You are on page 1of 24

Central Coast

November 2013

Family
Inside
Getting Out .................... 2 Child Development ....... 3 Library Voice ................. 4 Money ............................ 6 Fun & Games .................. 9 Gift Ideas ..................... 10 Local History ................ 12 Education .................... 14 Calendar ........................ 17 Family Events ............... 18 Local Resources .......... 20 Alt Education .............. 22

Prematurity / Gratitude / Gift Ideas / SLO History / The Family that Zips Together...

Pg 2

Free! Central Coast Family

Margarita Adventures Zipline Tours
When was the last time your whole family went on a thrilling adventure together? If you could use a dose of team-building fun that everyone can enjoy, try a Margarita Adventures Zipline Canopy Tour! Zippers of all ages will leave with a healthy sense of family bonding, nature appreciation, and personal accomplishment. This private family-owned and locally operated company is committed to offering guests a safe, memorable, and rewarding experience at the historic Santa Margarita Ranch. The crew can accomodate private groups and special celebrations (birthdays, reunions, anniversaries), and they feature gift certificates! (and soon five) distinct ziplines spanning more than 3,000 combined feet, starting with an epic valley crossing, and finishing with forested vineyard views. Periodically, guests can enjoy extra games, such as dropping pumpkins or bean bags on targets from the ziplines. Anyone can enjoy this non-strenuous activity; kids under 75 lbs zip with an adult. Along the way, guests learn about the ranch’s sustainable practices and history, and experience diverse plant and wildlife habitats on one of California’s oldest continuously operated cattle ranches. Patient, knowledgeable guides provide gear checks, yummy snacks and drinks, and helpful tips and encouragement.

room of affiliated Ancient Peaks Winery, specializing in artisan wines grown on the ranch. Adult tour guests enjoy a 20% savings on wine purchases, and the tasting fee is waived with the purchase of one or more bottles. Tours last ~2.5 hours, and include guided transportation. Ziplines soar over majestic oaks and valleys amid a breathtaking backdrop of vineyards, mountains and forest. The Renegade: From a looming hillcrest, guests soar 1,300 feet across a grassy valley into an oak forest along a rugged flank of the Santa Lucia Mountains.

The Archway: Finally, zippers descend 800 feet back into the forest and under a natural oak archway before emerging to a wide-open panorama of vineyards and mountains. The tours also include information about native ecosystems, local archeology, and the fascinating origins of this historic landmark property, including its role in California’s famed Mission Trail.

Margarita Adventures offers four Guests may opt to visit the tasting

Margarita Adventures places an uncompromising priority on safety in the construction and maintenance of ziplines; integrity of equipment; and training of guides. Their ziplines meet or The Woodlander: Next, guests exceed all accepted design and travel 800 feet over canopies of safety requirements. native blue and white oaks before touching down on a steeply The Margarita Adventures office is open year-round, every day pitched mountainside. except TUE and WED. Advance The Hilltopper: For the next 500 reservations are required. The feet, guests emerge from oaks tour office is located at 22719 El and digger pines until reaching Camino Real, Santa Margarita, CA a rocky outcropping with a killer 93453. For more information, call view. This is the fastest ride, and (805) 438-3120, or visit: www. it gets the adrenaline flowing! margarita-adventures.com .

Cover Photo:
Central Coast Family
Phone: (805) 528-0440
TM

Happy Zipper
Margarita Adventures Zipline Tours
©

Chris Leschinsky Photography

PO Box 6424, Los Osos, CA 93412
Fax: (805) 439-0798 PUBLISHER David Vogel ccfamilypb@gmail.com ADVERTISING Inquiries: ccfamilyad@gmail.com DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Eric Woodards

Our goal is to connect Central Coast families with the resources they need to thrive!

EDITOR Patrice Vogel ccfamilyed@gmail.com Associate EDITOR Claire Vogel ccfamilyae@gmail.com GRAPHIC DESIGN Out of the Blue

New Patient Special

CC F

New patients only with paid cleaning. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Exp: 12/31/13

Exam & X-Ray
(805) 544-9440

FREE

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Kristen Barnhart, Jennifer Best, Guy Crabb, Stephanie Foster, Molly Peoples, CS Perryess, Walter Reil, Steven Smith, David Vogel
Central Coast Family is published monthly with a readership over 40,000. Find FREE copies throughout San Luis Obispo County and North Santa Barbara County.

Visit our website: www.centralcoastfamily.com Submission deadline: 15th of each month prior to publication
Information contained in advertisements and other submissions is accepted in good faith. Publication does not imply endorsement by Central Coast Family. Opinions expressed by contributors do not necessarily reflect views of the publisher. We reserve the right to reject or edit all submissions for any reason.

www.rrdentalcare.com
878 Boysen Ave, San Luis Obispo
• www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 2

Material published herein may not be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission. © Vogel 2008

Every issue is printed with soy ink on 100% recycled paper. Please recycle again!

Central Coast Family

November 2013

Prematurity Awareness

Child Development

November is National Prematurity Awareness Month. Nearly a half million babies in the United States—that’s 1 out of every 9— are born premature each year. It is a birth that occurs at least three weeks before a baby’s due date. It is also known as preterm birth (or less than 37 weeks—full term is 40 weeks). Important growth and development occur throughout pregnancy—especially in the final months and weeks.

infections during pregnancy; cigarette smoking; alcohol use, or illicit drug use during pregnancy.

Premature Birth: What to Know Doctors sometimes need to deliver a baby early because of concerns for the health of the mother or the baby. An early delivery should only be considered when there is a medical reason to do so. If a pregnant woman is healthy and the pregnancy is progressing well, it is best to let the baby come naturally, The earlier a baby is born, the more in its own time. severe his or her health problems Although most babies born just a are likely to be. Although babies few weeks early do well and have born very preterm are a small no health issues, some do have percentage of all births, these very more health problems than full preterm infants account for a large term babies. For example, a baby proportion of infant deaths. More born at 35 weeks is more likely to infants die from preterm-related have jaundice, breathing problems, problems than from any other single and a longer hospital stay. cause. Some premature babies require special care and spend What Can I Do? There are things weeks or months hospitalized in a that women can do to improve neonatal intensive care unit. Those their health, lower the risk of having who survive may face lifelong a premature baby, and help their problems such as: intellectual baby stay healthy. These include: disabilities; cerebral palsy; breathing Avoid smoking, alcohol, and drugs. and respiratory problems; visual problems (including retinopathy See your health care provider for a of prematurity); hearing loss, and medical checkup before pregnancy. Get prenatal care as soon as you digestive problems. think you may be pregnant, and Risk Factors - Even if a woman throughout your pregnancy. Talk does everything “right” during to your health care provider about: pregnancy, she still can have a how to control diseases such as premature baby. There are some high blood pressure or diabetes; a known risk factors for premature healthy diet and prenatal vitamins birth. For example, one risk factor (taking 400 micrograms of folic is having a previous preterm birth. acid daily before and during early Additionally, although most black pregnancy); concerns about women give birth at term, on pregnancy and warning signs or average, black women are about symptoms of preterm labor; use 50% more likely to have a premature of 17 alpha hydroxyprogesterone baby compared to white women. caproate if you had a previous The reasons for the difference are preterm birth, and breastfeeding an area of intense research. (breast milk is the best food for The other known risk factors are: babies, whether they are born early carrying more than one baby (twins, or at term). triplets, or more); problems with Warning Signs of Preterm Labor - In the uterus or cervix; chronic health most cases, preterm labor begins problems in the mother, such as unexpectedly and with no known high blood pressure, diabetes, cause. It’s important to seek care and clotting disorders; certain if you think you might be having

preterm labor, because your doctor as how family history, genetics, infections, race and ethnicity, may be able to help. nutrition, and environment may The warning signs are: contractions work together to put some women (the abdomen tightens like a fist) at greater risk for a premature every 10 minutes or more often; delivery. change in vaginal discharge (leaking fluid or bleeding from the vagina); For more Information, go to: pelvic pressure—the feeling that www.cdc.gov/reproductivehealth/ the baby is pushing down; low, dull maternalinfanthealth/Preterm backache; cramps that feel like a Birth.htm menstrual period, and abdominal www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/ cramps with or without diarrhea. Preterm_Labor_and_Birth.cfm Birth is a complex and wonderful process. Fortunately, the outcome www.marchofdimes.com/ for most women is a full term, prematurity healthy baby. More research still is needed to understand the risk Excerpted with permission. © Centers for factors for premature birth, such Disease Control and Prevention.

