AMERICANS

REFORM
for
WASHINGTON, DC OCTOBER 2013
DEAR AMERICANS FOR REFORM:
Welcome to Washington, DC, and thank you for joining us as we urge Congress to take action now to pass
comprehensive immigration reform.
Americans for Reform is a group made up of more than 300 leaders from over 50 congressional districts across
the country, and together, you have the opportunity to make a real impact. Conservative leadership and support for
immigration reform has been a critical part of the debate in communities nationwide. This week, leaders on Capitol
Hill will hear your message loud and clear.
While you are in Washington, you will have the opportunity to meet with members of Congress and their staff,
network with conservative leaders, engage with media, and mobilize your own communities through digital
campaigns. We encourage each of you to share your unique story about why immigration reform is important to
you and your community with everyone that you meet in the nation’s capital.
T|roug|out t|is briefng book, you will fnd key nessage points, statistics and ot|er inportant infornation to |elp
you nake your case. You will also fnd an agenda and staff contacts to |elp answer w|atever questions you |ave.
We hope you will reach out to our team members if you need anything during your visit and when you return home.
T|e fg|t for innigration reforn |as been long and grueling, but we believe t|at your voices are t|e ones t|at
Washington’s leaders need to hear now. You represent a national coalition of leaders from business, faith, law
enforcement and government. While each of you offers a different perspective, there is a strong consensus on the
need to fx a broken innigration systen t|at is |urting our econony, our fait| and our security every day. T|at is
why your collective participation this week is so powerful.
Thank you for your time, your perspective and your commitment to this cause.
Sincerely,
AMERICANS
REFORM
for
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PARTNERSHIP FOR A NEW AMERICAN ECONOMY BIBLES, BADGES AND BUSINESS FWD.US U.S. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
Anerican Farn Bureau Federation · Anericans for Tax Peforn · Bipartisan Policy Center · Bread for t|e World
C|ristian Connunity Developnent Association · Consuner Electronics Association · Engine Advocacy
Et|ics & Peligious Liberty Connission of t|e Sout|ern Baptist Convention · ¦nnigrationWorks USA · Liberty Counsel Action
Marriott ¦nternational · Microsoft · McDonalds National Association of Evangelicals · National Association of Manufacturers
National Hispanic C|ristian Leaders|ip Conference · National Latino Evangelical Coalition · National Pestaurant Association
Pepublicans for ¦nnigration Peforn · So|ourners · Tec|Net · US Conference of Cat|olic Bis|ops · US Travel Association
Walnart · Western Crowers Association · World Pelief
Thank you to all of the organizations & individuals
who helped support Americans for Reform.
Hosts
Sponsors
Conveners
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
WELCOME
PAGE 1
THANK YOU TO SPONSORS
PAGE 2
AMERICANS FOR REFORM AGENDA
PAGE 4
NAVIGATING WASHINGTON, DC
PAGE 6
THE CRITICAL NEED FOR IMMIGRATION REFORM
PAGE 7
IMMIGRATION BY THE ISSUES
PAGE 9
IMMIGRATION BY THE NUMBERS
PAGE 14
IMMIGRATION IN FAITH, FAMILIES AND COMMUNITIES
PAGE 15
LEGISLATION BRIEF
PAGE 16
SPEAKERS
PAGE 19
HOST ORGANIZATIONS
PAGE 23
MEDIA COVERAGE
PAGE 25
ENGAGE ON SOCIAL MEDIA
PAGE 27
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AMERICANS FOR REFORM AGENDA
MONDAY, OCTOBER 28TH
Washington Marriott Wardman Park
5:00 PM Evening Reception, Dinner and Program

Emcee
Pandel l. Jo|nson, Senior Vice President of Labor, ¦nnigration & Enployee Benefts,
U.S. C|anber of Connerce
Benediction
Calen Carey, National Association of Evangelicals Vice President, Covernnent Pelations
Opening Comments
Arne M. Sorenson, CEC, Marriott ¦nternational
“Why We Are Here”
Dayana Torres, President, Dreaners of Virginia
0ef|||ç t|e P|ob|em
Clenn Haner, President and CEC, Arizona C|anber of Connerce
Sen. Jo|n E. Sununu, Forner Pepublican Senator, New Hanps|ire
|eç|s|at|ve 3tate of P|ay a|c Ta||||ç Po||ts
Danielle Burr, Principal, Navigators Clobal
Jeff Lungren, Director of Congressional and Public Affairs, U.S. C|anber of Connerce
8:00 PM 0|os||ç
Jereny Pobbins, Director, Partners|ip for a New Anerican Econony
~| oµt|o|a| t|me of µ|aye| w||| fo||ow t|e µ|oç|am at 8.15.
