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Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical Engineering
Practice Aptitude Quiz
It is critical for young people to build their career management skills so they can make informed choices regarding their study and training options and navigate a pathway towards their occupation and career of choice. This career development resource combines labour market information with a practical industry specific activity to help develop awareness about the skills needed to pursue a career pathway in the Mechanical Engineering sector.

PART 1:
1.

About the Mechanical Engineering sector

The Mechanical Engineering sector in a nutshell


Mechanical Maintenance Mechanical Fitting Machining Manufacturing - machine operations Locksmithing

Key sub-sectors:

The Mechanical Engineering trades cover the manufacture, installation, testing, operation and maintenance of machines, mechanical and mechatronics systems, automated systems and robotic devices, heat transfer processes, thermodynamic and combustion systems, fluid and thermal energy systems, materials and materials handling systems, manufacturing equipment and process plant. Mechanical Engineering trades support most industry sectors including: Mining; Minerals Processing; Chemical Processing; Pharmaceutical; Manufacturing; Oil and Gas; Automotive; Communications; Health; Building; Electrical Power Generation and Distribution; Water and Waste; Natural Gas Distribution; Transport; Fishing; and Food Processing. Mechanical Engineering Tradespersons may specialise as a: Fitter who fits and assembles parts and sub-assemblies made from metal and other materials to make production machinery and other equipment. They may be known as bench fitters, diesel fitter mechanics, fitter machinists, fitter welders, fluid power fitters or maintenance fitters; Locksmith who tests security requirements and installs and maintains locks and related security equipment. Locksmiths who want to install security lock systems must undergo a police check before being issued with a security licence and; Metal Machinist who sets up and operates tools to cut, shape and form metal stock and castings to exact sizes, using detailed drawings, computer aided drawing (CAD) systems and specifications. Note - A common title used to describe a person working in this trade is a Fitter and Machinist however the current job title is Mechanical Engineering Tradesperson. Work may include a variety of tasks involving fitting and machining however some jobs may focus on one particular area such as maintenance fitting or machining.

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2.

Key occupation information (Sources Job Outlook www.joboutlook.gov.au and Australian Jobs publication www.deewr.gov.au/ australian-jobs-publication)

Weekly average earnings for major occupations:


Maintenance Fitter - $1,200 Fitter and Machinist - $1,230 Mechanical Fitter - $1,200 Computer Numerical Control Setter - $1,300 Machinist - $1,200 Fitter and Machinist - $1,200 Metal Machinist (First Class) - $1,150 Locksmith - $1,050

Jobs and demand information


Maintenance Fitters are specialist Mechanical Engineering Tradespersons. They are usually responsible for the maintenance, overhaul and repair of machinery and equipment. They may also be known as Bench Fitters, Diesel Fitter Mechanics, Fitter Machinists, Fitter Welders, Fluid Power Fitters or Plant Fitters. Job prospects - Average to above average Weekly earnings - $1,200 Occupation size - 109,000

Potential entry level qualifications: Certificate II in Engineering Certificate III in Engineering - Mechanical Trade Certificate IV in Engineering

Mechanical Fitters use tools, machines, equipment and engineering techniques to maintain and repair mechanical plant and equipment to operational standards. Work includes identification of defect or worn mechanical components or equipment, repair/replacement of worn/faulty components or equipment, and modifications. Parts may be repaired or manufactured using general application of workshop machines including lathes, milling and drilling machines. Thermal heating and cutting as well as welding equipment are also utilised. Job prospects - Average to above average Weekly earnings - $1,100 Occupation size - 4,400

Potential entry level qualifications: Certificate II in Engineering Certificate III in Engineering - Mechanical Trade Certificate IV in Engineering

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Fitter and Machinists are Mechanical Engineering Tradespersons who have combined specialisation in mechanical fitting and metal machining. A Fitter fits and assembles parts and sub-assemblies made from metal and other materials to make production machinery and other equipment. A Metal Machinist sets up and operates tools to cut, shape and form metal stock and castings to exact sizes, using detailed drawings, CAD systems and specifications. They machine metal components from single to complex forms. Job prospects - Average to above average Weekly earnings - $1,200 Occupation size - 109,000

Potential entry level qualifications: Certificate II in Engineering Certificate III in Engineering - Mechanical Trade Certificate IV in Engineering

