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Most senators whether arguing

for or against the coalition reso-


lution agreed that the Student
Senate election process needs
improvement.
Last week's resolution to remove
coalitions from the election process
failed, but election reform legis-
lation will be discussed in Senate
committees Wednesday.
Until then, Marcus Tetwiler,
student body president, encourages
students to speak up when it comes
to election reform.
Were going to have our door
open and include as many perspec-
tives on the legislation as possible,
Tetwiler said.
Tetwiler said he was pleased
with the debate on Wednesday
and thinks its a good sign for the
future.
For as many senators to stand up
and say reform is necessary, it really
gives us a lot of support going into
the reform process, Tetwiler said.
Te main changes to election rules
and regulations focus on limiting
coalitions to allow more students to
be involved in Student Senate.
Tetwilers main goal with election
reform is to increase representation
for the student body and increase
Senate outreach to the student
body.
Current Senate rules defne a coa-
lition as any group of students who
temporarily unite to campaign for
Student Senate positions as defned
in Article II of Student Senate Rules
and Regulations and are registered
as a student organization with the
Student Involvement and Leader-
ship Center.
Te proposed defnition stems
from the original rule, adding that
coalitions must hold a supervised
caucus to elect presidential and
vice presidential candidates and
a second caucus to approve the
remaining Senate candidates of the
coalition.
Te proposed caucuses would
be supervised by the election
commission and allow members of
the coalition to vote for whom they
want as the presidential and vice
presidential candidates, where in
the past there were no caucuses or
formal rules on how the presiden-
tial and vice presidential candidates
were chosen.
Tetwiler said he hopes the caucus-
es will allow for more transparency
in the selection of the candidates.
If coalitions are to exist, then
they should maximize representa-
tion and allow for party members
to elect the tops of their ticket,
Tetwiler said.
Another component of the legis-
lation restricts the time coalitions
Volume 126 Issue 36 kansan.com Monday, October 28, 2013
UDK
the student voice since 1904
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
All contents, unless stated otherwise, 2013 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 9
CROSSWORD 5
CRYPTOQUIPS 5
OPINION 4
SPORTS 10
SUDOKU 5
Partly cloudy skies in the morning
give way to cloudy skies during
the afternoon. Southeast winds at
10 to 20 mph
Figure out your Halloween costume Index Dont
forget
Todays
Weather
Prepare for a wet week.
HI: 70
LO: 53
AMENDED ALLIANCES
STUDENT SENATE
Election reform moves forward with coalitions intact
KAITLYN KLEIN
kklein@kansan.com
Honor societies can provide leadership opportunities
Afer opening his email to the
same third or fourth congratulato-
ry honor society email, junior Sam
Jackson refused to pay a dime and
put his information out there.
Jackson, from Waldorf, Md., said
the invitation seemed like a spam
advertisement. He compared the
honor society acceptance emails
to spam emails alerting recipients
that they have won a new TV.
Like Jackson, many students
think national honor societies
are not credible and are a scam
because they require membership
fees.
Advisors, such as journalism
school advisor Dan McCarthy,
continually deal with questions
from students about these organi-
zations.
Honor societies are, only as
essential as the student makes
them, McCarthy said. Nothing
inherently looks good, but, if you
can speak to how your experience
on the Ofcer Board of NSCS
(National Society of Collegiate
Scholars) developed better time
and resource management skills,
it was worthwhile. Otherwise, it
looks like resume padding.
Requirements for eligible mem-
bers are set by each honor society,
sent to the registrar and the indi-
viduals information is sent back
to the society. Contacting future
members is up to the society itself.
For Allen Schaidle, a senior from
Metamora, Ill., contacting him
by email instead of mail wasnt a
problem. Rather, it was deciding
which national honor society to
join.
Tere are many national honor
societies that have chapters at the
University: Golden Key, NSCS, Phi
Beta Kappa and Phi Kappa Phi to
name a few.
Te overall goal for honor soci-
eties is to promote the success of
their students. But, each one has
its own particular goals that sepa-
rate them from the others.
If students think service is
important, GK is a great organiza-
tion to join, Golden Key Advisor
Precious Porras said.
Golden Key invites sophomores
through seniors, but NSCS accepts
freshmen as well.
Because we invite students in
their frst year of college, NSCS
ofers the opportunity to fll
leadership positions early on in a
students career, NSCS President
Sondra Moore said.
Phi Beta Kappas list of eligible
members is quite diferent. Only
students in the College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences who have com-
pleted 100 credits and have taken
four semesters of a foreign lan-
guage or show equal represent-
ed skills are invited to join.
Phi Beta Kappa is the oldest and
best known society in the country,
Phi Beta Kappa Chapter President
Jefrey Moran said.
Phi Kappa Phi is the second
oldest national honor society. But
unlike Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa
Phi extends its invitation to every
discipline.
We dont actually make the
students across units (diferent
schools) compete against each
other, it is self-contained within
the unit, Phi Kappa Phi Chapter
President Angela Lumpkin said.
Certain distinctions should
make the decision a bit easier,
but if you cant decide, follow the
advice of Schaidle.
It is important to only join the
ones that are tailored toward your
major or are considered the best.
I decided to join the two I am a
part of (NSCS and Phi Kappa Phi)
because I discussed them with
faculty members, Schaidle said.
Edited by Casey Hutchins
ASHLEY BOOKER
abooker@kansan.com
ACADEMICS
ELLE TERNES/KANSAN
Student Body President Marcus Tetwiler addressed election reform at last Wednesdays Student Senate meeting. Senate proposed the use of caucuses to help coalitions determine the presidential and vice presidential candidates.

