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Jacksonville Review Page 2 November 2013
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352 Martone Pl. Jacksonville
$949,500
3 Bedroom • 2F 2 H Baths
4601 Square Feet • 5.12 Acres
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740 E. California, Jacksonville
$259,900
3 Bedrooms • 2 Baths
1870 Square Feet • .35 Acres
Private setting. Slate Floor.
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Doug Morse OCT 2013_Doug Morse SEPT 10/9/13 10:59 AM Page 1
Jacksonville Review Page 3 November 2013
by Whitman Parker, Publisher My View
Publishers:
Whitman & Jo Parker
Print Layout & Design:
Andrea Yancey
Mail: PO Box 1114
Jacksonville, OR 97530
Visit: 220 E. California Street
(next to McCully House)
541-899-9500 Ofce
541-601-1878 Cell
whitman@jacksonvillereview.com
production@jacksonvillereview.com
Website & Kiosk: Jo Parker
jo@jacksonvillereview.com
Te Review is printed locally
by Valley Web Printing
Jacksonville Publishing LLC
JacksonvilleReview.com
Advertising available!
Contact us for rates
and options.
Introducing Jennifer Hall, M.D.
The care team at Providence Medical Group – OB/Gyn Clinic welcomes Dr. Jennifer
Hall as the newest member of our clinical staff. A Rogue Valley native, Dr. Hall
specializes in general obstetrical and gynecological care.
our specI alI zeD care teaM: offerI ng servI ces at:
www.providence.org/pmg
541-732-7460
Providence Medical Group-OB/Gyn Clinic
940 Royal Ave., Suite 350
Medford, OR 97504
nicole Brooks, D.o.
obstetrician, gynecologist and surgeon
Maria cordeiro, M.D.
obstetrician, gynecologist and surgeon
shannon fife, D.o.
obstetrician, gynecologist and surgeon
Karen parker linn, cnM
certifed nurse Midwife
amy zastrow, M.D.
obstetrician, gynecologist and surgeon
now welcoming
new patients
Providence Medical Group- OB/Gyn Health Center
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On Our Cover
N
ot long ago, I wrote a column decrying the
use of social media, going so far as to say
you would “never fnd me on Facebook.” In
fairness, I also said, “one should never, say never!”
Fast-forward fve years… I’ve eaten
my words, big-time. Not only did
I recently trade my Blackberry for
an iPhone, my dandy new iPad is
everything others said it would be and
is forcing me to re-think the future of
this publication.
Although big marketing ideas and
projects constantly percolate in the
cyber-side of my brain, The Review’s
print version will remain intact, albeit
with upgrades like the shiny new
magazine cover I couldn’t resist adding!
I am thankful this publication is moving ahead
at cyber-speed, reporting on the news and events
happening in town—often in real time! Thanks to
technology, our website and Facebook page are updated
every day, keeping our readers more informed than ever.
Recently, photos posted on our sites of the archeology
dig, (see the story on page 4) were viewed by 2000
people…in 24 hours…from around the world! The
following day, a slew of folks visited the dig site in-
person after viewing the photos online. I think that’s a
prety cool use of technology.
Please visit our website at JacksonvilleReview.com or
our Facebook page to check-out our new 4-minute
“Jacksonville Now” video—it’s an overview of our
town that will make you proud you live here. Produced
by the Review and hosted by our favorite media guy,
Joe Camarlinghi, this is the frst in a new series we are
creating to showcase the best of
our town. Future episodes will
focus on specifc subjects such as
local shopping, dining, recreation,
wine tasting, hiking/biking trails,
lodging and more.
I am thankful for many things,
including advancements in
technology that enable the Review
to get beter and beter…in print
and online in our Small Town with
Big Atmosphere!
Thankful to be found on Facebook!
Our cover photo was taken last year by Jacksonville
resident Thom Gregg just before Thanksgiving
dinner— at his brother, Ken Gregg’s home, here
in Jacksonville! Ken is a professional photographer
and Photoshop expert who worked some magic,
transforming the shot into an artistically-stunning
holiday image for all to enjoy! Please enjoy Gates
McKibbin’s cover story on page 6 to learn more about
the inspiration for this month’s cover!
Jacksonville Review Page 4 November 2013
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Chelsea Rose, lead archeologist at Southern
Oregon University, really, really digs her
work. During three weeks in October, Rose
and her team could be seen working in the
“Chinese Quarter,” near the intersection
of Main Street and Oregon Street. The
archeology site turned out to be “far richer
than we expected…it was way more than
we thought it would be, but everything we
hoped-for,” Rose explained. The dig was
mandated by state law and scheduled in-
advance of a major road and pedestrian
improvement project leading to the Brit
Festival grounds. Within days of removing the
frst few feet of dirt, Rose’s team thought they
may have discovered the site of a home that
burned to the ground in 1888. Using archive
maps and photos of the city, the team knew
a home once stood near the dig site. Finding
the exact site is another mater, however. “The
most exciting thing for us is that this dig site
is in someone’s home, not at community dump or privy site where we would expect
to fnd lots of artifacts.” The home, Rose explained, was likely around 300 square feet
in size and served as a home and as a laundry business. The evidence leading to the
home/laundry theory is backed-up by the number of Chinese butons, bluing material
and bone brushes unearthed. “The brushes were likely used for cleaning clothes
and shoes. We’ve also found a large number of gaming pieces, dice, Chinese and US
coins, food bones, pig jaws, a pocket knife, two toy guns, spoons, knives, wine botles,
dishes, cookware and more…this is a rich site archeologists dream about fnding their
entire lives.” At the end of the project, a large section of a charred house timber will
be removed from the ground and donated to the city to exhibit in the Applebaker Fire
House museum. Rose and her team will
be sorting and researching their fndings
at SOU for months to come. In February,
during the Jacksonville Chinese New Year
celebration, the team plans to bring many
of the items back from the lab for an exhibit,
open to the public. Rose noted, “It was really
incredible how many people showed-up to
see the excavation in-person and how many
Jacksonville residents came by every day
to check on our progress!” In addition to
atracting local interest, the SOU team made
national and international news, garnering
atention from archeologists and industry
publications around the world while digging-
up and helping interpret a major part of
Jacksonville’s rich history.
Archeology Dig Far Richer than Expected!
"Ronit and I found a copy the Jacksonville Review in this dude's gondola in Venice.
Says he reads it for the Annie's Antics column." ~David Gibb
On the Canals of Venice with the Review!
Chelsea Rose
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 5 November 2013
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N
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O
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!
Whitman Parker,
Publisher of the
Jacksonville Review, is
accepting nominations
for the Review’s frst-ever
Jacksonville Citizen
of the Year Award.
Nomination leters will
be accepted for consideration through
December 10.
Parker says, “For years, I have been
running stories on the amazing adults
and kids living in Jacksonville…I like
to say the “V” in Jacksonville stands for
“volunteer.” I’m looking for nominees
doing good things in and around town…
those making a diference and working to
make Jacksonville a nice place to live.”
Parker adds that COYA nominees
don’t need to belong to a formal group
or service club. “I’m not just looking for
people in the public eye, either. There are
lots of folks working quietly behind the
scenes on all sorts of things to improve
life here…these are the volunteers making
great things happen in Jacksonville and
the greater Rogue Valley area.”
To nominate someone
you feel deserves this
special recognition,
simply email a
leter to Whitman@
thejacksonvillereview.com
describing in 500 words
or less what the nominee
does for the community and why he/she
deserve to be named the 2013 Jacksonville
Review Citizen of the Year.
“In our upcoming December holiday
issue,” Parker concludes, “I will publish the
winning story along with other inspiring
ones…I’m sure it’ll be hard to select just one
winning entry and that all of the nominees
will be worthy of this award.”
Both the winning nominee and the
person sending-in the nomination will
receive special Jacksonville-related gifts
for participating.
To nominate the 2013 Jacksonville Review
Citizen of the Year, email your story to
Whitman@thejacksonvillereview.com or mail
a copy to PO Box 1114, (97530) no later than
December 10, 2013. Please include your name
and contact information in all correspondence.
Publisher Seeking Nominees for
“2013 Citizen of the Year Award”
Sterling Creek Antiques, located in
the historic Orth Building at 150 South
Oregon Street, is celebrating its one-
year anniversary during the month of
November. Sterling Creek Antiques
owner Joelle Graves remarked, “I am so
excited that the Orth Building is full and
I’m really enjoying a bustling business
season this fall…I look forward to
celebrating and thanking my wonderful
customers.” Graves is a regular
contributor to the Jacksonville Review,
writing the “Speaking of Antiquing”
column. She is also a recognized expert in
appraisal and estate services throughout
Southern Oregon and beyond. Her shop
features an extensive line of top-of-
the line antiques, matched by superior
customer service and atention to her
clients’ varied needs.
Stop-by the store for more information
on Sterling Creek Antiques’ upcoming
events and please see Joelle Graves’
column and ad on page 28 of this issue.
She may be contacted at the store at
541-702-2224.
Sterling Creek Antiques Throwing 1–Year
Anniversary Open House Party
Jacksonville Review Page 6 November 2013
David Pfrimmer
Principal Broker, Accredited Buyers Agent
Certified Residential Marketing Specialist
Cell: (541) 326-6262
pfrimmer@windermere.com
www.southernoregonhomes.org
Principal Broker
541.944.2700
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Wade-Dave-OCT 2013_Wade-Dave-SEPT 10/15/13 9:50 AM Page 1
Y
ears ago my mother sent me a
thank you card with a line on the
front I’ll never forget: “Gratitude
is the memory of the heart.” I still have her
note, and the message it expressed remains
with me as clear as it was the day it arrived.
In this season of Thanksgiving I have been
revisiting what my own heart remembers.
As I reviewed myriad sources of
gratitude, something unexpected
occurred to me. I realized that until I
moved to Jacksonville, few of my frst
rate memories involved my being part of
a community. Rather, they were mostly
about something I did on my own or with
very close friends and family.
Now I have a whole new reason to be
grateful. It is called community.
Thanksgiving here in Jacksonville last
year provides a
case in point. A
splendid evening
resulted from
minimal planning,
maximum
cooperation – and
not a shred of
pretense.
It all happened
because a month
earlier my friends
Frank DeLuca and
Ken Gregg closed
escrow on the Eagle
Saloon and Brewery
(formerly Eugene Bennet’s home). They
had set up temporary living arrangements
with a bit of borrowed furniture and
whatever they could bring here in a
couple of carloads from Carmel. Needless
to say, it was bare bones.
A group of our friends had been
tossing around the idea of geting
together for Thanksgiving dinner, and
we wanted to welcome Ken and Frank
into the community by inviting them
as well. Then it occurred to us that our
preferred venue would be their saloon
room, which had an open area that could
accommodate a table long enough for an
inclusive guest list.
The only issue – not a minor one –
was that everything we needed for the
dinner would have to be brought in:
dishes, fatware, napkins, tables, chairs
and candles for starters, not to mention
plentiful food and wine. No problem! The
meal could be more like a festive picnic
than a formal banquet.
There is nothing like saying, “We’d like
to invite you to Thanksgiving dinner – at
your house.” But that is exactly what we
did. Ken and Frank agreed immediately
to host the event. After one round of
emails, potluck contributions for a
multi-course meal had been agreed upon
and people were volunteering to bring
whatever else was needed.
First to be delivered were the banquet
tables. Ken placed two of them end-to-
end, covered them in brown paper and
topped it of with a table runner made
of vintage wallpaper. So much for the
tablecloth. Frank plugged in an electric
“freplace” heater for atmosphere and
placed outdoor café chairs around it
to form a conversation grouping. We
arranged pumpkins and candles on the
table, and declared ourselves good to go.
As people arrived we put them to
work, unfolding chairs and devising a
bufet table. Out came the appetizers,
which we noshed on as we chated and
assembled place setings. Everything
happened on the fy, but the end result
was magnifcent. Each and every one of
us had made it that way, though I must
admit, the glimmer of candlelight on the
crystal stemware helped as well.
Our thoroughly improvisational
gathering, which required everyone
to contribute
everything, led
to an outpouring
of shared joy.
When we seated
ourselves around
our “farmhouse”
table to indulge
in a delicious
repast made
possible by us
all, we raised our
glasses to toast
our togetherness
at Thanksgiving,
in Jacksonville.
Somewhere along the line someone
decided to open the shuters on the front
windows. Soon we noticed that the people
who were walking by stopped to look in
on the warmth and fellowship. Between
dinner and dessert we popped outside
ourselves to take a peek, and marveled at
how the room glowed with life and light.
Our celebration had spilled out into the
community and back in again.
We talked and ate, laughed and ate,
shared stories and ate. Assorted friends
who had celebrated Thanksgiving
elsewhere stopped by for dessert.
We listened to an irreverent poetry
reading, laughing all the while, and sat
reminiscing for a very long time.
As we were preparing to depart,
reluctantly, someone commented that this
was by far the best Thanksgiving he had
ever experienced. Then another chimed
in, agreeing unequivocally.
I realized that I, too, had just enjoyed
the very best Thanksgiving, in this
community I call home. We had created
it together, with a spirit of openness,
generosity and caring.
Gratitude is a “habit of the heart” here
in Jacksonville, to borrow a phrase from
Alexis de Tocqueville. We are blessed
to be here. We are blessed to have each
other. We live in thanksgiving every day.
I for one give thanks to those who have
grown so dear to me in this lovely and
loving community.
Photos: Whitman Parker and Ken Gregg
Gratitude
by Gates McKibbin
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 7 November 2013
For the month of September, the Kiwanis
Club of Jacksonville honored Daniel
Elmore as Student of the Month. Daniel
is a senior at South Medford High School,
and carries a 3.65 grade point average.
The courses he has been taking are
under the Honors or AP programs,
including mathematics and sciences,
history, English and psychology. He is
currently taking Advanced Marketing,
Spanish 4/5 and Honors Pre-Calculus.
He has been involved in many activities
including track and feld, Link Leader,
Leadership Film Editor, DECA Club,
and Student Government (ASB). He is
currently ASB Treasurer, and DECA Club
Treasurer. DECA stands for Distributive
Education Clubs of America, and he just
participated in a State competition as a
fnalist. He has even found time to work
as counter help at a couple of local fast
food locations!
His goals are to become the best he can
become, and to learn how to flm and
edit business commercials in college.
He would also like to one day hike the
Camino de Santiago, a famous trail that
starts in Spain and continues into other
European countries.
He feels that his family and friends
have infuenced him the most, and he
wants to make a change that leaves an
impact on others, and to live life humbly
and generously.
The Kiwanis Club feels very gratifed
that they are able to honor these fne
students each month of the school year,
for they are the future of our country!
For more information, please contact Dave
Wilson at 541-899-1934 or elkhntr@charter.net.
Kiwanis Honors Student of the Month
for September
Kiwanis' Gaye Wilson and Daniel Elmore
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F
ind
th
e
pe
rfe
c
t
w
ine
pairing
from