Locksmiths use tools, equipment and engineering techniques to maintain and repair electronic locking and security systems to operational standards. Work involves identification of defect or worn lock system components, repair/replacement/modification and/or installation of locking systems, gaining entry and performing security surveys. They can specialise in lock manipulation, safe work, key manufacture and identification, door closure work or master key systems. Job prospects - Above average Weekly earnings - $1,050 Occupation size - 5,800

Potential entry level qualifications: Certificate II in Engineering Certificate III in Locksmithing Certificate IV in Engineering

Skills and knowledge


To become a Mechanical Engineering Tradesperson usually requires the completion of an apprenticeship. An apprentice works and studies at the same time. Work and study involves the development of a safe working attitude along with comprehensive mechanical knowledge and skills including: Occupational health and safety including manual handling; Interpreting technical drawings to enable you to make parts or repair equipment; Performing calculations to work out the machine speeds to make parts efficiently; Using measuring tools to check for correct sizes; Using hand tools to make, repair and fit mechanical parts together; Operating a range of different machines to make parts for equipment; Applying quality procedures and systems to ensure parts comply with standards and that repairs meet specifications.

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On completion of an apprenticeship, further learning to broaden your skill set can increase your suitability for more varied work.

The qualifications
The range of qualifications available in the Mechanical Engineering trades includes: Certificate II in Engineering Certificate III in Engineering - Mechanical Trade Certificate IV in Engineering - (CNC Programming, Fluid Power or Maintenance) Diploma in Engineering - (Advanced Trade) Advanced Diploma in Engineering

About the qualifications


Qualifications provide the core skills, knowledge and experience (competencies) required for effective performance on the job plus the option of choosing a range of elective competencies that meet the needs of the employer and the individual. Every qualification includes an emphasis on Employability Skills or the skills that employers identify as playing a significant part in contributing to an individuals effective and successful participation in the workplace. Employability skills are non-technical skills. They are also sometimes referred to as generic skills, capabilities, enabling skills or key competencies. The Employability Skills are: Communication skills that contribute to productive listening and understanding, speaking clearly and directly and harmonious relations across employees and customers; Teamwork skills that contribute to productive working relationships and outcomes; Problem-solving skills that contribute to productive outcomes; Initiative and enterprise skills that contribute to innovative outcomes; Planning and organising skills that contribute to long and short-term strategic planning; Self-management skills that contribute to employee satisfaction and growth; Learning skills that contribute to ongoing improvement and expansion in employee and company operations and outcomes; Technology skills that contribute to the effective performance of tasks.

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3.

Career Pathways Websites


Australian Apprenticeships Pathways - view potential career pathways for this industry - www.aapathways.com.au/Search/Job-Pathway-Charts/Charts?ind=13304

Other useful careers sites are: MAKE IT! Manufacturing careers website - www.makeit.net.au/index.html My Future - www.myfuture.edu.au Job Guide - www.jobguide.thegoodguides.com.au

4.

Job Hunting

Job vacancy website: Australian Jobsearch - www.jobsearch.gov.au/findajob/advancedsearch.aspx The Australian Governments job site. Input your postcode, select the Occupation Category Metal and Engineering Trades, then select Mechanical Engineering Trades scroll down to the Additional Search Criteria section and click on Apprenticeships/Traineeships, then click on the Find Jobs button.

Job hunting hints and labour market information: Australian Apprenticeships Pathways - www.aapathways.com.au Click on Search to find potential Australian Apprenticeships occupation ideas. You can also find job hunting hints in the Self Help menu item. My Future: Labour Market Information - www.myfuture.edu.au/services/default.asp? FunctionID=5400 Click on the map or use the drop down menu to find general labour market information for your region including top occupations and incomes. Data is based on the most recently available census.

5.

Useful Contacts

Here are some links to a range of support services, organisations and government agencies that may help with careers research and job hunting: Support services: Search for your local Australian Apprenticeships Centre - www.aapathways.com.au/aac Group Training Organisations employ Australian Apprentices and places them with businesses. www.grouptraining.com.au/Find/find_gto.html Job Services Australia providers work with eligible job seekers to develop an individually tailored Employment Pathway Plan. The plan maps out the training, work experience and additional assistance needed to find job seekers sustainable employment. www.jobsearch.gov.au/provider/ ProviderLocation.aspx?ProviderType=JNS&

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5.