Phi Beta Kappa is the


oldest and best known
society in the country.
JEFFREY MORAN
Phi Beta Kappa Chapter President
Society Requirements Benefts Fees
Top 15% of Sophomore,
Junior or Senior
one-time fee
$1 million in yearly scholarships,
discounts (Geico, T-Mobile,
Lenovo, etc.) graduate test-
prep materials, study abroad
opportunities, leadership-build-
ing conferences and career
resources
3.4+ GPA in freshman or
sophomore year. Students
may nominate themselves
one-time fee
$1 million in yearly scholar-
ships, discounts (Geico, Hertz,
T-Mobile, etc.), graduate test
prep materials, study abroad
opportunities, leadership-build-
ing conferences, networking
and career resources
College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences students only: 100
credits, 3.65+ GPA, average
ACT: 32, taken 4 semesters
of a foreign language or show
equal represented skills
one-time fee
Discounts: Colonial Wil-
liamsburg, and publications
like The Key Reporter, The
American Scholar and
Financial Times
Honor Society
Golden Key
National
Society of
Collegiate
Scholars
Phi Beta Kappa
Phi Kappa Phi
Atleast 72 hours and rank in
top 7.5% for Juniors, rank in
top 10% of class for Seniors,
and Graduate Students must
rank in top 10% of class
-$66 new member fee
(initiation and member-
ship fee combined)
-$35 yearly renewal fee
or $320 new member
active-for-life member-
ship fee
$500,000 in yearly
scholarships for fellowsi-
hps, study abroad grants,
literacy grants and Love of
Learning grants. Membership
discounts (Dell and Apple
products, T-Mobile, Geico,
Etc.), networking and career
$95
$60
$85
SEE SENATE PAGE 2
PAGE 6
COSTUME QUIZ
What should you be
for Halloween?
PAGE 5
CHEAP COSTUMES
Dont break the bank
do it yourself.
Ric Averill didnt want to
portray William Quantrill, and
he wasnt sold on using Twitter
either.
I got rid of my Twitter
account because I was sick
of seeing when everyone was
brushing their teeth, Averill
said.
But that didnt stop the local
actor from recognizing the
potential for an acting exercise
by playing the most infamous
person in Lawrence history.
Averills acting, along with those
of other participants, helped
1863 Commemorate Lawrence
win the 2013 Technology Award
given by the Kansas Museums
Association at the KMA Annual
Conference in Lawrence on Oct.
18. 1863
Commemorate Lawrence is a
group of local organizations that
worked together for the project.
Averill, who is the Lawrence
Arts Center artistic director
of performing arts, acted as
William Quantrill and other
bad guys for the 1863 Com-
memorate Lawrences Twitter
project #QR1863, a reenactment
of Quantrills Raid on Aug. 21,
1863, exactly 150 years later.
Averill and other actors tweeted
status updates as if the raid
happened that day.
Te raid was an attack on the
people of Lawrence during
the American Civil War by
Quantrill and his group of
combatants of the Confederate
Army. Te attack lef almost 200
people dead.
Murl Riedel, the KMA Awards
Chair, said the award was given
to the project because of its
innovative use of technology.
We liked it because it went
beyond social media for just
promotion, Riedel said. Its
something that can be adapt-
ed for other commemorative
events. Its pretty groundbreak-
ing.
Abby Magariel, education and
programs coordinator at the
Watkins Museum of History,
said the project sent 7,000
tweets and reached more than 1
million people.
People loved it, Magariel
said. We had feedback from
people who said they were at
work and couldnt get any-
thing done because they were
too busy following the action.
Magariel said 1863 Com-
memorate Lawrence recruited
actors and others who were
interested to join the proj-
ect through Twitter. One
participant even joined the
project by seeing the casting
call on Twitter and tweeted from
Colorado.
For such a massive project,
large amounts of research
had to be done for those who
would write the tweets. Tose
who participated were given
published memoirs and letters
of the characters who lived in
Lawrence during the event.
Averill said that he had done
some research on the subject for
another project, which helped
him with his tweets.
It ended up being quite fun,
but I did feel quite dirty afer,
Averill said. You think of a sit-
uation like that and, regardless
of the fact that what they did
were horrible actions, they had
a sense of motivation for what
they did.
Magariel said fnding an actor
to play William Quantrill was
important, and Averills pres-
ence in Lawrence as an actor
helped move the project along.
We knew we could trust him,
Magariel said of Averill. He was
going to do a great job creating
dialogue, it was going to be
interesting, it was going to be
engaging. It wasnt going to be
just dry talk.
Magariel said the project end-
ed up working better than the
group had anticipated, and that
they plan to use the practice
later for educational purposes.
With a project so large, there
was a possibility for disaster, in-
cluding the chance of southern
sympathizers derailing the proj-
ect through the public forum.
Magariel said there was even
a Lawrence resident who was
originally critical of the reen-
actment and created a satirical
profle of a horse during the
event. But when the project
started, the horse profle began
to participate with the project,
and gave an account of Quan-
trills raid through a horses
eyes.
We knew it was going to be
exciting, and we were going to
have a whole lot of voices going
at once, Magariel said. But we
didnt realize just how moved
people were going to be.
Edited by Paige Lytle
What: A Case for Social Resilience
When: Noon to 1 p.m.
Where: Fraser Hall, 706
About: Informal talk on social resilience in
Kansas with Robert Wuthnow
What: Digital Wall Drawing: Halloween
When: 4 to 5 p.m.
Where: Anschutz Library, Level 3
About: Spooky drawings, with optional
costumes
What: How a Generation of People is Getting
Hungrier
When: Noon to 1 p.m.
Where: ECM Center
About: Lecture with Jeremy Farmer, Just
Food CEO, discussing food distribution
system
What: Global Entrepreneurship and Politics
When: 4 to 5:30 p.m.
Where: Dole Institute of Politics
About: Lecture with Gracita Arrindell, St.
Maarten president of parliament, about
untapped economic markets
What: The U.S., Drugs and Guns in Mexico
When: 7:30 p.m.
Where: ECM Center
About: Lecture discussing the Mexican
Human Rights Organization Comite Cerezo
What: Rocky Horror Picture Show
When: 8 to 11 p.m.
Where: Kansas Union, Kansas Union
Ballroom
About: Screening of the cult classic,
audience interaction, costumes and dance
competition presented by Student Union
Activities
NEWS MANAGEMENT
Editor-in-chief
Trevor Graff
Managing editors
Allison Kohn
Dylan Lysen
Art Director
Katie Kutsko
ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT
Business manager
Mollie Pointer
Sales manager
Sean Powers
NEWS SECTION EDITORS
News editor
Tara Bryant
Associate news editor
Emily Donovan
Sports editor
Mike Vernon
Associate sports editor
Blake Schuster
Entertainment editor
Hannah Barling
Copy chiefs
Lauren Armendariz
Hayley Jozwiak
Elise Reuter
Madison Schultz
Design chief
Trey Conrad
Designers
Cole Anneberg
Allyson Maturey
Opinion editor
Will Webber
Photo editor
George Mullinix
Special sections editor
Emma LeGault
Web editor
Wil Kenney
ADVISERS
Media director and
content stategist
Brett Akagi
Sales and marketing adviser
Jon Schlitt
N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
MONDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2013 PAGE 2
CONTACT US
editor@kansan.com
www.kansan.com
Newsroom: (785)-766-1491
Advertising: (785) 864-4358
Twitter: @KansanNews
Facebook: facebook.com/thekansan
The University Daily Kansan is the student
newspaper of the University of Kansas. The
frst copy is paid through the student activity
fee. Additional copies of The Kansan are
50 cents. Subscriptions can be purchased
at the Kansan business offce, 2051A Dole
Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside
Avenue, Lawrence, KS., 66045.
The University Daily Kansan (ISSN 0746-
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break, spring break and exams and weekly
during the summer session excluding
holidays. Annual subscriptions by mail are
$250 plus tax. Send address changes to
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Avenue.
KANSAN MEDIA PARTNERS
Check out
KUJH-TV
on Knology
of Kansas
Channel 31 in Lawrence for more on what
youve read in todays Kansan and other
news. Also see KUJHs website at tv.ku.edu.
KJHK is the student voice
in radio. Whether its rock
n roll or reggae, sports or
special events, KJHK 90.7
is for you.
2000 Dole Human Development Center
1000 Sunnyside Avenue
Lawrence, Kan., 66045
weather,
Jay?
Whats the
Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
HI: 71
HI: 68 HI: 61
LO: 60
LO: 46 LO: 39
weather.com
Scattered T-Storms.
80 percent chance
of rain. Wind SE at
12 mph.
Scattered T-Storms.
40 percent chance
of rain. Wind ESE at
12 mph.
Thunder storms.
50 percent chance
of rain. Wind SW at
16 mph.
Its raining... Its pouring... Baby Jay is snoring.
Calendar
Monday, Oct. 28 Tuesday, Oct. 29 Wednesday, Oct. 30 Thursday, Oct. 31
The 14th Oldest Jewelry
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What: Fashioning their Place: Dress
and Global Imagination in Imperial
Sudan 1900-1956
When: 3:30 to 5 p.m.
Where: Hall Center, Seminar Room
About: Gender seminar with history
professor Marie Grace Brown open
to faculty, staff and graduate
students
What: Issues in U.S.-China Rela-
tions
When: 6 to 8 p.m.
Where: Kansas Union, Alderson
Auditorium
About: Webcast with Madeleine
Albright, former U.S. Secretary of
State, and lecture with Professor
Dru Gladney
LAWRENCE
Local actors tweets receive technology award
DYLAN LYSEN
dlysen@kansan.com
CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS
Top: Murl Riedel presents the KMA Technology Award for 1863 Commemorate Lawrences live-tweeting reenactment of Quan-
trills Raid to Christine Metz Howard, the project creator, and Abby Magariel, a planning member of the event. Bottom: Ric
Averill tweeted in character as William Quantrill as part of the 1863 Commemorate Lawrences reenactment project.
MONDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 3
POLICE REPORTS
Just a few more days to donate
to the KU Fights Hunger program.
There are food barrels in many
campus buildings, including the
Libraries and Unions.
An 18-year-old male was
arrested yesterday on the
800 block of Oak Street on
suspicion of possession of drug
paraphernalia, open container,
purchase or consumption of
liquor by a minor, possession
of controlled substance,
cultivation or distribution
of controlled substance and
driving while intoxicated. A
$3,450 bond was paid.
A 19-year-old female was
arrested yesterday on the 1100
block of Louisiana Street on
suspicion of operating a vehicle
under the infuence. A $500
bond was paid.
A 19-year-old male was
arrested yesterday on the 1500
block of Kentucky Street on
suspicion of battery, interfering
with the duties of an offcer and
disorderly conduct. A $300 bond
was paid.
Emily Donovan
Information based on the
Douglas County Sheriffs
Offce booking recap.