Central Coast Family

November 2013

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 3

Library Voice

by Kristen Barnhart

“Count your blessings Name them one by one. Count your many blessings See what God has done...” Miss Sparks, huffing and puffing on the foot pump organ in the religious education trailer parked outside Kingsley Elementary School. Her wavering voice preparing our 5th grade souls to march back into the classrooms as the Christian soldiers she believed us to be. We never imagined that it was the last time we could ever sing that hymn without question. We returned to our desks that beautiful November 22nd 50 years ago to hear the radio show

dramatization of “Great Moments in American History” interrupted by: “The President has been shot.” The rest of the day is a blurred memory: my stoic teacher’s eyes filled with tears; knowing that the whole world had changed, not understanding any of it; expecting Walter Cronkite to say it had been a mistake, instead seeing his tears as he announced our President’s death. I was nowhere near ready for my childhood to end at ten years of age, but a chunk just fell out and died, leaving me and my generation with unresolved childish issues, a mistrust of the future and a loss we had no place for. Holding hands around the dinner table that

night, giving thanks with my family, I felt emptied of gratefulness. I surround myself with reminders of why gratitude is vital. Photos of my daughter, inspirational art, and books fill my home. I find that, no matter what class I attend, from economics to aging, keeping a gratitude journal of some sort is recommended. There was Sarah Ban Breathnach’s Simple Abundance in the 1990s, given to me by my friend Mary (for whom I am grateful). Each year, I start it only to let it slip away. Julia Cameron’s The Artist’s Way got me through some tough times too. I picked up her book of everyday readings recently, and it now joins my plethora of daily reading books strategically and creatively placed around my home. I really want to be that person who wakes up grateful each and every morning. While I may not always wake up that way, I’m pretty much in the zone before leaving for the day. Coffee, that sacred elixir, artfully combined with meditation, reading, and my very green drink, can usually help me leave my inner Eeyore at home, tail attached. A panoply of loving kindness completes my ensemble, and off I go. I struggle with my mantle of good naturedness. That sad 10-year-old malcontent sneaks up to step on its hem and my eyes well up as all the unfairness of the world hits me. I feel everything and then I take it too far and make it personal, hopefully for no more than a moment, before I straighten everything back up, fully dressed with a smile. I know I am not alone in this conflict, but when it hits, alone is how I feel. Fortunately I’m smart, willing and able to open up my eyes and heart to gratitude and get on with living my very blessed life.

I have work I love and that nourishes me. I have an amazing beautiful daughter, who is my greatest teacher and deepest joy. I make myself a perfect cup of coffee every morning. I have friends who make me laugh, cry with me, pull me out of my cave, challenge me, cherish me, bring me soup, celebrate me, chide me, surprise me, and refuse to give up on me. I can read and have the means to surround myself with books borrowed and owned, which gives me another circle of 24/7 friends. I have children who claim me as their own with hugs and bedtime stories and the sharing of secrets. I have a spiritual community to help connect me with my divine nature and give me a place to sing my heart out. I own my funky little condo, where I can nurture and be nurtured with my pets and music and even technology like the new iPad, on which I’m writing this in bed with Callie on my feet. I live in the paradise of the Central Coast with its ocean, vineyards, breathtaking vistas, creative people, incredible food, easy access to LA and San Francisco, and even a movie theatre where I can have a great glass of wine while watching films from a leather lounge chair. Join me by counting your blessings this Thanksgiving, whether through tears or laughter. Miss Sparks will surely provide the accompaniment if we know how to listen.
Kristen Barnhart has been telling stories, recommending books, and stamping little hands for over 34 years throughout SLO County. She is currently a Youth Services Librarian at the San Luis Obispo Library. Kristen can be reached at (805) 781-5775 or kbarnhart@slolibrary.org.

Libraries will get you through times with no money, better than money will get you through times with no Libraries!”

Central Coast Family

November 2013

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 4

4211 Broad St, #D in San Luis Obispo
Art & Spanish Class
Call to schedule a free class Tuesday 4:30-5:30 pm Join our

Monart Birthday Party!
See website for pricing

Learn Spanish while creating great art projects This class will have weekly vocabulary and students will practice conversational skills, learn songs, and more!

Age 12

Kindergarten

Call (805) 544-4243 to Register Now!
Like SLOMonart on facebook for discounts! and check out our new website:
Homeschool

www.slomonart.com
• November 2013 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 5

Central Coast Family

Money
that diversification by itself can’t we can learn some techniques guarantee a profit or protect that may help us to nurture our against loss. investments. Relatively few of us toil in the fields to make our living. But, by understanding the challenges of those who farm the land,
Molly Peoples is a financial advisor at Edward Jones in San Luis Obispo. She can be reached at (805) 784-9013. © 2013 Edward Jones. All rights reserved. Member SIPC.

Harvest Lessons for Investors
by Molly Peoples

It’s harvest time again. Of course, harvest season may not mean that much to you if you don’t work in agriculture. Nonetheless, you can learn a lot from those who do — especially in your role as an investor. Consider these lessons: • “Feed” your portfolio. By properly combining fertilizers and irrigation, farmers seek to maximize their crops’ growth. If you want to give your portfolio the opportunity to grow, you need to “feed” it with the right mix of investments. This generally means owning a reasonable percentage of growth-oriented vehicles, such as stocks and stockbased securities. Keep in mind: the value of these types of investments will fluctuate, sometimes sharply — and there’s no guarantee you won’t lose some or all of your principal. • Be patient. Crops don’t grow overnight. Farmers know they will put in countless hours of work before they see the fruits of their labors. And they know that, along the way, they will likely experience setbacks caused by a variety of issues: too much rain, too little rain, insect infestations — the list goes on and on. When you invest, you shouldn’t expect to “get rich quick” and you can expect to experience obstacles in the form of bear markets, economic downturns,

changes in legislation and so forth. Continuing to invest for the long term and focusing more on long-term results than short-term success can help you as you work toward your objectives. • Respond to your investment “climate.” Farmers can’t control the weather, but they can respond to it. For example, when it’s been dry for a long time, they can boost their irrigation. As an investor, you can’t control the economic “climate,” but you can make adjustments. To illustrate: If all signs point to rising long-term interest rates, which typically have a negative effect on long-term bond prices, you may need to consider reducing your exposure, at least for a while, to these bonds. • Diversify. Farmers face a variety of risks, including bad weather and fluctuating prices. They can help combat both threats through diversification. For instance, they can plant some crops that are more droughtresistant than others, so they won’t face complete ruin when the rains don’t fall. As an investor, you should also diversify; if you only owned one type of financial asset, and that asset class took a big hit, you could sustain large losses. But spreading your dollars among an array of investments (such as stocks, bonds, cash and other vehicles) may help reduce the effects of volatility on your portfolio. Be aware, though,

Ch s n So
&
Credit Cards Accepted

s i r

Local Family Owned

e g&R n i e n f a Pro r Cle e t t ured s u n I G Rain sed & n e c Li
al W ssion

indo

shin w Wa

pair

g

Chris Waller

8 05

stim EE e R F for a Call

5 7 3 2 305 -

ate

Central Coast Family

November 2013

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 6

SPONSORED BY RON BELL, KSBY TV, SANTA MARIA SUN

Central Coast Family

November 2013

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 7

Fun & Games
Thanksgiving Hidden Treats
Can you find all of the hidden treats?
1 fork 3 pumpkins 1 milk carton 3 corncobs 2 apples 1 spoon 2 pilgrim hats 3 turkeys 2 loaves of bread

A day set aside for expressing gratitude thank you, kind readers

Thanksgiving Sodoku

Central Coast Family

November 2013

S U D O K U

Sudoku begins with some of the grid cells filled with numbers. The object is to fill the other empty cells with numbers between 1 and 9 (1 number only in each cell). A number should appear only once in each row, column, and region.

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 8

Central Coast Family

November 2013

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 9

Family Life

Gift Ideas for Kids
by Steven Smith

CC Flutes
Band
Instruments
Locally Owned and Operated . Amazing Discounts!
Personal Knowledgeable Service by Flexible Appointment

New and Used Instruments . Band Instrument Rental

ron@ccflutes.com
Books are always great gifts. Detective stories are usually popular with children, as are books about the way things work. Younger children love books about animals and young protagonists having fanciful adventures. Books encourage using imagination to explore the possibilities of this world. For older children, classic novels, popular new series, and Newberry Award winners are all excellent choices.

CCFlutes.com
Toys involving sports and physical activities are also great choices, since they develop motor movement skills and coordination, and encourage physical fitness. These toys can be as simple as a jump rope, or more specialized like a basketball, soccer ball, Frisbee, Hacky Sack, or Hula Hoop. Pets are captivating to children, and they can help children learn responsibility and empathy. If

The holidays will soon be upon us and most children hope to receive toys. There are countless toys available, and all can entertain, but the best toys stimulate critical thinking or skill development. Certain toys can help children develop skills such as organization, vocabulary, recognition, creativity, and following directions. All of these skills can help children become successful in life.

explore an aptitude or desire for creativity. Children may want to take classes to develop their abilities, from painting and drawing to fashion design, sculpture, pottery, and jewelry making. I highly recommend giving a child a musical instrument, since music education requires many skills that are transferable to other areas. Choose something simple for a child with no previous musical experience, and be sure to match the instrument to the child’s age group. For example, very young children can play percussive instruments, such as drums, or simple wind instruments like recorders. An important consideration is the volume of an instrument and the po-tential for loud instruments (such as electric guitars or drums) to annoy neighbors or other family members.