our loc
al se
le
c
tion!
Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
board members Tom Piete and Jack
Berger, both of whom are military
veterans, are collaborating to sponsor a
special Veterans Day service on Monday,
November 11 at 1:45pm.
This new event will last approximately
one hour and will be located on the
Courthouse grounds near the corner
of California and 5th Streets. Plenty of
chairs will be provided for seating on the
lawn. In the event of inclement weather,
activities will be moved inside. Everyone
in the community is invited to atend and
also encouraged to bring American fags
to wave proudly in honor of our veterans!
Cofee and light refreshments will be
provided, as well.
The schedule of events includes:
• Live music followed by a welcome for
all veterans
• A fag ceremony by Jacksonville Boy
Scout Troop 61
• Invocation (by invitation)
• Address by Bill Travis, VFW
Jacksonville Chapter
• Introduction of and address by
Jacksonville Mayor Paul Becker
• Closing comments, benediction and
retiring of fags
Tom Piete served for nine years on
active naval duty in Vietnam as an
Aviation Electronics Technician Pety
Ofcer 1st Class. Post-military, he
worked at Intel for 21 years and is now
and Independent Insurance Agent. He is
an active volunteer driver for Disabled
American Veterans (DAV).
Jack Berger served nine years in
Vietnam as a US Navy Nuclear Reactor
Operator. He also served 27 years in the
US Army National Guard and Reserves
and is an Iraq and Afghanistan Veteran.
Today, he is the Network Operations
Manager for CenturyLink.
Veterans Day Celebration Planned
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GRANITE RIDGE
Freel November 2012:Freel November 8/13/13 9:47 AM Page 1
Jacksonville Review Page 8 November 2013
News From Britt Hill by
Donna Briggs, Britt Executive Director
Comments or questions for Brit Festivals?
Email Donna at ed@britfest.org.
Connect with
the artists
you love
Connect
with the
community
Connect
with Britt
Become a member today! www.brittfest.org
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A
s you have likely heard, we
have big news for our Classical
Festival! After an extensive
search that drew 130 applicants from
across the U.S. and Europe, I’m very
excited to announce that Teddy Abrams
has been selected as the Classical Festival’s
new Music Director and Conductor.
Teddy spent a week in residence
with us this summer, leading the Brit
Orchestra in rehearsals and two concerts.
He also spent time meeting various
constituents and members of the Brit
family. He demonstrated a brilliant mind,
with an engaging and approachable style,
and he was as inspired by Brit as we
were by him. In concert, he showed an
extraordinary ability to lead powerfully
moving and insightful performances. As
we continue to connect audiences to the
inspirational power of classical music,
Teddy is uniquely qualifed to help us
grow new generations of listeners.
As Music Director, Teddy is the
artistic leader of Brit’s Classical Festival,
and is responsible for building an
artistic vision, selecting guest artists
and repertoire, and leading the Brit
Orchestra. He will also work with
me, and the rest of the Brit team, as
an important partner for educational,
outreach and development programs.
In addition to his new position with
Brit, Teddy is currently the Assistant
Music Director of the Detroit Symphony.
He was formerly the Resident
Conductor of the MAV Symphony in
Budapest. In addition to his conducting
career, he is also an accomplished
pianist, clarinetist and composer, and
co-founded the Sixth Floor Trio.
Our Maestro Abrams is already at
work on the 2014 season, which he will
announce Tuesday, January 21, 2014. His
musical talent, knowledge, and visionary
leadership, along with his exuberance,
will inspire the next chapter in the Brit
Orchestra's future. Please join me in
welcoming him to Brit and to Jacksonville.
Britt announces Teddy Abrams as its
New Music Director
Teddy Abrams conducting at Brit 2013
Photo: Bryan Nealy
The Rising Stars competition was
started by Porscha Schiller, Director of
Marketing and Special Events at South
Stage Cellars, with two purposes in mind:
to support a local non-proft organization,
and to provide a vehicle of
support for local musical
talent. Both goals continue
to see successes. Rising
Stars has raised about
$20,000 for charity in two
years, and many local
artists have gained valuable
exposure for their music.
The winner of the frst
Rising Stars Competition
(in 2012) was Jef Kloetel.
Although now he’s well
known in Jacksonville,
he says when he entered
the competition, he was
still new to the valley. He
entered the competition to
gain some exposure, and to lend a hand
to the charity that was benefting. Kloetel
rose through the ranks, and, he says, “I
was prety blown away to
have been the winner.”
He says Rising Stars
helped splash his name
around, and was a key
part of his career taking
of. He says, “My music
was exposed to people I
never would have seen
otherwise.”
The winner of the 2013
season, the Mat Hill
Band, also values the
experience. With Brit
Festivals on board as a full
partner, the winner of the
competition received a spot
as an opening act on Brit’s
2013 lineup. Hill says, “The exposure
has been incredible and the experience
has catapulted me and my band much
further along in our musical journey than
we would have been without winning a
competition with such high stakes.”
Another new prize in 2013 was a
30-minute slot on Jeferson Public Radio.
Hill says, “Winning the 2013 South Stage
Cellars/Brit Rising Stars competition has
been huge for geting my music out there.”
Beyond the competition winners,
many artists who earned a spot in the
performing rounds have also
benefted. Living on Dreams
was part of Rising Stars 2013,
and band member Kent
Heyward says, “It was a great
way to network with other
artists, as well as the folks
who are creating events in
this valley. It’s encouraging to
see that this is happening.”
Heyward says the band
has booked other gigs directly
as a result of Rising Stars,
including a Jacksonville Rotary
fundraiser. He says, “It feels
good to be connected with that
sort of energy—helping people
and extending some hope and
being part of a positive cause.”
Heyward also says that the competition
helped them as a band. He says, “It’s a
competition, so it really
provides a platform to rise
to the occasion.”
He encourages other
bands to apply to Rising
Stars, and says, “It
has boosted our reach
signifcantly. That’s been
the highlight of our year.”
Applications are now
being accepted for the 2014
Rising Stars competition,
which is co-presented by
South Stage Cellars and
Brit. Prizes will include
a spot as an opening act
on the main stage in the
2014 Brit season (pending
artist approval), and a live interview/
performance on JPR. Voting proceeds will
beneft Brit’s music education programs.
Applicants should visit the web sites of
South Stage Cellars or Brit to download
materials, or email porscha111@gmail.com.
The deadline to apply is November 15.
Rising Stars Competition Boosts Careers
for Local Musicians
Jef Kloetel
Mat Hill
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 9 November 2013
The Unfettered Critic by
Paula Block Erdmann & Terry Erdmann
A Walk in the Woods: From a hike to a
book to a movie
Randall Theatre Company of Medford
is seeking additional volunteers to
help out with house operations for two
upcoming productions.
Concessions, ushering, box ofce,
telephone customer service, and
custodial are all areas where volunteers
can help. Upcoming productions
include “Black Friday,” opening Friday,
November 8 and running for three
weekends, and “Scrooge—The Musical,”
opening Friday, December 12—also for
three weekends.
Performances are generally Thursday
through Sunday. House volunteers
typically work two or three shifts per
production.
For further information, please contact David
Sours, volunteer house manager, at 541-601-
2948 or dbsours@charter.net.
Randall Theatre Seeks Volunteers
for Upcoming Holiday Plays
T
he Jacksonville Woodlands Park
and Trail System meanders above
and around town, providing
access to panoramic views and historic
landmarks. The trails have been an
expanding treasure since the Woodlands
Association was founded in l989 in hopes
of preserving the forest from threatened
development. Those of us who regularly
travel the trails revel in the fourishing
madrone, oak and pine covered beauty.
At the moment, the trails run for fourteen
colorful miles.
The granddaddy of American hiking
paths, The Appalachian Trial, is, of
course, longer. Much longer. It runs for
2,200 miles, through fourteen states, from
Georgia to Maine, crossing the Blue Ridge
Mountains, Great Smoky Mountains,
Shenandoah Valley and other eastern
topographical highlights too numerous
to mention. Just thinking about it makes
you want to slip into your boots, pack
up and set out, doesn’t it? But if you
can’t take fve months of for the trek, we
recommend a great book that’ll give you a
taste of the experience.
Author Bill Bryson’s 1998 “A Walk
in the Woods,” details a frst person,
step-by-step view of the trip up the
Appalachian Trail. He captures the ardor
for the journey, the exhaustion (again,
2,200 miles), the discomfort (think rain),
the distractions (a perpetually lost geezer
known as Chicken John, an “awesomely
brainless” woman named Mary Ellen),
and the potential dangers (wolves and
bears). The wolves and bears, by the
way, are mostly in the author’s head,
and yet he ponders: “A black bear will
continue chewing on you until you are
considerably past caring.”
Bryson’s hilarious writing style is equal
parts Garrison Keillor and Dave Barry.
You’ll chuckle as he describes stepping
of rocks into waterways that shouldn’t
be there. And you’ll gufaw at the antics
of his traveling companion, Stephen Kat,
an out of shape, junk-food junkie who’s
more suited to a city bar stool than a tent
by a campfre. If Kat reminds you of
Falstaf, you’re on the right track. Or trail.
Yet it’s when Bryson describes the
views, the silence and the wooded
splendor—relating the ways that hiking
gets under your skin, into your blood
and draws you under its spell—that
you’ll really feel his literary prowess.
Consider, for example, his description
of the moon as “the creamy inside of an
Oreo cookie.” Could anything be more
comforting during a long night in the
wilderness? Throughout his journey,
Bryson covers every subject of import to a
hiker: history, botany, geology, zoology,
meteorology, and scathing reviews of
the work done or not done by the Unites
States Forestry Service. The man is a
walking (pun intended) encyclopedia.
And if you’re in the market for some
new hiking equipment, he provides the
ultimate shopping list, including reviews
of backpacks that have “a 70-denier
high-density abrasion-resistant fy with
a ripstop weave,” although, he admits,
“the seams are lap felled rather than
bias taped, and the vestibule is a litle
cramped.” Seriously. You’ve gota read
this stuf before you go shopping.
And now we get to the really exciting
part. Since 2005, actor, director and
producer Robert Redford has been
keen on making a movie based on
Bryson’s book. The original plan was
for him to star as Bryson, and for Paul
Newman (Butch Cassidy to Redford’s
Sundance Kid, as you recall) to play
Kat. Sadly, Newman passed away
during preproduction, leaving the
world without that great actor and
philanthropist, and Redford without
his old friend and co-star. Redford
isn’t known, however, for giving up on
his dreams. Now actor Nick Nolte (48
Hours, The Prince of Tides) has signed
to play Kat. And Redford is going
to direct. It’s a task he’s good at; he’s
proven it many times, helming Ordinary
People, The Horse Whisperer, A River Runs
Through It and more.
A Walk in the Woods—the movie—won’t
be at our local theaters until sometime
in 2015. When it arrives we’ll be frst in
line for tickets. Meanwhile, we have our
own trails to hike, right here, above and
around town. Hope to see you there.
Paula and Terry each have long impressive-
sounding resumes implying that they are
batle-scarred veterans of life within the
Hollywood studios. They’re now happily
relaxed into Jacksonville.
Cast of “Black Friday”
Jacksonville Review Page 10 November 2013
Spa Jacksonville Holiday Launch Party!
Spa Jacksonville is having a holiday
launch party on Saturday, November
23rd from 11:00am-2:pm. We will be
providing complimentary mini-massages,
facials and relaxing foot soaks while
showcasing our new organic skincare line,
pureSkin. Try out our new self service
facial bar, now free with all services!
There will be a free rafe every half
hour for massage therapy sessions, facials,
a pureSkin basket of skincare products
with a botle of Valley View Cabernet and
a Spa Certifcate...You may even win a
Holiday gift for a loved one!
Meet and greet our expert team of six
massage therapists and facial pros while
enjoying great food by Chef Kristen Lyon
and a glass of wine from Valley View
winery.
Spa Jacksonville is located at 235 West
D Street, Jacksonville. We are of of North
Oregon Street and on the main Brit
parking lot.
For more information call us at 541-899-7893
or visit our website at JacksonvilleSpa.com.
See SpaJacksonville ad this page.
Don Skundrick begins
another round of Town Hall
meetings which are open to
the public. This is a great
chance to fnd out more
about what’s happening
at the County level and to
ask the Commissioner your
specifc questions and to
make comments.
The Applegate Town
Hall meeting is on Tuesday,
November 12th at 6:30pm, at
the Applegate Library.
Skundrick notes, “This
process is a valuable experience for
gaining a comprehensive understanding
of our entire County. I'm learning
frsthand about the real issues people are
concerned with and I hope I’m helping
residents beter understand what Jackson
County is doing to help each
one of them.”
Commissioner
Skundrick’s goal is to
have open and genuine
conversations with
communities throughout
the County, both large and
small. The intent of these
meetings is for residents
to discuss a wide range of
topics with him.
"These meetings also
provides me an opportunity
to inform citizens about
some of the County's capital projects,
such as the new Health and Human
Services building," said Skundrick,
who is the 2013 Board Chair and has
served on the Jackson County Board of
Commissioners since January of 2011.
County Commissioner Skundrick
Holding Applegate Town Hall
The members of the Jacksonville/
Applegate Rotary Club invite you to
atend any of their upcoming meetings
to learn more about the club and listen
to interesting topics happening around
the Rogue Valley. Unless otherwise
noted, meetings start at 7:00am at the
upstairs meeting room of the Bella
Union Restaurant at 170 W. California
Street in downtown Jacksonville. For
more information about the club and/
or the speaker series and to arrange for
a personal invitation to atend, please
contact John Bowling at 541-292-6174 or
Judi Johnson at 541-899-1875.
• November 7: Chris Dennet “The Craft
Beer Movement in Southern Oregon”
• November 14: Mike Jacobsen, Rogue
Disposal and Recycling “Where stuf
goes!”
• November 21: Thanksgiving Rotary
alumni breakfast at Pioneer Village
• December 5: John Bowling, “Is it the
truth? –Evaluating truthfulness and
credibility”
• December 12: Kelly Soter, Principal,
Jackson Elementary “Unique
community support programs for kids”
• December 19: Brigite Nickels, Cary’s
Tofee of Oregon
Upcoming Schedule of Speakers for the
Jacksonville/Applegate Rotary Club
"Abstract Color" at Art Presence in November
The November show at Art
Presence is all about color, the theme
is called "Abstract Color." It will
open on Friday, November 1st and
run through Sunday, November
24th. Art Presence Art Center,
located on the courthouse grounds,
is open from 11:00am–5:00pm every
Friday, Saturday and Sunday during
the month. There will be a reception
to meet the artists on November
8th, from 5:00–7:00pm.
For more information, please see the
Southern Oregon Artists Rescource
calendar on page 22.
Artwork by Deanna St. Martin

11777 Hwy 238
12 miles West of Jacksonville
(541) 846.6800
www.redlilyvineyards.com
Open Thursday-Sunday 11-5p.m.

~Recently voted “The Applegate Valley’s Best
Wine Experience” by The Oregonian~

November Rocks at
Red Lily Vineyards!
November 14th-17th--Join us in celebrating
International Tempranillo Day! We’ll be featuring
a flight of 3 Tempranillo library vintages (2004-2006)
along with a special food pairing & live music!
November 24th--Fall UnCorked!
Join us for the Fall Uncorked
event, where 17 Applegate Valley
wineries offer tours, barrel
tastings & savory food pairings!
Tickets are $39.
Purchase tickets online at:
applegatewinetrail.com
Sunset Magazine loves Red Lily
Vineyards! Check out the
October 2013 issue.

Per the Oregonian, “Red Lily is the best
wine experience in the Applegate Valley!”
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 11 November 2013
Up Close and Personal with Local Artist,
Jenay M. Elder
Tenth in a series of artist profles by Randall Grealish
W
e all seem to want more
time in our lives and
when you’re a young
mother of two and an aspiring artist,
time is the one thing you probably
need more than anything. Up-and-
coming artist Jenay M. Elder, who
will be one of the featured artists in
the Umpqua Valley Arts Association
show dubbed, “30 under 30” has
found she gains more time by
tuning-out everything around her
while painting. Although this tends
to frustrate her husband when his
questions go unanswered, he’s come
to understand that’s just the way it
is when his wife is in “The Zone.” Even
her kids dancing to music and jumping
around can’t shake Jenay from her intense
focus while painting.
Jenay describes her daily life with
kids as “living in the “Precious
Moments,” and it’s apparent that she
adores her children
and the time she gets to
spend with them. This
is also refected in her
paintings, as Jenay has
begun to paint more
children and parent/
child-themed paintings
since becoming a mother
shortly after graduating
from the Ashland
Academy of Art. She
says, “The academy
was very tough, with
9 hour days of intense
training, where I saw
many students quit.”
Jenay, however, found
motivation in the
competitive vibe that
permeated her classes.
“I realized I needed
to be focused and to
take everything I was
learning very seriously
if I wanted to get to the
next level.”
A big part of her
journey at the moment
is to share what she has
learned via teaching
portrait-drawing classes
at the Ashland Art Center. In doing so,
she ofers students a chance to watch her
work her craft up-close as she paints from
a live model, all the while explaining her
process and answering questions from an
eager-to-learn audience.
With the intense
nature of her
schooling behind
her, Jenay is now
enjoying the
feeling of being
grounded for a
change. As a child,
her musician
parents kept the
family moving
from town to
town, across state
lines on a yearly
basis, playing at
recovery centers,
homeless shelters and a variety of church
events. Even her younger brother got into
the act at age three when he began playing
his frst drum set. This vagabond lifestyle
would eventually lead Jenay to steer far
away from music and pursue a diferent
creative path. Her artistic adventure would
eventually bring her to
Southern Oregon. Today,
living in the Rogue Valley,
she fnds herself happier
than ever, feeling very
fortunate to live in such a
beautiful state.
The joy she feels for her
surroundings reminds
her of something said by
artist N.C. Wyeth:
“I don't believe any man
who ever painted a great big
picture did so by wandering
from one place to another
searching for interesting
material. By the gods! There's
almost an inexhaustible
supply of subjects right
around my back door, meager
as it is. I have come to the
full conclusion that a man
can only paint that which
he knows even more than
intimately; he has got to know
it spiritually. And to do that
he has got to live around it, in
it and be part of it!”
Jenay looks forward to
the future while she hold
on to each day’s “Precious
Moments,” always
thankful for the time she has to paint, to
teach and to share her art with the children
and parents in the art community.
To see and learn more about Jenay's art and
art classes, please visit: www.Ashlandartcenter.
com, on Facebook or at jenayelder.com.
98 Placer Hill, Jacksonville
$799,000
3BR • 3BA • 3012 SF • 5.05 Acres
Warm & Inviting home w/ Amazing Views
Inground Pool, & easy access to Jacksonville &
Woodlands Trails. A one of a kind property!
720 Sterling St, Jacksonville
$490,000
3 BR • 4 BA • 3642 SF
Large open floor plan, covered deck, 2 garages
w/room for 4+ cars, near downtown
660 G St, Jacksonville
$350,000
Commercial Building
In Nunan Square Community. Nicely finished.
Four separate Units plus Two Baths.
831 Juanita Dr, Jacksonville
$575,000
4 BR • 3 BA • 4645 SF • 5.01 Acres
Wonderful views. Fireplace, exercise room,
heated therapy pool & finished basement.
Private but close to downtown Jacksonville
225 Conifer, Jacksonville
$399,000
3 BR (plus office/den) • 2.5 BA
Wonderful kitchen, granite counters & SS appliances.
Lrg. decks to enjoy the peaceful wooded setting.
179 Blue Chip Ln, Murphy
$725,000
4 BR • 3 BA • 3266 SF • 3.71 Acres
Pacific NW Dream Home in the Applegate Valley.
Gourmet kitchen, great room w/ custom f.p.,
40x60 barn/shop, VIEWS!
W
Van Vleet Jacksonville
505 N. 5th St • Jacksonville, OR 97530
541-899-2000
P
EN
D
IN
G
J
U
S
T
L
IS
T
E
D
Sally Oct 2013_Sally Sept 10/17/13 11:30 AM Page 1
The
Crown Jewel
Jewelry Art Decor Gifts   
You’re Invited!
Jacksonville
165 East California St.
541-899-9060
Ashland
266 East Main St.
541-488-2401
The Crown Jewel
www.thecrownjewel.net
Pre-Holiday Party
$150 Drawing, Live Music, Wine, & Chocolates.
Come in and enter to win any time between now and the party.
Must be present at drawing to win.
Jacksonville
Friday, Nov. 22nd
5-8pm
Door Prizes
and $150 drawing!
Free
Delivery minimum of $ 25.00 from sun - wed
( 5 pm - 8 pm) in Jacksonville (available in some areas.)
Thai House
Serving fresh, authentic Thai food.
www.thaihousejville.com
Jacksonville Review Page 12 November 2013
Clayfolk Artist, Cheryl Weese
by Karen Rycheck, Clayfolk Committee
In addition to housing
unique displays of rocks,
minerals, gems and fossils,
the Crater Rock Museum has
beautiful works of art. We are
proud to host an Art Show
November 2nd showcasing
magnifcent works donated
and collected throughout the
museum’s history. Exhibits
include glass work by
students of the Dale Chihuly
school, Carvings from the
Orient, Scrimshaw Collection
(one of the rarest and most
complete on the West Coast)
African Artifacts, Anastasi potery &
Eskimo cultural artifacts, a whimsical
collection of hand-carved trucks,
airplanes and fre-trucks, a
Jasper, Chalcedony, Carnelian
and Dumortierite mosaic and
so much more!
Talented artists from the
Roxy Ann Gem & Mineral
Society will also be displaying
their unique and beautiful
creations in the museum’s
Multi-Media Hall.
Please join us and see
why we’re so proud of our
collection of fne works on
November 2, 10:00am-4:00pm.
Admission is FREE!
Crater Rock Museum is located
at 2002 Scenic Avenue, Central Point. For
information call Pamela Sasseen, 541-608-
8091 or Crater Rock Museum, 541-664-6081.
Celebrate Beautiful Works of Art
at Crater Rock Museum
Cheryl Weese is a woman of many
loves, but her greatest loves are art,
nature, and family. She came from a
family blessed with talent. Everyone
seemed to draw, paint, tell stories, or in
some way allow their creative drive and
spirit to shine through. Her father was
probably her greatest infuence and for
years she felt in awe of his artistic talents.
Cheryl had always been creative, but
began clay studies back in high school
when she sat in on evening ceramics
classes at the University of Oregon with
her father. Although she rarely touched
the clay then, intimidated as she was, a
new love was beginning to grow.
She started college at Oregon State
studying geology but she soon switched
her major and received a degree in
elementary education with an emphasis
in art and clay. While atending summer
school at the University of Oregon, she
studied with a ceramics group, took
part in shows at Belleview, and took
raku classes.
After graduating, she started a two year
stint teaching in Portland, then landed a
job at Hahn Air force Base in Germany
where she taught for an additional two
years. These were some of the best times
of her life…teaching art to children,
taking them on feld trips to working
studios and traveling with friends.
She also gave extra atention to special
students during an afterschool art club.
After returning to the U.S., she continued
to teach until marrying, having two
children, and eventually divorcing and
marrying her current husband, Jim. Jim
brought four more kids into the family,
and Cheryl had her hands full for many
many years.
After a 23-year hiatus from art, Cheryl
embarked on a trip to Chile that would
change her life.
Her senses were
reawakened and her
love of making art
reignited. She came
home to begin a
new chapter of her
life with clay and
joined the Umpqua
Valley Arts Association and began taking
classes and developing a new sense of
confdence in her abilities. Her father had
also been an accomplished artist, and she
recognized that his doodles and cartoons
had greatly infuenced her own sense of
mark making. The cartooning she innately
used to teach children in her classes was
a valid and quirky style that she fnally
embraced as her own.
During this time of great personal
and social change, Cheryl felt drawn
to express the strength and beauty that
women ofer to the world—women have
become a trademark in her work. The
evolution of the women’s movement ft
right into what Cheryl was experiencing
in her life and everything began to come
together for her.
After her father passed away in 2005,
she built a small sunny studio on the
family’s historic property on the Umpqua
River. She was tackling her potery
work full-force now, drawing on her
old love of reciting and memorizing
poetry as a junior-high girl.
Soon, verses accompanied
her women, giving them
voice and expressing their
thoughts—both poignant and
funny. Her studies of Japanese
printmaking, woodblocks
in particular, have greatly
infuenced her current
style. Cheryl uses a grafto
technique of carving through
a layer of barely damp black slip, as well
as using the bright contrasting colors of
underglazes, to give her works the strong
character she herself embodies.
Cheryl lives in Winston, Oregon, named
for her Great Uncle who ran the town’s
frst post ofce. Her grandfather bought
a section of land and taught school while
also running a small ferry service across
the river. While living in a tiny building
on the property, Cheryl’s grandfather
built the family’s home back in 1887.
Today, Cheryl and her husband live
there. Living beside the river amongst the
remaining orchard
of cherries and
apples planted
by her great-
grandfather; she
and her husband
still care for the
trees, harvest,
and sell the fruit
at the local Thunderbird Market. The
caulifower her grandfather introduced to
Winston in the 1950’s is still grown in the
surrounding area.
Cheryl Weese participates in the
Clayfolk Show as a member of the
Southern Oregon Poters Association. View
her work at the 2013 Clayfolk Show at the
Medford Armory, November 22nd-24th.
See Clayfolk ad this page.
Find the gift you seek at WillowCreek!
Jewelry•Unique Gifts•Souvenirs
115 W California Street • 541.899.5590
‘Like’ us on
facebook for
specials and
new products!
Giving THANKS
for a wonderful frst year!
BEST SELLERS
Gorgeous Scarves
Famous Massage Candles
Unique and Fabulous Jewelry
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 13 November 2013
Jacksonville's Victorian Christmas 2013
JACKSONVILLE GARDEN CLUB HOLIDAY GREENS SALE
Friday, December 6, 10:00am–2:00pm
Saturday, December 7, 9:00am–2:00pm
Location: Alcove between the Post Offce and
Phone Company on Oregon Street
Come to the Saturday parade and go home
with some holiday cheer!
Available for purchase: lovely holiday centerpieces
and baskets featuring fragrant mixed greens, bows and candles;
also handmade papers and cards.
Between November 1-19, centerpieces may be pre-ordered by calling Peggy
Peffey at 541-899-5708. Funds raised go to support student scholarships and
local beautifcation projects, including the Peter Britt Gardens.
LIVING NATIVITY AT BIGHAM KNOLL
Friday, December 6, 6:00–9:00pm
Saturday & Sunday, December 7 & 8, 4:00–8:00pm
Join Jacksonville’s churches for their 3rd-annual presentation
of some of the greatest stories ever told, featuring spiritually-inspired
stories with live actors and animals.
Enjoy New Narrations, New Characters, Crafts for the Kids
and Special Performances in the Ballroom!
Start a new family tradition this Christmas season that you’ll never forget!
Admission is FREE!
MERCHANT OPEN HOUSE & TREE LIGHTING
Saturday, November 30
5:00pm–7:00pm
Enjoy the annual tree lighting festivities including the
arrival of Father Christmas and community Christmas
caroling with the Rogue Valley Symphony Brass Band!
Plus, merchants up-and-down California Street will be
holding a special Open House, offering a chance to get
some holiday shopping done while supporting the local
business people who support Jacksonville all year-round!
NEW! SATURDAY MORNING CHRISTMAS PARADE
Saturday, December 7
9:30am
Kick-start your holiday festivities in grand style with
everyone’s favorite parade including marching bands,
foats, vintage cars, and so much more! Note: the
parade is on Saturday morning this year. Bring your
camera and your entire family and spend the day
downtown shopping, dining and having tons of fun.
3 WEEKENDS OF VICTORIAN CHRISTMAS
Saturdays and Sundays, December 7&8, 14&15, 21&22
11:00am–4:00pm
Nothing’s better than spending holiday weekends in
Downtown while taking in the sights and sounds of
Victorian Christmas. Town will be decked-out with lights
and greenery, so bring the kids to meet Father Christmas,
take a horse-drawn wagon ride, enjoy carolers and street
performers and partake in complimentary apple cider,
roasted almonds & more.
BEEKMAN HOUSE HOLIDAY TOURS
December 7-8, 14-15, and 21-22
11:00am & 3:00pm
Do you hang a good luck German pickle ornament on
your Christmas tree, hang mistletoe in a "kissing ball,”
or serve plum pudding for your holiday dessert? You're
invited to tour the 1873 C.C. Beekman House, home to
Jacksonville’s wealthiest pioneer family, to learn how
Christmas was celebrated during the late 1800's and how
holiday traditions have changed.
Admission: Adults, $4; Seniors/Students, $2.
470 E. California Street, Jacksonville.
For additional information, please contact
541-899-123 x312 or email events@jacksonvilleor.us.

