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INFORM AS S U P

SSUES 33

UMBER 3

A new member of the Hercules family - the C13OE-is now operating within United States Air Force units. Lockheed-Georgia Company is building the new E model in an existing C-130 production line, where experience and attention to details ~ e c u l i a rto the C-130 are resulting - in a production type airplane from the first. In truth, of course, the C-130E is a production type airplane. It varies very little from its immediate forerunner, the C-130B. Those changes made

CA RG0-130

III rhe basic C-130 between the B-model and the E-model are for the most part related to one feature, increased range.

T h e C-130E is an all weather extended range cargo transport with the dual roles of assault and strategic airlifter. Its active crew includes pilot, vigator, and loadT h e crew stations for the first four of these are in the flight station; that of the loadmaster is in the cargo compartment. Provisions for a relief crew are included in the flight station, just aft of the navigator's seat. Relief crew seating is also available in the cargo compartment. Ask anyone who has ever ridden u p front in the C-130 and you will learn that the visibility is excellent. Transparent areas are provided from just above floor level to well above the usual windshield area. NESA self defogging and defrosting glass keeps the windshield transparent under all conditions of temperature and humidity. T h e C-130E is a fully pressurized air conditioned airplane, with the capability of maintaining an 8,000 foot cabin altitude at an airplane altitude of 35,000 feet. Pressure and temperature are accurately controlled with fully automatic systems.

This increased range is achieved, of course, by the addition of provisions for carrying more fuel. Increasing the fuel load increased the weight of the airplane, thus some structural changes have been made to give more beef for the heavier loads on the landing In addition to structural changes, several systems improvements have been made. Some important changes have been made in the electrical system, and though oxygen distribution is essentially the same, the supply has been changed from gaseous to liquid. Down the line, the C-130E will have the forward cargo door deleted. But this is not a change issue, it's a new issue, about a new airplane being introduced to new commands. We'll mention how it is in the C-130B from time to time in this and the following issue, but primarily it is our intention to tell you very briefly what kind of bird the C-130E is.

tanks make this airplane a dual role airlifter. are possible without sacrifice of short field capa-

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i t l : .G:pckheed-Service ~ News No. 33

operation, is Zcr ten crew stations through diluter det-pe oxygen regulators. In addition, four walk-amnd oxygen supply units are provided at four recharging stations in the oxygen distribution system.

&eXh axygen, for unpressurized

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exits. For overseas flights, the wing center section has compartments for four life rafts.
landing gear is a modified tricycle type with steerable dual nose wheels and tandem mounted main wheels. T h e tandem arrangemenl of the main wheels allows the forward tire tc pack a path for the aft tire during operation or unprepared surfaces. Soft and rough field takeoffs and landings are routine assignments. T h e C-130E has a maximum gross takeoff weight of 155,000 pounds (a 39% increase in fuel capacity over the C-130B accounts for this). Maximum landing weight is the same, at a sink rate of 5 feet per second. Much of the beef added to support these extra pounds isn't readily apparent to the casual observer. In some cases it exists in the form of slightly greater thicknesses, and sometimes it is achieved merely by using higher strength material In short, the C-lf is a production airplane with some changes wh-,&- add to the performance and reliability for which the Hercules is already famous.

the sac-"lo

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Passenger provisions include accommodations for the following: 92 ground troops 64 paratroops 74 litter patients plus two attendants Paratroop exits and parachute static line anchor cables allow rapid and safe mass jumps. Much of the equipment required for troop carrier, paratroop, and aerial delivery missions can be removed readily for all-cargo missions to increase the payload capability by 1,265 pounds. Emergency escape provisions are numerous. These include the crew door, the paratroop doors, the ramp and aft cargo door, two side escape hatches, and three overhead escape hatches. Escape ropes are installed at each of the three overhead emer-

March-April 1962

C-130E SPECIFICATIONS A N D SYSTEMS

WEIGHTS
Equipped weight empty Tactical Logistical . . . . Maximum payload Tactical Logistical

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72,300 1bs 70,600 Ibs

ANTI-ICE Engine bleed air heats wing and empennage leading edges, radome, and engine inlet air ducts. Propellers, NESA glass, and pitot tubes are electrically heated.