Some candidates for gifts include: wooden blocks and geometric shapes (for very young children); Legos, K’NEX and other building sets (creating/ designing); art and craft supplies; puzzles; drawing books (comics and themed instruction); games (board games, chess, etc.); calligraphy kits; sock puppet kits with books; paper plane or kite kits; magic kits; origami kits; nail decorating kits, and balloon animal kits, to name a few. Scrapbooks are also engaging and can create an awareness There are also electronic toys of family history and lead to an that resemble pianos or guitars and use colored lights to instruct interest in photography. children to play melodies and Art related gifts can allow learn simple music theory. For children the freedom to fully older children (age 6 and up), express themselves and their instruments such as acoustic ideas. The art that results can guitars and keyboards can be admired and shared with introduce composition and friends and family members. dexterity, and allow children Art and craft supplies can to learn and master songs they also encourage children to know.

M W

Dr. Marc Irving Weber
Music Lessons for All Ages
Piano, Guitar, Voice, Winds, Brass, Percussion Composition & Music Theory
Composer and performer with many years of teaching experience

B.M. from the Cleveland Institute of Music M.M. from Yale School of Music Ph.D. from the University of Iowa School of Music
Each student is unique and requires a flexible approach I teach the student, not the instrument My goal is to provide students with a solid musical foundation that will transcend all genres

Lessons in Your Home
$25/half hour $50/hour
Credit Cards Accepted

drmarcweber@yahoo.com
http://iowacreativemusic.com

661 993-2540

Central Coast Family

November 2013

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 10

you are considering the gift of a live animal, keep in mind the amount of care required, and the potential for danger. Younger children may enjoy an ant farm, which is simple to care for and poses virtually no threat. Small rodents such as mice or hamsters, and small birds are also good choices, as they can interact with children. But they need to be handled respectfully, or they can bite. These pets will also require regular care, such as feeding and watering, changing the bedding, and cleaning the cage. Hermit crabs are safe and easy to care for, as are some amphibians, like frogs and tadpoles. Before considering a specific pet, talk to an employee at a pet store to learn about that animal and factor in the age and lifestyle of your child. Watching children play can give you an understanding of what types of toys are exciting and appropriate for them. Some toys can invite social interaction,

while others are geared toward solitary play. Some basic considerations include how durable and safe a toy is, and how long it will interest a child. The best toys are well-made and provide entertainment and learning for a year or more. I grew up playing mostly with Legos and G. I. Joes. While building toys allowed for limitless creativity, war-related toys can glamorize killing and violence. My recommendation is to avoid war toys and play weapons, as they may lead to an appreciation for aggression and dominance, which can make social interaction more difficult. Ultimately, choosing the right toys can encourage a child’s personal growth and challenge them in a fun way to learn new skills.
Steven Smith is a resident of San Luis Obispo and a graduate of CSU Long Beach with a degree in Creative Writing. Steven is currently a painter/muralist and a freelance writer. His art can be viewed at www.myspace.com/sloartiststevensmith. Steven can be reached by e-mail at: sloartiststevensmith@yahoo.com.

Consult the Toy Professionals
11-4

www.whizkidsslo.com
www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 11

Central Coast Family

November 2013

Local History SLO Downtown
by Guy Crabb

San Luis Obispo: 100 Years Books
Collect all three great books about the history of SLO town. Buy your memory of downtown as it continues to change in the coming months and years. Capture a moment in history!

In this article, I want to get back to the roots that led me to create my three books about San Luis Obispo downtown history. I am in the middle of rewriting the Higuera Street book, and have been pulling out artifacts that I have bought over the years. One of my prized possessions is a simple matchbook cover that answered a question I had for years. I have lived in San Luis Obispo for over 30 years, and always wondered how Bull’s Tavern on Chorro Street got its name. I came up with lots of ideas over the years, such as maybe a bull got loose in town and burst through the front door, or maybe tavern patrons were meeting to “shoot the bull.” Then one day, I found my answer on the internet. I saw a matchbook advertising the “Budweiser Tavern” at 1032 Chorro Street, which had been the address for Bull’s in the past. Additional information on the matchbook was the sale of “MIXED DRINKS OF ALL KINDS.” But the answer to my question was found in the name of the tavern proprietor: Albert “Bull” Tognazzini. Albert later named the tavern after himself. Curiosity and discovery about these kinds of interesting tidbits of SLO downtown business history inspired me to write my books. One of my favorite restaurants in town is Pepe Delgado’s on Monterey Street. The food is good, the chips and salsa are great, and the service is always outstanding. In the 1950s and 1960s, this building housed a neighborhood “mom and pop” store named Monterey Market. The front door was at the corner of the building, but it was recently moved to the front

of the restaurant. Many corner “mom and pop” stores would have a door at the corner of their building. After the market closed, a business called La Casa de Monterey was at the location for about 5 years before Pepe’s moved into the building in 1971. My wife and I walked into Ross Dress for Less the other day and we went downstairs, which always brings back memories of this building being a J.C. Penney’s. When I was a kid, all J. C. Penney’s had a basement, and I loved going up and down those stairs. Another cool fact is that the second floor of the building used to be the Marshall Hotel from the 1930s to the 1960s. I’m not sure where the hotel guests parked, but this was a nice sized hotel right in the middle of downtown. You would check in by going through a door that was on the end of the building. If you stand outside of the Ross store on Higuera Street looking across the street, you see The Gap, which is where the downtown Sears building used to be. Recently, I purchased several slides and old 16 mm movies from a person who bought them at an estate sale. The slides were from the 1968 La Fiesta Parade. The photographer stood on the corner of Higuera and Morro Streets to take most of the pictures. Of course, the kids in the parade were cute, but my interest was in the businesses in the background. A few of the pictures have a business called “Best Ever Grill” in them. One of the pictures shows a parade float going past the “Best Ever Grill,” and you can see several kids sitting on top of the building watching the parade

Enjoy Your Memories!
Get an autographed copy at www.slo100years.com, Boo Boo Records, the History Center, and Antiques on Monterey
Also available at Barnes & Noble, Crushed Grape, Apple Farm, and Volumes of Pleasure
GUY CRABB PUBLISHING

go by with pedestrians below. Today. the business at this location is Louisa’s Place. Many of us think of Louisa’s Place as being here forever, but Best Ever Grill was here for over 15 years until Louisa’s Place opened up around 1980. This location has been a local favorite for many years. Another business that is in several of the slides is Norton’s Eagle Pharmacy with a small shoe store at the end of the building. The shoe store was called Copeland’s Fine Shoes and was owned by the same Copeland family that has bought many properties in downtown. Today, this location is occupied by Victoria’s Secret. Norton’s Pharmacy was at this location for over 40 years, serving the community from the 1930s into the late 1970s. The pharmacy was the place to go to buy anything from medicine to an ice cream bar. Many small towns depended on stores like these, because there weren’t a lot of department stores during the 1930s and 1940s. One of the most historic buildings in downtown is at 856 Higuera, where Fiore Boutique has been in business since 1999. This is where Sandercock Transfer was located for over 30 years. There are several photos of the Sandercock moving crew taking

goods to businesses downtown in their assortment of wagons pulled by horse power. There is one picture that I have seen used many times by the city in advertisements with Mr. Sandercock standing in front of his store with two of his moving wagons on either side of him. It’s fun to write an article about what businesses used to be at different locations. It is also fun to talk with people who have lived in the area for a long time. I sometimes get a chance to talk with Jean Martin, who is a retired teacher in town. Our conversations can last for hours, because she is full of great facts and stories about people from the past. The new edition of the Higuera Street book will have many new pictures and more stories about the the pioneers of our great county. It’s great getting back to my roots and remembering why I started writing the 100 year books. It’s even more fun passing on some interesting information.
Guy Crabb teaches at Charles E. Teach Elementary School in San Luis Obispo. He graduated from Cal Poly SLO and has been teaching for 28 years. Guy was a Teacher of the Year in 2006 and currently teaches at a National Blue Ribbon School. Reach him at crabbx5@charter.net.

Central Coast Family

November 2013

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 12

26 & 27

9:30am-2:30pm

December 23, 26, 27

Mon-Thu-Fri Thu-Fri

January 2, 3

Central Coast Family

November 2013

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 13

Education
Scholarships could be the answer for hundreds of thousands of students everywhere and it is important that students know where to look for them. The internet is one of a student’s greatest resources during the application process. The following fund college costs at an average is a list of some of the best free amount of $7,673. For the first scholarship databases online: time, the study asked respondents to identify the type of scholarships FastWeb Scholarship Search – they received. 73 percent features 1.5 million scholarships reported receiving a scholarship worth over $3.4 billion and email directly from the college at an notifications of scholarships average amount of $5,645; 27 relevant to you percent reported receiving a scholarship from a community College Board’s FUND FINDER – group or nonprofit organization features scholarships and other at an average amount of $568; financial aid programs totaling 26 percent reported receiving nearly $6 billion a scholarship awarded by their state government, at an average Scholarships.com LLC – since 1999, they have matched students of $592. with 2.7 million local, state, and In recent years, more and more national scholarships families are narrowing college choices because of financial Sallie Mae’s Scholarship Search – limits. In 2012, 69 percent of updated daily and contains over families eliminated colleges based 3 million scholarships worth over on cost, up from a previous high $16 billion

Scholarship Month

of 64 percent in 2011.