Photos courtesy of: Jym Duane, Carolyn Kingsnorth, Larry Smith
and David Gibb Photography, www.dgibbphoto.com.
Jacksonville Review Page 14 November 2013
Focus on Hanley Farm by
Dr. Kerri Hecox, Hanley Farm Volunteer
T
his fall, Hanley Farm welcomed
over 200 elementary school children
through the innovative Rogue
Valley Farm to School (RVF2S) class feld
trip program. RVF2S’s mission is to “educate
children about our food system through
hands-on farm and garden programs, and
by increasing local foods in school meals.
We work to inspire an appreciation of local
agriculture that improves the economy and
environment of our community and the
health of its members.”
Children participating in the
feld trips begin with a class visit
from Hanley farmer, Emma Abbey.
Emma talks with the children about
the process of food being grown,
and the steps that happen between
food leaving a farm and reaching
their table. The children will
suggest a common household food,
like ketchup, and Emma guides
them through everything from a
tomato seed being planted to its
fnal packaging in a botle. The goal,
Ms. Abbey says, is to have children
think about where their food comes
from and what the benefts are of local
food production.
After the classroom visit, the children
take a feld trip to Hanley, where they
participate in 8 station-based programs
such as: seed saving, composting, planting,
nutrition and animal care. All of the
children help harvest vegetables and help
prepare a lunch from what they gathered.
The children then sit together to eat and to
talk about what they learned from the day.
One of the favorite meals the children
prepare is pizza, topped with fresh
veggies, in the new cob oven at Hanley.
In August, Coenraad Rogmans of House
Alive! Natural Building and Design,
helped with the design and construction
of a cob oven on the Hanley property for
use in educational programs and events.
It has been a very popular addition for
school groups!
Schools from all over the valley have been
participating in the program, with Central
Point, Jewit, and Rogue River Elementary
schools all visiting Hanley, to name a few.
Emma says that one of the most
gratifying aspects of the feld trips is that
many of the children have never been on
a farm, and the experience is completely
eye-opening for them. Learning about
the life cycle of plants and how farm
work changes throughout the year are
topics that most of the children had never
thought about before. At the end of the
day there is a “sharing circle” and many
of the children shared that after the visit
they now wanted to be farmers when they
grew up! Hard to ask for more than that
from a feld trip….
To learn more about Hanley Farm please
visit: www.hanleyfarm.org or www.sohs.org.
For more information on Rogue Valley Farm
to School: htp://www.rvfarm2school.org.
Over 40 years ago, what started as a
group of moms interested in enriching
their children’s learning experiences, has
created a legacy. Today, the Storytelling
Guild continues to draw on an amazing
group of organized, fun, and commited
women to promote a love of literacy in
the youth of Jackson County.
Our dedicated group is looking for
members with
diverse interests
and abilities to
add to our Board
of Directors.
Commitments
include:
atending
a monthly
meeting,
assisting with
programs, and
volunteering at
the Children’s
Festival.
Being a
member of the
Storytelling Guild is a rich and delightful
experience! We have created an ever-
evolving and unique roster of programs
encouraging the joy of reading and magic
of books….
The Winter Program—partnering
with the Craterian Theater, we bring
two free performances to families
in our community. A professional
puppet theatre group is hired for these
performances and children can enjoy
another form of storytelling.
Storytime at the Medford Library—a
long and beloved tradition of conducting
a weekly 30 minute storytime—complete
with puppets, fannel boards and a
dizzying array of books!
Pass the Book—our volunteers
collect, sort and distribute thousands of
recycled books and donate them to 22+
organizations that encourage and support
early literacy.
Dial-A-Story—Guild members record
stories from home to support this
outreach service of the Jackson County
Library System for pre-school age
children.
Scholarship—
an annual
scholarship
is provided
to a student
pursuing a
career in early
childhood
education.
Bookwalk—a
fashion show for
books! Designed
to pique the
interest of
3rd-grade
children, Guild
members don costumes and give a brief
description of chosen books. This year,
the Storytelling Guild visited 19 Jackson
County schools and was able to donate
two books to each school’s library!
Children’s Festival—is held annually at
the Brit Gardens in Jacksonville. Families
from all over frequent this amazing 3-day
arts and crafts event. Running exclusively
on volunteer-power and local business
donations, this event reaches thousands.
Monies made are then funneled into our
various literacy programs.
Please consider joining our organization!
To fnd out more, please visit our website
at www.storytellingguild.org.
Storytelling Guild Seeks New Board Members
Storytelling Guild members from l-r: Judit Bowling,
Anne Billeter, Laura Horton, Lona Dillard
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JacksonvilleReview.com Page 15 November 2013
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Jacksonville’s favorite Patio & Balcony are now open ~ Join us for a Margarita!
150 S. Oregon Street • In the Historic Orth Building
541-899-4450 • lafestajville.com
Classic Mexican Cuisine
Open
Tues-Sun
11:00am
Sterling Mine Ditch Trail Happenings
Joy Rogalla, Siskiyou Upland Trails Association
The Sterling Mine Ditch Trail (SMDT)
continues to expand and improve
with recent construction of new access
trails. These trails ofer more options
for trail users to explore the SMDT and
the upland terrain that will be part
of the Jack-Ash Trail System between
Jacksonville and Ashland. The Siskiyou
Upland Trails Association
(SUTA) worked with the
Bureau of Land Management
(BLM) to select the routes for
the new trails and complete
the required environmental
assessments. Once that
process was completed, we
were eager to get the new
trails constructed.
The new Grub Gulch access
trail was just constructed this
fall and connects the end of
the SMDT to an unimproved
BLM road and the new Grub
Gulch trailhead on BLM
Road 38-2-26. Opening this
trail creates endless opportunities for
wonderful long-distance loops on the
various roads criss-crossing Anderson
Bute. We will be posting several hikes
and rides on the SUTA website this fall.
With the BLM’s arrangement for a crew
of hard-working young men from Jackson
County’s Criminal Justice Program and
SUTA volunteers the trail was completed
in record time. The Grub Gulch trail
leaves the SMDT near its northern
end and crosses a dry slope with oaks,
pines, mountain mahogany and other
native shrubs, and then enters a lovely
mature pine and fr area as it traverses
the gulch. The new trail section travels
about 1.5 miles long and then connects
to an unimproved BLM road that is part
of a network of roads around Anderson
Bute. The soon-to-be-completed trailhead
is on BLM road 38-2-26 right across
from the Hidden Creek Trail, so you can
continue your exploration of the gulch
and Anderson Bute if you’re so inclined.
If you turn right after reaching 38-2-26
you can connect up to Armstrong-Deming
Road and create a giant loop to take you
all the way back to the Deming trailhead.
This summer SUTA hosted a contingent
from Oregon Parks and Recreation (OPR),
who came to evaluate SUTA’s application
to have the SMDT designated as an
Oregon Scenic Trail. The group rode the
entire trail on mountain bikes on one
of the smokiest days we had in August!
Despite the smoke and resulting lack of
views, OPR notifed SUTA that the SMDT
was selected to continue in the evaluation
and selection process. OPR provided
some suggestions for improvements
along the trail and requires a long-term
management plan, so we have some more
work to do to gain this designation.
Other SMDT trail improvements
include installing seven kiosks at
trailheads and two small bridges, funded
by a grant from REI. These will be
completed by the end of the year. The
kiosks will have maps and interpretive
information, as well as other information
for trail users. SUTA will also be
installing additional directional and
mileage signs at trailheads and along the
SMDT this fall. We are planning winter
maintenance work parties to be the 3rd
Saturday of the month in November
and January through May, so mark your
calendars and come out to meet fellow
trail enthusiasts, spend some time on the
trail, and help keep it open for everyone.
In the last four years we’ve logged over
4,000 volunteer hours on the SMDT—an
impressive total, and it shows! Visit
www.sutaoregon.org for directions to
all the trailheads, and details on the
upcoming work parties and other events.
Trail Talk
by Tony Hess, Gary Sprague
& Bob Budesa
W
hat is
it that
draws
us to the outdoors and being in the woods
and forests? Is it some force in our genes,
or is it something that builds from life
experiences beginning in our youth? No
doubt, we venture outdoors for the sheer
beauty and quiet, away from the hubbub
of our daily lives. In
my life, as a youth, I
played in the woods
of rural Iowa, went on
canoe trips in northern
Minnesota and Canada
and explored the wild
regions of the Southern
Utah Canyonlands
before it became
popular. I have a quote
from D. H. Lawrence
taped above my desk that reads:
"When we get out of the glass botle of our
ego and when we escape like the squirrels in
the cage of our personality and get into the
forest again, we shall shiver with cold and
fright. But things will happen to us that we
don’t know ourselves. Cool, unlying life will
rush in.”
Often, we think back on our youthful
experiences to recall happy and carefree
times… maybe they are carried into
adulthood and work to shape our
lifestyle, work occupations, and locations
we choose to live.
The residents of Jacksonville and
neighboring communities don’t need to
travel to far of states, or even remote
areas of Oregon to feel and enjoy the
woods and forests. The Woodlands
trails are a mere step away from the
cofee houses of downtown Jacksonville,
ofering miles of
trails transporting
one to a quiet place,
devoid of the stress
and strain of the
busy day.
For another
escape and great
getaway, check-
out the Forest Park
with its miles of
trails spread over
1,080 acres of canyons with vast scenic
vistas. Through the Forest Park canyons,
three major streams await, with Cantrall
and Jackson Creek being the largest.
Many waterfalls rush over the water-
smoothed granite bedrock, such as the
waterfall on Canyon Falls Trail, shown in
the accompanying photo.
We are lucky here in Jacksonville to
have the Woodlands and Forest Park
trails and the brief return to a youthful
moment they ofer!
The Mysticism of Being in the
Woods and Forests
making your house your home
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Jacksonville Review Page 16 November 2013
Thank You From The Friends of
Jacksonville's Historic Cemetery
by Dirk J. Siedlecki, President – FOJHC
Cemetery Cleanup —I’d like to thank
and express my appreciation to the 37+
volunteers who showed-up on a beautiful
Saturday morning, October 5, for our
annual fall and pre-tour clean-up of the
cemetery grounds. Joining the Friends of
the Cemetery were volunteers from the
Boosters Club, Masonic and Odd Fellow
Lodges, and
the community.
They raked,
blew and
bagged 163
extra-large bags
of leaves, and
picked up and
stacked downed
branches and
limbs. Our three
yearly clean-up
days are really
making a diference in helping the city
maintain the grounds, and making it safer
for visitors and residents alike. Thank you
one and all and hope to see you at the
next scheduled clean-up date on Saturday,
March 15, 2014 from 9:00am-Noon.
Meet the Pioneers—What can I say
but “Bravo” to all the volunteers who
delivered another amazing Meet the
Pioneers Program to a sell-out-plus
crowd of 600 people who atended the
show. Our Players looked the part and
took on the lives of Jacksonville's early
Pioneers as they shared their stories
and important news and happenings in
Jacksonville during the late 1800's and
early 1900's. Our volunteers in the ticket
& boarding area and on the tour route did
an outstanding job of keeping the tours on
schedule and provided for a safe and fun
evening for all our guests. The feedback
from those atending was outstanding and
full of praise for another remarkable year.
In addition to all our dedicated volunteers
who make this program possible, we want
to sincerely thank the following people
and organizations
for their continued
support and
assistance:
Jacksonville
Chamber Visitor &
Information Center–
Sandi and Maryl,
Jacksonville Review–
Andrea and Whit,
City of Jacksonville
and Staf, Staf
& Residents of
Pioneer Village, Sharon Wesner-Becker,
First Presbyterian Church of Jacksonville,
Ann Wilton & Renaissance Rose, Bill and
Debbie Miller, Southern Oregon Historical
Society, Rogue Valley Genealogical
Library, Ron Moore, Climate Control
Mini-Storage, Cammy Davis, Clara Wendt,
Emily and OSF, the 4th Wednesday String
Band and the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers,
our cemetery neighbors, our Event Partner,
the Jacksonville Boosters Club, and fnally,
our wonderful and loyal audience, many
who have been atending year after year.
As always, please accept my sincere
appreciation and gratitude for making
this program possible.
Dirk J. Siedlecki
President - FOJHC
An entertaining clean-up volunteer
Photo: Mary Siedlecki
A scene from Meet the Pioneers 2013
Photo: Tom Davis
650 G Street • Jacksonville
FOR MORE INFO, CALL J’VILLE SNAP 541.702.0700 www.SnapFitness.com/jacksonvilleor
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Tuesday, November 19, 2013
3:00 - 4:00 pm
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805 N. 5th St., Jacksonville, OR 97530 • www.PioneerVillageOregon.com
Held at
Refreshments
Served!
Tours
available
during this
event!
Families and
the community
are welcome to
attend this important
educational seminar!
This
event is
FREE!
Angela Clague, the Jacksonville Tax Lady,
will be discussing the new tax changes and
focusing on the tax benefts available
for those in assisted living and for
families that share the cost.
Learn About
Tax Benefits for
Long Term Care!
Learn About
Tax Benefits for
Long Term Care!
©

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Together we’re
making a difference.
To all our Blue Sky
SM
business partners and customers, we say thank you.
It is your support that helps keep the environment healthy, brings economic
benefits to the region and preserves resources for future generations.
You can join the Blue Sky business partners listed below, as well as
thousands of individuals and other businesses across the region and
make a difference.
To learn more or enroll visit pacificpower.net/bluesky or call toll
free 1-800-769-3717.
City of Jacksonville
Cycle Analysis
Daisy Creek Vineyard
Devitt Winery and Vineyards
Jacksonville Veterinary Hospital
Scheffel’s Toys Inc.
Spa Jacksonville
Star of the Morning
Children’s Center
The Jacksonville Mercantile
Yale Creek Ranch
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 17 November 2013
A Few Minutes with the Mayor
by Paul Becker
CITY OFFICE
Monday - Friday
8:30am - 4:00pm
(541) 899-1231
MUNICIPAL COURT CLERK
Monday - Friday: 9am - 4pm

PLANNING DEPARTMENT HOURS
Monday, Tuesday, Thursday
& Friday 8:30am - 2pm
Wednesday:
Closed to Public
Direct #: 541-899-6873
JACKSONVILLE OFFICE HOURS
CITY COUNCIL: Tuesday, November 5, 6:00pm (OCH)
PLANNING COMMISSION: Wednesday, November 13, 6:00pm (OCH)
CITY COUNCIL: Tuesday, November 19, 6:00pm (OCH)
HARC HEARING OFFICER: Wednesday, November 20, 10:00am (OCH)
HARC: Wednesday, November 20, 6pm (OCH) SAME DAY AS HEARING!
City Offces 541-899-1231
www.jacksonvilleor.us
LOCATION KEY: CH - Old City Hall (S. Oregon & Main) CC - Community
Center (160 E. Main Street) NVR - Naversen Room (Jacksonville Library)
FH - Fire Hall(180 N. 3rd St. @ C) EOC - Emergency Ops Center at Police Station
JACKSONVILLE CITY SCHEDULE
POLICE BLOTTER
Jacksonville Police Department
A consolidated report based on type of calls & number of incidences
September 23, 2013 to October 20, 2013
Abandoned Vehicle - 1
Alarm - 2
Animal Complaint - 7
Assault - 1
Assist - Medical - 5
Assist - Other Gov't/
Law Enforcement
Agencies - 76
Assist Public - 43
Bar Check - 2
City Ordinance - 8
Civil - 3
Domestic Disturbance - 3
Fraud - 1
Foot Patrol - 2
Larceny/Theft - 1
Missing Person/Adult - 1
Property Found - 2
Property Lost - 1
Public Safety - 1
Runaway - 2
Suicide Threats - 2
Suspicious - 11
Threats - 2
Traffc Crime/Hit &
Run - 1
Traffc/Roads All - 7
Call Type – Total Calls