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AMERICANS FOR REFORM AGENDA (CONTINUED)
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29TH
U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Hall of Flags

8:00 AM 0µe|||ç |ema||s
P. Bruce Josten, Executive Vice President for Covernnent Affairs, U.S. C|anber of Connerce
|ema||s a|c l|t|ocuct|o| of c|ove| No|qu|st
Jo|n Feinblatt, C|air of Partners|ip for a New Anerican Econony
Panel 1, Moderated by Grover Norquist, Founder and President of Americans for Tax Reform:
Alberto P. Cardenas, C|air, Anerican Conservative Union
Dr. Barrett Duke, Vice President for Public Policy and Pesearc|, T|e Et|ics & Peligious
Liberty Connission of t|e Sout|ern Baptist Convention
Frank leating, President and CEC, Anerican Bankers Association
Sheriff Margaret Mims, Fresno County, California
Ton Nassif, President and CEC, Western Crowers Association
Panel 2: Immigration Reform: Implications for Growth, Budgets & Housing, Moderated by
Rebecca Tallent, Director of Immigration Policy, Bipartisan Policy Center:
leit| J. Fontenot, Visiting Sc|olar Brookings ¦nstitute and Forner Associate Director for
Healt| Prograns, Congressional Budget Cffce
Douglas HoltzEakin, President, Anerican Action Forun
Joel Prakken, Senior Managing Director and CoFounder, Macroecononic Advisers
l|t|ocuct|o| of |ev. cab||e| 3a|çue|o
Ali Noorani, Executive Director of t|e National ¦nnigration Forun
Peverend Cabriel Salguero, President, National Latino Evangelical Coalition
United States Capitol and Congressional Office Buildings
11:00 AM Meetings wit| Legislators
Sonoma Restaurant and Wine Bar
5:30PM Evening Cocktail Peception wit| Menbers of Congress and Staff
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NAVIGATING WASHINGTON, DC
1 | Washington Marriott Wardman Park 2CCC Woodley Poad Nort|west | Was|ington, DC 2CCC8 | (2C2) 3282CCC
2 | U.S. Chamber of Commerce 1C15 H Street Nort|west | Was|ington, DC 2CCC2 | (2C2) C59CCCC
3 | United States Capitol Building 1st St SE, | Was|ington, DC | (2C2) 22C8CCC
4 | Sonoma Restaurant and Wine Bar 223 Pennsylvania Ave SE | Was|ington, DC | (2C2) 5448C88
A digital version of this map can be found at: http://bit.ly/afrdcmap
If you have questions during your time in Washington, please contact
Chris Stineman at 515-707-2734 or email info@americans4reform.org.
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THE CRITICAL NEED FOR IMMIGRATION REFORM
IMMIGRATION REFORM WILL HELP THE US ECONOMY
· Immigration reform will increase GDP: T|e US stands to gain an estinated S1.5 trillion over 1C years fron
conpre|ensive innigration reforn, in addition to a SCC billion boost in federal tax collection.
IMMIGRATION REFORM WILL MEAN BETTER SECURITY
· ¦nnigration Peforn Will Allow Law Enforcenent Pesources to Focus on Serious Crininals and T|reats.
Border agents are focused on major transnational criminal organizations that bring drugs, guns and
violence to our streets, and yet must spend much of their resources apprehending and removing
innigrants w|o |ave no crininal background or affliation and are nerely seeking to work or reunite
with family. By allowing those who pose no threat to come forward, undergo background checks and be
identifed easily in t|e future, law enforcenent can use its linited resources to focus on t|e true t|reats and
the “unknowns” and further intelligence-driven and risk-based policing.
· Creating workable and adequate legal immigration channels for future immigrants to reunite with families
or fll econonic needs in t|e country will reduce t|e incentives for illegal entry and |elp our federal agencies
to secure the border.