November 1st kicks off the start of the celebration of National Scholarship Month. Sponsored by the National Scholarship Providers Association, November is dedicated to raising awareness of scholarship opportunities for current and future college students. It is no coincidence that November is also the recommended time to start researching and applying for scholarships for the next fall semester. In fact, National Scholarship Month was changed from May to November in 2008 to coincide with the application season. According to the 2012 Sallie Mae national “How America Pays for College” study, 35 percent of total families used scholarships to

ScholarshipPoints is a unique free, rewards-based program that awards over $100,000 in scholarships to students each year. Students earn points for completing online activities such as quizzes, surveys, and blogs, and each point earned equals one entry into a monthly $1,000 or quarterly $10,000 scholarship drawing. It’s also important for students to get creative during their scholarship search and look outside of the internet. Aside from college financial aid offices, it is recommended that students look to their local communities and organizations as well as local professional associations. They should also consider talents aside from their academic successes such as athletics, art, music, and hobbies. In celebration of National Scholarship Month, Sallie Mae is offering the chance to win a full ride to college with $150,000 in scholarship money through its UPromise program. There is no purchase required to enter the program. Some tips to consider when applying for scholarships: Start early. Start the scholarship search and application process as early as possible. There are scholarship programs available for early high school students. Apply, apply, apply. The more scholarships you apply for, the more likely you are to receive one. Apply for as many scholarships as possible that are relevant to you. Don’t overlook any opportunities. Avoid application fees. Proofread. Many committees will not consider applications with major errors in an effort to eliminate some candidates among a sea of applicants. Be sure to follow instructions, and check that you have fulfilled all of the requirements of each application.

Central Coast Family

November 2013

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 14

$30 Special ($15 Savings!)
Wash, Cut & Style
(only valid with Mandy B)

Legends Salon & Day Spa
4855 El Camino Real Atascadero

Mandy B

Curl Specialist

(805) 461-5207 salon (916) 225-3971 direct

David S. Vogel
Serious Injury
Car, Truck & Motorcycle Accidents Wrongful Death, Head Injury, Burns Medical Malpractice, Nursing Home Neglect No Recover y . No Fee
Former Prosecutor with 30 years of Experience Honored with the highest rating (AV Preeminent) in the Peer-Reviewed National Law Directory Martindale-Hubbell

Law Offices of

www.davidvogel.com (805) 540-7100
1026 Palm Street, Suite 214, San Luis Obispo
Central Coast Family • November 2013 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 15

Central Coast Family

November 2013

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 16

November 2013 Free Ongoing Events
SUNDAY
FARMERS MARKET: 11:30-2:30pm Nipomo: Monarch Club

MONDAY 28 FARMERS MARKET:
2-4:30pm Los Osos: 2nd & Santa Maria

TUESDAY
3:00-6:00 pm in Paso Robles City Park LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:10 SLO DOC BURNSTEIN’S READING LAB 3:30-4:15pm AG

27

29 FARMERS MARKET:

November is:
Aviation Month Child Safety Month Good Nutrition Month National Family Literacy Month National Adoption Month National Epilepsy Month Latin American Month Peanut Butter Lover’s Month

Birthstone: Citrine/Topaz Flower:

8:30-11am AG Spencers Market 12:30-4:30pm Santa Maria Town Ctr 3:00-6:00pm AT Sunken Gardens 5:00-8:00pm Pismo, Main St & Dolliver LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 AT, 10:30 AG, 11:00 NI

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY 30 31 FARMERS MARKETS: FARMERS MARKETS:

FRIDAY
FARMERS MARKETS:
9:00am-12:30pm Paso Robles Wal Mart 2:30-5:30pm Cambria Main St Vets Hall
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 LO

SATURDAY
8:00-10:30am SLO Promenade 9:00am-12:30pm Templeton City Park 9:00am-1:00pm Shell Bch Dinosaur Caves 9:00am-1:00pm Paso Downtown Park 12:00-2:30pm AG Village Gazebo 2:30-6:00pm Morro Bay 800 Main St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 11:00 AG

3:00-6:00pm Old Porte Fisheries AG 2:30-5:00pm Spencers Morro Bay 6:00-9:00pm Downtown SLO LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:00 MB, 10:10 SLO, 10:15 CAM,10:30 AT, 10:30 AG,10:30 LO, 11:00 CAY, 11:30 SMG

1 2 BINGO VETS HALL MB - 1st FRI 5:00pm FARMERS MARKETS:

all saints day

SLO CO GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY 1st SAT 12:30am IOOF Hall SLO

Chrysanthemum

national family literacy day national author’s day

daniel Boone’s birthday (Born in 1734)

3 FARMERS MARKET:

11:30-2:30pm Nipomo: Monarch Club

4 FARMERS MARKET:

2-4:30pm Los Osos: 2nd & Santa Maria

daylight saving time ends (Fall Back 1 Hour)
1st wagon train reached california (in 1841)

3:00-6:00 pm in Paso Robles City Park LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:10 SLO DOC BURNSTEIN’S READING LAB 3:30-4:15pm AG

5 FARMERS MARKET:

8:30-11am AG Spencers Market 12:30-4:30pm Santa Maria Town Ctr 3:00-6:00pm AT Sunken Gardens 5:00-8:00pm Pismo, Main St & Dolliver LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 AT, 10:30 AG, 11:00 NI

6 FARMERS MARKETS:

7 FARMERS MARKETS:

3:00-6:00pm Old Porte Fisheries AG 2:30-5:00pm Spencers Morro Bay 6:00-9:00pm Downtown SLO LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:00 MB, 10:10 SLO, 10:15 CAM,10:30 AT, 10:30 AG,10:30 LO, 11:00 CAY, 11:30 SMG

8 FARMERS MARKETS:

9:00am-12:30pm Paso Robles Wal Mart 2:30-5:30pm Cambria Main St Vets Hall
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 LO

9 FARMERS MARKETS:

8:00-10:30am SLO Promenade 9:00am-12:30pm Templeton City Park 9:00am-1:00pm Shell Bch Dinosaur Caves 9:00am-1:00pm Paso Downtown Park 12:00-2:30pm AG Village Gazebo 2:30-6:00pm Morro Bay 800 Main St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 11:00 AG

national Donut day

sandwich day (Birthday of creator J. Montague)
NEW MOON

usa election day basketball day

magazine day hug a bear day X-Ray day (Discovered in 1895)

parade day

10 FARMERS MARKET:

11:30-2:30pm Nipomo: Monarch Club

11 FARMERS MARKET:

2-4:30pm Los Osos: 2nd & Santa Maria

veteran’s day

3:00-6:00 pm in Paso Robles City Park LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:10 SLO DOC BURNSTEIN’S READING LAB 3:30-4:15pm AG

12 FARMERS MARKET:

8:30-11am AG Spencers Market 12:30-4:30pm Santa Maria Town Ctr 3:00-6:00pm AT Sunken Gardens 5:00-8:00pm Pismo, Main St & Dolliver LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 AT, 10:30 AG, 11:00 NI

13 FARMERS MARKETS:

14 FARMERS MARKETS:

3:00-6:00pm Old Porte Fisheries AG 2:30-5:00pm Spencers Morro Bay 6:00-9:00pm Downtown SLO LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:00 MB, 10:10 SLO, 10:15 CAM,10:30 AT, 10:30 AG,10:30 LO, 11:00 CAY, 11:30 SMG

15 FARMERS MARKETS:

9:00am-12:30pm Paso Robles Wal Mart 2:30-5:30pm Cambria Main St Vets Hall
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 LO

16 FARMERS MARKETS:

8:00-10:30am SLO Promenade 9:00am-12:30pm Templeton City Park 9:00am-1:00pm Shell Bch Dinosaur Caves 9:00am-1:00pm Paso Downtown Park 12:00-2:30pm AG Village Gazebo 2:30-6:00pm Morro Bay 800 Main St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 11:00 AG

Elizabeth cady stanton day US MARINE CORPS EST. (1775)

mom’s & dad’s day fantasia released (by Disney in 1940)

national clean out your refrigerator day

button day america recycles day pack your mom lunch day

17 FARMERS MARKET:

11:30-2:30pm Nipomo: Monarch Club

18 FARMERS MARKET:

2-4:30pm Los Osos: 2nd & Santa Maria

world prematurity awareness day homemade bread day national young reader’s day take a hike day
FULL MOON

3:00-6:00 pm in Paso Robles City Park LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:10 SLO DOC BURNSTEIN’S READING LAB 3:30-4:15pm AG

19 FARMERS MARKET:

8:30-11am AG Spencers Market 12:30-4:30pm Santa Maria Town Ctr 3:00-6:00pm AT Sunken Gardens 5:00-8:00pm Pismo, Main St & Dolliver LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 AT, 10:30 AG, 11:00 NI

20 FARMERS MARKETS:

21 FARMERS MARKETS:

3:00-6:00pm Old Porte Fisheries AG 2:30-5:00pm Spencers Morro Bay 6:00-9:00pm Downtown SLO LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:00 MB, 10:10 SLO, 10:15 CAM,10:30 AT, 10:30 AG,10:30 LO, 11:00 CAY, 11:30 SMG

22 FARMERS MARKETS:

9:00am-12:30pm Paso Robles Wal Mart 10:00am-12:30pm Cayucos Vets Hall 2:30-5:30pm Cambria Main St Vets Hall
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 LO