This month brings us Thansgiving—A time to refect on our reasons
to be thankful—I would like to take this opportunity to ofer
my personal thanks to the following:
Thanks to:
Good Bean Cofee who has graciously provided cofee at
all our Friday Night Movies
The First Presbyterian Church for providing a free
breakfast to our frst responders
The CERT team for their devotion and volunteer
service on behalf of their fellow citizens
The Boosters who seem to always be in the forefront
when our community is in need
Jacksonville Rotary who generously shared their
grill for the July 4th picnic
Friends of the Jacksonville Cemetery who seem
to be perpetually cleaning-up
“Meet the Pioneers” for another successfully
mounted historical and entertaining evening
Mayor’s Advisory Board for their invaluable
conceptual ideas involving city management
Jacksonville Woodlands volunteers that keep the
Woodlands and Arboretum in beautiful shape
Forest Park volunteers who build and maintain trails
along with securing grants
Beekman House tour groups that keep history
alive in Jacksonville
Chamber and JOBA for promoting our town and
sponsoring events that bring people out to visit us
First Presbyterian and Calvary Church for standing at the
ready for any emergency that might befall our town
City Council for a faithful year of dedicated
work with a harmonious spirit
Commissions and Commitees who’s selfess
volunteer efort helps steer our city operations
City Staf, including Administration, Police, Fire, Public Works,
and Building Maintenance for their exemplary devotion to daily tasks
My patient, longsufering, understanding, and
sympathetic wife, Sharon
And fnally to:
This newspaper’s publisher who has allowed this writer freedom
to express opinions without any censorship
From the Firehouse to
Your House
by Fire Chief, Devin Hull
Fire Department Offering FREE
Community Service Classes
THANK YOU
Jacksonville Fire Department 2013-2014 Community Class Schedule
November – Home Safety for Winter
December—Basic First Aid
January—How Public Safety Systems Works
February—Cold Weather Injuries
March—Hands On CPR
April—What Is CERT and How It Works
May—When to Go, When To Stay
Classes are held at the fre station on the 3rd Thursday of the month at 6:30pm
(except during fre season). For more information, please call 541-899-7246.
I
f you are you interested in taking community service classes to learn how you
can assist others in our community recover from personal struggles, or help your
community prepare for a natural disaster, the Jacksonville Fire Department is the
place to be. The department is pleased to announce its 2013-2014 Schedule of Classes
and encourages you to atend as many as possible. Becoming beter informed is simple!
Classes are held on the third Thursday of each month at the fre station!
City Snapshot
City Council, October 1—During
“Public Comment,” Jackson County
Commissioner Don Skundrick spoke
in support of the county-wide library
funding proposal. He urged the Council
to vote “yes” to enable Jacksonville city
voters to decide the mater which will be
on the May, 2014 ballot. After discussion,
the Council agreed to place the issue on
its October 15 agenda.
Administrator Jef Alvis presented
Council with portions of the city’s
updated Master Water Plan, which
council later adopted. The move enables
planning eforts to move forward relevant
to system updates and upgrades for water
lines and pump stations. Council discussed
the need to address water rates in the next
fscal year and that a small rate increase is
imminent to keep-up with utility system
delivery and maintenance costs.
Following the recommendation of the
Transient Lodging Tax Commitee, Council
approved the following grant requests:
• $200 grant to the Chamber of Commerce
for downtown Halloween decorations
• $5125 grant to the Jacksonville
Oregon Business Association for
promotional ads in the 2014-15
Oregon Shakespeare Playbill
Recorder Jan Garcia updated council
on the 2013 Citywide Yard Sale, reporting
that parking issues appeared to be beter
this year per a post-event discussion with
Police Chief David Towe.
During “Council Discussion,” Mayor
Becker noted that Councilor Jim Lewis
had recently been elected to a two-year
term on the Board of Directors for the
League of Oregon Cities.
City Council, October 15—Council
listened to a presentation by Jackson
County Commissioner Doug Briedenthall,
who echoed previous sentiments by
Commissioner Don Skundrick, to
vote to enable Jacksonville to join the
county-wide library district. Please read
Publisher Whitman Parker’s report on the
issue on page 18 of this issue. Briednethall
reported that after losing $23M of $24M
in “timber funds,” the county can no
longer support the library system as-is
and that an alternative taxing district
is being sought. Council discussed the
issue at great length, ultimately “tabling”
the issue for the evening and requesting
that it be placed on a future agenda. The
following day, Mayor Becker scheduled
a November 5 Study Session on the
mater at 5:00pm., prior to the regularly-
scheduled November 5 Council meeting
at 6:00pm.
City Planning Director Amy Stevenson
was on-hand to brief Council on the
relocation of the Brit Volunteer Booth,
currently located across from the main
Brit entrance. As a part of the 1st
and Main Street pedestrian and street
improvement project, relocation of the
booth was advised. The booth will be
re-purposed in the lower Brit Gardens
and will serve a dual-purpose with
an addition of public restrooms. The
new ADA-compliant restrooms will
serve concert patrons and Brit Garden/
Woodland Trail users. Currently, those
needs are being served by unsightly port-
a-poties, which will be removed once
construction of the new public restrooms
is complete.
Council listened to a report delivered
by Review Publisher Whit Parker on the
downtown holiday lighting project, which
Parker is overseeing. Parker reported
that nearly all historic core properties
agreed to participate in this year’s lighting
and garland decoration project and that
installation of lights will be completed
in mid-to-late October. Additionally, the
Boosters Club has agreed to volunteer to
hang all holiday garland this year at no
cost to participating businesses.
Please note: A complete copy of City
Council minutes is available online on the city
website at www.jacksonvilleor.us.
Jacksonville Review Page 18 November 2013
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You need to be aware that the Jackson
County Board of Commissioners is
atempting to divest the County from its
responsibility for funding and operating
the County-wide library system. The
system comprises 14 branches in Medford
(main), Applegate,
Ashland, Bute
Falls, Central Point,
Eagle Point, Gold
Hill, Jacksonville,
Phoenix, Prospect,
Rogue River, Ruch,
Shady Cove Talent
and White City.
The County
claims that due
to the loss of $23
million of the $24 million O&C timber
money funds, it cannot aford to operate
the system any longer at current levels.
As such, the County Commissioners are
now approaching each city council in the
county and requesting participation in a
new, county-wide special library taxing
district. The district would be a separate
entity with no afliation with Jackson
County. At the October 15 Jacksonville
City Council meeting, County
Commissioner Doug Briedenthall was on-
hand to deliver this news personally.
In a nutshell, if Jacksonville’s City
Council votes to participate in the new
library district and the upcoming May,
2014 library levy passes, our branch
library stays open. If our City Council
votes to opt out of the district and the
levy passes, a newly-elected library board
could/would close the Jacksonville branch.
If the City Council votes to participate
and the levy passes in the county but fails
in Jacksonville, the branch would likely
remain open since funding would be
secured and available. If the levy fails in
the county as a whole, all branch libraries
will close on June 30, 2014. (The main
Medford branch will remain open unless
the levy fails county-wide, in which case it
will then close June, 2015.)
Today, the County Commissioners are
recommending a funding level that calls
for a new tax levy NOT TO EXCEED 60
cents/$1000 assessed value. Currently,
the 14-branch library system operates
on about a 30-35 cent funding level. The
Commissioners have stated that the higher
proposed operating budget would enable
more branches to be open for longer hours.
In Jacksonville’s case, our branch is open on
Saturday’s thanks to the fnancial backing
from the Friends of the Jacksonville Library.
These expanded hours are not the case at all
branches, however.
There are more questions than answers
right now about this issue. I spoke with
Mayor Paul Becker today (10/16/13) –
he has scheduled a Jacksonville City
Council Special
Study Session for
NOVEMBER 5 at
5 pm at Old City
Hall to discuss
the issue. This
session is open
to the public and
will be held prior
to the regularly-
scheduled 6 pm
council meeting.
This is a good time to show up and learn
about the issue. It is highly likely that
the council will vote on the mater that
evening in regular session. The mayor
informed me on 10/17/13 that County
Commissioner Don Skundrick will be
on-hand to make comments and feld
questions. In order for Jacksonville voters
to vote “yes” or “no” on funding the
libraries in the May, 2014 election, 4 “yes”
votes from the City Council are needed
on November 5.
Having covered City Council maters
for 5+ years, I have no doubt that a strong
public response and lobbying efort can
and will make a diference.
I will continue looking into the mater
and will advise you of my fndings online
at www.jacksonvillereview.com and on
the Jacksonville Review Facebook page.
In the meantime, I strongly suggest
contacting your elected City Councilors to
insure 4 “YES” votes to take the batle to
the next step.
Jacksonville City Councilors:
• Mayor Paul Becker 541-899-1231 x 307
mayor@jacksonvilleor.us
• Councilor Jim Lewis 541-899-7023
councilorlewis@jacksonvilleor.us
• Councilor Paul Hayes 541-899-1213
councilorphayes@jacksonvilleor.us
• Councilor David Jesser 541-973-4343
councilorjesser@jacksonvilleor.us
• Councilor Dan Winterburn 541-899-9110
councilorwinterburn@jacksonvilleor.us
• Councilor Criss Garcia 541-326-5920
councilorgarcia@jacksonvilleor.us
• Councilor Jocie Wall 541-261-4102
councilorwall@jacksonvilleor.us
Whitman Parker
Publisher, Jacksonville Review
whitman@thejacksonvillereview.com
541-899-9500 or 541-601-1878
Jacksonville’s Library Could be CLOSED
C
L
O
S
E
D
?
Rogue Valley Symphony Unleashes Orchestral
Fire with Cypress String Quartet
The San Francisco-based
Cypress String Quartet
will join the Rogue Valley
Symphony for the second
public performance of
Pablo Furman’s Paso del
Fuego (or The Fire’s Passage)
on November 1, 2, & 3.
RVS Conductor Martin
Majkut says Furman’s
music is “a delight—there
are passionate melodies,
driven harmonies and
rhythms suggestive of
Argentinian tango.” Mozart’s Symphony
No. 40 is one of his most famous and
beloved and will be featured on this
program as well. Beethoven’s Prometheus
Overture will open the concert bringing
forth the theme of fre.
The featured work, Pablo Furman’s
Paso del Fuego, was writen for string
quartet with string orchestra and was
commissioned by the San Jose Chamber
Orchestra in collaboration with the
Cypress String Quartet in 2010.
The Cypress String Quartet (Cecily
Ward, violin; Tom Stone, violin; Ethan
Filner, viola; and Jennifer Kloetel,
cello) has been praised by Gramophone
for “artistry of uncommon insight and
cohesion.” They were
formed in San Francisco
in 1996 and during the
initial rehearsals the
group created a signature
sound through intense
readings of J.S. Bach’s
Chorales. They have a 12
album discography. The
Cypress Quartet members
received degrees from
The Juilliard School,
Guildhall School of Music
& Drama and the Royal
College of Music (London), the Cleveland
Institute of Music, and the San Francisco
Conservatory of Music.
Concert Schedule:
• Friday, November 1, SOU Music
Recital Hall, Ashland, 7:30pm
Cost: $33, $38, $44, or $50
• Saturday, November 2, Craterian
Theater, Medford, 7:30pm
Cost: $28, $33, $38, or $44
• Sunday, November 3, Grants Pass
Performing Arts Center, Grants Pass,
3:00pm, Cost: $20, $28, or $34
Please call the Rogue Valley Symphony Box
Ofce at 541-552-6398 or go online to www.
rvsymphony.org for more information and
tickets. See ad on page 22.
JMO... by Whitman Parker
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 19 November 2013 Page 19
Fairfield Drive,
Jacksonville
Country living in the city limits of
Jacksonville. Rare opportunity to own
a level one acre lot. Wonderful views,
city water available, standard septic
approval, paved road and no CC&Rs.
A serene setting in a well established
neighborhood. Views of mountains,
trees and blue sky. A pefect location
for building your dream home.
$199,900
455 Coachman,
Jacksonville
Just listed!
Incredible Stagecoach Hills home
with 4 bedrooms and 2.5 baths
and over 3100 sq. ft plus a bonus
room. Master bedroom on the
main level, spacious deck for
entertaining, peaceful, natural
setting. Great location.
$459,000
240 Stagecoach,
Jacksonville
4 BR, 3 BA home with views in
Stagecoach Hills. 2 FP, bonus room &
fantastic kitchen w/granite counters
and SS appliances. There is an over-
sized garage, a large landscaped lot
with a fenced back yard and lots of
decking for outdoor entertaining.
$349,000
Upper Applegate Rd
5 acres
Jacksonville
Close to Applegate Lake.
Includes fractional interest in
recreational lot on the river.
Wonderful Views!
$149,900
570 N. Oregon,
Jacksonville
Make your own history on this
beautiful .34 acre home site.
Lovely setting with mature trees.
Gas, water, and sewer to the
property.
$152,500
Daisy Creek Road,
Jacksonville
Beautiful 1.74 acre parcel of land
just outside the city limits,
Daisy Creek frontage,
septic approval, well. Close to
town but in a wonderful
country setting.
$169,000
1100 and 1104 S. Third
St.,
Jacksonville
Beautiful 1.06 acre in city
limits. Includes 2 separate
tax lots with utilities.
Get both lots for...
$159,900
Placer Hill Drive
5 acres -
Jacksonville
Nestled above Jacksonville in
Vista Wood Ranch.
Underground utilities, paved
road, fabulous
mountain and city views.
$299,000
394 Orth Drive,
Central Point
Charming Craftsman style
1694 sq.ft. manufactured home in
Miller Estates, a 55 and older
community. Immaculate! Covered
front porch, vaulted ceilings,
gas fireplace, spacious kitchen
with cherry cabinets and
a 2 car garage
$124,900
1235 Shafer Lane,
Medford
Quality Mahar built home on
a lovely cul-de-sac in Southwest
Medford. 3 bedrooms and 2 baths,
built in 2003, this home is
in immaculate condition. Vaulted
ceilings, gas fireplace,
covered patio.
$219,900
2014 Hyatt Prairie Rd.,
Ashland
Wonderful year round cabin/home
on 5 acres with views and privacy.
Vaulted ceilings, tile and wood
flooring, granite kitchen counter
tops & 2 heat sources. 2 w/decks
w/spa and sauna, 576 sq.ft.
garage shop w/2nd story unfin-
ished. An amazing retreat.
$249,000
355 W. Oak St,
Jacksonville
Just Listed. Charming home on
a great .35 acre lot close to Britt.
2 bedrooms plus a den. Approx.
1118 square feet. New flooring,
gas heat, new kitchen, covered
porch and patio, RV parking.
$239,900
Coachman Drive Lots
2 adjacent lots for sale in lovely
Stagecoach Hills, surrounded by
beautiful homes.
$89,900
for each of them
W
Van Vleet, Jacksonville
505 N. 5th St, Jacksonville, OR 97530
541-899-2000
3667 Livingston Rd.
English Manor style home on 2.98
acres. 5188 sq.ft. home with 5 BR, 5
1/2 BA w/a private guest wing. Dra-
matic entry, formal
dining, incredible kitchen, 3 FP, master
suit on the main level, an inground
pool & shop. $875,000.
Adjoining 2.69 acre lot is also available
for sale for $249,000.
Kathy H OCT 2013_Kathy H September 2013 10/17/13 4:35 PM Page 1
541 899 8614
www.farmhousetreasures.com
120 West California Street Jacksonville
Gifts for everyone!
No one wants to pay for
unnecessary extras and with my
help, you won’t have to. I’ll help
make sure you understand your
options, and that you have the
best coverage at the best price.
Like a good neighbor,
State Farm is there.
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1001183.1 State Farm, Home Ofce, Bloomington, IL
Judi Johnson, Agent
645 N 5th Street
Jacksonville, OR 97530
Bus: 541-899-1875
judi.johnson.cmld@statefarm.com
No one wants to pay for
unnecessary extras and with my
help, you won’t have to. I’ll help
make sure you understand your
options, and that you have the
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Like a good neighbor,
State Farm is there.
®

CALL ME TODAY.
Need
someone
that speaks
fluent
insurance?
I’m your agent for that.
1001183.1 State Farm, Home Ofce, Bloomington, IL
Judi Johnson, Agent
645 N 5th Street
Jacksonville, OR 97530
Bus: 541-899-1875
judi.johnson.cmld@statefarm.com
No one wants to pay for
unnecessary extras and with my
help, you won’t have to. I’ll help
make sure you understand your
options, and that you have the
best coverage at the best price.
Like a good neighbor,
State Farm is there.
®

CALL ME TODAY.
Need
someone
that speaks
fluent
insurance?
I’m your agent for that.
1001183.1 State Farm, Home Ofce, Bloomington, IL
Judi Johnson, Agent
645 N 5th Street
Jacksonville, OR 97530
Bus: 541-899-1875
judi.johnson.cmld@statefarm.com
No one wants to pay for
unnecessary extras and with my
help, you won’t have to. I’ll help
make sure you understand your
options, and that you have the
best coverage at the best price.
Like a good neighbor,
State Farm is there.
®

CALL ME TODAY.
Need
someone
that speaks
fluent
insurance?
I’m your agent for that.
1001183.1 State Farm, Home Ofce, Bloomington, IL
Judi Johnson, Agent
645 N 5th Street
Jacksonville, OR 97530
Bus: 541-899-1875
judi.johnson.cmld@statefarm.com
Escape to Extraordinary
Life slows a pace or two in the picturesque Applegate
Valley. 17 small wineries with big wines can be found
all along the meandering roads and rivers. Come meet
our grape growers, step into their vineyards and share
a glass of wine. Enjoy the scenic drive on Highway
238 just 8 miles west of Jacksonville.
“Wine Country the way it should be.”
– Sunset Magazine
Plan your trip online at:
www.applegatewinetrail.com
Wild Wines
8 miles
9 miles
Save the Date for our Fall
Uncorked Event!
Sunday, Nov. 24th
Tasting Room
Hours:
Thursday
through Sunday
12–7