IMMIGRATION REFORM UPHOLDS PRINCIPLES OF FAITH
· More t|an 175,CCC C|ristians |ave answered our call to `Pray for Peforn¨ and continue to learn about Cods
heart for the immigrant.Christians understand the importance of keeping families together and we support
legislation that reflects our Christian values.
· We must respect human dignity and family unity as part of reform. We can honor the rule of law, secure our
borders, and chart a just and compassionate way forward for the millions of undocumented immigrants
living peacefully and productively in our midst. That means including a tough but fair path toward earning
eventual citizenship. We are not for amnesty or any “special path,” but the opportunity for aspiring
Americans to earn legal status and eventual citizenship is essential.
IMMIGRANTS FILL WORKFORCE SHORTAGES
· Immìgrants are essentìaI tc ñIIìng the massìve shcrtfaII we face cf STEM wcrkers. Even if every Anerican
advanced degree STEM graduate gets a |ob after graduation, we will still face a pro|ected s|ortfall of nore
t|an 2CC,CCC advanceddegree STEM |obs by 2C18.
IMMIGRANTS ARE SUCCESSFUL ENTREPRENEURS AND INNOVATORS
· Immigrants are far more entrepreneurial than their native-born counterparts: ¦nnigrants are nore t|an
twice as likely as the native born to start a business.
· Immigrants have created many of America’s greatest companies: 4Cº of Fortune 5CC conpanies were
founded by an immigrant or a child of an immigrant.
· Immìgrant-cwned busìnesses make huge ccntrìbutìcns tc US CDP. ¦nnigrantowned businesses
generated nore t|an S775 billion in revenue for t|e econony in 2C11.
· Immigrants earned more than 3 out of every 4 patents (76%) t|at t|e top 1C US patentproducing
universities were awarded in 2011.
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THE CRITICAL NEED FOR IMMIGRATION REFORM
US IMMIGRATION LAWS HURT OUR ABILITY TO EDUCATE AND INNOVATE
· Just 7º of all visas are allocated for enploynent reasons in ot|er countries, its as nuc| as 5Cº. We
have no visa for entrepreneurs and our arbitrary country caps on visas have created years-long wait times
for citizens fron C|ina, ¦ndia and ot|ers.
IMMIGRANTS IN AGRICULTURE
· Many industries are entirely dependent on immigrant labor: Poug|ly 8Cº of all seasonal agriculture
workers in t|e US are foreignborn.
IMMIGRANTS AS YOUNG WORKERS
· As baby bccmers retìre, we are facìng a wcrkfcrce crìsìs. For 4C years, t|e nunber of seniors for every working
age adult |as been relatively constant at 2C seniors for every 1CC working age adults. Cver t|e next 2C years,
t|at nunber is set to spike by 7Cº. By 2C3C t|ere will be 34 seniors for every 1CC working age adults.
THE ECONOMIC CONTRIBUTION OF DREAMERS AND A PATH TO CITIZENSHIP
· Passing the DREAM Act will create jobs and boost economic activity by adding 1.4 nillion |obs and S329
billion to t|e econony over t|e next 2C years.
IMMIGRATION BY THE ISSUES
IMMIGRATION REFORM WILL HELP THE US ECONOMY
· ¦nnigration reforn will increase CDP. Currently, innigrants productivity raises CDP by about S37 billion
per year. T|e US stands to gain an estinated S1.5 trillion over 1C years fron conpre|ensive innigration
reforn, in addition to a SCC billion boost in federal tax collection.
· Newly legalized innigrants will |elp create |obs. Hig|er personal incone of newly legalized innigrant
workers would generate increased consuner spending enoug| to support 75C,CCC 9CC,CCC |obs |ere in
t|e US
· Cn average, innigrants inprove t|e living standards of Anericans. ¦nnigrants raise t|e overall standard of
living for American workers by boosting wages and lowering prices.
· Cne quarter of all USbased Nobel laureates over t|e past |alfcentury were foreignborn.
· As a result of innigration, 9Cº of nativeborn Anericans wit| at least a |ig|sc|ool diplona |ave seen
their wages increase.
· ¦n t|e long run, innigrants increase overall average incones. ¦n t|e long tern, innigrants do not reduce
native-born American employment rates, but they do increase productivity and hence average income.
· For every 1,CCC innigrants t|at arrive to a county, 27C USborn residents nove t|ere in response, and t|e
average innigrant w|o noves to a connunity raises t|e total value of |ousing wealt| by S92,8CC.