23 FARMERS MARKETS:

8:00-10:30am SLO Promenade 9:00am-12:30pm Templeton City Park 9:00am-1:00pm Shell Bch Dinosaur Caves 9:00am-1:00pm Paso Downtown Park 12:00-2:30pm AG Village Gazebo 2:30-6:00pm Morro Bay 800 Main St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 11:00 AG

mickey mouse’s birthday (Created in 1928)

(Forced to shoot an apple off his son’s head in 1315)

william tell day

gettysburg address delivered (by Lincoln in 1863)

mexican revolution day universal children’s day

world hello day

national adoption day
stop the violence day

national cashew day

24 FARMERS MARKET:

11:30-2:30pm Nipomo: Monarch Club

25 FARMERS MARKET:

2-4:30pm Los Osos: 2nd & Santa Maria

3:00-6:00 pm in Paso Robles City Park LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:10 SLO DOC BURNSTEIN’S READING LAB 3:30-4:15pm AG

26 FARMERS MARKET:

zachary taylor’s birthday (Born in 1784)

8:30-11am AG Spencers Market 12:30-4:30pm Santa Maria Town Ctr 3:00-6:00pm AT Sunken Gardens 5:00-8:00pm Pismo, Main St & Dolliver LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 AT, 10:30 AG, 11:00 NI

27 FARMERS MARKETS:

28 FARMERS MARKETS:

3:00-6:00pm Old Porte Fisheries AG 2:30-5:00pm Spencers Morro Bay 6:00-9:00pm Downtown SLO LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:00 MB, 10:10 SLO, 10:15 CAM,10:30 AT, 10:30 AG,10:30 LO, 11:00 CAY, 11:30 SMG

29 FARMERS MARKETS:

9:00am-12:30pm Paso Robles Wal Mart 2:30-5:30pm Cambria Main St Vets Hall
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 LO

30 FARMERS MARKETS:

8:00-10:30am SLO Promenade 9:00am-12:30pm Templeton City Park 9:00am-1:00pm Shell Bch Dinosaur Caves 9:00am-1:00pm Paso Downtown Park 12:00-2:30pm AG Village Gazebo 2:30-6:00pm Morro Bay 800 Main St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 11:00 AG

John F Kennedy Jr’s birthday (Born in 1960)

national cake day

pins & needles day

thanksgiving day

national native american heritage day
king tut’s tomb opened (in 1922)

Hanukkah begins

Central Coast Family

November 2013

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 17

Family Events
THU OCT 31 at 5:00-7:00 pm: Trunkor-Treat HARVEST FESTIVAL at Templeton Presbyterian Church, 610 S. Main St. Candy, games, snacks, and a bounce house. Cost: free. Contact: 434-1921 or http:// templetones.org. Nipomo. Families and friends come together to celebrate those who have departed with altars, music, crafts including sugar skull decoration, face painting, and a FRI NOV 1 - TUE DEC 31: STEVEN poetry recital. Cost: free. Contact: SMITH ART EXHIBIT at West 929-5679. End Espresso & Tea, 670 Higuera THU OCT 31 at 5:30-8:30 pm: 10th St, San Luis Obispo. Enjoy the SAT NOV 2 5:00-9:00 pm: GIRLS’ Annual FALL FESTIVAL at El Morro contemporary artwork of local NIGHT OUT Abel Maldonado Youth Church of the Nazarene, 1480 artist and freelance writer Steven Center, 600 S. McClelland St, Santa Santa Isabel Ave, Los Osos. Shuttle Smith. Cost: free. Contact: 593- Maria. This event features snacks, provided from Los Osos Middle 0937. spa treatments, crafts, a ‘chick School. No scary costumes, please. flick’ movie marathon, and cookie Cost: donations accepted. Contact: SUN NOV 1 - TUE NOV 3 (times decorating. Cost: free. Contact: vary): 7th Annual WEAVERS SALE 925-0951, x 519 or http://ci.santa528-0391. & GALLERY SHOW at Central maria.ca.us. FRI NOV 1 at 6:00 pm: VOODOO Coast Weaver’s Guild, 9156 Santa BOOGALOO: A Who Dat Halloween Margarita Rd, Atascadero. Cost: SAT NOV 2 at 7:00 pm: JACK Par-Tay at SLO Vets Hall, 801 Grand free. Contact: centralcoastweavers. HANNA’S INTO THE WILD LIVE! at Ave. Enjoy a BIG Costume party org or 543-7467. Christopher Cohan Center, 1 Grand featuring Bon Temps Creole Cafe Ave, SLO. America’s “favorite and Burning James and the Funky SAT NOV 2 9:00 am - 2:00 pm: zookeeper” returns with another Flames. Funky Music, Creole Food, CALIFORNIA NATIVE PLANT SALE live show featuring many of his and Libations! Cost: $22 in advance; at Pacific Beach High School, favorite animal friends, as well as $25 at the door. Proceeds benefit 11950 Los Osos Valley Rd, San Luis fascinating and humorous stories Noor Foundation. Contact: 544- Obispo. Cost: free. Contact: 528- and footage from his adventures 0914 or http://cnps-slo.org. 2100 or www.burningjames.com. around the world. Cost: $23-45. Contact: pacslo.org or 756-4849. FRI NOV 1-SUN NOV 24 (times vary): SAT NOV 2 at 2:00 pm: DIA DE DON’T CRY FOR ME, MARGARET LOS MUERTOS (Day of the Dead) SAT NOV 2 & SUN NOV 3 10:00 MITCHELL at Cambria Center for celebration at Rancho Nipomo am-4:00 pm: CRAFTY CREATIONS the Arts, 1350 Main St, Cambria. Dana Adobe, 671 S Oakglen Ave, BOUTIQUE at 707 Huasna Rd, Arroyo Grande. Shop for homemade crafts from around the county. Contact: 234-2799. Celebrate the Beauty of Authenticity & Art of Being Human Directed by Judith Jesness. Cost: $20 or $15 members, $5 students. Contact: 927-8190 or http:// artistsofcambria.com. from the area’s top restaurants and social gathering places will compete in a bartending competition. All proceeds benefit educational programs. Cost: $45. Contact: chemistryofcocktails. com. SUN NOV 3-SUN NOV 17 (times & locations vary): 30th Annual SAN LUIS OBISPO POETRY FESTIVAL. The festival takes place at various venues throughout San Luis Obispo County. Cost: $8 general, $6 for students & seniors. Contact: 5471318 or http://languageofthesoul. org. THU NOV 7 6:00 - 9:00 pm: VETERANS CELEBRATION at Chorro & Higuera Sts, San Luis Obispo. Enjoy displays from various service branches, a recognition ceremony, Marine procession, music, free flags and cupcakes. Contact: www.downtownslo.com. THU NOV 7-SAT NOV 9 (times vary): Disney’s ALADDIN JR at Atascadero Junior High Baro Stage, 6501 Lewis Ave, Atascadero. Cost: $7, $4 kids 5 and under. Contact: 462-4360 or http://atasjhs.sharpschool.net. THU NOV 7-SUN DEC 22 (times & prices vary): MARY POPPINS at PCPA Marian Theatre, 800 S. College Dr, Santa Maria. This Broadway musical is based on the book by P.L. Travers and the Disney film. Contact: 922-8313 or http:// pcpa.org. FRI NOV 8 9:00 am-4:00 pm & SAT NOV 9 9:00 am-2:00 pm: MAKING SPIRITS BRIGHT Holiday Boutique at Community Church of Atascadero, 5860 Rosario Ave, Atascadero. Contact: 466-8610.

Real II Book Release & Signing
Friday, November 8th
No charge - Open to public

3:30-7:00 pm

La Perla del Mar Chapel, 205 Windward Ave, Shell Beach
www.marthamartha.net

FRI NOV 8-SUN NOV 10 9:00 am4:00 pm: CHRISTMAS ARTS & CRAFTS FAIRE at Mission San SUN NOV 3 12:00 - 5:00 pm: DIA Miguel, 775 Mission St, San DE LOS MUERTOS at Veterans’ Miguel. Contact: 467-2131 or http:// Memorial Community Center, 313 missionsanmiguel.org. W. Tunnell St, Santa Maria. This free family event from the City of FRI NOV 8 3:30-7:00 pm: REAL II Santa Maria Recreation and Parks BOOK RELEASE & SIGNING at La Dept features altars, arts and Perla del Mar Chapel, 205 Windward crafts, live music, dance, and food. Ave, Shell Beach. Celebrate the Contact: 925-0951, x 260 or http:// release of REAL II, a collection of photos and stories that portray ci.santa-maria.ca.us. the “the beauty of authenticity SUN NOV 3 2:00 - 5:00 pm: and art of being human.” REAL CHEMISTRY OF COCKTAILS at II features Archbishop Desmond The Exploration Station, 867 Tutu, missionary Heidi Baker, Ramona Ave, Grover Beach. Enjoy National Buckdancing Champion an afternoon of food, live music, Thomas Maupin, bluegrass banjo fun activities, silent auction, and star Daniel Rothwell, and Kathy cocktail tastings. Local mixologists (Gidget) Zuckerman, et al. Many will

SUN NOV 3 11:00 am-4:00 pm: GIDDY UP ROUND UP Kids & Family Day at Santa Margarita Ranch, 9000 Yerba Buena Ave, Santa Margarita. Enjoy a day of family fun including rides on a historic steam train, dummy roping contest, stick horse race, working cow dog demos, gold panning, live entertainment, vendor booths, interactive exhibits, and much more! Cost: $10 per person (includes 1 train ride), kids under 2 free. Contact: 540-3214 or www. historicsantamargaritaranch.com.