Tasting Room
Wood Fired Pizza

Espresso Bar
4554 South Stage Road
(one mile east of downtown Jacksonville)
www.dancinvineyards.com 541-245-1133
Corporate and Group Rates
541-899-2050 | 830 5th St
Bistro • Wine Bar
www.dejavubistrowinebar.com
541-899-1942
Déjà Vu
Tour 14 Local Wineries with our
Exclusive Wine Package
The McCully House Inn
240 E. California St. | 541.899.2050
A Part of Country House Inns Jacksonville | www.countryhouseinnsjacksonville.com
Home of:
Jacksonville Review Page 22 November 2013
❈Friday-Sunday, November 1-2: ROGUE VALLEY
syMpHony & cypress sTring
QUARTET, Ashland, Medford, Grants Pass.
See article on page 18.
❈Saturday, November 2 & 30, 10:00am-7:00pm:
ÉLÉglance HoMe dÉcor Holiday open
House. Decorated for Christmas—refreshments and
bow making demonstrations, 110 N. Fifth Street.
See ad on page 15.
❈Saturday, November 2, 10:00am-4:00pm: CRATER
rocK MuseuM arT sHoW. See article on page 12.
❈Monday, November 11, 1:45pm: VETERANS DAY
service, Courthouse Grounds. See article on page 7.
❈Thursday, November 14, 8:30am: cHaMber
MonTHly MeeTing, second Thursday each
month, Old City Hall.
❈Friday, November 15, 7:00pm: Movie nigHT
aT old ciTy Hall, The Eddy Duchin Story.
See article below.
❈Saturday, November 16, 2:00-5:00pm: KATE
ingraM booK signing & recepTion,
for her new memoir, Washing the Bones, at Terra
Firma. See ad on page 33.
❈Tuesday, November 19, 3:00-4:00pm: LONG
TerM care Tax benefiTs, with Angela
Clague, Pioneer Village. See ad on page 16.
❈Thursday, November 21, 5:30-7:00pm: fire
deparTMenT coMMuniTy classes,
November: "Home safety for Winter," Jacksonville Fire
Station. See article and schedule on page 17.
❈Friday-Sunday, November 22-24: CLAYFOLK
poTTery sHoW & sale, Medford Armory.
See article and schedule on page 12.
❈Saturday, November 23, 11:00am-2:00pm: SPA
JacKsonville Holiday launcH parTy.
See article and ad on page 10.
❈Sunday, November 24, 11:00am-5:00pm: APPLEGATE
VALLEY UNCORKED, 18 wineries. See ad on page 38.
❈Saturday, November 30, 5:00pm-7:00pm:
MercHanT open House & Tree
ligHTing, downtown Jacksonville.
See schedule on page 13.
❈Saturday, December 7, 9:30am: Morning
cHrisTMas parade, downtown Jacksonville.
See schedule on page 13.
EVENTS CALENDAR ❈NOVEMBER 2013
J a c k s o n v i l l e A r t E v e n t s
N o v e m b e r 2 0 1 3
November 1 - 24
“Abstract Color”
Art Presence Art Center
This month we present a member
show of abstract works which focus
on the use of color in a variety of
mediums from traditional 2D visual
art to innovative dimensional works.
Meet the artists and discuss their
work at a reception on Friday, Nov
from 5 to 7pm.
See More Art Presence Curated Exhibits:
Jacksonville Library:
Naversen Room, Now through Jan 23:
Oil paintings by Jacksonville artist Tana Domecq-Davis.
! Front Entrance Display Case
! Now - Nov 14: Exhibit of military memorabilia by Dirk
! Siedlecki.
! Nov 14 - Dec 31: Exhibit of handmade & tin lithograph
! toys by Mark Daucher & Katharine Gracey.
Medford Library:
Now - Jan 15: Watercolor paintings by Anne Brooke.
Art Presence is a nonprofit organization. The Art Presence
Art Center gallery is open every Friday through Sunday
from 11am-5pm. We are located at 206 N. Fifth Street, on
the grounds of Jacksonville’s historic courthouse.
Visit us online at art-presence.org
November 1 - 30:
Lindell Stacy-Horton
GoodBean Coffee Company
Artist Lindell Stacy-Horton
relocated to Grants Pass from the
Grays Harbor, WA area just a few
months ago. She says she’s feeling
“home” now, having returned to
southern Oregon after living here
in the 70s. We received a call from
her shortly after she got settled in,
looked at her work online, and
decided this was an artist we really want to introduce to
the patrons of the GoodBean and the southern Oregon art
community! We’re sure you will enjoy her landscapes,
florals & abstracts, painted in acrylic on canvas. Learn
more about the artist online at lindellstacyhorton.com
November 5 - 29:
“Wordbody: Drawings in Paint”
Anna Elkins
South Stage Cellars
This month Resident Artist Cheryl
Garcia welcomes Jacksonville artist
and published author Anna Elkins
for a show of new art and word
paintings entitled “Wordbody:
Drawings in Paint.” For those who
don’t know her, Anna has traveled
the globe writing, painting and
teaching. Her paintings hang on
walls around the world. Elkins’
second book “The Honeylicker
Angel” was published recently and her poetry collection
“The Space Between” is in the process of publication,
making this a very exciting time for this very talented
woman! Meet the artist and help her celebrate her
birthday with fine wine, complimentary hors d’oeuvres
& cake at an artist reception on Saturday, November 9
2013 from 5-8 pm. Exhibition runs November 5-29.
Learn more about Anna’s work at annaelkins.com.
www.soartists.com ~ soar@soartists.com
Website & Art Event Calendar by
Hannah West Design, LLC ~ 541.899.2012
”Eye Candy Melting”
by Jerry Simon
”Poppy Fields”
by Lindell Stacy-Horton
"I Am Written"
by Anna Elkins
THE RHYTHM KINGS
MARK HILL
L.E.F.T.
RYAN VOSIKA TRIO
THE BEATS WORKIN’ BAND
THE TIM MITCHELL DUO
FRET DRIFTERS
RYAN VOSIKA TRIO
HAVE A WONDERFUL THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY!
MILESTONE REVIEW
THIS MONTH AT
THE BELLA
1 & 2
7
8 & 9
14
15 & 16
21
22
23
28
29 & 30
NOVEMBER
170 WEST CALIFORNIA STREET, JACKSONVILLE • 899-1770
7:30pm
Grants Pass Dec. 6
Newman United Methodist Church
Ashland Dec. 7
First United Methodist Church
Medford Dec. 13 &14
First Presbyterian Church
Special Performance
Copland: Clarinet Concerto
Gwen Hutchings, Clarinet
Music by Leroy Anderson · Mozart • Handel
Holiday Singalong
Tickets at rvsymphony.org
541-552-6398
General $28
Students $5
Holiday
Concert 2013
November Movie Night
at Old City Hall
THE EDDY DUCHIN STORY starring the classic flm
ladies heart throb, Tyrone Power… and the girl every
male would love to take on a PICNIC, Kim Novak… is the
feature flm in November. And what a magnifcent pairing
this is. They melt into one another’s arms like buter on hot
toast. Romeo and Juliet never looked so good.
A biography of the famed pianist Eddy Duchin, this
is a romantic flm in every sense of the word. It is also a
story of success, biterness, and redemption. Through it
all, you will marvel at the skill Tyrone Power displays
in his role of one of the great pianists of the frst part of
the 20th Century. His keyboard artistry is a compelling
display of showmanship, breathing a brilliance into the
musical sequences. He should have been nominated
for an Oscar for this one.
Progressing from the jazz-age to the post-war years,
this flm portrays the world around the central players
in as real a fashion as Hollywood has ever done…
indeed, far beter than most, including the recent
GREAT GATSBY. And I guarantee this flm will remain
with you when you leave Old City Hall. However, a
word of caution… Bring at least two handkerchiefs.
THe eddy ducHin sTory screens at 7:00pm
on Friday, November 15th. There will be the usual
cartoon, cofee, tea, and cookies or snacks.
Mayor Paul Becker
541-899-9965
Orders to Go!
Catering Available
PATIO DINING
210 E. CALIFORNIA STREET
DOWNTOWN JACKSONVILLE
8
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 23 November 2013
A Cup of Conversation by
Michael Kell of GoodBean Coffee
The 33
Christian Hamilton, Principal Broker
541-621-0679
chamilton@windermere.com
www.jvilleagent.com
THIS MONTH’S FEATURED PROPERTY
590 Powderhorn Drive
Jacksonville
505 N Fifth St, Jacksonville, OR 97530
4 BD, 3 BA - Beautiful custom home in
a great location right outside of Historic
Jacksonville’s city limits. Great setting on
5-acres with views of the surrounding
mountains and the valley. Large deck of
of the kitchen/dining area for entertaining
and taking in the sun and views, with
formal living and freplace and tons of
storage throughout. More! $575,000
Beautiful Custom Home!
831 Juanita Drive, Jacksonville
Talk to Christian Today!
Thank You.
2013
Jacksonville/Medford
O
ver the years people have asked me how we’ve survived living and doing
business in a small town for so long. Here are (33) notable things observed over
the past quarter-century. Please note there is no intended order of importance.
1. Anonymity is a myth. There is no place to hide from stupid things said and
done.
2. Study names and faces of your customers. Anyone consistently spending their
money in your store deserves to be on a frst-name basis.
3. Say "yes" as much as possible when asked to donate to good local causes.
4. Never tout your product as the best unless, of course, you can prove it.
5. Mind your own business. Meddling is a destroyer of relationships as is gossip.
6. Just say "no" to that last glass of wine at the local watering hole especially if you
like the sound of your voice.
7. Bad-mouthing should only happen frst thing in the morning and don’t forget
to brush.
8. Patronize the competition from time to time especially if they do a good job.
You’ll learn something.
9. Avoid being the lone objection to a popular issue at the local council meeting.
10. Don’t have political signs or religious icons in your establishment. If you have
to post a sign or wear the t-shirt, you’re probably not doing it right anyway.
11. Use local vendors whenever possible and pay them on time, sometimes easier
said than done.
12. Stay of Facebook except to promote your shop. Small-town is small enough.
13. Don’t bring the dog to work. You’ll forget Fido as the daily distractions mount
and the dog will make you pay.
14. If you have a poty-mouth, save it for the above-mentioned dog but defnitely
not in your store or anyone else’s.
15. Don’t bring the shop home with you especially the part when you pay bills.
16. Be wise when hiring kids of friends. Nobody wants to see their kid lose a job
even if Junior has it coming.
17. In December, say "Merry Christmas" even if you’re not feeling very merry and
don’t necessarily do Christmas.
18. Avoid working the business with the spouse without well-defned roles,
healthy boundaries and right priorities. This means marriage frst and business
second.
19. Pick your managers very carefully. They are you when you’re not there.
20. Always wave to local law enforcement even when caught driving down Main
Street a litle too fast.
21. Never park in front of your merchant-neighbor’s business or in her parking
spot, designated or not.
22. Don’t hire your own kids unless you’re disciplined in the art of not playing
favorites.
23. Treat fellow merchants well. Alienated merchants cost you a small fortune in
non-referred business.
24. If you’re not even-tempered, hire an amiable front person and stay safely in the
back ofce.
25. Treat regulars to a free purchase every now and then to let them know how
appreciated they are.
26. Be reluctant to raise prices and only when the competition does so frst or when
vendors and or government leave you no choice.
27. Don’t tow a car parked in your spot unless it’s an emergency. You may not
know who it belongs to but they know where to fnd you.
28. Do not under-volunteer or over-volunteer. The former promotes selfshness, the
later biterness.
29. Avoid alienating the power of the pen and sword. This means the local
newspaper and city hall.
30. Understand the inherent moral contract of employing young people. With the
right guidance and encouragement, any one of them just may change the world
for the beter.
31. Make it a point to come in after-hours and hit your knees in gratitude for the
privilege of a small town living.
32. If you write a column for your local paper, measure your words thrice and hit
the "send" buton once.
33. Be Good not biter.
541-702-2258
100 E. California Street • Jacksonville
Dine-in or Take-out
Now open in Ashland & Grants Pass
Jacksonville Inn & Wine Shop
175 E. California Street • Historic Jacksonville, OR
For lodging or dining reservations: (541)899-1900 or (800)321-9344
Join us for FINE DINING in a friendly, relaxed atmosphere!
Book your HOLIDAY
PARTIES now!
Holiday GIFT CARDS
make the perfect gift!
Our WINE SHOP has
Southern Oregon’s
best prices on over
2,000 wines!
Jacksonville Review Page 24 November 2013
APPLEGATE VALLEY
ORCHARD –50+ irrigated
acres on the Applegate River
with three totally remodeled
homes, pictured is main house
5600 sq ft., also 3bed/2ba &
2bed/2ba plus guest cabin,
barn and so much more. Solar power for two houses, over 2,500 fruit trees
and farm stand. All gated and fenced. $2,350,000.
Stop in our New Ofce in Murphy at 6953 Williams Hwy!
(Across from Ray’s Market)
541 541
Calling All Foodies
by Constance Jesser, Jacksonville Mercantile
Creme-fraiche
Apple Pie
Adam Haynes is the owner of Artisan Landscapes, Inc.
Contact him at 541-292-3285, adam@artisanlandscapesinc.
com, or visit his website at www.artisanlandscapesinc.com.
Love Your Landscape by Adam Haynes
Summer's Final Bloom
W
ith summer winding-
down, there’s
something about the
back-to-school season that’s flled
with promise of new beginnings.
This time of year ofers-up fall colors in bloom, backyard
garden harvests and lots of local farmers market fnds!
You may have noticed the trend toward consumers
becoming more interested in where their food comes from.
Imagine coming into the kitchen with bags of salad
greens, veggies and berries… without having to go to
the grocery store. This time of year provides the ultimate
harvest for reaping the fruits (and vegetables) of our labor
as well as those of local markets. Customers of farmers
markets frequently pay lower prices and often buy in
bulk, preserving the food for future use by pickling,
canning, drying, or freezing. And home gardeners really
beneft by growing and preserving their own food.
According to the National Gardening Association, nearly
19 million of us planned to grow our own vegetables in
backyard gardens, and the seed companies continue to see
sales growth. Some backyard growers even sell their excess
vegetables at local markets, seeking to make a proft from
their own gardens. It can be a unique part-time cash-fow
infusion for an individual or family with an abundant
harvest and an entrepreneurial spirit.
At this time, be sure to take advantage of Fall-
blooming perennials in your landscape plans!
• One of a group of great native plants in the daisy
family, helenium ofers its blooms at the end of the
season. It’s tough and
easy-to-grow.
• It's fun to contrast
warm autumnal shades.
Russian sage does the
trick with its airy blue
fowers and silvery
foliage…it’s a favorite,
is tough as nails and its
foliage and blooms smell great.
• One of the quintessential autumn plants, sedum,
bursts into bloom at summer's end. This tough plant
laughs of all summer's heat and drought to look
great in your garden at the end of the season.
• Most gardeners are familiar with the spring-
blooming crocuses but overlook the fall types.
They're perfect for the garden, too.
This Fall, we can all look forward to local farmers
markets, the opportunity to carry our own food from
garden to table and the unique variety of fall colors now
in-bloom. For help planning all facets of your home
landscape, including fower and vegetable beds, give me
a call and let’s create something special!
To Prepare the Filling:
12 ounces Crème Fraiche
1 Cup Granulated Sugar
1 Large Egg
1/3 Cup All-Purpose Flour
2 Teaspoons Vanilla Paste
1/2 Teaspoon Salt
6 Large Granny Smith Apples
(Peeled, Cored and Sliced)
Mix the crème fraiche, sugar, egg,
four, vanilla paste and salt in a large
bowl. Add the apples and place into
the formed pie shell. Bake the flled pie
at 450F for 10 minutes, lower the oven
temperature to 350F and bake another
35 minutes.
To Prepare the Topping:
1 Cup Chopped Hazelnuts or
Pecans
1/2 Cup All-Purpose Flour
4 Ounces Unsalted Buter
(room temperature)
1/3 Cup Dark Muscavado Sugar
1/3 Cup Granulated Sugar
2 Teaspoons Chinese 5 Spice
Pinch Salt
While the pie is baking, mix all the
ingredients together, blending well.
After the pie has been baked for 45
minutes, evenly spoon on the topping
and bake for an additional 15 minutes
at 350F. Remove the pie from the
oven and allow to cool completely
before refrigerating. Serve cold with
additional sweetened crème fraiche on
the side.
Constance Jesser is the co-owner of Jacksonville Mercantile and a professionally-trained chef. She can be reached at
541-899-1047 or JacksonvilleMercantile.com. See ad on page 4.
For a spin on your traditional holiday
Apple Pie recipe, Chef Constance Jesser
of Jacksonville Mercantile recommends
trying this delicious alternative using
Crème Fraiche and a crumble topping.
Helenium
To Prepare the Crust:
1 Cup All-Purpose Flour
5 oz. Unsalted Buter
1/2 Cup Powdered Sugar
Pinch Salt
1/4 Cup Water
Cut the buter into the four, sugar & salt
until it is the size of small peas. Add the
water a litle bit at a time until the dough
holds together. Place it between two pieces
of plastic wrap and roll it out to about 1/4”
thickness. Refrigerate it for 30 minutes (this
can be done up to two days ahead). When
ready to fll the pie, remove the dough from
the refrigerator and allow it to warm-up to
room temperature for 10 minutes. Unwrap
the plastic on one side and place into a 10”
pie plate, keeping the plastic wrap on the
side facing your hands, press it into the pie
plate. Remove the plastic and fold the edges
of the pie under and pinch to create the
formed edges. Refrigerate for 30 minutes
before flling so the crust doesn’t shrink
when you bake it.
"
Gift Certificates Available
Having company for the holidays?
541-899-0255
245 N. 5th Street
www.magnolia-inn.com
Book your room
reservations
early!
214 E. California Street (next to Las Palmas)
(541) 899-1972
Over 1200 Quilts!
Fabrics, Tapestries, Gifts & more!
•Quilt Finishing
•Custom Designs
•Special Requests
•Hand or machine quilting
Full line of Jim Shore
& Heartwood Creek Statues
Largest US website with
American-made Quilts!
CountryQuilts.com
or QuiltsR4U.com
email: countryquilts@msn.com
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 25 November 2013
H
ow lucky are we to live in a burgeoning wine
region where so many delicious options are a
stones-throw away? Keeping this in mind, you
have every reason to celebrate the holiday season with
style and great taste. But the season can bring confusion
when it comes to pairing the perfect wine with the
perfect meal because there are so many great favors that
come into play. Consider this your ofcial “cheat sheet”
for fnding the ideal food and wine pairings for your
November festivities.
The Harvest party
2006 Tempranillo, Red Lily Vineyard
Who doesn’t love all of the comforts that come with
a traditional Harvest Party? Delicious, hot, and earthy
foods utilizing the bounty of the season means you’ll
likely be dining on roasted meats, root vegetables,
and apple crisp. For this meal, I lean toward a nice
Tempranillo and Red Lily makes a dandy one. The
crushed black fruit favors are spot-on with just enough
foral notes to please. This bold choice stands up nicely to
your heartiest stews and braised meats.
Game Day
2011 Anna Maria Viognier, Valley View Vineyards
It’s game day, right? So I imagine you’ve got some
bean dip, hot wings and chips. Or maybe you’re more of
the artisan cheese, smoked salmon and harvest bread type.
Either way, Viognier is a solid choice for enjoying all of the
salty, crunchy, yumminess of the day. Viognier is a dry
white wine with peach and apricot favors. It can hold its
own with spicy foods like bufalo wings but is absolutely
delightful with cheese and seafood, too. Valley View
Vineyard is known for producing a delicious Viognier.
Thanksgiving Dinner
2011 Estate Syrah & 2011 Dry Riesling, Troon Vineyard
The traditional day of American feasting is one of
my favorite holidays. Every year I make the traditional
fare my family can count on and relish. But for the cook
in me, I always throw in something new. I will admit
I don’t hit that homerun as often as I’d like, but that’s
okay. It flls my needs, and more often than not, I get
that thumbs-up across the table that warms my inner
chef. So when deciding on your wine for the main event,
you really must consider everything on your table, not
just the bird. Roast turkey is one of those dishes that is
lovely with both red and white wine. But what else is
on your table? What’s in your stufng? And how have
you seasoned the bird this year? If you make a sausage
and cornbread stufng and serve Brussels sprouts with
sautéed panceta, then lean toward a Syrah. You’ll need
something bold, yet easy to drink to stand up to those
strong favors and the Troon Syrah is a very food-friendly
option. If your meal features apple stufng, fresh fruit
salad and puréed parsnips, then consider the Dry Riesling.
The Troon Vineyard Riesling has traditional favors of
pear and yellow apple but with noticeable minerality,
making it the perfect foil for your holiday feast.
Thanksgiving Day Dessert
Essensia, Quady Winery
What is Thanksgiving dinner without pumpkin pie?
If your house is like mine, you’ll be presenting several
dessert options. I know with certainty that the best
pairing for that spiced, custard confection, fruit pies and
chocolate, is Quady Winery’s Essensia. This delicious
dessert wine is made from 100% Orange Muscat
with aromas of orange and apricot. It’s a divine and
memorable way to end your holiday feast.
Leftovers!
2009 Merlot or Syrah, Schmidt Family Vineyards
Honestly, I LOVE Thanksgiving weekend because
of the leftovers! There’s nothing beter than a great
homemade turkey sandwich, stufng and gravy over
toast, turkey tetrazzini, and turkey and fall veggie
soup. And to soak in every last morsel of your holiday
menu, go for a good, easy drinking red. Schmidt Family
Vineyards Merlot flls the bill. Merlot is one of those
wines that just works great with casseroles, sandwiches,
soups—you really can’t go wrong.
I recommend that you stock-up on your holiday
wines early. And, if you haven’t ventured on to the
Applegate Wine Trail, you owe it to yourself to get
out there and fnd out what is right outside your door.
There’s no beter time to do so than on november 24th
when "UnCorked" invites you to visit all 18 Applegate
wineries in one afternoon. In one day you can winery-
hop and sample the goodness that we grow just a few
miles from town. Come out and taste for yourself what
makes our wine region so unique. For more information
on UnCorked, please visit ApplegateWinetrail.com and see
for yourself. Cheers!
See UnCorked ad on page 38.
Holiday Food with Fine Local Wines
By Erika Bishop, Troon Vineyard Marketing Director
15095 Hwy 238, Applegate, OR
541-846-6659
Stay at a real country farm on the Applegate River
Guesthouse Stayovers
B&B
Call for information and reservations: 541-941-0000
In the Heart of the Applegate Valley Wine Trail
Weekend or nightly, rustic bunkhouse-style country home
away from home sleeps up to fve. One bedroom with
king-size bed, one queen & twin bunk, kitchen & large
bathroom, gas freplace, TV, movies & board games.
Wine Tasting Picnic Supplies
Breakfast • Lunch •To Go Orders
Gas • ATM • Espresso
Deli • Beer & Wine
Open 7days a week!
Applegate Store
13291 Hwy 238, Applegate, OR
Horsefeather
Farms Ranchette
Bring the kids! Pet friendly!
www.horsefeather-farms-ranchette.com
Jacksonville Review Page 26 November 2013
Let's Talk Real Estate
by Graham Farran, Expert Properties
Graham Farran is a broker with Expert
Properties, located at 620 N. 5th Street in
Jacksonville. Please see their ad on the back
cover and contact them at 541-899-2030 or
online at www.expertprops.com.
Ten Reasons Why Real Estate
is a Superior Investment
edenvalewines.com
2310 Voorhies Road
Medford, Oregon
Thanksgiving Open
House Weekend
Locally-made gifts
Great, holiday atmosphere
Terrifc winter wines
D
o you have enough money
saved for retirement? Financial
planners usually use the “25
Times Rule” to determine how much a
portfolio should be worth for someone to
safely retire. If you need $50,000 a year
to live on when you retire, then, using
the “25 Times Rule” you should have
$1,250,000 in stocks, bonds and mutual
funds. Then, at retirement, fnancial
planners begin liquidating these assets
using a “4-Percent Rule,” which simply
means they liquidate 4 percent of the
portfolio each year until it is down to
zero after 25 years. If you retire at 65,
you beter hope you don’t live past 90 or
you’ll be broke.
Compared to investors who rely
on the stock market to accumulate
assets for their retirement, real estate
investments take a diferent approach.
If you accumulate $2,800,000 in income-
producing real estate it will pay $50,000 a
year in income and continue to appreciate
in value over the years, not only covering
you indefnitely but also leaving you
something to pass on to your children.
Here’s the interesting part, it only
takes $700,000 in investment capital to
accumulate $2,800,000 in real estate assets.
By comparison, it takes about $900,000
in stock investments to achieve a $50,000
per year annual income, assuming that
during 30 years of investing both types of
investments yield a 4 percent return.
Real Estate has many advantages over
investing in stocks, bonds or mutual
funds. Real estate ofers predictable cash
fow; it appreciates in value, thus keeping
up with infation; it provides a higher
return because of positive leverage; and
it ofers equity growth through debt
reduction. During retirement, real estate
is a self-sustaining asset while stocks are
a self-liquidating asset. Which would you
prefer, a self-sustaining asset or a self-
liquidating asset?
Ten reasons to invest in real estate:
1. Real estate has a predictable
cash fow—Cash fow is the net
spendable income derived from
the investment after all operating
expenses and mortgage payments
have been made. A good real estate
investment should provide you
with 6% or greater cash fow.
2. Real estate appreciates in value—
Since 1968, appreciation levels for
real estate have been 6 percent per
year, including during the downturn
in the economy beginning in 2007,
according to the National Association
of Realtors.
3. Real estate can be leveraged—The
most important advantage of real
estate investing is LEVERAGE!
It is the use of borrowed capital
to increase the potential return
of an investment. In real estate
transactions, leverage occurs when
a mortgage is used to reduce the
amount of investor capital required
to purchase a property. The annual
return on a $200,000 property with
a $20,000 net cash fow purchased
with cash is 10 percent. If 75% of
the money required to purchase the
property is borrowed, even factoring
in the cost of making the mortgage
payment, the annual return more
than doubles to 22 percent (assuming
a loan of $150,000 is amortized over
30 years at 5 percent interest). Once
you have built up an equity position
in an investment property, you can
leverage that investment for cash in
one of two ways: Secure a second
loan against the increased equity or
refnance the original loan amount
plus the increase equity.
4. Real estate provides equity
buildup—Most real estate is
purchased with a small down
payment with the balance of the
money being provided through debt
fnancing from a lender. Over time,
the principal amount of the mortgage
is paid down, slowly at frst, and then
more rapidly toward the end of the
amortization period. This principal
reduction builds equity.
5. Real estate is improvable—One
of the most unique and atractive
advantages of real estate is that it is
improvable. Because real estate is a
tangible asset made of wood, brick,
concrete, and glass you can improve
the value of any property with some
“elbow grease” and “sweat equity.”
Whether the repairs are structural
or cosmetic, do it yourself or hire
someone, the principle is the same.
6. Real estate coincides with
retirement—When real estate is
purchased, the cash fow is lower
and the principal reduction on the
mortgage is less. Over time, the
mortgage is paid down, or paid
of, and the cash fow increases. In
some respects it’s a forced savings
program, yielding a greater amount
as time goes by which is a perfect
investment for retirement as it
increases in cash fow down the road.
7. Real estate is tax deductible—Tax
codes allows various deductions
for the normal expenses incurred in
owning real estate, such as property
upkeep, maintenance, improvements
and even the interest paid on the
mortgage. The deductions can ofset
income and reduce your overall taxes.
8. Real estate is depreciable—
Depreciation is a non-cash
expense permited by the tax
code that depreciates in value of
your investment property over
time. However, the value of your
investment property actually
appreciates. The depreciation
deduction allows a real estate
investor to generate a larger positive
cash fow while reporting a lower
income for tax purposes. This
creates a higher return than you may
initially realize.
9. Real estate has a lower tax rate—If
your investment property is sold
after a year, the gain is subject
to capital gains tax rates which
depending upon your individual
tax bracket is generally 15% or 20%
which is usually less than ones
personal tax bracket.
10. Real estate gains are deferrable—
Our tax code, under a 1031 exchange,
permits the gain on the sale of an
investment property to be transferred
from the property being sold to a
new property being purchased, hence
deferring the payment of any tax on
the sale of the property.
There is one fnal advantage to a
real estate investment and that it is
understandable and easy for most
everyone. It’s easy to purchase, it’s
easy to fnance and there are no
insurmountable fnancial barriers to
entry. It’s easy for most investors to
improve their properties and it’s easy
to use the tax advantages. While Wall
Street is becoming more and more of
a mystery and becoming the game
of fnanciers, real estate investing is
looking beter and beter.
(541) 664-2218
LedgerDavid.com
245 N. Front St. | Central Point
Your time. Your wine. Indulge
Open Thurs.-Mon., noon-5pm.
Just minutes from Jacksonville, off Hwy. 99.
Our first vintage 2010
Tempranillo is “quietly
raising the bar.”
-Sunset Magazine
October 2013 Issue