· Attracting 1CC,CCC new innigrants per year would preserve 4,CCC Anerican nanufacturing |obs and grow
US |ousing wealt| by S8C billion annually.
· T|e nore t|an 4C nillion innigrants are responsible for an estinated S3.7 trillion boost to |one equity.
IMMIGRATION REFORM WILL MEAN BETTER SECURITY
· ¦nnigration Peforn Will Allow Law Enforcenent Pesources to Focus on Serious Crininals and T|reats.
Border agents are focused on major transnational criminal organizations that bring drugs, guns and
violence to our streets, and yet must spend much of their resources apprehending and removing
innigrants w|o |ave no crininal background or affliation and are nerely seeking to work or reunite
with family. By allowing those who pose no threat to come forward, undergo background checks and be
identifed easily in t|e future, law enforcenent can use its linited resources to focus on t|e true t|reats and
the “unknowns” and further intelligence-driven and risk-based policing.
· Creating workable and adequate legal immigration channels for future immigrants to reunite with families
or fll econonic needs in t|e country will reduce t|e incentives for illegal entry and |elp our federal agencies
to secure the border.
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IMMIGRATION BY THE ISSUES (CONTINUED)
IMMIGRATION REFORM UPHOLDS PRINCIPLES OF FAITH
· T|e ¦nnigration Systen is Broken. T|e vast na|ority of undocunented innigrants stay in t|is country
for the opportunity to make a living and live the American dream like so many others. They would choose
to come legally if possible. But the current immigration system in most cases provides no avenues for
these individuals to immigrate legally, so in desperation to improve their situation they come without
authorization.
· We must respect human dignity and family unity as part of reform. We can honor the rule of law, secure our
borders, and chart a just and compassionate way forward for the millions of undocumented immigrants
living peacefully and productively in our midst. That means including a tough but fair path toward earning
eventual citizenship. We are not for amnesty or any “special path,” but the opportunity for aspiring
Americans to earn legal status and eventual citizenship is essential.
IMMIGRANTS AS ENTREPRENEURS
· ¦nnigrants are driving new business growt| in t|e US. 28º of all conpanies founded in t|e United States
in 2011 had immigrant founders.
· ¦nnigrants |ave created nany of Anericas greatest conpanies. 4Cº of Fortune 5CC conpanies were
founded by an immigrant or a child of an immigrant.
· ¦nnigrantowned businesses nake |uge contributions to US CDP. ¦nnigrant owned businesses generated
nore t|an S775 billion in revenue for t|e econony in 2C11.
· ¦nnigrantowned businesses are enploying nillions of workers. Cne in every 1C workers in t|is
country employed at a privately owned business is employed by a business owned by an immigrant.
· ¦nnigrants are far nore entrepreneurial t|an t|eir nativeborn counterparts. ¦nnigrants are nore t|an
twice as likely as the native-born to start a business.
· ¦nnigrants start a quarter of engineering and tec|nology conpanies founded in t|e US. 24.3º of t|e
engineering and tec|nology conpanies founded in t|e US between 2CCC2C12 |ad at least one founder
w|o was foreignborn. ¦n Silicon Valley, t|at rate was 43.9º. Nationwide, t|ese conpanies enployed
about 5CC,CCC workers and generated SC3 billion in sales in 2C12.
· Latino and Asian business owners create nillions of |obs. Businesses owned by Latinos and Asians
enploy 4.7 nillion workers a year.
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IMMIGRATION BY THE ISSUES (CONTINUED)
IMMIGRANTS FILL WORKFORCE SHORTAGES
· T|e US needs young workers. As baby booners retire, we are facing a workforce crisis w|ere we will |ave
a s|ortage of young workers. For 4C years, t|e nunber of seniors for every working age adult |as been
relatively constant at 2C seniors for every 1CC working age adults. Cver t|e next 2C years, |owever, t|at
nunber is set to spike by 7Cº, so t|at by 2C3C t|ere will be 34 seniors for every 1CC working age adults.
· ¦nnigrants are essential to flling t|e nassive s|ortfall we face of STEM workers. wit|out t|ese graduates,
we will cone now|ere close to fnding t|e nunber of science, tec|nology, engineering, and nat| (`STEM¨)
graduates our econony needs. Even if every Anerican advanceddegree STEM graduate gets a |ob after
graduation, we will still face a pro|ected s|ortfall of nore t|an 2CC,CCC advanceddegree STEM |obs by
2C18 t|at we cant fll.