Useful Contacts - continued

Industry Organisations: Manufacturing Skills Australia - www.mskills.com.au Australian Industry Group (AiG) - www.aigroup.com.au Australian Manufacturing Workers' Union - www.amwu.org.au

Government Agencies: Department of Innovation - www.innovation.gov.au AusIndustry - www.ausindustry.gov.au Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) - www.csiro.au

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Part 2:
Guidance

About this Resource

This Practice Aptitude Quiz provides a detailed overview of work carried out within the Mechanical Engineering trade. It also provides an opportunity to practice answering questions found in Mechanical Engineering aptitude tests when applying for employment. You will discover that this trade is very diverse and includes many different types of work for people who like to use their hands to fix mechanical equipment or operate machines to make parts. This Practice Aptitude Quiz includes a range of information and questions categorised into four main sections: Section 1 - Literacy, Reading and Comprehension This section gives a brief overview describing the main types of work carried out in the Mechanical Engineering trade as a Fitter and Machinist. A series of questions is included to test your level of comprehension. Section 2 - Problem Solving and Numeracy The ability to solve problems and use basic mathematics is important to enable you to work as a mechanical tradesperson. This section provides a range of problems including numerical calculations designed to test your ability to problem solve and perform basic computations. Section 3 - Visual Perception When manufacturing or assembling parts together, the ability to read technical drawings is critical to ensure that correct sizes will allow parts to fit together. This section tests your ability to observe a three -dimensional image and visualise how this image would look in two-dimensional views. Section 4 - Mechanical Aptitude This final section presents a range of basic mechanical devices used in the engineering trade. Mechanical aptitude enables you to explore ways in which machines and tools can be utilised to make work more efficient. Questions based on the operation and function of each of these devices, are used to gauge your level of mechanical aptitude. This resource can be used by a number of different organisations and people such as careers practitioners with young people, Group Training Organisations and Job Services Australia providers with job seekers. The Practice Aptitude Quiz can be: Used by careers practitioners with individuals or in a class setting to provide general guidance on the level of study involved in undertaking an entry level qualification in this industry; Provided to people to enable them to practice their skills before sitting an actual aptitude test; Used by teachers as a guide to industry math requirements at the entry point of this particular Australian Apprenticeship career path; and Used by teachers as classroom based activities for students in Year 11 and 12 and VET Business-centred studies.

The quiz should be able to be completed in approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes. Calculators may be used to complete parts of this practice assessment. Answers are located at the end of the quiz.

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After the Quiz


There are a range of support services available to help you find out about courses that may help you improve your literacy and numeracy skills and also your readiness for work. If you are still at school you should discuss any concerns you may have with your career practitioner. Further information may also be provided by a Job Services Australia provider, an Australian Apprenticeships Centre, a Group Training Organisation or a training provider.

Useful Contacts
Here are some links to job seeker support services:
Search for your local Australian Apprenticeships Centre: www.aapathways.com.au/aac Find a local Group Training Organisations: www.grouptraining.com.au/Find/find_gto.html Job Services Australia providers work with eligible job seekers to develop an individually tailored Employment Pathway Plan. The plan maps out the training, work experience and additional assistance needed to find job seekers sustainable employment. www.jobsearch.gov.au/provider/ ProviderLocation.aspx?ProviderType=JNS&

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Part 3:
1.

The Quiz

Section 1 - Literacy, Reading and Comprehension


Complete the following questions related to safety and quality. a. Complete the numbers to indicate the alphabetical order of the twelve words listed. The first two are shown:

measurement standard 2 caliper gauge tolerance 1 accuracy

finish roughness diameter width length hardness

b.

The following text has 11 spelling errors. As you find each word, list them in the space below using the correct spelling. Occupational Helth and Safely is an important part of your everyday working life within the Mechanical Engineering sector. The use of Personal Protective Equitment (PPE) is madtory in the workplase. Equitment can include googles, stell capped boots, hard hats and heat and fire resitent gloves. You muk read safety signs and be careful with haevy lifting.

c.

Selecting the correct tool for each task is very important. It also prevents damage to the tool and ensures that work is carried out safely. Draw a line to match the correct tool to each mechanical component in the list below. Screwdriver Rivet Gun Spanner Hammer Nut Chisel Screw Rivet

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2.

Read the following article and answer the questions that follow.