VOTING BEGINS MON THE 28TH | SUBMIT YOUR BALLOT AT WWW.KANSAN.COM/VOTE


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SAN FRANCISCO Happily
hunched over his iPad, Britains
most celebrated living artist
David Hockney is pioneering in
the art world again, turning his
index fnger into a paintbrush
that he uses to swipe across a
touch screen to create vibrant
landscapes, colorful forests and
richly layered scenes.
Its a very new medium, said
Hockney. So new, in fact, he
wasnt sure what he was creating
until he began printing his digital
images a few years ago. I was
pretty amazed by them actual-
ly, he said, laughing. Im still
amazed.
A new exhibit of Hockneys
work, including about 150 iPad
images, opened Saturday in the
de Young Museum in Gold-
en Gate Park, just a short trip
for Silicon Valley techies who
created both the hardware and
sofware for this 21st-century
reinvention of fnger-painting.
Te show is billed as the
museums largest ever, flling
two foors of the de Young with
a survey of works from 1999 to
present, mostly landscapes and
portraits in an array of mediums:
watercolor, charcoal and even
video. But on a recent preview
day, it was the iPad pieces, espe-
cially the 12-foot high majestic
views of Yosemite National Park
that drew gasps.
Already captured by famed
photographer Ansel Adams,
and prominent painters such as
Tomas Hill and Albert Bier-
stadt, Hockneys iPad images of
Yosemites rocks, rivers and trees
are both comfortingly familiar
and entirely new.
In one wide open vista, scrubby,
bright green pines sparkle in sun-
light, backed by Bridalveil Fall
tumbling lightly down a clif side;
the distinct granite crest of Half
Dome looms in the background.
In another, a heavy mist obscures
stands of giant sequoias.
He has such command of
space, atmosphere and light,
said Fine Arts Museums director
Colin Bailey.
Other iPad images are overlaid,
so viewers can see them as they
were drawn, an animated begin-
ning-to-end chronological loop.
He tackles faces and fowers, and
everyday objects: a human foot,
scissors, an electric plug.
Some of the iPad drawings are
displayed on digital screens,
others, like the Yosemite works,
were printed on six large panels.
Hockeys technical assistants
used large inkjet prints repro-
duce the images he created on
his iPad.
Exhibiting iPad images by a
prominent artist in a signifcant
museum gives the medium a
boost, said art historians, helping
digital artwork gain legitimacy in
the notoriously snobby art world
where computer tablet art shows
are rare and prices typically low-
er than comparable watercolors
or oils.
Im grateful hes doing this
because it opens peoples mind
to the technology in a new way,
said Long Island University Art
Historian Maureen Nappi, al-
though she described Hockneys
iPad work as gimmicky.
Writing about the historic shif
of drawing from prehistoric cave
painting to digital tablets in this
months MIT journal Leonardo,
Nappi said that while iPad work
is still novel, the physicality of
painting and drawing have gone
on for millennia.
Tese gestures are as old as
humans are, she said in an
interview.
TECHNOLOGY
iPad art gains recognition in new exhibit
ASSOCIATED PRESS
can campaign and table for the
election.
Candidates and coalitions
currently have four weeks, fve
including election week, to table
on campus.Te proposed legisla-
tion would limit candidates to two
weeks of tabling, including election
week.
Chief of Staf Tyler Childress
said the shorter time would force
coalitions to focus on the issues
and it would alleviate some of the
election fatigue felt by students who
are overwhelmed by the current
campaign season.
Youre going to be gearing
your energies toward what youre
fghting for rather than the name
branding that seems to happen in
the spring semester, Childress said.
To view the full current rules and
regulations for Student Senate elec-
tions go to http://www.scribd.com/
KUStudentSenate and fnd the doc-
ument labeled Student Senate Rules
and Regulations August 2013.
Te reforms are broken into two
proposed bills, which will go to
the Student Rights and University
Afairs committees for discussion
on Wednesday at 6:30 p.m.
Edited by Casey Hutchins
ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this photo taken Thursday, Oct. 24, a man records how a painting made by David Hockney using an iPad takes shape at
an exhibit in San Francisco. A sweeping new exhibit of Hockneys work includes about 150 iPad images.
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O
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
opinion
MONDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2013 PAGE 4
I
love October. Besides being
my birthday month and the
month when temperatures
fnally dip below 80 degrees,
October is the month of breast
cancer awareness.
Each year I am amazed by
the wide amount of businesses,
schools and organizations that
choose to go pink in the name of
beating breast cancer. Some just
seek to raise awareness with their
pink out games, others want
to raise funds through pink hair
extensions or special deals at their
stores, while still others want to
involve cancer patients in a walk/
run event.
One local establishment, how-
ever, has a particularly unusual
way to support the cause. Perhaps
youve heard of it. Its the Jayhawk
Cafs Bartenders in Bras, Booze
for a Cause. Its pretty much ex-
actly what you think it is. Female
employees wear nothing but bras
and bottoms while bartending in
order to draw a larger-than-usu-
al crowd for the fundraiser.
On this night, patrons pay a
higher cover charge to beneft
various breast cancer charities.
Last years event raised more than
$5,000 for the Lawrence Memorial
Hospital Breast Center.
Heres my problem with the
bartenders in bras scenario. You
dont get to support one faction of
women by objectifying another. I
say this with full knowledge that
men can contract breast cancer,
as well, but that it is 100 times less
common in men than in women.
Im sure Lawrence Memorial
Hospital is thrilled to receive
thousands of dollars toward treat-
ing their breast cancer patients,
but at the expense of the dignity
of dozens of our Lawrence wom-
en? Im sure they can fnd another
way to raise the funds.
Touting our most attractive Law-
rence women in next-to-nothing
behind a bar is not supporting a
cause. Its a thinly veiled excuse to
use female bodies for proft. And
the hype around the event doesnt
lead me to believe that supporting
breast cancer is at the forefront of
this night.
Take some of the tweets people
used to recommend the fundrais-
er. One supporter: Breastesses
and large amounts of booze at the
@JayhawkCafe tonight so what
else can you ask for? Another:
Combine boobs and booze at
the @JayhawkCafe and you know
its going to be a great night.
#BartendersInBras. Still another:
Bartenders in Bras tonight! Guys,
you can stare at the bartenders
boobs & its okay! Girls, you can
tease & tip the shot BOYS!
Can we not think of any better
way to support breast cancer
eforts? I know from personal ex-
perience how willing these female
employees are eager to help the
cause, and willingly participate.
But I dont need my friends to
ofer up their bodies to get my
money. Ill just hand it to them to
support a good cause.
If the Jayhawk Caf can raise the
same amount of money with-
out the bartenders dressing half
naked, I applaud them. But I dont
think they can garner the same
amount of enthusiasm without
the half-naked women, and thats
the problem.
Just because breast cancer
involves the word breast doesnt
mean we can support it using
near-nudity or ofensive terms
like boobies, tatas and breastesses.
Until the male employees agree to
wear thongs for prostate cancer,
Ill continue spending the bar-
tenders for bras night at home
and give my money to Lawrence
Memorial directly.
Lawrence is an extremely gen-
erous, socially aware town. Lets
not betray it by using these types
of tactics to support an otherwise
upstanding cause.
Lindsey Mayfeld is a senior from
Overland Park studying journalism,
public policy and leadership.
Demeaning fundraiser cheapens breast cancer fght
The Pale King shows importance
of discipline for long-term success
Research business
practices before buying
SOCIAL ISSUES
BOOK CLUB CORPORATE CAUSES
T
odays column is once
again brought to you by
my intense obsession
with David Foster Wallaces
work. His fnal novel, Te Pale
King, was lef tragically unfn-
ished. I have neither the space
nor the clarity of opinion on it to
discuss his suicide here, which
is what cut the work short of co-
alescing into possibly his best (a
tall order to fll with Infnite Jest
already under his belt). In Te
Pale King, Wallace immerses
the reader in the world of an IRS
auditing facility. Tis is hardly
an exciting place for a novel to
occur, you might thinkand you
are absolutely right: DFW selects
this setting and cast of characters
to bring the struggles of everyday
modern life into sharp focus. Te
Pale King challenges our concept
of success, suggesting that it is
measured in disciplined, daily
actions over time, rather than in
an imaginary list of signifcant
accomplishments.
Heroism is where our con-
cept of success manifests itself.
What makes a hero? In popular
culture, a hero might be the guy
that can shoot a ball into a hoop
better than anybody else, or the
character in flm that saves an
entire planet/race, destroying the
would-be destroyers in the pro-
cess. We defne heroism in the
feeting moments of incredible
transcendence of human limits
and hold the heroes in high
regard. DFW turns this notion
on its head: True heroism is
in minutes, hours, weeks, year
upon year of the quiet, precise,
judicious exercise of probity and
care--with no one there to see or
cheer. Tis is the world.
Tis defnition of heroism
isnt about what you do, but
how you do it. It doesnt rely on
others validation or recognition.
Anyone can aspire to this hero-
ism, which is about intentional
personal control rather than
decisive action at a critical mo-
ment. DFW brings out this new
heroism against the backdrop
of the monotonous workday of
an IRS auditor. One of the great
challenges that an everyday hero
overcomes is that of boredom.
To be, in a word, unborable...
he writes, ...is the key to modern
life. If you are immune to bore-
dom, there is literally nothing
you cannot accomplish.
As college students we are
lucky (and unlucky) to have an
endless list of things to do and
opportunities to make use of our
time. Even with a full schedule,
or maybe especially with a full
schedule, boredom can creep in.
Tose hours spent grinding out
homework, working a job, or
even just grocery shopping can
become an interminable torture.
Not everyone works fve days a
week auditing tax returns, but to
some degree we are entrenched
in a routine. Rather than run-
ning away from boredom, DFW
suggests that the secret is to
transcend the monotony and live
within it, yet without it.
I spend a signifcant amount of
my week working in a chemi-
cal engineering research lab. I
deeply care about the broader
impacts of the research like
biorenewable chemical produc-
tion and green reactor engi-
neering. On a day-to-day basis,
though, research involves precise
repetition of experiments and
great attention to detail. Progress
doesnt come in great leaps and
bounds, but in the incremental
solution of thousands of smaller
problems. Were I to succumb to
boredom, I would be continually
dissatisfed with the routine and
disappointed in my (as of yet)
lack of an academic publication.
Instead, I have immersed myself
in and focused my attention on
solving the everyday problems,
which will eventually yield those
personal results and broader
impacts.
I dont believe that DFW is
suggesting that having bold aspi-
rations is a bad thing, or that sig-
nifcant accomplishments dont
have value or bring one a sense
of success. Its that we spend
most of our time in between
these points. We dont spend
every day of our lives walking
down the hill with a degree in
hand: we spend four (or more)
years working toward this single
day. And aferward, its back to
the everyday grind. I think that
DFW is telling us to remember
that we can experience heroism
in the everyday so that, at one
time or another, it will help us
all make it to those singular
moments of success.
Jason Bates is a senior majoring in
chemical engineering from Overland
Park.
S
tep onto campus, scan
the sidewalk and youre
likely to notice a lot of
people wearing TOMS. While
you probably dont know that
the shoes are modeled afer the
Argentinian alpargatas, or that
TOMS founder and CEO Blake
Mycoskie found the inspiration
for his now-multimillion-dollar
company while learning how to
play polo in Argentina in 2006,
youre probably aware that TOMS
matches each sale with a donation
of shoes to a child in need. Oc-
tober is International Fair Trade
Month, but every purchase made
year-round provides an oppor-
tunity for students as consumers
to think about which business
practices they want to support.
Te One for One business
model is simple: Produce shoes,
sell them, and match each sale
with a donation. Its been as-
tonishingly successful to date,
TOMS has given away over ten
million pairs of shoes, with plans
to double that number within the
next two years. Its also sparked
controversy, with critics arguing
that money spent on shoes could
be invested in other, more ef-
cient community interventions
like health clinics or clean sources
of drinking water.
Te most serious criticism is
that, by simply giving away the
shoes, TOMS misses out on the
opportunity to employ local
workers and strengthen local
economies. Kelsey Timmer-
man, author of WHERE AM I
WEARING? A Global Tour to
the Countries, Factories, and
People Tat Make Our Clothes,
points out that the real, under-
lying problem in impoverished
communities worldwide is not
that individuals just decide not
to manufacture and purchase
shoes. Its that shoes become an
unafordable luxury when fami-
lies are making tough decisions
about fnding food and water and
shelter. Here, the obvious point
is the one captured in the parable
about deciding between giving
someone a fsh, feeding them for
a single day, or teaching them
to fsh and empowering them to
feed themselves for life.
Timmerman describes an
example of a company with a very
similar message as TOMS with
one key diference. soleRebels is
a shoe company based in Addis
Ababa, Ethiopia. It employs about
100 people and pays them triple
the average industry wage and
quadruple the legal minimum
wage. It also provides complete
medical coverage and sends the
children of its workers to school.
Te message from the founder,
Bethlehem Tilahun Alemu, is
simple and powerful: creating
a global brand of shoes while
providing high quality jobs for
individuals builds strong commu-
nities. Tis is evident in the way
the company treats its workers
there are no quotas for how many
shoes workers must produce per
day, and the company provides
transportation to and from work
for its employees with disabilities.
Personally, I prefer the soleReb-
els model. While Im certainly
not a fashion expert, Id guess that
the shoes will gain popularity
in the U.S. as they increase their
exposure currently, they are
sold in 40 countries worldwide.
Tis doesnt mean that the TOMS
model is a bad one, and they
are taking steps to improve and
update their practices. Currently,
TOMS is giving a portion of prof-
its to third-party charities work-
ing in the communities TOMS
serves. In two years, the company
plans to manufacture one-third
of the shoes it gives away in the
regions where they are donated.
TOMS employs Haitian artists to
hand-paint shoes to be sold, and
last month Mycoskie announced
that TOMS will open a manufac-
turing center in Haiti this Janu-
ary. Te company has also begun
to sell eyeglasses, using the profts
to provide sight-saving medical
care in thirteen countries.
Why should students care about
the benefts or disadvantages to
a business model, especially the
business model of a company
that is obviously doing its best
to improve the lives of people
around the world? Each purchase
we make represents a choice,
and Id guess that students who
buy TOMS are choosing to be
stylish while doing good. Tats
admirable, and TOMS deserves
credit for making consumers
more aware of the seriousness of
poverty worldwide. Our decision
to support any company shapes
the market for successful socially
conscious groups so its im-
portant that we frst take the time
to know exactly what it is were
supporting.
Amanda Gress is a junior studying
political science and economics from
Overland Park.
Dear attractive lady on the face wash
commercial, people dont actually
splash their face with water like that.
Sincerely, My Bathroom Floor Is Now
Soaking Wet.
To whomever took the crossword then
put the newspaper back, I hate you.
The piccolos did a wave in the 4th
quarter. It was awesome. Hope they
do it again next game.
Theres always that one Facebook
friend who likes about 62 vines in
a row.
Hey editor, hook up the banana suit
and gorilla suit.
Sometimes when I see a person with
a pizza in the library, I want to tell @
FreeFoodAtKU so random people will
come up and take a slice.
I taught my grandma how to use
Netfix and I dont think she has
changed clothes for three days.
Why couldnt I have been born a cat?
Horoscopes gives me a 5. Had an
amazingly awesome day, and then
got hit by a car at 11pm. They do
come true.
The way to feel warm in Smith is to
refute your belief in the AC. I hear
it works with gravity also but I am
afraid to try.
No one knows it but I pull the strings
of student government like Kevin
Spacey in House of Cards.
If you dont want your copy of the
New Testament, Pearson Scholarship
Hall will gladly accept it.
To the couple on the frst foor of
Wescoe: straddling each other in the
middle of a hallway is not allowed.
Kindly dismount and stop being
gross. Sincerely, everyone.
I hope to someday live in a world
where people dont smash other
peoples pumpkins. Excuse me
for thinking I could safely put my
pumpkin on the porch for just an
hour. Jerks.
Can Ass Jamz just stop, please?
When are bidets going to become
standard in the U.S.? Just another
example of our government failing
us.
I wouldnt say I eat meals, so much
as I just never stop eating at any
point during the day.
Ive sent an FFA about the Chiefs
every week and weve won every
week, so here we go.
My mustache doesnt look so bad,
maybe.
Text your FFA
submissions to
7852898351 or
at kansan.com
HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER TO THE EDITOR CONTACT US
LETTER GUIDELINES
Send letters to kansanopdesk@gmail.com. Write
LETTER TO THE EDITOR in the e-mail subject line.
Length: 300 words
The submission should include the authors name,
grade and hometown. Find our full letter to the
editor policy online at kansan.com/letters.
Trevor Graff, editor-in-chief
editor@kansan.com
Allison Kohn, managing editor
akohn@kansan.com
Dylan Lysen, managing editor
dlysen@kansan.com
Will Webber, opinion editor
wwebber@kansan.com
Mollie Pointer, business manager
mpointer@kansan.com
Sean Powers, sales manager
spowers@kansan.com
Brett Akagi, media director & content strategest
bakagi@kansan.com
Jon Schlitt, sales and marketing adviser
jschlitt@kansan.com
THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Members of the Kansan Editorial Board are Trevor
Graff, Allison Kohn, Dylan Lysen, Will Webber,
Mollie Pointer and Sean Powers.
By Lindsey Mayfield
lmayfield@kansan.com
By Jason Bates
jason.s.bates@gmail.com
By Amanda Gress
agress@kansan.com
@KUDM
@KansanOpinion KU Dance Marathon! We offer emotional &
fnancial support for the children at KU Pediatrics. Join us Nov.
9! FOR THE KIDS!
What charities do you
think more people should
know about?
FFA OF
THE DAY

