recruited informant

to them aoviaed, whom they pay
$6,000 per year.
WER-BELL leter left Guat on 12 Aug traveling vith tall
Latin WOIJI4D.
c.-
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r
WER-BELL has
1
'
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. ',arge
retainer to obt-ain
NHr secret but formal written recogniat!on de facto CUban
Gov. in exile called "Uniced .Organization For the Liberation
of Cuba" vith t!arlo Garcia Kohly as provioional president.
\ 0J'A AUJ.')
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