Central Coast Family

November 2013

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 18

Family Events
Diana Stanton, Cal Poly Dance SUN, with a special New Year’s Dept. Cost: $30-60. Contact: 756- Eve Bash. Cost: $15-25. Contact: pewterploughplayhouse.org or 4849 or http://pacslo.org. 927-3877. MON NOV 14 - SAT NOV 23 at 8:00 pm: CROSSROADS at Spanos SAT NOV 23 11:00 am - 12:30 Theatre, 1 Grand Ave, San Luis pm: WENDELIN VAN DRAANEN Obispo. An outcast family travels PROGRAM at Santa Maria Public through time and meets a host of Library, Shepard Hall, 421 S bizarre and eccentric characters McClelland St, Santa Maria. Van in this original play, written and Draanen presents an all-ages directed by Dr. Al Schnupp. Cost: slideshow that chronicles her $12-20. Contact: 756-4849 or http:// journey from local teacher/mom to world-renowned author of Sammy pacslo.org. Keyes, Flipped, Shredderman, SAT NOV 16 7:00 - 9:30 pm: and many other titles for young ABUNDANCE BARN DANCE at readers. Cost: free. Contact: 925Oak Creek Commons Community 0994. Room, 635 Nicklaus St, Paso Robles. Calamity House Band SAT NOV 23 2:00 - 3:00 pm: will be playing dance tunes; Gary WENDELIN VAN DRAANEN BOOK Shapiro will call the 3rd Annual SIGNING at Barnes & Noble Abundance Barn Dance November Booksellers, 894 Marsh St, San Luis 16. Families welcome. Cost: $7 Obispo. Van Draanen is the worldadult, kids free. Contact: 239-8134. renowned author of Sammy Keyes, Flipped, Shredderman, and many SUN NOV 17 2:00 & 5:00 pm: other titles for young readers. POTTED POTTER: The Un- Cost: free. Contact: 781-8334. authorized Harry Experience at Cohan Center, 1 Grand Ave, San SAT NOV 23 at 7:30 pm: Cuesta Luis Obispo. This runaway off- Master Chorale MESSIAH Concert Broadway hit takes on the ultimate at CPAC Cuesta College, Hwy 1, challenge of condensing (or potting) San Luis Obispo. Cuesta Master all seven Harry Potter books into Chorale begins its 30th Anniversary 70 madcap minutes to delight all Season under the musical direction ages! Cost: $32-59. Contact: 756- of Thomas Davies with a complete performance of Handel’s most 4849 or http://pacslo.org. popular work. Cost: $10-20. WED NOV 20 - TUE DEC 31 11:00 Contact: 546-3936. am-5:00 pm: CRAFT ART MARKET at SLO Museum of Art, 1010 Broad WED NOV 27-THU DEC 5 at 5:00 pm: St. This one-of-a-kind craft fair SLO HANUKKAH CELEBRATION featuring unique handmade gifts at Old Mission, Mission Plaza, by local artists and artisans is open SLO. The lighting takes place daily. Cost: free. Contact: sloma. above the Mission steps, with songs and storytelling. NOV 27: org or 543-8562. Immediately following the candle THU NOV 21 - TUE DEC 31 (times lighting ceremony is a Hanukkah vary): HOLIDAY EXTRAVAGANZA party at San Luis Obispo Museum at The Great American Melodrama of Art featuring dreidel spinning and Vaudeville, 1863 Front St, contests, cookie decorating, Oceano. The grand holiday menorah making, and fun foods tradition continues with the most that showcase Thanksgivukkah popular triple bill show of the year. (Hannukah and Thanksgiving Tickets: $20-$22, with discounts for happening together)! Menorah groups, seniors, students, active lighting continues for eight nights. military, and children. The in- Cost: free. Contact: jccslo.com or house snack bar serves food and 426-5465. drinks before the show and during intermissions. Contact: 489-2499 SUN DEC 1 10:00 am - 4:00 pm: or http://americanmelodrama. Morro Bay Merchants CHRISTMAS STREET FAIRE along Morro Bay com. Blvd. Enjoy a day of Arts and FRI NOV 22 - SUN DEC 29 (times Crafts, food and entertainment all vary): A TUNA CHRISTMAS at along Morro Bay Blvd in the heart Pewter Plough Playhouse, 824 of Old Towne Morro Bay! Contact: Main St, Cambria. This fabulously 877-478-9477. funny and spot-on satire of small town life, featuring the SUN DEC 1 at 3:00 pm: THE outrageous characters of Tuna, MESSIAH by G.G. Handel at Trinity Texas, plays every FRI, SAT, and Lutheran Church, 940 Creston Rd,

sign pages at the event.  Cost: free. Expo Center, 100 Madonna Rd, SLO. Contact: www.marthamartha.net. Don’t miss this vintage show. Cost: $12. Contact: remnantsofthepast. SAT NOV 9 1:00-3:00 pm: HOLIDAY com or 555-1234. WREATH WORKSHOP at SLO Botanical Garden, 3450 Dairy SUN NOV 10 at 4:00 pm: LIGHT Creek Road. Get a head start on & SHADOW Choral Concert By the holiday season as you learn to Canzona Women’s Ensemble at create beautiful holiday wreaths CPAC Cuesta College, Hwy 1, San and decorations using succulents Luis Obispo. PolyPhonics joins and other foliage. This hands- Canzona for this concert featuring on creative workshop is a fun new works. Cost: $10-25. Contact: and inspiring way to be “green” 542-0506 or http://canzonawomen. in planning seasonal home org. embellishments. Pre-registration is appreciated. Cost: $5-10. Contact: MON NOV 11 at 10:30 am: South slobg.org/wreath or 541-1400 x304. San Luis Obispo County VETERANS DAY CEREMONY at 780 Bello St, SAT NOV 9 at 6:00 pm: ALMOND Pismo Beach. Cost: free. Contact: COUNTRY QUILTERS GUILD 868-3171. HOLIDAY AUCTION at Trinity Lutheran Church, 940 Creston Rd, MON NOV 11 at 10:30 am: Paso Robles. Handmade items will VETERAN’S DAY PROGRAM at Los be auctioned. Cost: free. Contact: Osos Valley Mortuary & Memorial almondcountryquilters.org or 461- Park, 2260 Los Osos Valley Rd. Cost: free. Contact: 528-1500. 1266. TUE NOV 12 at 7:30 pm: DANCE THEATRE of HARLEM at Cohan Center, 1 Grand Ave, San Luis Obispo. This legendary dance company performs an eclectic and demanding repertoire embracing their vision to build community SAT NOV 9 - SUN NOV 10 (times and to inspire and uplift through vary): REMNANTS OF THE PAST the power of art. 6:30 pm: PreFALL 2013 SHOW at Alex Madonna concert lecture in the Pavilion by SAT NOV 9 6:00 - 8:00 pm: STAR GAZING PARTY at San Luis Obispo Botanical Garden, 3450 Dairy Creek Rd, SLO. Cost: $5 members, $10 non-members. Contact: 541-1400 x 304.

Central Coast Family

November 2013

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 19

Local Resources
Paso Robles. Cost: $10-35. Contact: com or 444-4445. 328-3575. TUE DEC 3 1:00 - 4:00 pm: AWAY SUN DEC 1 - SUN DEC 22 4:00- IN A MANGER Calvary Evangelical 9:00 pm: CAMBRIA CHRISTMAS Lutheran Church, 480 Monterey MARKET at Cambria Pines Lodge, Ave, Morro Bay. This free family 2905 Burton Dr, Cambria. WED- event includes live music, and over SUN: enjoy an outdoor market in 250 nativity sets from all over the the German American tradition world. Contact: 772-8457. with food, drink, music, and gifts. Vendors feature locally made items, ornaments, toys, jewelry, Recurring Events / Resources woolen goods, hand blown glass, candles and more. Nightly entertainment. Cost: free. Contact: Daily NOV 1 - FEB 28 10:00 amcambriachristmasmarket.com or 4:00 pm: Monarch Butterfly Talks 966-6490. at Pismo State Beach Monarch Butterfly Grove, Hwy 1, Pismo SUN DEC 1-TUE DEC 31: CHRISTMAS Beach. Knowledgeable docents AT HEARST CASTLE at 750 Hearst give talks at 11:00 am and 2:00 Castle Rd, San Simeon. The pm daily. Cost: free admission Assembly Room, the Refectory, and parking. Contact: www. and the Morning Room all contain monarchbutterfly.org or 800 443lavish decorations of hand made 7778. garlands, brilliant red poinsettias, and two 18 foot Christmas trees, Last FRI every month at 6:00 pm: fully decorated with lights and Family Fun Night at Unity Church, traditional ornaments. The 1165 Stubblefield St, Orcutt. Experience Tour during the daytime Contact: 937-3025. includes these rooms for viewing. Cost: $12-24. Contact: hearstcastle. Every WED 5:45-7:00 pm: Play at the