Brought home
some 150 pounds
of new beer from
my weekend trip.
I think I heard the
Super Smash Bros
announcer shout
a new record!
Its that time of year againthe
time of year when we realize
that we are sadly lacking Hal-
loween costume ideas, leaving us
scrambling at the last minute to
fnd something for that costume
party. But this year, dont scramble
aloneyour roommate can pro-
vide the perfect solution to your
costume quandary.
You dont need to be in a rela-
tionship to wear a two-person
costume (doctor and sexy
nurse dont scream originality,
anyway). Grab your roommate
and rope them into dressing up
with you. And while one person
dressing in all gray and another in
all white could pass for a school
spirited rock and chalk, putting
more thought into your costume
will not only be more creative, it
will save you from having to ex-
plain exactly what you are to every
person who sees you.
Retro costumes that throw back
to the days of college students
childhoods are a big trend this
year. So why not incorporate
this into your costume with your
roommate? Not only will your
costume be unique but will inspire
many conversations about days
gone byan ice breaker if there
ever was one.
Ladies, if youre feeling Clueless
about what to do for a costume,
fnd some short plaid skirts, blaz-
ers, knee-high socks and heels to
dress up as Cher and Dionne from
the classic 1995 flm. Complete
the look by fnding a guy friend
with a KU hat to be the Paul Rudd
to your Alicia Silverstone.
If you and your roommate hap-
pen to look somewhat alike, fnd
identical collared dresses that you
dont mind splattering with fake
blood. Adopt a blank stare and
repeat the phrase Come play with
us, Danny in a monotone voice
to create a convincing Grady twins
costume. Halloween is supposed
to be scary, afer all.
Guys, if youre lucky enough to
get your hands on a suit, a Men
in Black costume is only a pair of
dark sunglasses away. Dress up a
pen or laser pointer to create your
own Neuralyzer.
Tere is nothing a woman loves
more than a man in uniform.
So for all of you men out there,
channel your inner Maverick and
Goose for a dashing costume idea.
Grab some leather or bomber
jackets, aviator sunglasses and
blast Highway to the Danger
Zone from your phone all night
to complete the look. And if you
fnd a girl who tells you to take her
to bed or leave her forever, you
have found a keeper, gentlemen.
And dont think that Ive for-
gotten those of you with multiple
roommates. Play along with the
retro theme by dressing up as
your favorite groups from the past
decades.
Ladies, grab your girlfriends and
dress up as one of your favorite
girls groups from the 90s. Decide
which of you most embodies
Sporty, Posh, Baby, Ginger and
Scary and pull it all together to be-
come the Spice Girls. Even better,
if you can spontaneously perform
Wannabe, youll be the life of the
party. However, there is no need to
limit your group costumes to real
life celebrities. Grab some animal
print from your closet and be the
Cheetah Girls or utilize the colors
green, pink and blue to create your
own Powerpuf Girls costumes.
Guys, take a new approach to
the ever-popular Teenage Mutant
Ninja Turtles costumewear blue,
orange, purple and red shirts,
but tape pictures of da Vincis,
Donatellos, Michelangelos and
Raphaels most famous works to
yourself to demonstrate that you
are far more cultured than you
appear. And of course, you can
never go wrong with superhero
costumes. Find one of your girl
friends to complete an Avengers
costume, or simply pick and
choose among the hundreds of
comic book superheroes (and
villains) available to you.
With costumes like these, you
and your roommates are bound
to be the talk of the party. Afer
all, who wants to be anything ge-
neric for Halloween? With a little
thought and blast from the past,
you can create a costume that will
be remembered for years to come.
MONDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2013
E
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
entertainment
HOROSCOPES
CROSSWORD
Because the stars
know things we dont.
SUDOKU
CRYPTOQUIP
CHECK OUT
THE ANSWERS
http://bit.ly/1gTnthk
PAGE 5
340 Fraser | 864-4121
www.psych.ku.edu/
psychological_clinic/
Counseling Services for
Lawrence & KU
RETRO
Aries (March 21-April 19)
Today is an 8
Monday is for romance (at least today
is). Fall in love all over again. You can
do more with less. You know what you
really want, so follow your passion. If
you fail, get back on the horse. Keep
it fun.
Taurus (April 20-May 20)
Today is a 7
Youre full of brilliant ideas, which
are extremely practical now. Talk it
over with your partner for exponential
gains. Listen carefully, and dont
make assumptions. When in doubt,
ask. Bring your ingenuity home.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)
Today is an 8
Avoid distractions and get into
detailed work. Now its easier to
concentrate. Dont wander off too far
from home, as you have some chores
frst. Share sweet words with someone
interesting later.
Cancer (June 21-July 22)
Today is a 9
What you learn now will stay with
you for a long time. Focus on the
piece of the job you love. Make some
honest money while youre at it. Youre
especially good, more than you give
yourself credit for.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Today is a 9
Youre on top of the world for the rest
of the day. Come down from cloud
nine, eventually, and start making
some serious money. You have every-
thing you need, just add discipline.
Enjoy the process.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Today is a 7
Youre especially sensitive now. It
may look like an uphill kind of day.
Theres still beauty to be found along
the trail. And just think about the fun
youll have running down after you
reach the crest.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Today is an 8
Surround yourself with common
goals and support each other in your
dreams. Together you can fgure out
new ways to make money. Keep your
friends close, and stay out of the way
of enemies. Use your intuition.
Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Today is an 8
Youre in charge and ready to take
action. Pour on the steam and
advance more than expected. Some
caution is advised since Mercury is
retrograde, but dont let that mess up
your plans. Get a friends help with
any breakdowns.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Today is a 9
Hit the road, Jack, and discover an
adventure along the way, the kind
to tell your grandchildren about.
Romance fgures in the picture, too.
Keep your expenses low, and your
head held high. Pack light.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is an 8
Youre being challenged, giving you
an opportunity to show your worth.
Be tough. You may even surprise
yourself. Youll have time to play, too.
Opposites attract even more so now.
Find a way to share resources with a
partner.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Today is a 9
Youll fnd it easier to balance
romance with career. Start by working
on projects you love. Involve a partner
to take it farther, and dramatically
increase the fun level. Keep practicing
and trying new things. Just go play.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Today is a 9
Give yourself the room to grow, even if
that means letting go of things youve
been hanging on to for no particular
reason. Out with the old, and in
with new income and possibilities.
Renovate the way you provide great
service.
DIY options keep
Halloween creative
KATE MILLER
kmiller@kansan.com
CLOSET RAID
On a college students budget,
celebrating Halloween can get
expensive quickly. With store bought
costumes ranging from $40 to $75,
making your own outft is a cost
effective and creative alternative.
Mermaid
An old bra or bikini top
Your closet
Miniature shells/pearls/rhine-
stones
$5 at most craft stores (Hobby
Lobby, Michaels, etc)
Pencil skirt
your closet
Green shimmering fabric
$5-10 dollars depending on the
amount of fabric you purchase
Start by arranging and hot gluing
a variety of sea shells, pearls and
rhinestones onto an old bra or bikini
top. Once you have covered it com-
pletely, set out to dry. Then measure
out a length of fabric to wrap around
your pencil skirt. Hot glue or sew
the fabric to the skirt, and trim the
excess.
Complete the look by attaching one
of the larger shells to a headband
or clip to put in your hair. Have fun
with your makeup, use bright colors
and dont be afraid to add shimmer
wherever possible.
Despicable Me
Minion
Overalls
$5 at most thrift stores
Yellow tights
$6
Long sleeved yellow shirt
your roommate's closet
Black combat boots or sneakers
your closet
Black gloves
your closet
Yellow beanie
$3-4
DIY Minion Goggles
Black headband- $3
Plastic Foam Cups- $1
Start by cutting two of the foam
cups about 1-1 1/2 inches from the
bottom all the way around the cup.
Spray paint or color the cups silver.
Then pin the cups to the headband to
form makeshift goggles.
Walter White from
Breaking Bad
This simple costume only requires
a few pieces from your or your dads
closet.
Button-up dress shirt
White briefs
Tall dress socks
Sneakers/Suede shoes if possible
Glasses
Buy a beaker or test tube to car-
ry around with you to complete
the look.
Pirate
White button up dress shirt
your closet
Vest
$3-4 at a thrift store
Old jeans that can be cut
your closet
Eye patch
$4-5 at most costume stores
Bandana/Scarf
girlfriends closet
Boots
$10-15 at a thrift store
Try to grow out facial hair for a
more rugged look. Cut off the jeans
into shorts, and add rips and tears
to the shirt.
Edited by James Ogden
HANNAH SUNDERMEYER
hsundermeyer@kansan.com
Group, couple ideas
simplify costumes
Go green! Recycle this paper
MONDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 6
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DETROIT Calvin Johnson
thought Matthew Staford was
going to spike the ball for at least
another snap.
Te Dallas Cowboys did, too.
Staford's 1-yard lunge over a pile
of linemen with 12 seconds lef
and Johnson's 329 yards receiving
lifed the Detroit Lions to a 31-30
win over Dallas on Sunday.
"I was yelling that I was going to
spike the ball," Staford recalled.
"But their linebackers were just
standing there."
Te Cowboys weren't just stand-
ing around letting Johnson make
catch afer catch, but he made
them look helpless.
Johnson almost broke an NFL
record, and could celebrate the
feat because of a comeback from
a 10-point, fourth-quarter defcit
that some people who entered
Ford Field didn't see because they
had lef.
"Even our fans didn't think we
could pull this one out," he said.
"Tey were leaving, but we knew
we could do it."
Johnson's total trails only the 336
yards receiving Flipper Anderson
had for the Los Angeles Rams
against New Orleans on Nov. 26,
1989 in a game that went into
overtime. Anderson had 296 yards
receiving in regulation.
Te Cowboys dared Detroit to
throw to Johnson with a lot of
one-on-one coverage. Tey usually
asked cornerback Brandon Carr
to do the improbable by defending
him by himself, and sometimes
attempted to slow him down with
a zone.
"He had his way," Carr said. "And,
we couldn't fnd a way to keep him
from rolling."
Johnson noticed.
"It was crazy," he said. "We had a
lot of one-on-one coverage today,
and we were able to take advan-
tage and hit some deep balls. Matt
made some great throws to me."
Te Lions (5-3) overcame four
turnovers without forcing a turn-
over, becoming the frst team to do
that and win since New England
did against Miami in 2007, accord-
ing to STATS.
On their last drive, Staford threw
a 22-yard pass to Johnson to set up
the winning score. Te quarter-
back caught at least some Cowboys
by surprise, including linebacker
Sean Lee, who appeared to expect
him to spike the ball to stop the
clock.
"He kind of caught us of-guard,"
defensive tackle Jason Hatcher
acknowledged.
Dallas (4-4) seemed to set itself
up to win three straight for the
frst time this year to build a bigger
lead atop the NFC East when Tony
Romo threw his second touch-
down and third of the game
to Dez Bryant with 6:45 lef to take
27-17 lead.
Te Cowboys, though, allowed
Reggie Bush to cap an 80-yard
drive with a 1-yard TD with 3:33
lef. Tey also had to settle for
Dan Bailey's third feld goal with
1:02 lef afer Tyron Smith was
fagged for holding on third down,
a mistake that stopped the clock
even though Detroit declined the
penalty.
"If we don't get called for a pen-
alty, I think they probably had 20
seconds or so lef," Romo said.
With no timeouts, the Lions went
from their 20 to the Cowboys
end zone thanks in large part to a
17-yard pass to Johnson, a 40-yard
connection with Kris Durham and
Johnson's 14th reception that gave
them the ball at the Dallas 1.
Instead of spiking the ball,
Staford took the snap and leaped
with his arms extended to beat the
team he rooted for growing up in
Highland Park, Texas.
"I was just as fooled as the de-
fense was," Lions ofensive guard
Larry Warford said.
Staford was 33 of 48 for 488
yards his second-highest total
with a 2-yard TD pass to Johnson
in the frst quarter and two inter-
ceptions. Reggie Bush had 92 yards
rushing and a score.
Romo was 14 of 30, failing to
complete half his passes for the
frst time since 2009, for 206 yards
without a turnover.
Dallas began the game without
two starters on both sides of the
ball: DeMarco Murray and Miles
Austin on ofense and DeMarcus
Ware and J.J. Wilcox on defense.
Late in the frst half, Romo threw
two straight passes to Bryant
afer not making him the intended
receiver once and he caught
the second one with his lef hand.
pinning it against his shoulder pad
for a go-ahead, 5-yard TD with 46
seconds lef in the frst half.
Despite leading by six in the third
quarter, Bryant didn't look happy.
He fapped his arms and screamed
at Romo on the sideline. Afer the
loss, Bryant insisted his demon-
strative actions were a result of his
positive passion.
"People who have a problem
with me are the people that don't
understand what is going on," he
said.
NOTES: Lions DE Ezekiel "Zig-
gy" Ansah (lef ankle), WR Ryan
Broyles (Achilles tendon) and CB
Bill Bentley (knee) and Cowboys
RG Brian Waters (triceps), CB
Morris Claiborne (hamstring) and
FS Barry Church (hamstring) were
hurt during the game. ... Te Lions
have a bye next week while Dallas
plays on the road against the New
York Giants.
___
DENVER In all those years
roaming the sidelines in Denver,
Mike Shanahan never saw one get
so ugly, so fast.
Not surprisingly, Peyton Man-
ning had a hand in turning Shana-
han's homecoming sour.
Afer being showered with ap-
plause, then staked to a two-touch-
down lead, the Broncos' old coach
watched Manning and the Broncos
score the last 38 points Sunday in
a come-from-behind 45-21 victory
over the Washington Redskins.
Manning overcame four turn-
overs and threw for 354 yards and
four touchdowns, as the Broncos
came back from a 21-7 defcit early
in the third quarter.
Ahead by those two touchdowns
afer Manning threw a pick-6 to
DeAngelo Hall when receiver
Demaryius Tomas fell on an out
route, Shanahan squinted into
the sunlight, rolled-up game plan
in hand, and looked at a familiar
sight on the scoreboard in Denver
his team comfortably ahead
as the sun began to set over the
Rockies.
Tings changed quickly, though.
Manning led the Broncos (7-1)
on a 75-yard scoring drive to
make it 21-14, the key play coming
when Knowshon Moreno ran for
5 yards on fourth-and-2 from the
Washington 22.
Ten, afer the defense forced
a punt, it was Manning picking
and poking again, moving Denver
83 yards in 16 plays for the tying
score, a 1-yard pass to Joel Drees-
sen on the frst play of the fourth
quarter.
Robert Grifn III threw three
straight incompletions and Sav
Rocca followed by shanking a
punt 15 yards. On the next play,
Manning gave Denver a 28-21 lead
with a screen pass Moreno took in
for a 35-yard touchdown.
Von Miller ended the next drive
with a sack and forced fumble
to give Denver a feld goal and a
10-point lead, and Washington
(2-5) never got closer.
Te rest had all the makings of a
routine runaway for the Broncos,
who knocked Grifn out of the
game late with an injured lef
knee, then got their fnal touch-
down when Dominique Rodg-
ers-Cromartie picked of backup
Kirk Cousins and returned it 75
yards.
But all the video-game numbers,
including the franchise-record
31 fourth-quarter points, masked
some growingly troubling prob-
lems as the Broncos reach the
halfway point.
Most notably, Manning has had
some issues the last three weeks.
Yes, he went 30 for 44 and hit
four receivers for scores, includ-
ing Wes Welker, who scored for a
career-high ninth time.
But Manning doubled his inter-
ceptions total for the season and
lost a fumble, bringing Denver's
league-leading total to 11 lost fum-
bles. In all, the quarterback simply
didn't look as comfortable as he
did the frst fve weeks, before he
sprained an ankle that forced him
to miss his frst regular-season
practice as a Bronco last week.
He got bailed out by the low-
est-ranked pass defense, which
held Grifn to a 15-for-30 day a
week afer he led a late winning
touchdown drive in a 45-41
victory over Chicago. Te Broncos
forced fve turnovers, including in-
terceptions by Chris Harris, Rahim
Moore and Shaun Phillips.
MONDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 7
Manning leads Broncos to 45-21 win over Redskins
NFL
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning (18) pulls away from Washington Redskins linebacker Darryl Tapp (54) in the frst quarter of an NFL football game on Sunday
in Denver.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Detroit Lions quarterback Matthew Stafford (9) celebrates scoring on a 1-yard
touchdown run against the Dallas Cowboys in the fourth quarter of an NFL football
game in Detroit on Sunday.
Staffords sneak steals win from Cowboys
NFL
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Even our fans didnt think