· Jobs in STEM |ave grown t|ree tines as fast as |obs in t|e rest of t|e econony over t|e last 1C years.
· More t|an onefourt| of science and engineering frns already report diffculty |iring, and t|is is only going
to get worse because t|e nunber of Anericans studying STEM is growing by less t|an 1º per year.
· US Science and Engineering prograns are increasingly dependent on innigrants. ¦n recent years,
nearly |alf of t|e doctorates and nore t|an |alf of t|e post doctorates in science and engineering at US
universities were foreign.
· The rising educational attainment of native-born workers suggests that few of them are in the market for
t|e kinds of lessskilled |obs currently flled by H2A and H2B visa |olders. For exanple, `in 195C, nore
t|an |alf of U.S.born workers |ad not conpleted |ig| sc|ool. Today t|e fgure is less t|an 5 percent
compared to nearly one-quarter of immigrant workers.”
IMMIGRANTS AS INNOVATORS
· ¦nnigrants are inventing t|e products t|at will drive Anerican innovation over t|e coning generation. More
t|an 3 out of every 4 patents (7Cº) t|at t|e top 1C US patentproducing universities.
· T|ose inventions are growing our econony. T|e National Bureau of Econonic Pesearc| reports t|at
innigrant innovations over t|e decade between 199C2CCC contributed to growing US CDP by 2.4º.
· Yet t|e US s|are of international patents is decreasing. For t|e frst tine in recent years, in 2CC9 nonUS
innovators earned nore patents t|an Anericans. Contrast t|at to 1999, w|en US innovators earned 57º of
patents worldwide.
· Cur greatest scientists are disproportionately foreignborn. Cnefourt| of t|e Anericans w|o |ave won
Nobel Prizes |ave been innigrants, even t|oug| t|ey nake up |ust oneeig|t| of t|e population.
IMMIGRATION BY THE ISSUES (CONTINUED)
IMMIGRANTS IN AGRICULTURE
· Many industries are entirely dependent on innigrant labor. Poug|ly 8Cº of all seasonal agriculture workers
in t|e US are foreignborn.
· T|ere is a worker s|ortage on t|e farns. ¦n a PNAE study of Nort| Carolina, researc| s|ows t|at t|ere is
virtually no supply of native nanual farn laborers in Nort| Carolina. ¦n 2C11, wit| C,5CC available farn |obs
in t|e state, only 2C8 of t|e nearly 5CC,CCC unenployed Nort| Carolinians applied for t|ese |obs. More t|an
9Cº (245 people) of t|ose applying were |ired, but |ust 1C3 s|owed up for t|e frst day of work. Cnly seven
native workers conpleted t|e entire growing season, flling only onetent| of 1of t|e open farn |obs.
· No natter |ow bad t|e econony becones, native workers still do not take farn |obs. ¦n t|e late 2CCCs,
Nort| Carolina experienced an econonic s|ock t|at dranatically increased t|e states unenploynent rate,
fron 4.7º in 2CC7 to 1C.9º in 2C1C. Yet t|ere was alnost no correlation between rising unenploynent and
eit|er nore native workers being referred to NCCA |obs or nore workers starting at NCCA |obs, and t|ere
was no correlation between higher unemployment and more workers completing the growing season.
· Foreign farn workers create |obs for Anerican workers. ¦n 2C12, t|e foreignborn seasonal agriculture
workers w|o flled Nort| Carolina farn |obs added an estinated S248 nillion to S371 nillion to t|e state
econony t|at year. T|is econonic beneft created one US worker |ob for eac| 3.C to 4.C innigrant farn
workers w|o worked in Nort| Carolina.
IMMIGRANTS IN MANUFACTURING
· For every 1,CCC innigrants living in a county, 4C nanufacturing |obs are created or preserved t|at would
ot|erwise not exist or would |ave noved elsew|ere.
· T|e nore t|an 4C nillion innigrants currently in t|e US |ave created or preserved 1.8 nillion
manufacturing jobs nationally.
· ¦nnigration |as accounted for a connanding na|ority of |ob growt| in four of t|e fve US counties t|at |ave
experienced t|e greatest increase in nanufacturing |obs since 197C, suc| as Harris County in Texas |one to
Houston w|ere t|e increase of 43,299 nanufacturing |obs since 197C is attributable entirely to innigration.