Autism Assessments for Preschoolers

Los Osos Library, 2075 Palisades. 1405 E. Main St. New ways of free for ages 7-15. Contact: 528- doing daily tasks are taught by the 1862. Braille Institute, such as managing the home, traveling, and the use of Every THU-FRI 12:00-5:00 pm & talking library books. Contact: 462SAT 11:00 am-5:00 pm: Exploration 1225. Station’s Interactive Science Center welcomes families at 867 2nd & 4th MON every month Ramona Ave, Grover Beach. Cost: at 6:30 pm: MOPS (Mothers of $2 kids, $3 adults. Contact: 473-1421 Preschoolers) meet at Pacific or http://explorationstation.org. Christian Church, 3435 Santa Maria Way, Santa Maria. Childcare is 2nd THU of every month 6:00-7:00 provided. Contact: 934-3491 or pm: Grief Support Group at Central www.pacificchristian.net. Coast Hospice, 253 Granada Dr, Ste D, San Luis Obispo. This free group Every TUE 3:00-6:00 pm & FRI 3:00is for anyone suffering from the 5:30 pm: Teen Wellness Program at loss of a loved one who is in need Arroyo Grande EOC Health Services of support. Contact: 540-6020.2nd Clinic, 1152 E Grand Ave. Health SAT of every month FEB-NOV at services, including reproductive 9:00 am: Santa Maria Recreation health, in a safe environment with and Parks Department offers free staff trained to screen, assess, docent-led nature walks in Los and to provide intervention. Flores Ranch, 6271 Dominion Rd, Appointments are preferred. Santa Maria. Contact: 925-0951 x Contact: 489-4026. 263. 1st WED every month at 9:00 am: Volunteer as a Good Neighbor! Community Action Partnership Make a difference in the life of Senior Health Screening at First an older or disabled adult. Once United Methodist Church, 275 N. trained, volunteers choose services Halcyon Rd, Arroyo Grande. free to contribute and schedule hours and low-cost services are offered at their convenience. Training is for people 50 and older including scheduled monthly at Wilshire blood pressure, pulse, weight, Community Services, 285 South St, total cholesterol, screening for Ste J, SLO. Contact: 547-7025 x 17. anemia, diabetes and fecal blood, nutritional counseling, and medical Volunteer at San Luis Obispo referrals. Contact: 481-2692 or Museum of Art! Stop by at 1010 788-0827. Broad St (Mission Plaza) or email 1st WED every month at 12:00 volunteer@sloma.org. pm: Disabled American Veterans 2nd MON every month 6:30-8:00 luncheon at Veterans Memorial pm: Caregiver Support Group Bldg, 313 W. Tunnell St, Santa at Cayucos Community Church, Maria. Contact: 345-0402. Ocean Ave & S 3rd St. Free support group for caregivers and family Every WED 5:30-7:00 pm: Widowed members dealing with long-term Support Group at New Life Church, illness, memory loss, dementia, 990 James Way, Rm 14, Pismo and Alzheimer’s. Contact: 458- Beach. Arrive 10 min early for 1st meeting. Offered by Hospice of 7484. SLO Co. Contact: 544-2266 or Every MON 10:00 am-2:00 pm: www.hospiceslo.org. Remain Independent Despite Vision Loss at Santa Maria Terrace, 1st THU every month at 6:15 pm:

Central Coast Family

November 2013

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 20

Hazardous Removals Structural & Aesthetic Pruning Family Owned & Operated

PET OF THE MONTH Available for Immediate Adoption!
www.SLOdiaper.com
(805) 242-0431
1-year-old Black Female Cat Short Hair Spayed, Vaccinated, Microchipped, Litterbox Trained Calm, Gentle, Loving, Quiet

Serving all of San Luis Obispo County

lososostreeservice.com

Call for a free estimate:
Commission on the Status of Women meets at Coast National Bank, 500 Marsh St, San Luis Obispo. The Commission is an official advisory group to the SLO County Board of Supervisors to identify issues of concern to women that are not the focus of other advocacy or advisory organizations. Contact: 788-3406.

805 259.5239
www.sarpcenter.org. Every SAT 11:00 am-3:00 pm: ADOPT A PET at Petco, 2051 Theater Dr, in Paso Robles. Cats are available for adoption through NCHS. Dogs are available through Short n’ Sweet Dog Rescue. Contact: 466-5403.

ZEN

(805) 543-9316

San Luis Obispo

875 Oklahoma Ave

Home Delivery Service

The best choice for cloth diapers in San Luis Obispo County

Find the Adventures With Nature & Mind Walk schedule from Morro Every TUE at 7:00 pm: Al-Anon Bay Museum of Natural History at: Family Support Group at Luis www.ccnha.org/naturewalks.html. OASIS Senior Center, 420 Soares Every FRI at 7:00 pm: Senior Ave, Orcutt. Contact: 937-9750. Ballroom Dancing at Madonna 3rd WED every month at 7:00 pm: Inn. If you are a senior (single How to Survive Divorce seminar or attached) and like ballroom at the San Luis Obispo Women’s dancing, this is the place! Look left Community Center, 1124 Nipomo of the bandstand for a table sign St, #D in SLO. Practical tips, Senior Dancers. Dance, chat and pointers, and suggestions for listen to good music. No fees; no handling family law issues. $10.00 dues; just fun! Contact: 489-5481 donation requested for handout or dg17@juno.com. materials and book. Contact: 544Literacy Council for San Luis Obispo 9313 to register. County has an ongoing and urgent 4th TUE every month at 5:30 pm: need for volunteer tutors and Legal Clinic for Self-Represented offers free training in SLO. Contact: Litigants at the San Luis Obispo 541-4219 or www.sloliteracy.org. County Courthouse Law Library, 1050 Monterey St in SLO, #125. 1st THU every month at 6:15 pm: SLO County Bar Assn Family Law Commission on the Status of Section & Women’s Community Women meets at Coast National Center provide one-on-one legal Bank, 500 Marsh St, San Luis Obispo. advice for persons filing divorces This official advisory group to the w/o an attorney, and a document SLO County Board of Supervisors preparer to assist in completing identifies issues of concern to court-required forms. Min. $40.00 women that are not currently the donation. Limit: 12 participants. focus of other advocacy or advisory organizations. Contact: 788-3406. Contact: 544-9313. RISE (formerly Sexual Assault Recovery and Prevention Center of San Luis Obispo County) offers: Weekly Drop-In Support Group for Sexual Assault Survivors; 24 Hour Crisis Line; Advocacy and Accompaniment; Peer Counseling; Individual Clinical Counseling; Prevention and Education Programs; and Women’s Empowerment and Self Defense Workshops. Contact: 545-8888 or Central Coast Commission for Senior Citizens offers many free services: Senior Connection connecting callers with local resources; HICAP (Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program) one on one assistance for Medicare beneficiaries, advise and referrals for long term care options, and help with billing / appeals; Vial of Life magnetized containers with medical information; a Senior Resource Directory for SLO and

SB counties, and much more. periodically. Event details and Contact: 925-9554 or www. schedules, weather updates, and centralcoastseniors.org. local resources can all be found at: www.centralcoastastronomy.org. San Luis Obispo Senior Center Contact: Aurora Lipper at aurora@ offers health screening, legal centralcoastastronomy.org. services, meals, exercise, bridge, and bingo at 1445 Santa Rosa St. Every WED 11:00 am-12:00 pm: Growing With Baby, an infant Contact: 781-7306. feeding office for breastfeeding San Luis Obispo ALPHA (Alpha mothers and their babies (0-10 Pregnancy Counseling & Support) mos), offers a free class on feeding, provides free pregnancy support, crying, and sleep at 1230 Marsh newborn assistance & education St, San Luis Obispo. Pediatric in SLO, Arroyo Grande, and nurse practioner and lactation Atascadero. Pregnancy Testing; consultant Andrea Herron will Options Counseling; Follow-Up answer questions. Dads are always Counseling; Support & Referrals re: welcome! Call to reserve a spot. Post-Partum Depression; Medical Contact: 543-6988. Care & Insurance; Agency Referrals; Rental Deposit Assistance; San Luis Coastal Adult School’s Maternity & Baby Clothes; Infant Parent Participation Program is Supplies & Equipment; Workshops; a family - focused, integratedSupport Groups; and Speaker’s approach with Core Parenting and Bureau. Contact: 541.3367 or Enrichment classes in SLO, Morro Bay, and Los Osos. Come with your www.sloalpha.org. baby or preschooler to an adult and The Central Coast Astronomical child activity class, or find support Society plans a Dark Sky Star Party for parents only. All caregivers every month at Santa Margarita are welcome. Cost: $74 per 10 wk Lake KOA Campground at sunset. trimester, 10% discount for two or CCAS also sponsors special more classes. Contact: 549-1222 or guest speakers and programs http://parentparticipation.org.