we could pull this one
out.
CALVIN JOHNSON
Detroit Lions wide receiver
MONDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 8
www.HomesForLease.org www.HomesForLease.org
FOOTBALL
LACKLUSTER LOSS
Jayhawks weak offense dooms defense against Bears
GAME BALL
FINAL THOUGHT
LOOKING AHEAD
GLASS HALF FULL
Kansas stayed with Baylor for the most of the second half, partly because the game was well out of the reach
as Baylor thrashed Kansas secondary with its rapid fre pace, racking up 38 points in the frst half. Even
if Baylor had its backup quarterback in, who fumbled twice, Kansas only gave up 21 points and scored 14
thanks to a Brandon Bourbon run and a Rodriguez Coleman catch. Another superlative from this game was
that Weis fnally unleashed Montell Cozart and he got to exhibit his hyped-up arm strength. He only threw
one ball that really stood out a 45-yard strike right on the money to Rodriguez Coleman over two defenders.
Cozart overthrew a few other receivers later down the road, but his arm strength was apparent.
GLASS HALF EMPTY
The offense stalled out of its game plan early on and gave the defense no chance whatsoever. They couldnt
sniff a frst down, except when a penalty call went in their favor. The Heaps-Cozart hodgepodge didnt exactly
go favorably either, as they were 11-of-33 for just 154 yards passing, with most of those coming in the
second half when Baylor let its foot off the gas pedal.
GOOD, BAD OR PLAIN STUPID
While Baylor didnt put up more than 70 points at Memorial Stadium, they still put up some record numbers.
It was the third most yards Kansas has ever given up and Bryce Petty had over 400 yards passing. You can
throw out stats all day on this game, but the offense exacerbated the situation by not successfully holding
onto the ball longer. This was a beatdown, there are no two ways about it.
VERDICT: PLAIN STUPID
DELAY OF GAME
Usually special teams are always the silver lining, and is the only one you can fnd within this team in games
like this. However, after Matthew Wyman made fve out of his frst six feld goals, he now has missed two extra
points and one feld goal in the last two games. Shouldnt be too much to worry about going forward, but it
hasnt been pretty for him in the last two occasions.
Rodriguez Coleman gets the game ball, simply because he had the two longest plays of the day for the
Kansas offense. He showed his downfeld presence early on and gave Cozart some encouragement with a big
catch after a nice downfeld throw. He fnished the day with just two receptions but totaled 75 yards, includ-
ing a touchdown catch from Jake Heaps.
This game was expectedly over by the half, no surprise there, but the game plan was a little off for Charlie
Weis as the passing game spelled out the loss once again. Kansas is at the point in the season where evalua-
tion for next years passing game is more crucial than ever, especially for Weis.
Kansas will be taking on a Texas team that has now won four Big 12 games in a row and is tied for frst in the
conference. Texas crushed TCU 30-7 and Kansas now goes to Austin seeking to end its 21-game road-losing
streak.
MAX GOODWIN AND CONNER OBERKROM
mgoodwin@kansan.com; coberkrom@kansan.com
DEFENSE: D-
The defense gave up 505 yards in the frst half. Baylor averaged more than nine yards per play. That is
almost a frst down every snap, but Baylor has an unmatched offense and puts up ridiculous stats with
regularity. Bryce Petty threw for 430 yards, and didnt even fnish the third quarter.
SPECIAL TEAMS: B-
The special teams unit got a lot of work in Saturday. Trevor Pardula punted 11 times and four of those ended
up inside of Baylors 20-yard line. The Jayhawks had some impressive kick returns as well. A solid game for
this unit, but when you have to punt on almost every drive, your stats will look impressive.
COACHING: B-
Charlie Weis had a defensive game plan to just keep the offense in front of them and not give up plays, and
it worked early as Baylor went three-and-out on the frst two possessions. But no team can hold off the Bears
offense for long. The Jayhawks gave a good effort in the second half and didnt give up on a game that was
way out of hand.
OFFENSE: D-
The offense managed two touchdowns, which isn't far from the season average. Those points didn't come
until after Baylor had begun to put its backup players on the feld. The offense went three-and-out on six of
the nine possessions it had in the frst half.
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Senior defensive lineman Keba Agostinho attempts to bring down Baylors running back Lache Seastrunk as he carries the
ball.
ASHLEIGH LEE/KANSAN
Junior running back Brandon Bourbon runs past Baylors defense during Saturdays 59-14 loss.
ASHLEIGH LEE/KANSAN
Senior safety Dexter Linton pursues Baylors Tevin Reese on a pass play in the frst quarter. Linton had four total tackles and
a fumble recovery in the game.
A
fer tonights game, we will ofcially
be halfway through the 2013-14
NFL season. Tis has been a season
of bizarre happenings, with teams at both
the top and bottom of their divisions that
no one saw coming. Tis season has had
no shortage of injuries, upsets and con-
troversies. Powerhouses arent playing like
powerhouses and underdogs are starting to
produce more upsets. Here is my recap of
the frst half of the NFL season.