loves us! lllloovveess uuss!!!!
sunset.com
• Your Friendly, Professional
Pharmacy Staff
• Buy Local - Support Local
• Short Wait Time
• We Specialize in Custom
Compounding
• We offer Delivery to Your Home
• Unique Gifts - Large Selection
2355 West Main St, Medford
(541) 772-2330
www.WestMainPharmacy.com
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 27 November 2013
...behind the BLUEDOOR
541.899.3242 • 155 north 3rd street • jacksonville
Enjoy Fall Holiday Shopping
Snickerdoodles &
Hot Cider every
Friday and Saturday
throughout the
season!
Visit the garden...enjoy holiday
shopping and unique gifts galore!
throughout November
5th Annual...
“Holiday in the Garden”
My Neighbor's Garden
by Kay Faught
P
eggy Pefey
has a “bionic
garden”...
always exploding
and taking over!
After 36 years in
Santa Barbara, California, Peggy and Mac
pefey moved Jacksonville to be closer
to family. They’ve lived in their
Singler Lane home for eleven years,
now. She immediately joined the
garden club, then started working
on her “subdivision landscape”
home with a goal of creating four
season color and “planting things
she couldn't before!” Peggy’s
garden is amazing...in the size
of a city lot she has her own
composting section, veggie beds,
voracious perennial beds, beds of
brilliant dahlias, pots of peppers, a
full ecosystem pond, and beautiful
hanging baskets!
As I walked up Peggy’s front walk
to their home, big boxwoods lined the
path, inter-planted with cheery yellow
pansies! The front yard shelters plants
needing protection from afternoon heat.
Welcoming ivy topiaries at the front door
are fanked by deep orange weeping
begonias cascading from an old chair seat.
I'm happy already!
Peggy “lives” her garden and she
exudes joy as she talks about it and how
fun each section
is. The backyard
has cement edging
to trim the grass
area, preventing
the beds from
taking over with
abundance in
a hodgepodge
of perennials....
love-in-a-mist,
asters, black eyed
Susan’s, phlox,
evening primrose, and a myriad of garden
favorites fll and spill. The two corners
are anchored by birch trees carpeted
beneath with snow-in-summer and lemon
balm… tall pink anemones surprise you
as sentries to the side garden. Raised
beds of winter veggies and pole beans
provide a hiding place for bright dahlias!
Habaneros tuck in and out with impatiens
at their feet! Along the back of the home
by the patios, tansies repel fies, roses lay
over deep burgundy mums and a dinner
plate white dahlias smiles at the sun!
As if all of these garden beds aren't
enough adventure, in the middle of
it all is a pond and waterfall ofering
serene sound and planting options for
Peggy. A large Japanese maple anchors
the scene. Beneath it, interplaying with
rocks and water reeds, hibiscus, red
penstemons and volunteer ferns await. It
was mesmerizing trying to see what was
there…all in its own world.
Peggy has no regrets in her gardening
journey and gave one very strong bit
of advice: “Start with good soil… it
is the foundation... I do all my own
composting and have dug up each bit of
soil as I planted, replacing it with good
soil.” Obviously it works—Peggy and
her plants are happy!
It is obvious she loves to garden but I
asked Peggy why she gardens. “It is my
passion, a place where I can express my
artistic side... I also use it every day as my
time with God.”
Then she laughed
and added, “In
fact, God and I
garden together!”
Every day at
dusk, she walks
every inch of her
garden. “I love
the indescribable
color and fnding
a new fower or
bloom every day
that wasn't there the day before.”
From all I could see, that would truly be
a great way to end each day. Thanks for
sharing your garden
with me, Peggy!
Kay is the owner
of Blue Door Garden
Store, located at 155 N
Third St. Specializing
in paraphernalia for
the home gardener,
she carries garden
gifts, decor, and a wide
variety of pots, tools,
gloves, and organic product. See ad below.
HomeWorx by Cheryl von Tress
V
ery soon, we’ll be tucking
indoors for long sessions away
from the chilly outdoors. To be
comfortable outdoors, we layer up and
adorn ourselves with things practical and,
sometimes, things beautiful. Might this
translate to our home interiors? Yes!
So much of home decor
is in a fat, non-shiny fnish.
Textiles used for curtains,
upholstery and bedding
tend toward utilitarian
purposes and leave our
rooms lacking shimmer.
Shiny and glistening
objects provide the jewelry
for a space to come alive.
Where to fnd the
sparkle? How to
incorporate it? The most afordable
options are decorative accessories that can
change seasonally.
Lamp bases in glossy ceramic or
porcelain and various metals. Vases made
of clear or colored glass as well as shiny
or shimmery metals.
Pillow covers constructed of silk or faux
silk or those with metallic thread used for
patern. Lamp shades created in organza
with crystal or faceted glass beads.
Candlesticks, votive holders, wall candle
sconces with glass pillars and, of course,
an array of beautiful candles.
Mirrors, mirrors, mirrors! A single,
large mirror with a metal or metallic fnish
frame or a grouping of smaller mirrors
with matching or mixed design frames.
Batery-operated, LED lighted candles
(especially those with a timer) create an
instantaneous glow and warmth without
the wax mess clean-up.
More lasting options are: replacing
solid cabinet doors with glass-front doors;
buying glass top tables which refect
candlelight, frelight and outdoor scenery
when placed near a window, or simply
adding glass tops to existing tables. Metal
tables or table legs in gold, silver, bronze
and copper or a fnish of those colors. Any
material or item that will bounce light
around your room will
add life to the space.
Locally, you can fnd
many of these lovely
items at Eleglance
Home decor, The
Crown Jewel, Pico’s,
Blue Door Garden
Store, WillowCreek,
Sterling Creek
Antiques and Pickety
Place Antiques. What
an amazing and resourceful village we have!
If your home doesn’t have a freplace,
an afordable option is an electric,
infrared space heater with natural-looking
fame lighting. Durafame makes a very
nice one with casters to easily move
to diferent areas. It features a remote
control that allows for heating time (30
minutes to several hours), thermostatic
control and fve levels of fame design.
Chilly, dark days call for shimmer! So,
move beyond practical into spectacular
and love your days and evenings as you
feather your wintry nest.
Cheryl von Tress has owned and operated
Cheryl von Tress Design in the Rogue Valley
since 2004. She specializes in kitchens and
baths, full-service design for new construction
or residential and light commercial remodels,
and ofers hourly consultation. Direct access
to local and international design center
resources is available at designer discounts.
Reach her at 541-951-9462. See ad below.
All That Shimmers
Google us and like us on Facebook!
Southern & Coastal Oregon and Northern California
Kitchens, Baths & More • New Construction • Remodels
CHERYL VON TRESS DESIGN GROUP
Full-Service Design or
Hourly Consulting
541 951 9462 We create beautiful homes, ofces and
cafes and are known for passionate design
excellence and commitment to integrity.
Find us on Google and ‘Like’ us on Facebook
Join author Leta Lovelace Neiderheiser in the community room of the
Ruch Library from 1:00-3:00pm on Saturday, November 2 to learn more about
Jesse Applegate's fascinating life and his wide infuence on Oregon history.
Neiderheiser, an Applegate descendent, will be sharing research that led to her
book Jesse Applegate: A Dialogue with Destiny.
There's more to
Jesse Applegate
than just the
Applegate Trail!
Jacksonville Review Page 28 November 2013
Speaking of Antiquing
with Joelle Graves, Sterling Creek Antiques
Family Views
by Michelle Hensman
Thankful for: Yoga Pants,
Cereal & Gift Cards
S
everal times
a week,
I’ll have a
customer say,
“I inherited
my mother’s
china and it’s all
packed away…
sure would love
to sell it.” Then
they turn to me
and ask, “Would
you like to buy
a beautiful set of fll in the blank—I don’t
know what patern it is but it has tiny
roses all over it…it’s very prety… I have
all the pieces.”
As it turns out, there are many people
who have the same dilemma and because
of that, sets of china are available at
almost all antique stores. Replacements.
com, the website that’s expensive but
useful for fnding missing pieces, only
ofers you a fraction of what your set is
worth—and I do mean a fraction. Once,
they ofered me $1 for a plate they are
ofering online to others for $54.
So what to do? Some people make good
use of their china and use it more often
than just the holidays. They use it and
don’t worry about preserving it only for
special occasions. But if you are among
the many who’ve packed it away, here are
a couple of suggestions:
• Have a “trade your china” party at
your house—have everyone bring a
place seting and then trade sets. Be
sure you have eight people and that
you all actually agree to trade with
each other. Then set your holiday
table with 8 diferent place setings
at every place. It’s creative, beautiful
and you can add a centerpiece that
pulls it all together.
• Donate it. Go ahead and just bite the
bullet and let it go.
• Before you donate it, be sure to
have it appraised since you might
have the “one in ffty sets” that is
highly sought-after. Your antique
professional can help you decide
what to do next.
If you want to get an idea of value
yourself—here are some handy tips:
• Using Google Images, enter the name
of your china found on the underside
of a piece and fnd the name of your
patern.
• Click and learn but be aware that you
are looking at prices on the internet
that don’t always refect what your
set may sell for locally.
My frst and best suggestion is to
use your china this
Thanksgiving—so go
ahead and get out that
beautiful set and enjoy
it. You never know, you
may end up using it more
often than you think!
See Sterling Creek
Antiques ad below.
Time To Get the China Out
A Great Fit for the Perfect Smile!™
541.899.9516
valleydenturecare@gmail.com
590 Blackstone Alley • Jacksonville, OR 97530
Serving Jacksonville
for over a decade
with 30 years of
experience in
the Valley
Our services include:
• Full Dentures
• Partial Dentures
• Immediate Dentures
• Repairs • Relines
• Implant Dentures
• Great Service
• Customer Support
150 S. Oregon, Jacksonville, Oregon 97530 541-702-2224
Open Tuesday-Saturday 10-5
Sunday 11am - 4 • Closed Monday
Antiques and Collectibles
Consignment and Appraisal Services
Proprietor:
Joelle Graves
B
y mid-October family life seems
to get back into the full swing
of things. School schedules
are in place, car pools are set, and
extracurricular activities established.
It’s one of my most favorite times of the
year because the newness of learning still
hasn’t worn of and the excitement of
the holiday season is upon us. However,
it’s also one of the busiest times of the
year for my family and many of my
brethren. Negotiating work, school, and
volunteer schedules with sports practices
and music lessons while balancing social
time, leisure time and down time is
virtually impossible because there’s not
enough time!
As a caring and atentive writer for a
family oriented column I’ve been paying
close atention to the buildup of my own
family during this transition time and
asking random parents at various events
how they do it all. Virtually everyone
sighed deeply before answering, rolled
their eyes and said, “We just do it!”
Clearly not the answer I was hoping for.
I wanted some good solid tips for myself
and the Family Views readers.
So one fall evening I lit a candle, had
a glass of wine asked myself, “What
would Oprah do?” To which I laughed
and replied…to myself, “She would
send everyone to Disney Land in a new
car.” Again, not the right answer for my
situation. Then I heard Barbara Walters,
in her unique accent, say, “You are not
asking the right question.” She was
absolutely right! When I rephrased my
question to, “When your family is super
busy what are you most thankful for?” I
got overwhelming feedback that included
some great ideas, heartfelt replies and
several side-spliting belly laughs, which
I’m happy to share…enjoy!
“I’m thankful for good quality, stretchy
yoga pants that look like I spent the
morning at the gym even when I really
rolled out of bed in them and ran out the
door.” “I’m thankful for parents who
don’t act like fast food is the devil and
agree that cereal at 7pm flls bellies just
as well as pot roast.” “I’m thankful for
other parents who have cars flled with
sticky foor boards, dirty socks, cracker
crumbs, fast food packaging and old or
new school papers.” “I’m thankful for
online tutorial websites that can help me
with fractions, percentages, and algebraic
expressions so I don’t seem so pathetic to
my kids.” “I’m thankful for housekeepers;
but wish I could aford one.” “I’m
thankful for handy, self motivated, do-it
yourself, get the job done husbands; even
if they are not my own!” “I’m thankful
for family/friends that still appreciate
gift cards and don’t look at it as the easy
way out…even though it really is.” “I’m
thankful for the days I can sleep in.”
“I’m thankful for volunteers who bring
fresh ideas and energy to a cause and
who don’t completely know what they
signed up for but have too much integrity
to walk away from their unbeknownst
commitment.” “I’m thankful for
vineyards and microbreweries and that
my son is now 15 and passed the permit
test and can drive me home…when
necessary.” “I’m thankful that I don’t
have all the answers so that way when I
screw up I can play the deniability card.”
“I’m thankful that I have a teenager who
can keep me up to speed on the latest
technology.” “I’m thankful for friends
who continue to love, trust and count
on me even after I fake on them.” “I’m
thankful for other parents who curse and
shout; it lightens my own guilt.” “I’m
thankful for family networking which
leads to carpools, potluck dinners and
lifelong friendships”
As the writer of this column and
member of this amazing family
community, I’m personally thankful I’m
not alone and we’re all in this together!
Happy Thanksgiving!
Voices of the Applegate, a local
community choir directed by Blake
Weller, will be performing their Fall
Concert on November 22 at 7:30pm
in the Old Presbyterian Church on
California Street in Jacksonville, and
on November 24 at 3:00pm in the
applegate river ranch House, 15100
Highway 238 in applegate. The music
will consist of a variety of four part
harmony pieces, including Mozart,
Robert Burns, Queen and two songs from
the musical, “Pippin.”
Admission is free but donations are
appreciated.
For more information, please call Joan
Peterson at 541-846-6988.
Voices of the Applegate Fall Concert
A few months ago I popped into the
ofce of the Jacksonville Review to see
how much it would cost to run a small
display ad for a class I wanted to ofer.
I’d just moved to Jacksonville and had
no idea I was siting across the desk from
the journal’s publisher. When he said,
“What kind of class?” my heart sank and
my brain went into automatic shutdown
mode. I didn’t want to tell him it was a
class in Healing Touch. I was sure he’d
roll his eyes and say, “Oh dear, you’re
one of those airy-fairy space cadets.”
But he didn’t. He said, “Tell me
more.” He listened ever so patiently
and then suggested that instead of
an ad I write an article—“about 800
words.” And so I did. The article
appeared in the September issue. It
didn’t mention the class until the 767th
word. People had to read the WHOLE
THING, and then they had to phone me
to fnd out more before they could even
think about registering.
When I told the publisher that the
class was full and I had 14 people on a
waiting list for the next class, he asked
where else I’d advertised. “Nowhere,”
I said. He smiled. I smiled. The
people in the class smiled. I love the
Jacksonville Review!
Sharon Mehdi
Letter to Jacksonville Review
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 29 November 2013
Your Child Will
Love It Here!
Our teachers
are sweet and
caring. Our
classrooms are
bright and inviting.
Our location is
serene and calming.
Art and expression
are so important
to young children.
Our dedicated art
center inspires
our students
to create.
Little Pioneers School House
Pre School - M-F 8:30 - Noon $20 per day
Come see for yourself!
4400 Livingston Rd. ▪ Central Point, OR 97502 ▪ Phone: 541 - 842 - 2706
Email: director@jvilleschool.com ▪ www.jvilleschool.com
Early Childhood Enrichment Center
Individual after school foreign language and enrichment
programs available ages 3 to 10
T
here’s no
denying
the power
of massage
therapy.
Regardless of
the adjectives
we assign to it
(pampering,
rejuvenating,
therapeutic)
or the reasons
we seek it
out (a luxurious treat, stress relief, pain
management), massage therapy can be a
powerful ally in your healthcare regimen.
Research continues to show the enormous
benefts of manual therapy, ranging
from the treatment of chronic diseases,
neurological disorders and injuries,
to alleviating the stresses of modern
life. Here are just 10 proven benefts of
massage therapy.
1. Blood Circulation—Plain and simple,
manual massage therapy helps increase
blood circulation throughout the body,
thereby pumping oxygen and nutrients
into tissues and vital organs. Those who
have lost the use of a limb or are unable
to get daily exercise on their own may
especially beneft from manual circulation.
2. Healthy Moms-to-be—The possible
benefts of prenatal massage therapy
include improved breathing, increased
fow of nutrients to the placenta, postural
support, reduced anxiety and depression,
and relief of muscle discomfort, nausea,
and edema (swollen ankles and feet). And
don’t forget the baby! A happy, relaxed
mom is a happy, relaxed baby.
3. Chronic Pain Reduction—Massage
Therapy has been shown to reduce pain,
improve balance, and boost walking
speed in patients with multiple sclerosis.
A recent study also suggests that massage
therapy can help reduce pain intensity,
improve sleep quality, and increase the
pressure threshold for patients sufering
from fbromyalgia (Journal of Manipulative
and Physiological Therapeutics).
4. Low Back Pain—According to the
National Institute of Health, Americans
spend at least $50 billion each year
on low back pain, the most common
cause of job-related disability and a
leading contributor to missed work.
Causes vary widely and may include
muscle strain, bulging discs, arthritis or
skeletal misalignment. Massage therapy,
especially when dealing with soft
tissue strains or minor misalignments,
still remains one of the most benefcial
methods for treating this ailment.
5. Plantar Fasciitis—One of the most
perplexing, painful, and disabling
conditions of the feet is plantar fasciitis,
an infammation of the thick band of
connective tissue which supports the
arch on the botom of the foot. Massage
therapy is a treatment that naturally
focuses on the connective tissues of the
body and is a highly benefcial approach
to include in any comprehensive
treatment plan for plantar fasciitis.
6. TMJ Disorder / Jaw Pain—The
masseter (the thick muscle in the cheek)
is active in chewing, biting, clenching,
talking, neck stabilizing, and prety much
any time your jaw is not hanging open.
It’s always working! Massage therapy
can help release the built up tension in
the masseter and thereby decrease the
associated TMJ pain (think jaw popping,
clicking, pain), headaches, bruxism (teeth
grinding) and many other conditions.
7. Arthritis—According to the
Arthritis Foundation, recent studies on
the efects of massage for arthritis (both
Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid) have
shown regular use of the simple therapy
led to improvements in pain, stifness,
range of motion, hand grip strength and
overall function of the joints.
8. Headaches—Tension headaches,
the most common type, are usually
triggered by muscular tension and are a
perfect candidate for massage therapy.
Preventative treatment in this case is key.
9. No More Colds!—Besides increasing
blood circulation, massage also stimulates
lymph fow—the body’s natural defense
system. With winter approaching and
cold season soon to follow, why not lend
your immune system a helping hand?
10. improve condition of skin—
By increasing blood fow, massage
encourages cell regeneration which can
improve the health of your skin and even
reduce scar tissue. It also exfoliates dead
skin cells and helps excrete waste products
which lead to healthier, more elastic skin.
Whether it’s for relaxation or the many
therapeutic benefts, massage may be just
the element missing from your healthcare
practices. Be sure to consult your doctor
before making any sudden changes
to your regular health routine. And
remember, just because massage feels
like a pampering treat doesn’t mean it is
any less therapeutic. Consider massage
appointments a necessary piece of your
health and wellness regimen...and be
thankful they are so enjoyable!
See Elements ad this page.
Massage Your Way to Better Health!
by Kyleen Brodie, LMT
The Elements Massage Therapy LLC
T
he Jacksonville Pioneers have
had a busy start to the new
school year! The Jog-a-Thon, our
largest fundraiser, was a great success.
The students ran a combined total of
over 5000 laps. That is over 833 miles!
Congratulations to all those who ran so
hard! The PTO would like to thank the
following businesses for sponsoring the
Jog-A-Thon again this year:
• Brodie Dental (541-899-8833)
• Hi Yah! Tae Kwon Do (541-621-8960)
• Southern Oregon Gymnastics
Academy (541-245-9379)
• Southern Oregon Orthopedics
(541-779-6250)
• The Candy Shoppe (541-890-1170)
• Roller Odyssey (541-772-1400)
• Frau Kemmling Schoolhaus
Brewhaus (541-899-1000)
• Cutler Investments (541-770-9000)
• Rogue Valley Family Fun Center
(541-664-4263)
The money raised will help fund our
extensive art program, feld trips, OMSI
visit, Oregon Aquarium visit, our writer's
festival and author visit, classroom
support funds, media center and more. If
you have an idea for a school fundraiser
or would like to partner with Jacksonville
Elementary PTO, please contact Alyson
Fowler at 541-621-6861.
Happy Fall From
Jacksonville Elementary
School!
For Breaking News, Events, Photos
and More - Like us on Facebook!
www.facebook.com/JacksonvilleReview
Jacksonville Review Page 30 November 2013
Julie D. Danielson, O.D.
541-899-2020
950 N 5th Street • Jacksonville
www.jacksonvillevisionclinic.com
•CompleteVisionCareandPersonalService
•Hundredsofframestochoosefrom
•Freeadjustmentsandminorrepairs
Jacksonville Vision Clinic
See the diference...
Just across from
the Chevron
station in
Jacksonville!
SightSeeing by Julie D. Danielson, O.D.
Don't Let Smoke Get In Your Eyes
Julie Danielson, an optometric physician, is available by
appointment at 541-899-2020. See ad this page.
Why do I wake up at night to urinate?
by Daniel Khalil, MD, Urology
Asante Physician Partners–Grants Pass Specialty Clinic
The Laundry Center
Try our
BuLK
LAuNDry
SErVICE!
(clothes, towels, etc.)
• Self-service - or we do laundry for you!
• We do comforters, sleeping bags, and
other large items
• Drop-off/Pick-up for Weldon’s Dry Cleaning
• Children’splayarea
• CableTV&kid’smovies
2408 W. Main Street, Medford
(541) 842-2932
Hours: 7am-10pm
Close to Jacksonville,
next to Albertson’s Center!
$1.20/PouND - CHEAP!
(best price in the valley!)
A
s we get older,
our bodies start
to change in
ways that may result in
the development of new
urinary symptoms. One of
the most bothersome urinary
symptoms to both men
and women is nocturia, the
medical term for waking up
at night to urinate.
What are some causes of
nocturia? There are both
behavioral and anatomic/functional causes.
To start of, it is considered “normal” for a person in
their 50s to wake up once at night to urinate and twice
for someone in their 80s.
We have all heard the phrase “what goes up must
come down.” Similarly, “what goes in must come out,”
meaning whatever fuid you drink, you can expect most
of it to come out in the form of urine, which is made by
the kidneys as it flters waste products from the blood.
If you drink a large volume of fuid in the evening,
especially 2 hours before going to sleep, you can expect
to wake up at night to urinate. The best way to decrease
the chance of having to wake up to urinate is to decrease
fuid intake after dinner, especially cafeinated and
alcoholic beverages.
In men, one of the major causes of nocturia is BPH
(benign prostatic hyperplasia), or an enlarged prostate.
As men get older the prostate enlarges and grows
into the urethra, narrowing the channel, which results
in many possible symptoms including weak stream,
frequency, difculty starting and stopping, dribbling,
urgency, incomplete emptying, and nocturia.
Initially management is with behavioral modifcation
as outlined above (day or night), with or without
medications to help relieve the obstruction caused by
an enlarged prostate. Two classes of medications are
used: alpha blockers and 5 alpha reductase inhibitors
(5-ARIs). These two classes of medication work beter
together than when used individually, and each class
has specifc side efects associated with it. If medical
management is unsuccessful or not tolerated due to
side efects, then self catheterization is an option as
well as surgery to “core out” the obstructing prostate
tissue, the so called “roto-rooter” procedure, based on
the patient’s overall health and whether or not they can
tolerate a surgical procedure.
Dr. Khalil sees patients at Asante Physician Partners–Grants
Pass Specialty Clinic in Grants Pass. To contact him or make an
appointment, please call 541-507-2020. See Asante ad om page 5.
( 541) 899- 9999
725 N. 5th St., Jacksonville
www.MyDentureClinic.com