. . . . . . . . . . . 32,700 . . . . . . . . . . . 34,400 Maximum take-off weight . . . . . . 155,000 Maximum landing weight (5 fps) . . . . . . . . . . . 155,000

1bs Ibs Ibs Ibs

POWERPLANTS Engines-Four Allison T56-A-7, 4050 ESHP each, single spool axial flow, constant 13,820 rpm in flight. For low noise-level ground operation constant 10,000 rpm selection available. Gear box reduction is 13.54:l.
Propellers-Four-blade dromatic. Diameter: 13.5 feet. Hamilton Standard 54H60-91 hy-

CARGO COMPARTMENT Total volume including ramp 4300 f t 3 Width . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.3 ft Height 9.0 ft Length excluding ramp . . . . . . . . 41.4 ft Ramp length (angle to ground 11.5O). . . . 10.3 ft 3.4 ft Floor height above ground 7.2 ft Side cargo door width height 6.0 ft 3.0 ft Paratroop doors (2) width height. 6.0 ft 13,000 Ibs Maximum single axle load Maximum floor load 50 psi Tiedowns 5,000 Ib rings on ramp and fuselage walls 10,000 Ib rings on 20-inch grid pattern 25,000 Ib rings-twelve in floor

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Auxiliary power-GTC (gas turbine compressor) unit supplies air for engine starting, ground air conditioning, and ground ATM operation to generate a-c power. ATO-Provision for eight 1,000 pound thrust units.

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FUEL Internal capacity Pylon tank capacity Total fuel capacity . Single point refuel rate Jettison rate

PERSONNEL CAPACITY Crew . . . . . . . Troops Paratroops. Litters (plus two attendants)

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64 74

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. 6960 gals . 2720 gals . 9680 gals . 600 gpm . 400 gpm

LANDING GEAR
Nose landing gear Main Landing gear Unit Construction Index at 155,000 Ibs. Tread, MLG Wheel base Nose gear turn radius Wing tip turn radius

PRESSURIZATION/AIR CONDITIONING
Maximum normal pressure differential of 7.5 psi-cabin altitude of 8,000 ft with airplane at 35,000 ft.

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. . dual . . tandem . . 39 . . 14.3 ft . . 32.1 ft . . 37 ft . . 85 ft

T h e rugged C-130E structure results from ten years of design, test, and manufacture that went into the early C-130 models. Six years of operational service with an unsurpassed safety record and continuous product improvement have added to the capability of the airplane. Add more beef to take care of increased fuel loads and new mission requirements and you have the C-130E structure.

Demountable snatch blocks are provided to permit wheeled vehicles weighing up to 34,000 pounds :o be pulled into the cargo compartment by an autside prime mover. Tiedown rings or "D" rings are conveniently located in the floor and along the side. For cargo loading information check T.O. 1C-I30A-9. It contains details for proper distribution and tiedown of heavy loads.

WING
Addition of pylon structure to support the external tanks and stronger members to carry the load sums u p the wing story.

FUSELAGE T h e tough semi-monocoque fuselage is divided into the flight station and the cargo compartment.
T h e main part of the fuselage aft of the flight station forms the cargo compartment. Its dimensions are approximately 41 feet long, 10 feet wide, and 9 feet high. T h e lower aft cargo door doubles as a hinged ramp that may be lowered and locked hydraulically at any position with respect to the ground. At the horizontal position, approximately 41 inches from the ground, level with the cargo floor the ramp is supported by tension straps for direct, straight-in loading or unloading at truck bed height. T h e ramp and aft cargo door open to a width of 10 feet 2 inches and a height of 9 feet 1 inch. When the ramp is lowered to the ground, tread extensions are used to bridge the thickness of the ramp so wheeled or tracked vehicles may roll right in. T h e ramp is capable of supporting such