Central Coast Family

November 2013

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 21

Local Resources

Alternative Education
on the Central Coast

Integrated curriculum founded on life experiences, in-depth study, and active immersion in the arts for grades 1-8. Attendance Mon-Thu with homeschool Fridays. Carpooling encouraged. Contact: 434.2217, www.santaluciaschool.org. SLO Classical Academy. Private school. Part time or full time classical education in SLO. Part time options are Tuesday/ Thursday or Monday/ Wednesday with a Friday enrichment day. Contact: 548-8700, www. sloclassicalacademy.com. Sage Creek Sudbury. Modeled after Sudbury Valley School. Opening in the Fall of 2010. Contact: 489-3820, www.sagecreeksudbury.org. House Montessori School in Atascadero strives to help each child reach his/her greatest potential, by embracing learning and appreciating and respecting the world. Contact: 466-5068, www. childrenshouse.cc. Montessori Children’s School in San Luis Obispo seeks to inspire a passion for excellence, to nurture curiosity, creativity and imagination, and to awaken the human spirit of every child. Ages 3-12. Contact: 544-6691, http://montessoriofslo.com. Central Coast Montessori School in Morro Bay offers a rich, individualized academic environment to promote independence and optimum scholastic achievement. Contact: 772-9317, www.centralcoastmontessori.com. Heritage Montessori Preschool in San Luis Obispo provides an enriching and loving environment in a beautiful country setting. Waldorf and Montessori based for ages 2.5-5 years. Contact: 235-5589. Public Schools Cambria Montessori Learning Center. Tuition-free public school in Morro Bay for grades K-6th through the Family Partnership Charter School. Contact: 927-2337 or 541-2412. Application forms are available at familypartnershipschool.com. Santa Maria Joint Union Home School. Accredited high school program at Santa Maria Public Library. Interactive student-parent-teacher partnership providing educational resources, a mentor teacher, and eligibilty for sports, clubs, and activities. Students may qualify to enroll in community college as well as secondary classes. Contact: 937-2051 X2761 or X2762.

Templeton Independent Study High School. WASC accredited. Weekly meeting with teacher. Opportunity for early graduation and concurrent Cuesta College enrollment. Sites in Templeton and SLO at Los Ranchos Elementary School. Contact 434-5833. http:// tae.tusd.ca.schoolloop.com/tishs. Trivium Charter Schools in Lompoc, Santa Maria, and Arroyo Grande offer a hybrid program of classical project-based classes 2 days per week and homeschool 3 days per week. Contact: 489-7474 or www. triviumcharter.org. West Mall Alternative School. Independent Study Home School in Atascadero. Contact: 462-4238, www.edline.net/pages/West_Mall_ Alternative. Homeschool Organizations California Homeschool Network is a statewide grassroots organization dedicated to protecting the right of parents to educate their children. Their website provides information about current state and federal legislation affecting homeschooling families, and how to get started. Contact: 800 327-5339, http:// californiahomeschool.net. Homeschoolers of the Central Coast. An inclusive Yahoo! group for homeschoolers meeting on a regular basis for interaction and scheduled field trips: http://groups. yahoo.com/group/Homeschoolers_ of_the_Central_Coast. Santa Maria Inclusive Learners. A Yahoo! group offering free homeschool enrichment and support in the Santa Maria Valley: http:// groups.yahoo.com/group/santa_ maria_inclusive_learners. Templeton Unified School District K-8 Home Schooling program: 434-5840 or http://tae.tusd.ca. schoolloop.com. Homeschooling Links www.hsc.org www.californiahomeschool.net www.homeschool.com www.hslda.org www.ldonline.org/indepth/home schooling
Note: This feature is published as space allows and is a work in progress. Please submit updates, corrections, or additional resources to: ccfamilyed@gmail.com.

Central Coast families are fortunate to have a wide variety of quality choices for their children’s education. Following are some options for those seeking secular alternative education. For more information on independent and religious schools, go to: http://www.cde.ca.gov/re/ Children’s sd or http://private-schools.findthebest.com/directory/a/California.
Parent Participation. Core classes to enhance parenting skills, meet other families, and allow children time to play with others of the same age. Enrichment classes are offered, such as Spanish, Cooking and Gardening, and a Cooperative Preschool at CL Smith. Register through San Luis Coastal Adult School. Contact: 5491222, ppp.slcusd.org/Home.html. Charter Schools CAVA – California Virtual Academies. and K¹² give kids the chance to learn at the pace and in ways that are right for them. Online schooling aligned with California state standards. Teacher support as needed, meetings and work samples required quarterly. Contact: (866) 339-6790, www.caliva.org or www.k12.com. Family Partnership. A tuition-free K-12 independent study public school serving Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo and Ventura counties. Home study charter schools in San Luis Obispo (165 Grand Ave), Solvang, Santa Maria, and Cambria. Meet with teachers weekly and turn in work samples. Contact: 686-5339, www.familypartnershipschool.com Olive Grove. Independent study home school with sites in San Luis Obispo (165 Grand Ave), Santa Maria, Lompoc, Los Olivos, and Santa Barbara. Meet with teacher weekly and turn in work samples. Enrichment classes also offered. Contact: 543-2701, www.sbceoportal. org/losolivos. Orcutt Academy Independent Study. Affiliated with Orcutt Academy Charter School at 500 Dyer St, this free program offers home study and blended classroom/home study for grades K-8. Contact: 938-8934 or www.orcuttacademycharter.net. Nature Based Schools SLOWanders. Offering nature-based education in SLO County. Programs include wilderness living skills, naturalist studies, wildlife tracking, awareness skills, and rites-of-passage customized for after-school, homeschool, and personal one-on-one mentoring. Weekend workshops for adults. Contact: 215-0595, www. slowanders.com. Outside Now. Summer, after-school, and private nature-based education in SLO County. Contact: 541-9900, www.outsidenow.org. Coyote Road Regional School. Natural Science and Outdoor Education. Contact: 466-4550, www. coyoteroadschool.com. Independent Schools The Laureate School. Project-based, differentiated learning to develop critical thinking, with arts, technology, foreign language, and character development programs. Interactive learning in a small-class environment that addresses students’ unique needs. 880 Laureate Lane in San Luis Obispo. Contact: 544-2141, www. laureateschool.org. Clarity Steiner School. Waldorf education for first and second graders. Class meets four days per week in Nipomo. Contact: 929-6878. Santa Lucia School. Independent school on 5 acres in Templeton. Peace education for over 25 years.

Central Coast Family

November 2013

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 22

The Village Salon
We are thankful for your business & trust in our knowledge
Visit our Boutique for Hand-made Goods

Happy Thanksgiving!
Call Toni & Toni: (805) 489-5100

115 East Branch Street in Arroyo Grande

of San Luis Obispo County
Open TUE - SUN 10:30 am - 10:00 pm

Women’s Shelter

crisis line: 781-6400 business phone: 781-6401 email: info@wspslo.com www. womensshelterslo.org

Los Osos Valley Organic Farm
lovorganicfarm.com
mail@lovorganicfarm.com

(805) 242 6789

What do you offer Central Coast Families?
CONTACT US TO SPREAD THE WORD
Enjoy FREE full color, graphic design & website exposure:

(805) 528-0440 centralcoastfamily.com
Central Coast Family • November 2013 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 23

Central Coast

Family

Our goal is to connect Central Coast families with the resources they need to thrive!

What do you offer Central Coast families?

Display advertising in Central Coast Family offers an extraordinary value. Our loyal readers are relatively mature, prosperous, and educated family members in two of California’s most affluent counties. They take an active role in all aspects of parenting and purchasing. Every issue includes original feature articles and calendar listings for six weeks of local family events. Your ad is viewed the whole month through; not discarded after a day or a week. We offer the lowest rates in our region (and discounts for non-profits or ads running 3 months or more). All of our advertisers also enjoy FREE: full color printing; basic graphic design; preferred placement options; monthly edits; and website exposure!

Advertiser Comments
“Thank you for providing the single best source of useful information and encouragement for families in this area. Our whole family enjoys reading CCF and we refer to your event pages often. Our customers seem to love it too - as we need to keep more copies - Henry and Mary Ellen Eisemann in stock!” “I have received more phone calls from being in Central Coast Family than any other place I have advertised (including the Yellow Pages and Internet Yellow Pages). Thanks for everything!”
- Shelley Candelario

Contact us to spread the word in print, online, and social media:

CC F

Patrice Vogel, Editor David Vogel, Publisher PO Box 6424 Los Osos, CA 93412 (805) 528-0440 Phone (805) 439-0798 Fax

+

centralcoastfamily.com
ccfamilyad@gmail.com

and community centers, at chambers of commerce, schools, supermarkets, banks, restaurants, hotels, YMCAs, medical and dental clinics, real estate offices, museums, and other family-friendly businesses.
Distribution (population 400,000+) : Arroyo Grande, Atascadero, Avila Beach, Cambria, Cayucos, Grover Beach, Guadalupe, Los Osos, Morro Bay, Nipomo, Orcutt, Paso Robles, Pismo Beach, San Luis Obispo, Santa Margarita, Santa Maria, Shell Beach, and Templeton.

Central Coast Family is published monthly online and in print with a readership over 40,000! FREE copies are available throughout San Luis Obispo and North Santa Barbara Counties at all libraries

Every issue is printed with soy ink on 100% recycled paper. Please recycle again.