Working as a Fitter (also known as a Mechanical Engineering Tradesperson) If you enjoy a physical challenge and doing practical, hands on work, this type of occupation may just fit your style. Fitting work requires the use of hand skills for the assembly and maintenance of equipment found throughout a wide range of industries. These include manufacturing industries such as metal products, plastics, food and beverage and paper products to name a few. Other industries such as mining and forestry, involving the maintenance of mobile equipment, also provide job opportunities. Fitting work is performed in a wide range of environments such as production facilities, mechanical workshops, onsite and outdoors or underground in a mine. Mobile cranes, elevated work platforms, forklifts and mining equipment are just some of the machines that a fitter may repair or service. Other equipment includes power transmission gearboxes, conveyors, lifts, rolling mills, food production and packaging machinery. Machinery may be highly automated and include hydraulic and pneumatic systems. Some fitting work requires the ability to work accurately when assembling precision components such as gearboxes and turbines. Replacing bearings, aligning couplings, rebuilding pumps and other components are other tasks carried out every day by a fitter. A wide range of hand tools such as sockets, spanners, torque wrenches, hammers, chisels, scrapers, screwdrivers and many others are utilised to assemble and repair parts. Other power tools such as angle grinders, power drills, cold cut saws, friction saws and bench drills form part of the range of tools that a fitter is trained to use. Specialised equipment including welders, oxyacetylene and plasma cutters are also used. Maintenance work often involves break down repair of equipment, however preventative maintenance strategies continue to become more common. Condition monitoring is utilised to track and in some cases predict the operating condition of machines. This includes measuring energy usage, vibration, temperature and the amount of wear particles in lubricating fluids. Other technology such as lasers enables shorter setup times when aligning shafts and other equipment. The ultimate aim of preventative maintenance is to ensure that the machine is reliable and available for maximum production output. Working safely is vitally important as workplaces often contain large heavy equipment that may cause serious injury.

Questions - Working as a Fitter a. What are the two main types of fitting work that requires the use of hand skills?

b.

List four industries in which fitting work is carried out.

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c.

Name two different work environments in which a fitter may carry out work?

d.

List four machines that a fitter may repair or service.

e.

List four types of hand tools that a fitter may use.

f.

Name four types of measurements carried out as part of condition monitoring.

3.

Read the following article and answer the questions that follow.

Working as a Machinist (also known as a Mechanical Engineering Tradesperson) Work carried out by a Machinist involves the use of machines to make parts from plastic, steel, aluminium, brass and other engineering materials. Machinists can also use a lathe to resize existing parts after resurfacing by metal spraying. The required accuracy of machining may be high, especially when producing precision parts that operate with small gaps between them. Technical drawing interpretation skills are important to enable the machinist to manufacture parts to the correct size and surface finish required.

Manual Lathe

Manual machines such as lathes, drills, borers and mills are regularly utilised for production of large sized or small quantities of general parts. Automated machinery such as Computer Numerical Control (CNC)

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machining centres and lathes are suitable for high volume production work. They are also popular for machining of small quantity precision parts due to their high accuracy and fine surface finish. Machinists program and operate CNC machines.

Computer controlled machines are becoming more sophisticated with turning and milling functions now combined into one machine. In some cases, these machines can move simultaneously in up to five axis and produce parts with very complex shapes. The ultimate objective of machining is to make a part using minimal amount of material within the shortest amount of time.

CNC Machining Centre

The correct selection of materials, machine and tooling is critical to achieve the required accuracy and speed. Modern materials now include titanium and other tough or hard metals. When machining hard materials, cutters made from specialised materials to prevent wear and tool damage are utilised. This ensures that the size and finish of the part is within specification and the cutting tool lasts as long as possible. Micrometers and gauges are utilised to check that sizes of small diameter parts are correct. For larger or complex parts, coordinate measuring machines are used to measure in several dimensions with the part mounted stationary while the measuring probe moves around the part.

Coordinate Measuring Machine Probe

Questions Working as a Machinist

a.

What are four common types of materials machined?

b.

List the two reasons that technical drawing interpretation skills are important.

c.

What types of machines are utilised to make large sized or small quantities of parts?

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d.

What types of machines are popular for manufacturing small parts due to their high level of accuracy and fine surface finish?

e.

How many axis can some computer numerical control machines operate simultaneously?

f.

What are two main components in the objective of machining?

g.

What are the two main requirements achieved by selecting the correct combination of materials, machine and tooling?

h.

What are two types of measuring instruments used to measure small diameter parts?

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Section 2 - Problem Solving and Numeracy


Problem Solving
1. After fixing seven parts on the machine, the Fitter is only half way through completing the task. What is the total number of parts requiring repair?

2.

A Fitter has obtained twenty parts and needs fifteen more to complete an assembly. Unfortunately, the store only has seven more parts available. How many parts will the Fitter need to order to enable the task to be finally completed?

3.