AERIAL DELIVERY SYSTEM T h e aerial delivery system, built into the fuselage structure, provides for heavy airdrops. T h e electric controls for ramp and aft cargo door hydraulics are located on the pedestal between the pilot and co-pilot. They are used to operate the ADS for aerial delivery of cargo and machinery. A pendulum type extraction parachute ejection device is mounted above the ramp. Ejection is controlled from the flight deck. Manual release, however, may be effected from the cargo compartment as an emergency measure. GROUND HANDLING Ground handling the C-130E is about the same as that for any other big airplane. You need enough people to see all extremities in relation to objects they might bang into. And, these p e e ple need to be in contact with the tug driver' at all times.
Only one ground lock is required on the E-this is the nose gear lock. It should be installed as soon after landing as possible. Main gear locks are provided, but they are used only when maintenance is being performed. T h e reason you don't need main gear ground locks for normal ground handling . . . a friction washer at the lower end of the jackscrew binds the screw when the weight of the airplane is on the wheels, providing a built-in ground lock.
Lockheed-Service News No. 33

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Another thing you don't need, and shouldn't use, is mechanical restraint on the flight control surfaces. T h e boost units provide a snubbing action against wind action on these surfaces. No hydraulic Dressure is reauired to assure this ~rotection. In Lase of high Linds and probable b r known banging of these surfaces against their stops, a careful inspection is necessary. There is, however, less chance of damage (even in high winds) with no restraint other than the boost unit snubbing action.
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There are many facets of ground handling, servicing, and airframe maintenance that cannot be covered here. This information is available for the C-130E in T.O. 1C-130B-2-2.E model diffe

POWER PLANT,

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T h e C-130E is powered by four Allison T56-A-7 turbojet engines and four Hamilton Standard 54H60-91 propellers. This propjet combination develops 4050 equivalent shaft horsepower per engine. T h e engine is constant speed, 100 percent rpm, controlled by the propeller. Prop thrust, in turn, is determined by the amount of fuel metered to the engine. T h e propjet has several advantages over the pure jet, especially where short field operations are involved. T h e turbojet power drives the reduction gear assembly and the propeller to give flexibility of control. On the other hand, the pure jet depends entirely on thrust for its power. There is, of course, some unabsorbed thrust on the p r o p jet, and this gives a bit of boost to the propjet application. It, however, is minor when compared to the controlled power obtainable from combination of jet engine and propeller. Engine control will be something different for pilots new to a propjet. This engine is controlled by coordinated operation of the fuel, electrical, and propeller control systems. Much of the pilot's work is done for him by electric a n d electronic systems.

GTC

If, however, all of the automatic circuitry should fail simultaneously, the engines would continue to operate on mechanical governing with a bit of attention to the throttles and gages. luow tor a few locations and descriptions: T h e engine starting control panel is located just over the pilot's windshield. T h e engine instruments are grouped at the center of the main instrument panel. T h e engine throttles and condition levers are quadrant mounted on the flight control pedestal between the pilot and co-pilot. T h e throttles are located to the left of the condition levers and are used to make the desired power settings. T h e throttle quadrant is marked for different operating conditions from maximum reverse on the ground to maximum power in flight. Actually, automatic devices directly control the operation of the engine at any given power setting. Once the power setting is established by the throttle vosition, an electronic fuel correction system maintains power at a constant value by monitoring temDerature.
~ockheed-Service News N o . 33

the airplane self su source of bleed air

LOCKHEED PRODUCT SUPPORT ORGANIZATION

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ANDREWS AIR FORCE BASE, MARYLAND PH. RE 5-8900 J. D . lIJOET1 DOUGLAS* xt. 8-4161 H. T. "Hank" B a r r e t t K. N. "Ken" Henderson J. D. "John" Crowe

CHARLESTON AIR FORCE BASE, SOUTH CAROLINA


B. I. "BEN" HALL 111*

JOHN

I I . STODDARD. DIRECTOR
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F. A. "Fred" Hehmeyer

PH. SH 7-4111 Ext. 3422

DYESS AIR FORCE BASE, TEXAS

CUSTOMER SERVICE

CUSTOMER SUPPLY DIVISION

T. E. J. U. E.

pH. OW 2-1212 "EARL" HUDDLESTON A. "Jack" Roelofs Ext. 8479 S. "Go" Golightly R. "Roger" Coley H. J. "Henry" Hobbs C. "Padge" Padgett

EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, CALIFORNIA

J. W. "JACK" MARTIN

PH. CL 8-2111 Ext. 4-3411

JACK C. GARWOOD, ACTING MANAGER

TOM J . CLELAND, MANAGER

EGLlN AIR FORCE BASE, FLORIDA G. E. "GEORGE" CONLEY


JIM R. WEILAND TECHNICAL SERVICES '3EPT MGR JIM W. TROUP AEROSPACE GROUND S U P P O R T DEPT MGR

PH. EXT. 5197

EVREUX-FAUVILLE AIR BASE, FRANCE J. H. " 3 M " GOLDEN* A. H. "Arch" McCleskey M. D. "Jack" h u e t t PH. 1194 o r 1195 Ext. 6466

KEN E. WALKER CUSTbMER TRAINING DEPT ACTING MGR

STEW A. HURLBURT C - 1 5 0 SUPPLY DEPT MGR

HALIM AIR BASE, DJAKARTA, INDONESIA J. P. "JIM" CURRENT* PH. Halim 229 J. A. "Jackn Davidson J. T. "Jim" Murone

W. H. "BILL" JONES
N E D C. R l D l N G S FIELD SERVICE D E P T ACTING MGR

PH. 4-4111 Ext. 416-203

The 401r; C-130


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When the first C-130E arrived on 6 April 1962 at Charleston Air Force Base, it brought with it 200 ..'$ million air miles of experience gained by the 400 C-130's that preceded it.
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Special Subcommittee on National Military Airlift, of which Congressman L. Mendel Rivers is chairman. Witnessing the performance of the C-130E were General Paul D. Adams, Commander of STRICOM, Lt. General Joe W. Kelly, Commander of MATS, and General Walter C. Sweeney, Jr., Commander of TAC. Specific roles that the C-130E will fill for each of these services are as follows: T o STRICOM, the C-130E will be a jetpowered workhorse capable of rapidly delivering the highly trained forces and modern equipment of the new United States Strike Command to trouble spots any place on the globe.
Lockheed Service News No. 31

T h e delivery of the first extended range Hercules followed by about eight months the first flight of the C-130E made on 25 August 1961 at Dobbins Air Force Base. At the delivery ceremonies, two C-130E's were accepted by General Curtis E. LeMay, USAF Chief of Staff. T h e ceremonies were attended by the House of Representatives'

HOLLOMAN AIR FORCE BASE, N E W MEXICO


J. W. "JOHNNY" MABES

NATC, PATUXENT RIVER, MARYLAND M. L. J. J. R. "MAC" MCDANIEL* PH. VO 3-3111 C. "John" Bailey Ext. 7350 R. "John" Dantzler H. "Dick" E s t e y S. A. "Sid" Manning

PH. GR 3-6511 Ext. 4 7191

PATRICK AIR FORCE BASE, FLORIDA F. E. "FRANK" HOWELL PH. U L 7-2019

MCAS, CHERRY POINT, NORTH C A R ~ L I N A PH. G I 7-2111

RCAF, AMC HQ, OTTAWA, CANADA P. E. "GENE" GUTHRIE* PH. C E 2-8211 Ext. 3-2577

RCAF, N A M A O , ALBERTA, CANADA J. M. "JOHN" CLARKE

pH.

L I 4-2093

H. M. "STEVE" STEVENS K. A. "Karl" P o r t e r

J. H. "JIM" J E F F E R S PH. WA 5115

PH.

G L 9-2561 Ext. 7126

NALF, EL CENTRO, CALIFORNIA


J. P. "JACK" PAYNE

TACHIKAWA AIR BASE, JAPAN PH. E l 2-3310 L. C. "TUSKY" MORGAN* F. W. "Frank" Griffith pH. 2-3070

C. E. "Charlie" Landrum

PH. HE 5-3411 Ext. 7129

D. L. "Doug" Chambley

W. S. "WALT" MILFORD

PH. WA 6-3653

PH. 7-8792

R. E. "Bob" Helmuth
T. G. "Tom" McLain

T o MATS, the C-130E provides a .modern stra----"-- I---

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March-April 1962

T o TAC, the C-130E adds range and tactical support capabilities in joining its proven predecessors as a part of the Command's air strike forces.

Ninety-nine of these 155,000-pound propjet airlifters are slated t o join the United States Air Force to perform these and other tasks of the Hercules.

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