• Fullandpartialdentures
• Personalizedcosmetic
dentures
• Dentureoverimplants
• Samedayrelinesandrepairs
V
a
l l e
y
D
E
N
T
U
R
E
C
a
r e
MemberofNationalandOregonDenturistAssociation
With decades of
experience Pieter
Oosthuizen offers the
residents of Jacksonville
and surrounding areas
the best in denture care
available today.
• Immediatedentures&soft
liners
• Sportmouthguards
• Anti-snoringdevices
A
ll over America, people are
trying to quit smoking, and
with good reason.
Smoke gets in your eyes. Smoking triples the risk
of developing macular degeneration, a serious eye
disease, which is the primary cause of vision loss in
older Americans. Reducing or
eliminating the habit of smoking
and tobacco use can reduce the
risk of vision loss.
Cigarete smoking also increases
the risk of developing cataracts. If
you have diabetes, hypertension
or heart disease, smoking can
increase complications related
to these diseases. Smoking also
increases the risk for a stroke.
Did you know that smoking and
tobacco use are the main avoidable causes of sickness
and death? You could become one of the 430,700 people
who die from smoking related diseases every year.
Smoking is a known cause of cancer, heart disease, and
stroke. In people age 75 and up, 50 percent of deaths
are the result of smoking-related illnesses. And, many
smoking related illnesses seriously degrade the quality
of life of those who sufer from them.
The risk of developing smoking-related illnesses
increases with the number of cigaretes the you smoke
and the length of time that you smoke.
At lease 70 percent of those who smoke indicate that
they would like to stop smoking. However, if you have
tried to quit smoking, you know how difcult it can be.
Nicotine is an addictive drug. Quiting is difcult. Most
people usually make 2 or 3 tries
before they are successful. Anyone
can quit smoking regardless of
age, health, lifestyle or number
of years spent smoking. Half of
all people who have ever smoked
have been able to quit.
Care providers including your
doctor of optometry can assist you
in your eforts to quit smoking.
Programs of smoking cessation are
available in your local community.
One of three methods used individually or together can
increase the odds in your favor: nicotine patch or gum,
support groups, and stress management.
Ask your family doctor of optometry about programs in
your area that can help you quit the smoking habit for good.
It's the best thing you can do for a lifetime of good vision!
Source: American Optometric Association
155 West California Street • Jacksonville
www.jacksonvillecompany.com
Where style meets elegance.
Jacksonville Company
©
rld’12
541-899-5611
aisy Creek
N
190 E. California Street - Jacksonville
www.daisycreeknailspa.net
Open
M
anicures
Facials
Pedicures
&
D
ail Spa
& Waxing Boutique
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 31 November 2013
Recipe for a Joy-Full Life
Joyfull Living
by Louise Lavergne
Anita’s Alteration Center
541-772-8535 or 541-899-7536
259 E. Barnett Road, Unit B, Medford (In the Win-co Center)
Whatever the need, whatever the occasion, trust Anita’s
for the best results in the most welcoming atmosphere!
•Alterations
•Prom dresses
•Pressing, hemming, repairs
•Custom sewing projects
•Special-occasion and
wedding gown design
•Bridal party ensembles
Anita’s specialties include but are not limited to:
Whatever the need, whatever the occasion, trust Anita’s for the best results in the most welcoming atmosphere!
ThereareNOhardtoftfgures!
Just a short walk from downtown
Jacksonville, you will fnd Jacksonville
Denture Clinic at the corner of 5th and
G Streets. Owner and operator Pieter
Oosthuizen, originally from South Africa,
earned his BSC in Dental Science from
Tshwane University in South Africa.
Before moving to Oregon, Pieter worked
as a dental technician and
owned and operated a high-
end, full-service dental lab
in Waco, Texas. There, he
specialized in crown, bridge
and implantology.
Desiring a career where
he could work one-on-one
with each patient and see
the process through from
start-to-fnish, Pieter became
a Licensed Denturist. He
atended GeorgeBrown
College in Toronto, Canada
receiving an advanced
diploma in Denturism. "It is
very rewarding seeing the
work that you have done and
hearing the happiness and
gratitude coming from the
patients from whom you've
helped to improve their quality of life."
His philosophy of practice is to
provide the latest technological advances
combined with the fnest craftsmanship
and giving control of the fnal appearance
to the patient along with 100% guarantee
of satisfaction. The clinic provides its
own state-of-the-art in-house lab where
dentures and partials are made, as well as
relines, repairs and other types of denture
needs. In a day where most work is sent
out to laboratories, even to China, the in-
house lab allows for beter quality control
over the materials that are used and
enables precise adjustments necessary to
be done in a timely manner for the patient.
Pieter's past extensive experience in
crown, bridge and implant dentures
qualifes him to a
high standard of
excellence. Many
patients describe
the quality and
likeness of the
fnished product as
"art." Peter creates
a product that
looks atractive
by designing a
denture to ft the
needs of each
patient. Working
closely with the
shape of the
mouth, gums and
bite, he makes it
appear that the
dentures are your
actual teeth and
gums, creating both a comfortable ft
with a confdent natural smile.
Jacksonville Denture Clinic is located at
725 North 5th Street, Suite 101 (at the corner
of 5th and G Street). Ofce hours are 9:00am
to 5:00pm, Monday through Thursday and
9:00am to 12:00pm on Friday. Call us at 541-
899-9999 to schedule your free consultation.
See ad previous page. Article and photo by
Elizabeth C. Dancer, Ofce Manager.
News From Jacksonville Denture Clinic
The Oosthuizen Family - l-r,
Alexis, Denise, Landon and Pieter
S
ince a big
part of our
Thanksgiving
celebration is
geared around food preparation, I though
I’d share a tried and true recipe for Joy-Full
Life. At this time of year, you can usually
fnd an abundance of the main ingredient
for this recipe: gratitude. All the current
circumstances in our life are simply a
result of what we bring into our
minds and hearts. How we bring
all the ingredients together give our
life the favor of happy, sad and
sometimes sweet, sour etc…. What
we put in, we get out. In a time of
crisis we can be quick to judge others
and ourselves as we look for reasons
and solutions outside ourselves for
whatever is “going wrong.” The
statement “It’s not MY fault,” keeps
us in a disempowering victim mode.
It can be challenging to fnd our way out
of there, because it feeds the illusion that
our happiness relies on external situations
and/or material things. By opening up to
the opportunity of what is showing up and
stretching beyond the blame game, we can
create amazing results and transform the
“favor” of our life.
The frst ingredient is acceptance and
taking responsibility for everything
around you. Some of the pain and
sufering we experience comes from
how we relate and feel about our
current circumstance. What we resist
persists. As we let go of the resistance,
we can move beyond the problems and
atract lasting solutions.
Then, you need to add the next
ingredient: forgiveness. First, forgive
yourself for the story within that is
atracting the “problem”, then forgive the
others playing a part in the story. This
will prevent “sticking” and allow for the
drama to be released from your life.
Be sure to take the time to clear out
complaining, blaming and resenting.
Then gently bring in compassion,
sweetened with unconditional love. If you
just add love, but keep the judgment, you
won’t get the unconditional kind and the
recipe won’t turn out as well.
Now you’re ready to add the gratitude.
It’s easy to give thanks for all the blessings
but be sure to include the challenges and
crises so you can open up to receive the
gift of transformation. Gratitude heals and
opens the door of our hearts so we can feel
joy. Practicing gratitude during a time of
crisis can be a challenge but begin by asking
yourself: “What is right about me and my
life right now?” Don’t get caught up on
what “was” or “should”
be, because that will create
a feeling of loss and give a
stuck and heavy texture to
your life. This tends to cause
us to feel powerless to make
the changes and adjustments
needed to align with the best
part of ourselves, which is
crucial for Joy-Full results.
Remember: your emotions
are your own personal
GPS—Global Positioning System. They
act as a magnet to what you can atract in
your life and help you navigate towards
a positive, productive, joy-full place or a
negative, destructive, more painful place.
Challenges are part of life; you need to
accept them and face them, by taking
responsibility for your position. With
compassion, forgiveness, unconditional
love and gratitude, you can clear the old
stories taking you away from your joy
and transcend them. Then you can atract
positive solutions with ease. This recipe
takes practice and requires you to develop
the ability to be present. Try practicing
gentle breathing to allow for a deeper
inner connection.
As you strive to accept your present
situation as an expression of your intentions,
you can begin to align towards a more Joy-
Full life. Look for classes at JoyFull Yoga to
assist you to breathe in gratitude and live in
joy to live your best life now!
© Louise Lavergne, 2001-2013
Louise is an international inspirational speaker,
author, creator of JoyFull Yoga and JoyFull
living coaching. She owns JoyFull Yoga LLC in
Jacksonville where she ofers private sessions and
group classes. Email us your questions at info@
joyfull-yoga.com. www.joyfull-yoga.com 541-
899-0707. See ad this page.
Glassware,
Jewelry, Fine
Antiques, etc.
130 N. 4th St.,
Jacksonville
Open Daily 10am - 5pm
Like us on facebook
L.L.C.
Jacksonville Review Page 32 November 2013
The Paw Spa & Boutique
541-899-6811
Dog and Cat Grooming
175 East C Street, Jacksonville
thepawspaandboutique@aol.com
Open Tues-Fri 8:30am-4:00pm
Please call for an appointment
Tarina Hinds
Owner/Grooming
10+ years experience with all
breeds of dogs and cats
Providence Medford Medical Center Expands
Genetic Testing with Pilot Program
by Hillary Brown, Public Relations Coordinator
I
magine the medical equivalent of a crystal
ball allowing you insight into your chances of
developing the cancers that have haunted your
family. A new program being tested at Providence
Medford Medical Center is as close as you’ll get, with
science stepping in for magic.
While scientists have been mapping genes for years,
it was Angelina Jolie who put breast cancer genes on
the map. The Hollywood star made headlines when
she announced she’d chosen a double mastectomy after
learning she carried the genetic mutation making her
more susceptible to breast cancer.
Genetic screening for the so-called breast cancer genes,
BRCA 1 and BRCA 2, has created what some consider a
life-saving buzz. For those at risk of developing breast
cancer, it’s a potential window into the future, which
opens up medical, ethical and philosophical questions.
A positive test is also an indication a patient may be at
risk for other cancers. Until recently, there wasn’t a way
to fnd genetic mutations for those cancers but a new test
called the MyRisk panel is flling the gap.
“A lot of women would get genetic testing because
they already met the criteria because they already had
cancer,” said Providence Medford Medical Center nurse
navigator, Kate Newgard. “There’s a full host of people
we weren’t looking at who had a full list of family
history that was prety deep with cancers and they
wanted to know what their risk was.”
The MyRisk panel is being tested in hospitals
throughout the country. Providence Medford Medical
Center is the only hospital in Oregon ofering the tests.
The panel goes beyond breast cancer genes, looking for
25 mutations that could lead to other hereditary cancers
including uterine, colon and melanoma.
“It gives us really powerful information,” said
Newgard. “We see it as empowering, even though it
sounds really overwhelming.”
Only fve to 10 percent of cancers are identifed as
genetic, which means the expanded testing doesn’t
cover a majority of the cancers patients may encounter
in their lives. Newgard says she’s seen people on both
sides of the genetic testing issue—some who would
rather not know their risks and others who want to know
everything they can.
“It’s just pieces of information that help guide your life
into maybe some behaviors that may avoid some of these
cancers. That’s the botom line with it.”
Right now, the expanded genetic testing isn’t available
to everyone. Patients must be referred to the program
and must have a medical history exhibiting an increased
risk for genetic cancers. Still, health care providers like
Newgard see the tests as another key step in eliminating
a deadly disease.
“My hope is that women see it as empowering and see
it as useful decent information and use it to the best of
their ability.”
Those interested in genetic testing must frst get a referral
from their primary care doctor. The expanded genetic tests
are available at the Leila J. Eisenstein Breast Center which can
be reached at 541-732-6100.
Registration is now open for
the 2nd annual Holiday Hustle
5K run slated for Saturday,
December 14th, 2013.
Runners and families are
invited to enjoy historic
Jacksonville, the great outdoors
and a festive late afternoon
at Jacksonville Elementary as
Junior League of Jackson County
(JLOJC) kicks-of this frozen
fun 5K run. League members, community volunteers
and Santa in his red suit will be on hand
for runners and their families. Awards,
prizes and goodies will follow the race in
the Jacksonville Elementary gymnasium.
Registration fee is $20 per person.
Runners can pre-register online at
htps://secure.getmeregistered.com/
HolidayHustle5K.
Start time for the run is 5:00pm.
Last-minute registration will be held
from 4:00-4:30pm the day of the race
on a space available basis. The 5K
course winds through the beautiful
neighborhoods of Jacksonville.
Residents will have their festive holiday
decorations lit and there will be fun for
all. Walkers are encouraged to participate
but will not be
timed for medals.
All runners are
encouraged to put
on their festive
holiday gear from
striped Christmas
socks to red tutus
and reindeer
antlers, but please
dress appropriately. The frozen fun run will be held
snow, rain or shine. All proceeds will directly beneft
an impactful community program created
by Junior League called the Rogue Power
Pack (RPP) program. The Rogue Power
Packs provides weekend food packages
to chronically hungry elementary school
students from low-income households who
are at risk of hunger over the weekend
when free school meals are unavailable.
Junior League of Jackson County is
an organization of women commited
to promoting voluntarism, developing
the potential of women and improving
communities through the efective action
and leadership of trained volunteers.
For more information, please contact the
Race Director at 541-944-9414 or by email at
JLHolidayHustle@gmail.com.
Junior League Holiday Hustle 5K Run
at Jacksonville Elementary School
The Frozen Fun Run hosted by Junior League of Jackson County
will raise funds for Critically Hungry Children
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th
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JacksonvilleReview.com Page 33 November 2013
Soul Matters
by Kate Ingram, M.A.
Betwixt and Between
M
y eggs have all hatched. This
is what I thought last week
as I sat on the porch in the
morning, my children back in school.
I thought about them being gone, and
about my book being fnished, and my
mother entering the last chapter of her
life, and about how life-as-I’ve-known-
it seems to be dissolving through my
fngers. I sat and I thought about a lot of
things that have to
do with the tenuous
and terrifying time
between the ending
of one thing and the
beginning of another.
Fall always stirs up
the feeling of being between something
and something else. It’s the harvest time,
when we gather what we've sown and
leave the felds fallow for the winter.
It’s my favorite season in many ways,
but it’s also sweetly melancholic. Unlike
spring, which heralds new beginnings,
fall initiates us into endings: the end
of warmth and the voluptuousness of
days. It’s potency lies in being a visceral
reminder of the passage of all things.
Fall places us, willingly or not, in an
in-between place, a place Tibetans call
“bardo.”
“Bardo” means “intermediate state,”
or “transitional state.” It refers to the
period of time between lives on earth.
More metaphorically, it describes those
times when our usual way of life becomes
suspended, as, for example, during a
serious illness, or loss. The empty nest
is a bardo state. Cancer is a bardo state.
Divorce and mourning are bardo states.
Anytime your identity is subjected to
radical change, you are in the bardos.
Being in-between undermines our
imagined sense of stability. Traveling
the bardos is a perilous journey into the
unknown. The time between leaving one
identity and embodying another can be
fraught with anxiety and impatience. Our
tendency is to try to fght and claw our
way out of this in-between place, to “do”
something to move things along (or back)
to regain our balance. This is actually a
form of resistance, and resistance, as they
say, is futile. It is resistance that creates our
sufering and anxiety, not change itself.
I can resist my children’s growing up,
and my mother's decline, and my own.
I can hate it and mourn the too-quick
passage of time, lamenting what is lost,
worrying about the future, and I often
do, which is foolish. It serves nothing to
rail against what is; it’s not graceful or
natural or even helpful. And the truth
is, the in-between is as real a place as
what came before or what will follow.
It’s not nothing. In fact, it’s the opposite
of nothing: it’s everything. The real in-
between time is what lies between our
birth and our death. The in-between time
is Life. Sometimes, like in the fall, we just
become more aware of that fact.
When you fnd yourself in-between, in
the bardos, you are, in fact, in a place of
pure potentiality, where the old limitations
are gone and the new paradigm is not
yet formed. This means total possibility.
Anything could happen (and it frequently
does, as Dr. Seuss would say). And while
such spaciousness can be terrifying (I might
die, or be alone, or
wind up living in a
box on the sidewalk),
it can just as easily
be electrifying. I
might become a huge
literary success, get
that house in Santa Fe that I always dreamed
about, and be surrounded by gorgeous
grandchildren.
The point is that surrendering to the in-
between time keeps this potential space
open, and the more open the space, the
deeper and more expansive the emerging
reality can become. It is in the space
in-between that we mourn and dream.
“Surrender is the intersection between
acceptance and change.”
Surrender is the key to traversing the
bardos: surrender the fear and longing,
surrender the struggle, and just be who
and where you are. Spiritual surrender
doesn’t mean you give up mindlessly,
or deny your feelings; it simply means
that you relinquish your inner resistance
to what is. You don’t have to like it,
but neither do you need to fght it. This
only wastes precious energy on fruitless
failing. Spiritual surrender is the
equivalent of aikido, a word that means
“way of adapting the spirit.” Rather than
meeting the onslaught with force, you
allow the force to move past you. The
skillful means to this is surrender.
Simply allowing yourself to sit quietly
in the in-between times allows you to
make meaning of what has passed, and
to prepare for what is coming. Something
is gone. Something new is arriving. Lean
into that space. There is no ending that
does not usher in a beginning.
Fall is here. My book is done. My
children are growing. My mother is
failing. What will happen next? Where
will it all go? I have no idea. So I sit and
repeat to myself the litle mantra I created
for the in-between time—another word,
really, for all the time.
I am open and willing to receive.
I am open, and willing to let go.
I am open to wonder, not needing to know.
KATE INGRAM, M.A., is a writer,
therapist and soul coach. Her frst book,
Washing the Bones: A Memoir of Love,
Loss, and Transformation, was published
in October and is available at Amazon.com,
Terra Firma in Jacksonville, or on her website,
www.katherineingram.com. See ad this page.
(541) 846-6176 www.slaglecreek.com
SLAGLE CREEK VINEYARDS
Slagle Creek wines have consistently earned top honors in such regional and international competitions
as the San Francisco Chronicle Wine Competition, Finger Lakes International Wine Competition, Newport
Seafood and Wine Festival, Lone Star International Wine Competition. Recently we became Multi-Award
winners in Savor the Northwest Wine Awards and Multi-Award winners at the World of Wine Competition.
New Wines released this year are our new 2011 Syrah, and 2011 Port, made from the Syrah grape.
Our new Claret just won a Silver Medal at the Southern Oregon World of Wine along with the 2011 Port.
Wines sell out quickly, so check our website often for our current wine selection.
SOUTHERN OREGON
–EST. 1980–
Jacksonville Review Page 34 November 2013
To us, our patients are like family. We’ve
seen families through generations of best
friends. We believe in a total wellness
approach to veterinary care which helps our
patients live long, healthy lives. A blend of
compassionate care and the use of the latest
medical technology, all at an affordable
price, makes Jacksonville Veterinary Hospital
the best choice for your pet’s care.
937 N. 5th St. | Jacksonville
541.899.1081 | www.jvillevet.com
• Preventitve Care
• Surgery
• Obedience
Training
• Boarding
• Spay/Neuter
• House Calls
• Emergency
Services
• And many more!
Ask about our online Pet Portal!
Providing compassionate
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Paws for Thought by Dr. Tami Rogers
Dr. Rogers can be reached at the Jacksonville Veterinary Hospital
at 541-899-1081 or jvhospital@qwestofce.net. See ad this page.
Marty's Musings by Marty Parker
High quality
toys from
around the
world for the
young and
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Mon.-Sat. 10-5 • Sun. 12-4
180 W. California St. • Jacksonville, Oregon
541-899-7421
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541-899-7421 • www.schefels.com
DONATE
www.SanctuaryOne.org
©