A Fitter is driving to a site where a mobile crusher needs repairs and must drive another twenty kilometres to reach the work site. The speed limit is eighty kilometres per hour. What is the minimum time it will it take, in minutes, to reach the destination safely without breaking the speed limit?

4.

A Fitter working in a cement manufacturing plant is connecting a large motor to a gearbox and needs ten bolts to assemble a coupling. The bolts available are longer than required and need cutting shorter to make them fit. As each one will take nine minutes to cut, how many hours will it take to cut all of the bolts to the correct length?

5.

A Machinist has used a computer controlled lathe to turn ten parts from a length of metal and has used up one third of the total material available. How many more pieces can the Machinist make before running out of metal?

6.

After making parts on a lathe, the Machinist needs to drill six holes in the end of each shaft at equal distance to each other around a circular pattern. How many degrees will the Machinist rotate the part before drilling the next hole?

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7.

Read the following information about Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and answer the questions on the next page. Personal protective clothing, hand protection and foot protection are often necessary and respiratory protective equipment may be required when dangerous gases and dusts are present. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) includes clothing, equipment and substances designed to be worn or used by a person to protect them from risks of injury or disease. PPE is only to be used in the workplace where it is not reasonably practicable to control hazards by other means. The following information describes some PPE used to guard workers against specific hazards.

Gloves

Breathing Mask

Goggles

Photo A

Photo B

Photo C

Sign A

Sign B

Sign C

Sign D

Part of Body Head: Face & Eyes: Hearing: Respiratory: Hands: Feet: Falling objects

Some Potential Hazards

Sparks, ultraviolet light, metal shards, chemical splashes, fumes Excessive noise Dust, fumes, vapours Abrasion, sparks, irritant substances, vibration , electric shock Crushing, slipping, abrasion, irritant substances, wetness, electric shock, static electricity, puncture, cold/heat.

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Questions a. Using an angle grinder can produce sparks that have the potential to damage eyes. What PPE could be used to guard against this hazard? (Note: there may be more than one PPE that can be used in this case).

b.

If you are lifting heavy objects there is a risk of dropping the load on your feet. What PPE can be used to protect you in this situation?

c.

Some machinery operates at high noise levels. What PPE can help to protect workers hearing in these types of situations?

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Numeracy (Basic Mathematics)


8. Attempt all calculations below without using a calculator. Show all working out. QUESTIONS a. b. c. d. e. f. g. 56 + 78 = 87 + 1032 = 2432 + 567 = 324 - 45 = 897 - 26 = 1024 - 48 = 1 x 27 = 2 2 x 75 = 3 3 x 60 = 4 10% x 35 = 60% x 200 = 75% x 400 = 72 12 = 39 13 = 560 7 = 300 x 30 x 60 = 60 ANSWERS

h.

i. j. k. l. m. n. o. p.

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Section 3 - Visual Perception


The ability to read and interpret drawings is an important skill required to work in the mechanical engineering trade. Types of technical drawings such as detail, assembly and schematics are just some of the drawing types used. The drawing on the right hand side is a pictorial drawing of a clamp block. The hole goes all the way through the block.

Top View

Front View Side View 1. What would the clamp block look like if viewed from the top view? Circle the correct response.

2.

What would the clamp block look like when viewed from the front view? Circle the correct response.

3.

What would the clamp block look like from the side view? Circle the correct response.

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Section 4 Mechanical Aptitude


Ratio and Proportion
1. In the gears shown, the small gear (A) has half the number of teeth than the large gear. If the small gear (A) turns around one hundred times, how many times will the large gear rotate?

B A

2.

This gear train uses three gears. The large gears (B) & (C) have the same number of teeth. The small gear (A) rotates in a clockwise direction and only has half the number of teeth of the large gears.

A B

a.

What direction will the second large gear (C) rotate?

b.

How many times will gear (A) need to rotate to make gear (C) rotate three complete times? rotations

c.

How many times will gear (A) need to rotate to make gear (B) rotate three complete times rotations

3.

A belt drive transmits power between pulleys using a vee shaped belt. The top pulley (A) is rotating anti-clockwise.

a.

What direction will the bottom pulley (C) rotate?

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b.

The tensioning pulley (B) is smaller than the other pulleys. Will it rotate faster or slower than the bottom pulley (C)?

Levers and Forces


4. A lever is a mechanical device used to multiply force such as those shown below.

Effort

Effort

Load

Load Lever B

Lever A

a.

Which lever will lift the load with the least amount of effort?

b.