IMMIGRANTS AS CITIZENS
· Providing a pat| to citizens|ip to undocunented workers would generate about S13 billion per year in state
and local taxes, according to estinates by t|e ¦nstitute for Taxation and Econonic Policy.
· Cverall, naturalized innigrants |ave nuc| |ig|er nedian incones (nearly 5C percent in 2CC7) and nuc|
lower poverty rates (nore t|an 1C percent) t|an noncitizen innigrants, even w|en factors suc| as
education are taken into account.
· T|e increase in incone as innigrants becone citizens |as a ripple effect on t|e econony. For every S1
increase in innigrants incones, t|ere is a S1.17 increase in CDP.
· ¦f innigration reforn denies innigrants an opportunity to gain citizens|ip, t|ere would be less of a beneft to
our econony t|an if t|ere was a pat| to citizens|ip. Cver a 1Cyear period, t|ere would be an increase in CDP of
S832 billion=signifcantly less t|an t|e S1.4 trillion we would gain if innigrants were given a pat| to citizens|ip.
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IMMIGRATION BY THE ISSUES (CONTINUED)
IMMIGRANTS AND TOURISM
· T|e travel industry is Anericas nunber one services export, generating S1C8.1 billion in travel exports last
year. W|ile travel is a key |ob creator and critical to t|e U.S. econony, barriers t|at international visitors face
in gaining a visa or entering t|e U.S. keep t|ese nunbers fron being even greater
· ¦n fact, fron 2CCC to 2C1C, t|e USs s|are of t|e global travel narket went fron 17º to 12º because of self
imposed barriers to international travel.
IMMIGRANTS AS YOUNG WORKERS
· ¦nnigrants are far nore likely to be of working age and can |elp ease t|e burden as baby booners retire.
According to t|e US Census, t|e ratio of working adults to seniors was 5 to 1 for t|e nativeborn. For
innigrants, t|e ratio is 28 to 1.
· Even wit| |ig| unenploynent, t|e US governnent estinates t|at t|ere are currently nore t|an 3.8 nillion
|obs in Anerican t|at we cannot fll because t|e skills we |ave do not natc| t|e skills we need. ¦nnigrants
are far nore likely to be lowskilled but also nore likely to be |ig|skilled. For exanple, in t|e |ealt|care
industry, immigrants are more than twice as likely to be physicians and surgeons at the high-skilled end but
also nearly twice as likely to be low-skilled nursing assistants and home health aides.
THE ECONOMIC CONTRIBUTION OF DREAMERS AND A PATH TO CITIZENSHIP
· Passing t|e DPEAM Act will create |obs and boost econonic activity. ¦ncentivizing DPEAMers to pursue
college and allowing t|en to work |ere legally will add 1.4 nillion |obs and generate S329 billion in
econonic activity over t|e next 2C years.
· Naturalized innigrants are nore valuable contributors in t|e labor narket, and outearn nigrants w|o are
not citizens by as nuc| as 1Cº.
OTHER COUNTRIES ARE MAKING EFFORTS TO RECRUIT THE TALENTED IMMIGRANTS WE ARE TURNING AWAY
· C|ile offers S4C,CCC to entrepreneurs w|o start t|eir businesses t|ere, w|ile we dont even |ave a visa for
entrepreneurs to come here.
· ¦n late January, Canada announced a new startup visa to entice entrepreneurs wit| pernanent resident
status and a path to citizenship. When he was asked why Canada enacted this new measure, the country’s
Minster of Citizens|ip and ¦nnigration Jason lenney said t|ey did it `to renain conpetitive in t|e global
economy.”
· China offers generous stipends, access to incubators, residency in Beijing, honorary titles, and other
incentives to lure top innovators back to China.
· ¦n Singapore, t|e governnent pays part of t|e salary for a startups frst enployees.
IMMIGRATION BY THE NUMBERS
Cur dysfunctional innigration systen is indefensible and frustrates enployers and workers alike. ¦nstead of
promoting job creation and economic growth, the current immigration system puts American companies and
workers at a distinct competitive disadvantage in our global economy. We support immigration reform because
America cannot compete and win in a global economy without attracting and retaining the world’s most talented
and hardest workers.