Injuries
Every NFL season is bound to have its fair
share of injuries. But this year, star players
are dropping like fies all around the league,
and seriously hurting their teams chances
of making the playofs. Just last week, four
players went down with season ending
injuries. Reggie Wayne and Sam Bradford
ended their years with ACL injuries. Jermi-
chael Finley went down with a neck injury
and Brian Cushing will miss the whole
season again with a leg injury. Randall
Cobb and Doug Martin will also be missing
serious amounts of time as they tend to
their injuries. A lot of lesser-known players
like T.Y. Hilton and Mike James are going
to have to shoulder the load and help their
teams win games.
Surprises
Tis NFL season is featuring many sur-
prises in the standings and power rankings
league-wide. Last week the NFL power
rankings came out with the undefeated Kan-
sas City Chiefs as number one. Te Chiefs
are atop the AFC West with a record of 8-0,
a game ahead of Peyton Manning and the
Denver Broncos. As weak of a schedule as
the Chiefs have played, it is still impressive
to fnish half of the season without a loss.
Can the Chiefs compete with the power-
house Denver Broncos to win the AFC
West? Tat will truly judge the Chiefs Super
Bowl hopes. Te Vikings and the Giants are
two teams that are surprising on the other
end of the spectrum. Tey went into the
week 29th and 30th in the power rankings
afer both being playof teams last season.
Te Giants squeaked out a victory yesterday
against the Michael Vick-less Eagles and
the Vikings played the Packers on Sunday
Night Football.
Individual Performances
Te consensus frst-half MVP
is none other than Peyton Man-
ning. He has 29 touchdown pass-
es through eight games. He has
a passer rating of 123.3 and has
only thrown six interceptions,
three of which came in yester-
days game against the Redskins.
He is leading the Broncos to an impressive
year where they are favorites to represent
the AFC in the Super Bowl. Russell Wilson
and Marshawn Lynch are leading the Seattle
Seahawks to an equally impressive year. To
go along with one of the best defensive units
in the league, Lynch is second in the league
in rushing yards and touchdowns while Wil-
son is top 10 in the league in passer rating.
Tere are also a few players having unchar-
acteristically poor seasons. Tom Brady has
thrown only nine touchdown passes and
has a QBR of 75.3. Most of Bradys ofensive
weapons are hurt, and he is struggling with
his young receiving unit. Indianapolis Trent
Richardson had a standout rookie season
with the Browns, but is having quite the
sophomore slump. He has 333 rushing yards
and a mere two touchdowns. Te trade to
the Colts hasnt catapulted his
production this season like
some had thought.
Playoff Predictions
AFC:
o East: New England Patriots
o West: Denver Broncos
o North: Cincinnati Bengals
o South: Indianapolis Colts
o Wild Card 1: Kansas City Chiefs
o Wild Card 2: Miami Dolphins
o AFC Champions: Indianapolis Colts