If the effort downwards is at the same speed on both levers what lever will move the load upwards the fastest?

5.

A winch uses two different size pulleys to multiply force. The large pulley (A) is three times larger than the small pulley (B). A

a.

If 100 kg of effort is used to pull the rope around the large pulley (A) downward, how much load can be lifted by the rope around the small pulley (B)?

b.

Would the load move up faster or slower than the rope being pulled down on the large pulley (A)?

Load

Effort

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ANSWERS
Section 1 - Literacy, Reading and Comprehension
1. a. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. b. c. 2. a. b. c. d. e. f. 3. a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. accuracy calliper diameter finish gauge hardness length measurement roughness standard tolerance width

Health, Safety, equipment, mandatory, workplace, equipment, goggles, steel, resistant, must, heavy Screwdriver Screw, Spanner Nut, hammer Chisel, Rivet gun - Rivet Assembly and Maintenance Metal products, plastics, food and beverage, paper products mining, forestry Production facilities, mechanical workshops, onsite and outdoors, underground in a mine Cranes, Elevated work platforms, Forklifts, Mining equipment, Power transmissions, Gearboxes, Conveyors, Lifts, Rolling mills, Food production machinery, Packaging machinery Sockets, spanners, torque wrenches, hammers, chisels, scrapers, screwdrivers Energy usage, vibration, temperature, amount of wear particles in lubricating fluids Plastics, steel, aluminium, brass Manufacture parts to the correct size and surface finish required Manually operated lathes, drills, borers and mills CNC machining centres and lathes Five Manufacture a part using minimal amount of material, in the shortest amount of time Accuracy and speed Micrometers and gauges

Section 2 - Problem Solving and Numeracy


Problem Solving 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 14 (Fourteen) 8 (Eight) 15 (Fifteen) minutes 1 (One and a half) hours 20 (Twenty) 60 (Sixty) degrees a. Photo C and Sign C b. Sign B c. Sign D

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Numeracy (Basic Mathematics) 8. a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. i. j. k. l. m. n. o. p. 134 1119 2999 279 871 976 13.5 50 45 3.5 120 300 6 3 80 450

Section 3 - Visual Perception


1. 2. 3. C B C

Section 4 - Mechanical Aptitude


Ratio and Proportion 1. 2. 3. 50 a. a. Clockwise Anti clockwise b. b. 6 Faster c. 6

Levers and Forces 4. 5. a. a. A 300 kg b. b. B Slower

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Contributions
This Practice Aptitude Quiz was developed by:

Australian Apprenticeships Pathways Website - www.aapathways.com.au This website provides sample Australian Apprenticeships job descriptions and links to more Australian Apprenticeships information and resources. The site is funded by the Department of Industry, Innovation, Climate Change, Science, Research and Tertiary Education.

Manufacturing Skills Australia - www.mskills.com.au Manufacturing Skills Australia (MSA) is one of 12 Industry Skills Councils funded by the Australian Government to support skills development. MSA is addressing the skills needs of over 250,000 manufacturing and other businesses employing over 1.1 million Australians. MSA represents a range of industries including: Metal and Engineering; Manufacturing; Aerospace; Chemicals, Hydrocarbons & Refining; Plastics, Rubber and Cablemaking; Laboratory Operations; Manufactured Mineral Products; Furnishing; and Textiles, Clothing and Footwear.

TAFE NSW Illawarra Institute - www.illawarra.tafensw.edu.au TAFE NSW is Australias leading provider of vocational education and training with more than 500,000 enrolments in NSW each year. Illawarra TAFE provides high quality customised training and enrols over 33,000 students each year. Whether youre an individual looking for your first job, a promotion, a career change or a pathway to a degree or you're an employer seeking training solutions for your workforce, TAFE Illawarra can deliver a range of courses and services to suit your needs. Some programs are delivered Australia wide.

The Career Education Association of Victoria - www.ceav.vic.edu.au The CEAV is the Victorian peak body for secondary school career practitioners, work experience coordinators, VET coordinators and MIPS coordinators. The CEAV provides professional development opportunities for members and also works with business, industry, and the education and training sector.

Industry Training Australia P/L - www.itaust.com.au Industry Training Australia (ITA) delivers consultancy services to government and non-government organisations in the education and training sector. ITA develops and delivers information and communication services, including the Australian Apprenticeships Pathways website, for service provider networks and the general public.

For enquiries about this Practice Aptitude Quiz contact the Australian Apprenticeships and Traineeships Information Service on 1800 338 022. Page 24