D
A
N
A

F
E
A
G
I
N
Don't forget to donate to SOHS, Sanctuary One or Friends
of the Animal Shelter and tell them Annie and Marty-the-cat
sent you!
H
i there—
Marty, the
C.A.T. here!
Since November is the
month of Thanksgiving,
I thought I’d chime-in
and give public thanks
for being a CAT. I also
thought I could thank
the Review readers by
sharing some of my
important and fulflling life philosophies. Perhaps some
of these could transcend and even beneft you two-
legged beings out there!
• Be alert
• Walk confdently with your tail held high
(a litle swish is good, too)
• When something is important, be willing to scratch
and claw to make a point
• When it’s time to relax—do it well
• Tolerate the DOG
• Eat well and often
• Play hard—even if it’s with an old piece of tissue
paper
• Participate—especially in making the bed or
unpacking boxes
• Find unique places to lie and survey your domain
(the higher the beter)
• Always lick the ice cream of the plate
• Use the element of surprise to jump out and scare
people
• Hide-out whenever possible (under bushes, under
chairs, behind the TV, etc.)
• Make it hard to have your nails trimmed, but easy to
be brushed
• When happy, purr loudly
• Enjoy the sunshine and roll in the dirt
• A litle nuzzling never hurt anyone
• Enjoy our Small Town with Big Atmosphere
F
all is ofcially here and
the holidays are fast-
approaching. The holiday
season seems to make everything
brighter and despite the colder
weather brings out a warmth we
don’t often feel the rest of the
year. I often fnd myself overwhelmed by the gifts in my
life and despite some negativity that normal life brings,
I truly am blessed. Of course, with this self-refection,
comes the realization that there are many who are less
fortunate, leaving me searching for ways to help.
There are many organizations, human and animal-
centric that look to the general public for donations
during this time of the year. So, I would like to invite
you to join our clinic in supporting what we feel are two
very worthy organizations this holiday season! We are
holding a Holiday pet food and supply drive for the
Jackson County Animal Care and Control Center and
c.a.T.s (commited alliance to strays). We did this
last year and thanks to the generosity of our clients, we
are happy to report that we were able to collect over 500
pounds of food. Numerous blankets, beds, collars, ofce
supplies, and more were also collected!
The J.C.A.C. and C.A.T.S provide care to thousands of
animals every year. Though they are often over capacity,
they rarely turn animals away, and they provide
excellent care for the animals in their shelter. They
depend on fees and charges generated by their programs
(license fees, shelter-related charges, adoption fees,
donations, etc) for daily operation. Both organizations
depend greatly on volunteer support and on the fnancial
support of donated funds and supplies.
So, how can you help? Below is a list of supplies that
both organizations are in constant need of. Add a few
of them to your grocery list the next time you go, go
through your cupboards, clean out your ofce, and dig
through your garage. Then, bring it all by our clinic
(Jacksonville Veterinary Hospital, 937 N 5th St. here in
Jacksonville) and we will gladly get it to them for you!
• Pet food—both canned/dry for cats and dogs and
puppies and kitens
• Old towels and rags for cleaning/bathing the animals
• Old blankets, rugs, and other bedding for the dogs
and cats
• Washable toys for the pets to help ease the stress of
kennel life
• Bleach, laundry detergent, and dish soap
• Pet shampoos, grooming supplies, and clippers
• Clay cat liter
• Small cat liter pans
• Food bowls for both dogs and cats
• Spout type watering cans for flling water bowls
• Collars and leashes
• Spiral Notebooks
• Copy Paper
Of course another big item that is not on that list
is MONEY! A check made out to Jackson County
Animal Care and Control or C.A.T.S can then be used
to purchase supplies as needed or can be applied
directly to the medical fund which is used to care
for the medical needs of animals that fnd their way
to the shelter (Please specify in the memo portion of
your check). For those of us that are unable to donate
supplies or funds, time is also a valuable resource. Give
the gift of your time and volunteer!
During the holiday season, and all year long, it is
critical for us to share… so, Dig Deep into those pockets!
Also, remember to take a moment and give thanks for
the gifts that surround you… I hope you all have a very
wonderful holiday season!
Dig Deep
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 35 November 2013
N�� V�������� O���������� • 1�� S������� • 1 – 2 PM
adopt  volunteer  foster  donate
www.fotas.org . facebook.com/fotas . 541.944.2021
FOTAS volunteers work hand‐in‐hand with the Jackson County Animal Shelter to
help adoptable surrendered and stray animals nd loving homes.
Help us by adop�ng, volunteering, fostering and dona�ng.
FOTAS is a 501(c)3. PO Box 92, Ashland, OR 97520
JACKSON COUNTY
ANIMAL SHELTER
5595 S Pacic Hwy 99
between Talent & Phoenix 
Mon – Fri, 11 AM to 4 PM
Sat & Sun, Noon to 4 PM
LOW-COST VACCINATIONS
3
rd
Saturday, 11 AM – 1 PM
$10/shot for cats & dogs • CASH ONLY
Nail clipping • $5
Get your dog’s rabies shot & license
all in one quick trip!
WAGGIN’ TALES BOOK SALE
Last Saturday of the Month, Noon – 4 PM
$5 for a bag of books!
PET FASHION SHOW
Saturday, November 9, 6 pm
$5 entry fee  benefits FOTAS
PET COUNTRY, MEDFORD
Dr. Julie Tavares
541-761-6163
Schedule an
appointment online at:
www.HomePetVet.net
It’s what’s inside
that counts...
All our foods contain
NO corn, wheat, soy or
by-products.
(541) 857-5000
In Winco Shopping Center, just behind Jack In The Box
roguevalleypet.com
• Locally owned
• Featuring made in
Oregon & USA
• Raw diets
®
Memories of Viktoria Carstens
A Danish citizen who recently interned for
Sanctuary One at Double Oak Farm
I
arrived from Denmark with a
backpack flled with passion for
animals and the earth, and a mind
ready to learn. I arrived with a dream to
one day open my own
care-farm so when
I found out about
Sanctuary One, I knew
I had to visit. I have
always dreamed of a
place where animals
can live happily and
in no fear of being
mistreated, a place
where pigs can feel the
dirt on their noses and
the sun on their backs,
a place where animals,
people and the earth
work together to create
a peaceful, simple
environment for the
beneft of all.
I have so many
wonderful memories of my visit.
During my stay I met Krypto, a
young pit-bull cross, who became my
constant companion. I got the amazing
opportunity to work with him and help
bring out a balanced, happy dog that
would be more suitable for adoption. A
gorgeous young dog he was with one
brown and one blue eye. After just a
few days of quality time, Krypto started
showing his true colors; one of a loving,
fun and loyal dog.
The mornings were cool and foggy,
mid-days hot and dry and the evenings
warm and welcoming. Walking into the
sweet-smelling barn in early morning,
Chrissy, the oldest mare, would meet
me with a "good morning, where’s my
breakfast?" whinny. Tim, the Angora goat,
insisted on a morning cheek rub before
joining the herd in the pasture to graze
peacefully for another
day. No one was forgoten
in the daily routine; old,
young, weak or energetic
they are all valued and
cared for.
I’ll remember the walks
in the pasture surrounded
by animals, listening
to the goats footfall on
the ground and the pigs
satisfed oinks as they lay
down for a belly rub. I’ll
remember the gardens and
the amazingly plentiful
vegetables and how well
they thrived on organic
composted soil. I won’t
forget what I learned about
permaculture-inspired
farming practices, how to sheet mulch,
how to create hot compost, and many
new ways for preparing produce fresh
from the garden.
During my stay at Sanctuary One, every
day was diferent. There were many hours
of watering and tending the gardens,
helping with tours and exercising and
socializing the animals. Meeting the needs
of almost 80 diferent animals is a full
time job and the people who do it every
day really make a diference.
It was so inspirational to watch the
people there interact with the animals and
the gardens. I can’t wait to go back.
Viktoria Carstens
October 2013
Viktoria and Krypto
Looking Back on a Great Year
by Dee Perez, Grant Writer, Dogs for the Deaf Inc.
D
ogs for the Deaf was established
in the Applegate Valley in 1977.
Over the last 35+ years, Dogs for
the Deaf has grown from one man’s dream
to a national nonproft organization that
has placed hundreds of dogs with people
living with hearing loss—all from right
here in Southern Oregon.
As we look back on our
accomplishments from last year, we are
so pleased with what we’ve accomplished
and where we are headed. Since January
2013, Dogs for the Deaf
has rescued 43 dogs from
shelters throughout the
northwest United States.
Once rescued and brought
to our facilities in Central
Point, dogs go through
intensive professional
training for about six
months before they are
ready to be certifed as
assistance dogs. So far this
year, Dogs for the Deaf
has placed nine certifed
assistance dogs with
people all around the U.S.
We currently have 15 dogs
in training. Our goal over
the next couple of years is
to rescue even more dogs,
and to place 50 certifed assistance dogs
per year. We are on track to meet that
goal.
In an efort to educate people about our
important work, we also held a number
of outreach events around the nation,
including events in Portland, New York
and Los Angeles. Our 22nd Annual
Dog Walk was held in Jacksonville in
June. Dog Walk is a chance for Dogs
for the Deaf to share our work with the
community, and have a day of fun for
people and dogs alike. This is one of
our favorite events, brings the whole
community together and allows us to see
our many local friends and supporters.
Dogs for the Deaf relies on the hard
work and support of approximately 100
volunteers to help us do our work. From
ambassadors who share the mission and
story of Dogs for the Deaf with groups in
every state, to ofce workers, docents and
our kennel volunteers who help care for
our dogs, these tireless folks have donated
nearly 6,000 hours to helping carry out
the work of Dogs for the Deaf.
We could not carry out our work
without the generosity and support of so
many who believe in our work. Dogs for
the Deaf is completely funded through
donations, grants
and other forms of
giving. We receive
no government
funding, and we
don’t sell assistance
dogs, so we rely on
donor support. We’ve
enjoyed a year of
growing fnancial
support, with gifts in
the form of bequests
and estate planning
growing by 62%.
Donations from
individuals have
grown by 71.4%.
In April, the
NonProft Times
rated Dogs for the
Deaf among the 50 Best Nonprofts
to Work for 2013. In a nationwide
examination comparing key factors in
employee satisfaction such as leadership
and planning, corporate culture and
communications, role satisfaction,
work environment, relationship with
supervisor, training and development,
pay and benefts, and overall employee
engagement, Dogs for the Deaf placed
40th overall and 14th for organizations
with 15-49 employees. This is a
remarkable accomplishment, of which
we are very proud.
So far, 2013 has been an amazing year,
and we look forward to even bigger and
beter thing to come! Thank you, Southern
Oregon, for being a part of our story.
Jacksonville Review Page 36 November 2013
• Mayor Paul Becker
• Erika Bishop
• Donna Briggs
• Kyleen Brodie
• Hillary Brown
• Viktoria Carstens
• Elizabeth Dancer
• Dr. Julie Danielson
• Lona Dillard
• Paula & Terry
Erdmann
• Graham Farran
• Kay Faught
• Alyson Fowler
• Joelle Graves
• Randall Grealish
• Adam Haynes
• Dr. Kerri Hecox
• Michelle Hensman
• Tony Hess
• Chief Devin Hull
• Kate Ingram
• Constance Jesser
• Dr. Jeff Judkins
• Michael Kell
• Dr. Daniel Khalil
• Sara King Cole
• Louise Lavergne
• Anne McAlpin
• Gates McKibbin
• Della Merrill
• Dee Perez
• Kelly Polden
• Joy Rogalla
• Dr. Tami Rogers
• Karen Rycheck
• Pam Sasseen
• Dirk Siedlecki
• Kathy Tiller
• Cheryl von Tress
• Hannah West
• Dave & Gaye Wilson

• Tom Davis
• Jym Duane
• David Gibb
• Ken Gregg
• Thom Gregg
• Carolyn Kingsnorth
• Larry Smith
THANK YOU to our Contributors!
Photographers
Have an idea or suggestion for the Review?
For print: Whit at 541-899-9500 or whitman@jacksonvillereview.com.
For website or kiosk: Jo at 541-227-8011 or jo@jacksonvillereview.com
The Cause of all Illness?
by Dr. Jeff Judkins, Animalkind Veterinary Clinic
541-973-2101
3960 W Main Street • Medford
Monday-Friday: 7:30am to 6:00pm
Saturday: Noon to 5pm
Full, Half & Multiple Day Rates
www.houseofpawsoregon.com
We are located just outside Jacksonville!
(Across from White’s Country Farm)
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Clip this ad for $5 off
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full day of Day Care!
*limit one coupon per customer
O
kay, so maybe not the cause of
ALL illness, but I would argue
that this problem is the root of
the majority of the chronic diseases that
afict humans and domesticated animals
alike in our modern society. What one
factor could cause such widespread
health problems? And if it’s so pervasive,
why isn't more being done about it?
Just in the last year alone, I’ve had four
cats brought into my clinic diagnosed
with diabetes. Three of these cats were
on insulin injections to control their
blood sugar level. Within six months of
their initial visits, all four cats were free of
diabetes. I saw a 10-year-old Beagle that
had been diagnosed with early Cushings
syndrome, a disease in which the adrenal
glands produce excess cortisol. Three
months later, the condition was resolved.
A client’s quarter horse had been having
recurrent episodes of laminitis, a painful
and potentially crippling disorder of
horse’s feet. Six months later, the horse was
completely sound with no hoof problems.
The one common treatment in all
these cases: A drastic reduction in the
percentage of carbohydrates in the
animals' diets. Sounds simple, right?
Well, it is, but it’s not always easy. Most
commercial pet foods that are commonly
available are quite high in such
carbohydrates as rice, corn and potatoes.
Much of the fresh green pastures that
horses graze on are actually too high in
sugar. And certainly much of the foods
that we humans love to eat are high in
carbs. But who wants to give up their
pizza and beer?
All grains and starches consumed by
humans and animals sugar very quickly.
Once these sugars enter the bloodstream,
insulin is released from the pancreas to
get the sugar into the body's cells for
fuel. This is all well and good, but with
prolonged elevations in blood sugars
resulting from diets too high in carbs,
cells start to get overloaded. Many of the
cells in the body protect themselves by
making it harder to absorb glucose. This
is what is known as insulin resistance
(IR). Other types of cells are unable to
resist the efects of insulin, and become
toxic from the sugar overload. The
exact mechanisms are not completely
understood, but the adverse health efects
of long-standing IR are insidious and
widespread. The resulting condition is
one of chronic infammation and toxicity.
Obesity, and all its related health
problems, is one common result of
long-standing insulin resistance, but not
all individuals with IR are overweight.
Other results are type 2 diabetes, high
blood pressure and heart disease, and are
epidemic in modern human populations.
Many of the chronic, recurring diseases
that I see in my patients such as arthritis,
infammatory bowel disease, skin
allergies, ear infections, feline urinary
tract disease and even cancer are caused
in part by IR. This is why I discuss
nutrition a length with my clients.
This also explains the trend toward no-
grain and low-carb diets in commercial
pet foods. Informed horse owners know
to limit their animals’ access to grass
pasture at certain times of the year, and
have eliminated the practice of feeding
grain-based "sweet feed."
Exercise is another large factor in IR,
but is a topic for another article. Sufce
it to say that the importance of adequate
exercise for animals and humans alike
should be clear to anyone with even most
basic understanding of health. It’s also
clear that prevention and management
of disease through nutrition is generally
preferable to treating the symptoms
of disease with pharmaceutical drugs.
Modern medicine's focus on drugs and
surgery is one of the reasons nutrition
is not appreciated more in our society.
Hippocrates, the ancient Greek physician
knew more than most of his modern
counterparts when he said, "Let food be
thy medicine and medicine be thy food.”
Dr. Jefrey Judkins is the owner of
Animalkind Holistic Veterinary Clinic in
Historic Jacksonville. See ad this page.
Next Medford Food Project
Jacksonville Pickup Day: Saturday, December 14
th
Please contact Jerrine Rowley at 541-702-2223 or
Faye Haynes at 541-324-1298 if you have any questions or wish to
become involved with the Food Project in Jacksonville!
(Always the 2nd Saturday of even-numbered months.)
130 N. 5th Street, Jacksonville • 541-899-2977
Wednesday-Saturday
7:00am-2:00pm
HOURS
Sunday 7:00am-1:00pm
Breakfast Only All Day
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Pencil Drawing Class
Beginning Watercolor Painting Class
For more information, please contact
toniandes@charter.net
Beginning & Advanced students welcome!
Learn to Paint or Draw!
You can do it!
Y
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JacksonvilleReview.com Page 37 November 2013
If you are currently an Online Bill Pay or Auto-Pay customer,
you have already been entered!
Learn more at www.roguedisposal.com
*Must be 18 years or older. No purchase required. Ends 12/31/13.
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It’s the green way to pay!
Sign Up for Online Bill Pay
or Auto-Pay
and You Will Be Entered to
Win Red Robin or Lava Lanes
Gift Cards!
one week only
Open to the public. AAA membership not required.
*Some restrictions apply. See store for details.
save 10%
December 2nd - 6th
Stop by the AAA Travel Store for holiday
shopping and special discounts on
everything for the traveler. Save 10%* off
AAA prices this week only!
December 4th
holiday open house
with Anne McAlpin
9am - 5pm
Join the festivities as travel and packing expert,
Anne McAlpin, along with the AAA team will
help you discover unique gifts for this holiday
season. Enjoy refreshments, prizes and more!
AAA Medford Service center
1777 E Barnett Rd. • Medford, OR
541-779-7170
Since traveling
over the holidays
can be stressful,
here are some tips to
help make your next
trip through airport
security a breeze.
The TSA Pre-
check and Global
Entry Program—If you are tired of
standing in long airport security lines,
consider applying for one of these
“trusted traveler programs.” Once
approved, you’ll receive expedited
screening benefts at participating
airports. The fees are
approximately $85+ for
fve years... this could
be the best money
you've ever spent on
travel! (Find additional
information at www.
tsa.gov.)
TSA Free Travel
App—If you fnd
yourself asking, “Can I bring my _____
through the security checkpoint?” this
travel “app” enables you to learn what
you can and can't bring through the
checkpoint. The app gives
you the results including
whether or not the item
can be carried-on, put in
checked baggage, or if it's
not permited for plane
travel.
3-1-1 for Carry-on-
Liquids—The abbreviation
TSA doesn’t need to stand
for, "Take Stuf Away!”
Remember, you are only
allowed one quart-sized
bag of liquids in your
carry-on bag, and each item
must be 3.4 oz or smaller
(larger liquids can be packed in checked
bags). Medications and baby formula are
allowed in quantities exceeding 3.4 oz.
Medical Conditions—At the beginning
of the checkpoint process, be sure to
notify security personnel about your
medical condition and/or if you need
special assistance during screening. And
remember, you may ask for a private
screening area at any time. And here’s
more good news if you’re age 75+… now
you don't have to take your shoes of
going through security!
Here are two of my favorite security-
friendly travel products for 2013:
Baggallini Trio
Baggs—This is my new
favorite travel essential
– a set of three clear-
zippered bags that make
staying organized for
security a snap. And, the
neon trim makes them
easy to spot in your bag.
Pack travel itineraries
and magazines in the large bag,
electronics and adapters in the medium
bag and medications in the small bag.
The possibilities are endless. Available
at AAA Travel Stores
scotevest Travel vest—
This streamlined vest holds so
much, you'll feel like you have
an extra carry-on bag with
you! With 24 hidden pockets,
you can just take it of and
send it through the X-ray with
all your gear stored safely
inside. It’s lightweight, water
and stain-resistant and is just
perfect for any trip. Available
in both men and women's
styles at AAA Travel Stores.
See AAA ad this page.
2013 Holiday Travel Tips
by Jacksonville-Based Travel Expert, Anne McAlpin
Jacksonville Review Page 38 November 2013



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“Wine Country the way
it should be”- Sunset Magazine
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Sunday, Nov 24 11am - 5pm
Enjoy 18 wineries, appetizers, tastings
and fun at this self-paced wine tour event.
Purchase your tickets online at
www.applegatewinetrail.com
Tickets are $39 each and include a
commemorative Wine Trail wine glass.
18 wineries in the Applegate participate
in this fun, self-guided tour. You pick your
starting location, but you’re free to visit
any number of the wineries on the Trail.
Each winery will offer both an appetizer
and a wine for tasting. This event also
provides a great opportunity to stock up
on holiday wines for gifts or parties. We
encourage you to bring your friends,
designate a driver and enjoy this great
event. Its also the perfect opportunity to
explore new wineries that you’ve never
been to before!
You’re Invited!
Here’s a sampling of what the wineries poured and
paired at our Spring event. Check our website for
Fall pairings coming soon!
Barrel Tasting: 2008 Pinot Noir
Featured Wine: 2007 Pinot Noir
Paired with Oregon Chanterelle Chicken Marsala with Pancetta & Saffron Rice
Barrel Tasting: 2011 Syrah
Featured Wine: “Black Beauty” Tempranillo
Paired with Buffalo Chicken Dip
Barrel Tasting: 2011 Syrah
Featured Wine: 2009 Syrah 80
Paired with Crostini with Basil Pesto
Barrel Tasting: 2008 Merlot
Featured Wine: 2006 Cabernet Franc
Paired with Ginger-Carrot Bisque
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 39 November 2013
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580 Blackstone Alley
Jacksonville, Oregon
(541) 899-2760
Chiropractic techniques can be used to treat a range of
conditions. Call to fnd out how we can help, today!
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License #12769
Specializing in Therapeutic Massage
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With a giant selection of toys, books, puzzles, candies,
specialty foods, and much more!
Introducing Grange Co-op’s
Grants Pass | Ashland | Central Point | Klamath Falls
Pet Country | South Medford | White City
www.grangecoop.com
BRAND
Special savings throughout the store!
Toyland
Specialty
Foods
Holiday Gift Shop
Shop online at www.grangecoop.com
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Jacksonville Review Page 40 November 2013
Bigham Knoll
phone: 541-899-9665
www.bighamknoll.com
Schoolhaus Brewhaus
phone: 541-899-1000
www.thebrewhaus.com
In Historic Jacksonville, Oregon
Nobody does celebrations like the
Germans. Bigham Knoll and
the Schoolhaus Brewhaus keep
the spirit alive. With the
holidays soon to be
here, book
your special
events now!
For more information please contact:
More than just Great Coffee . . .
Come experience why Pony Espresso is Jacksonville’s favorite
coffeehouse! Keeping it local . . .
• Jacksonville’s only drive-up window! Call ahead for quick pick up!
• Introducing: Pastry chef with over 20 years experience!
• Famous Britt Boxes fast!! Call ahead for easy drive-thru pick-up.
Beer and wine now available for take-out!
• Proudly serving award-winning Allann Bros. Coffee. An Oregon
tradition since 1972!
• Unique micro-draft beer and local wines. Mimosas!
• Full Breakfast and Lunch menu: Full-time chef. Everything from
scratch!
• Flatbreads, Panini, Wraps, Soups, Dressings, Sauces, Salsa…
• Gorgeous shaded deck seating!
• Our Baristas have an average of 5 years of experience and can’t
wait to serve you!
Like us on Facebook today for all the news, specials, and updates.
The Complete Coffeehouse
Celebrating 18 Years!
545 N. 5th St. | Jacksonville www.ponyespressojville.com
Open everyday until 6pm
541-899-3757