NFC:
o East: Dallas Cowboys
o West: Seattle Seahawks
o North: Detroit Lions
o South: New Orleans Saints
o Wild Card 1: Green Bay Packers
o Wild Card 2: Carolina Panthers
o NFC Champions: Seattle Seahawks
Super Bowl matchup:
Seattle Seahawks vs. Indianapolis Colts
Super Bowl Champions:
Seattle Seahawks
Edited by Evan Dunbar

Afer two drives of Jake Heaps,
Coach Charlie Weis decided to
bring in Montell Cozart in Satur-
days game against Baylor. Cozart
got his chance to showcase his arm
coming in for four straight drives
afer Heaps was taken out.
Cozart fnished the day 4-of-14
for 69 yards and his highlight play
came in the third quarter when he
threw a 45-yard downfeld strike
to Rodriguez Coleman, the longest
play of the day for the Kansas
ofense.
Weis said he knew that Cozart
was going to pass more than he
did last week against Oklahoma,
but the quarterback position is still
a little fuzzy.
We knew Montell was going to
play more this week than he did
last week, Weis said. And I think
as we go forward, rather than just
worry about settling on one [quar-
terback], we have to both get them
ready to play.
As the game got out of hand
in the second half, Heaps and
Cozart split the ofensive reps and
looked to carry a similar role going
forward.
Heaps threw one touchdown
pass in the second half. Combined,
Heaps and Cozart threw 11-of-33
for 154 passing yards.
Te future is promising for
Cozart and as the learning curve
has sped up with the new situa-
tion, along the sidelines he was
still himself. Tight end Jimmay
Mundine pointed out that he was
poised as he has been all season.
Just like last week into the
game, he was very calm, cool and
collected, he wasnt stuttering or
shaking, Mundine said. He was a
little quiet at times, but other than
that he was perfectly fne.
Tony Pierson was suited up for
the frst time in two games afer
sufering a head injury in the Oct.
5 game against Texas Tech. He saw
some action in the frst two series
and then didnt see the feld the
rest of the game.
Pierson saw two targets in the
frst three plays, but didnt have
any receptions.
Pierson stretched the Baylor
defense early on, with one deep
ball over the middle that Heaps
overthrew and the other a corner
route that he dropped near the
sidelines.
It hurt a little with Tony going
down early because all the bombs
were going to him, Weis said.
Weis said that he aired on the
side of caution with Pierson and
that he was dizzy afer he came
out.
Kansas game plan of trying to
milk the clock and trying to keep
Baylors high-octane ofense of the
feld went awry.
Kansas frst four possessions
spelled out trouble, accounting for
14 plays of just 11 yards of ofense.
Afer forcing Baylor to punt
twice, Kansas ofense had a chance
to make a statement, but the stall-
ing ofense continued to haunt the
Kansas defense.
Kansas rushed just four times
in the frst four drives and as its
passing game was stifed, so was its
running game, rushing the ball 23
times for a meager 53 yards over
the frst half.
Afer Baylors two punts, the
foodgates opened. Baylor scored
in its next four straight possessions
and jumped to a 28-0 lead.
Kansas passed it more than its
are accustomed to and the reality
set in once again the passing
game had to prosper in order for
Kansas to have a fghting chance.
I knew the way they played
defense and the way weve been
playing on ofense that those
safeties were going to play really
close to the line of scrimmage,
Weis said.
Kansas had the ball for more than
half of the game outdueling Baylor
in time of possession 37:53 to
22:07, but their miscues of trying
to hold onto the ball early in the
game turned the game over to Bay-
lor. Afer a few hiccups on ofense,
the Bears never looked back,
racking up 743 yards of ofense
and 59 points.
Edited by Casey Hutchins
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a woman w/autism. Great opportunity for
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HELP WANTED! New business in North
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Douglas County Aids Project has a Me-
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Jimmy Johns is looking to hire some
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ANNOUNCEMENTS HOUSING JOBS JOBS JOBS HOUSING

This week in athletics


Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Monday Tuesday
No Events Womens Golf
2013 Palmetto Intercollegiate
All Day
Kiawah Island, S.C.
Mens Basketball
Pittsburg State
7 p.m.
Lawrence
Volleyball
Baylor
6 p.m.
Lawrence
Soccer
Oklahoma
3 p.m.
Lawrence
Womens Basketball
Pittsburg State
8 p.m.
Lawrence
Womens Tennis
Houston Invitational
All Day
Houston, Texas
Womens Tennis
Houston Invitational
All Day
Houston, Texas
Womens Tennis
Houston Invitational
All Day
Houston, Texas
Football
Texas
2:30 p.m.
Austin, Texas
Cross Country
Big 12 Championships
10 a.m.
Waco, Texas
Womans Basketball
Emporia State
2 p.m.
Lawrence
Womens Rowing
Head of the Hooch
Final Results
Chattanooga, Tenn.
MONDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 9
!
?
FACT OF THE DAY
TRIVIA OF THE DAY
THE MORNING BREW
Q: Who holds the record for most
touchdown passes through 8 games in
an NFL season?
A: Tom Brady, with 30.
ESPN.com
The Kansas City Chiefs defense leads
the NFL with 36 sacks this season.
A mid-season review of the NFL
By Ben Felderstein
bfelderstein@kansan.com
Our goal has always been to win Super
Bowls, and Peyton gives us a chance to
win another world championship.
Pat Bowlen
Broncos owner
ESPN.com
QUOTE OF THE DAY
BAYLOR BLOWOUT
Football Notebook
Baylors strong offense tramples Kansas
CONNOR OBERKROM
coberkrom@kansan.com
At the start of the fourth quarter
there were a couple hundred
dedicated fans lef in the student
section.
Te Jayhawks trailed by 45
points and the Baylor back-up
players had been on the feld for
half of the the third quarter.
In the end it was a 59-14 maul-
ing that could have been worse.
At halfime, with Kansas down
38-0, Charlie Weis called his team
out.
Are we going to lose 200 to
nothing? Or are we going to be
competitive? Weis asked his
team.
In the second half, the Jayhawks
managed to halt the beat down
and score two touchdowns.
You dont get awards for playing
it close in the second half, but you
do evaluate by how you play in
the second half, Weis said.
Weis saw most of his players
fght back, but it was in front of a
nearly empty Memorial Stadium.
Baylor spread its ofense from
sideline to sideline, as they are
known for doing, and engulfed
the Kansas defense with strike
afer strike to the end zone. Te
biggest issue for Weis with the
defense was missed tackles, and
the players agreed.
If you tackle that bad you cant
win, defensive lineman Keon
Stowers said.
In watching past Baylor games
this season, Stowers said he saw
mistakes made by other teams
that he thought his team could
avoid.
But when he got on the feld
against the Bears, he realized just
how fast and deceptive they are.
Tey are a well coached team,
they are a dynamic ofense and
they do a good job of adjusting,
Stowers said.
When the Kansas players tried
to keep the receivers in front of
them and avoid big plays, Baylor
quarterback Bryce Petty threw
the ball underneath. When the
Jayhawks adjusted, he went deep.
Tats their ofense, you take
away one thing and here comes
another thing, Stowers said.
Te Jayhawks arent the frst
team that Baylor has done this
to. Te Bears have scored more
than 70 points in four games this
season, and 69 in another.
In comparison, the Jayhawks
defense wasnt so bad.
But, two Bears running backs
still ran for more than 100 yards,
and a third ran for 55. In all, Bay-
lor ran for fve touchdowns and
more than 300 yards.
Petty threw for 430 yards, three
touchdowns and ran for another.
And that was all in just two and a
half quarters of play before Seth
Russell came of the bench.
Defensive backs rotated in and
out in the Kansas secondary,
hoping to keep up with the Baylor
receivers, but no matter who was
in on defense the receivers gashed
them down the feld, play afer
play.
Despite the 59 points scored,
Baylors ofense was on the feld
for 15 minutes less than Kansas.
Te only time the up-tempo
Baylor ofense slowed down was
when the back-up players had
come onto the feld.
If there is a better ofense in col-
lege football, Weis said he would
have a tough time fnding it.
Edited by James Ogden
Volume 126 Issue 36 kansan.com Monday, October 28, 2013
S
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
sports
By Blake Schuster
bschuster@kansan.com
COMMENTARY
Tarik Black key to
non-conference
success
BAYLOR BEATDOWN
DEFENSELESS
Skewed Kansas game plan leads to defeat
MAX GOODWIN
mgoodwin@kansan.com
FRANK WEIRICH/KANSAN
Baylor wide reciever Tevin Reese dives across the goal line to score his second touchdown of Saturdays game. The Kansas secondary had no answer for the Baylor passing attack, which gained 437 yards.

If you tackle that bad you


cant win.
KEON STOWERS
Kansas football defensive lineman
Te quest to stay out of the
bottom of the Big 12 standings
became more difcult afer a
disappointing weekend for the
Kansas soccer team. Te Jayhawks
lost 0-1 to Texas Tech on Friday
and 0-2 to Oklahoma State on
Sunday, both on the road.
In each match, the Jayhawks
opponent scored in the frst
20 minutes, and the Jayhawks
couldnt build a comeback.
We played well, and battled
hard, Coach Mark Francis said.
I thought we came out in the
second half, and we were going at
them. It just wasnt meant to be.
Te Cowgirls frst goal came
of the foot of midfelder/for-
ward Allie Stephenson. She was
assisted by forward Krissi Killion
on a long through ball into
their attacking third of the feld.
Francis said his team lost track
of Stephenson, and she was wide
open. Te Cowgirls put the game
away for good with another goal
in the 65th minute by midfelder
Madison Mercado. Mercado was
assisted by forward Courtney
Dike.
Both teams in Sundays match
were aggressive. Kansas fresh-
man defender/midfelder Tayler
Estrada received a red card the
frst Kansas red card in four years
in the 57th minute. She earned
it by receiving her second yellow
card of the match, which results
in a red card. On that play, she
collided with an Oklahoma State
player.
Tey just got tangled up, Fran-
cis said. It didnt look deliberate
by either player.
While Francis said he thought
the call was too harsh, he said the
referee had a better view of the
play. Estradas ejection forced the
Jayhawks to play shorthanded one
player for the rest of the match.
Kansas and Oklahoma State also
combined for six yellow cards,
three for each team. Kansas
cards went to Estrada, freshman
defender Aurlie Gagnet and
junior midfelder/forward Jamie
Fletcher.
Te Jayhawks had many oppor-
tunities to fnd the back of the net.
Tey were even with the Cowgirls
in shots, 15-15. Fletcher led the
team with four shots. Sopho-
more midfelder Liana Salazar
and sophomore forward Ashley
Williams had three apiece.
Senior forward Caroline Kastor
was limited Sunday while battling
an illness. Te teams leading
scorer did not start the match and
played only 32 minutes.
On Friday, Kastor and Fletcher
combined for all 10 of the teams
shots against Texas Tech. Tey
each had near goals. In the frst
half, Kastor had two headers of
corners that were saved by the
Texas Tech goalkeeper. In the fnal
minute of the match, Fletchers
shot bounced of the crossbar.
Te 0-2 weekend makes Kansas
fnal game this Friday against
Oklahoma much more important.
Te top eight teams, out of nine,
make the conference tournament.
If the Jayhawks had won on Sun-
day, they would have clinched a
spot. Instead, Oklahoma and Kan-
sas will battle for the fnal spot
during their match. Kansas will
earn the spot with a win or a tie.
With a loss, the Jayhawks' season
would be over.
Edited by Paige Lytle
EMILY WITTLER/KANSAN
Freshman defender Aurlie Gagnet guards the ball against Baylor on Oct. 20. This was the Jayhawks last win in conference.
STELLA LIANG
sliang@kansan.com
Weekend losses jeopardize playoff berth
SOCCER

I thought we came out in


the second half, and we
were going at them. It just
wasnt meant to be.
MARK FRANCIS
Kansas soccer coach
A
lot is being said of what
this Kansas basketball
team can do this year.
Andrew Wiggins can be the
best player in the NCAA. Perry
Ellis can lead the team in scor-
ing. Joel Embiid can be the next
great post player to come out of
Lawrence.
Its true, all of this can happen.
But even if it does, it likely
wont come together in one
contest. Te safe bet is that it
doesnt happen before confer-
ence play.
And until the freshmen adjust
to the college game and the vet-
erans fgure out how to lead, a
lot will be asked of Tarik Black.
At Memphis, Black nearly
averaged eight points and fve
rebounds. At Kansas, hell be
expected to do a whole lot
more hes going to have to be
the guy Bill Self doesnt worry
about.
While Self fddles with the
lineup and tinkers with the
playbook, Black will have to
remain the constant, hell have
to assume the role as Self s
rock. Especially with how tough
the Jayhawks non-conference
schedule is.
Were going to make mis-
takes and well struggle in some
areas, Self said at Big 12 media
day. I assume closing close
games out could be a struggle
until you learn how to win and
that kind of stuf.
But Black cant be the one
making those mistakes. As a
senior, he should already know
how to win. We already know
he can show up for big games.
When Memphis matched up
against the eventual National
Champion Louisville Cardinals
last year, Black came out with
one of his best performances
of the year 21 points, two
rebounds and two steals.
With Kansas facing Duke,
Colorado, Florida, San Diego
State and Georgetown early
in the season, Black will have
plenty of chances to prove the
Louisville game wasnt a fuke.
Still, his presence on the team
means more than that. If the
Jayhawks want to take advan-
tage of the plethora of teaching
moments coming their way,
theyre going to need a safe way
to score points - and getting
the ball to a veteran big man in
Self s ofense is about as safe as
it gets.
Tis much was made obvious
when Self announced Black
would have an opportunity to
play as much as he wants this
season. Hell likely have the
ball as much as he wants to at
least early on this year.
Because Self will spend as
much time as he can getting
his young guys ready for Big 12
play, and if all goes according
to plan, it wont matter whos
taking the shots.
Te games that we play
non-conference, Self said. If
that cant get a freshman ready
to become a sophomore by
mid-season, Im not sure there
is any schedule out there that
can.
Edited by Evan Dunbar
PAGE 8
FOOTBALL REWIND
Quarterback situation
still up in the air