6% OF ALL GREEN CARDS GO SPECIFICALLY TO WORKERS. Less t|an Cº (about 59,CCC) of t|e approxinately 1 nillion
new lawful permanent residents we welcome each year are workers, selected based on their skill sets and jobs they
will perforn in t|e US
10 YEAR WAIT FOR A GREEN CARD FOR TALENTED WORKERS. A professional worker born in ¦ndia wit| a US Bac|elors degree
nust wait 1C years for a green card to be available after a sponsoring enployer docunents t|at US workers are not
available in suffcient nunbers. During t|e ten year wait, t|is worker cannot be pronoted until processing is conpleted.
Facing these bleak prospects, many of these talented workers take their skills to other countries, where they create new
products and jobs for America’s competitors.
5 DAYS TO FILL THE YEARLY H-1B HIGH-SKILLED VISA ALLOTMENT. ¦n t|e frst 5 days of April 2C13 all of t|e H1B visa
nunbers for foreign professional |ires for fscal year 2C14 were allocated, C nont|s before t|e start of t|e fscal
year. ¦n 5 of t|e years since Congress last considered innigration reforn, t|ere were zero H1B visa nunbers
during t|e fscal year all of t|e H1B visa nunbers were awarded prior to t|e beginning of t|e governnents fscal
year (neaning no businesses during t|e fscal year could sponsor a single new H1B worker).
7.5% OF ALL EMPLOYERS USE E-VERIFY. Cf t|e nations C.C5 nillion enployers, about 7.5º currently participate in
t|e voluntary EVerify enploynent verifcation systen. Wit|out a uniforn, national, nandatory enploynent
verifcation systen t|at is workable for enployers and used by all businesses, t|e country will continue to be a |ob
magnet for illegal immigrants.
4.64 ADDITIONAL US JOBS CREATED FOR EACH H-2B SEASONAL WORKER. Every 1CC lesserskilled seasonal workers
adnitted in H2B status is associated wit| an additional 4C4 |obs for USborn workers, because lesserskilled
innigrants generally conplenent, and do not conpete wit|, t|e existing Anerican workforce.
70% ILLEGAL WORKFORCE IN AGRICULTURE. About 7Cº of t|e workers in our agricultural sector are illegal, despite t|e fact
that the H-2A visa category for seasonal agriculture workers is unlimited, due to the fact that the visa process for this
category is unworkable for most employers.
0 TEMPORARY WORKERS TO FILL LESSER-SKILLED OPENING WHERE AMERICANS NOT INTERESTED. Current law provides for 0
(zero) lesserskilled workers to legally enter on tenporary worker visas to perforn in yearround positions after an
enployer tests t|e local labor narket. T|e |ig|est nunber and percentage of |ob growt| in t|e US t|roug| 2C2C
is expected in low and noderateskill |obs t|at cannot be nec|anized or outsourced, nany of w|ic|, like |one
|ealt| care, |ave insuffcient nunbers of interested Anerican workers.
11 MILLION ENCOUNTERING DE FACTO AMNESTY. Current law creates de facto amnesty for 11 million illegal immigrants
living and working in our connunities w|o are unable to pay t|eir full s|are of federal, state and local taxes. An
earned lawful status process, without a bar to citizenship, would allow the undocumented to get right with the law.
Source: U.S. Chamber of Commerce, August 5, 2013, http://immigration.uschamber.com
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IMMIGRATION IN FAITH, FAMILIES AND COMMUNITIES
IMMIGRANTS AND THE BIBLE
· The Bible is clear about how immigrants should be treated; the Hebrew word for immigrant, ger, is used in the Bible
92 tines and we are continuously called to care for t|e stranger in our nidst.
· Specifcally, scriptures call us, in initation of Cod Hinself, to s|ow conpassion and |ustice for t|e so|ourner and
alien anong us (Exodus 22.21, Deuteronony 1C.1819, Psaln 94.C, Jerenia| 7.C, Ezekiel 22.29, Zec|aria| 7.1C)
· Cur ancestors in t|e fait| were so|ourners and aliens in t|e land of Egypt (Exodus 1.114, 1 C|ronicles 1C.19, Acts
7.C) and our Lord Jesus C|rist lived His c|ild|ood years as an innigrant and refugee (Matt|ew 2.1323)
IMMIGRANTS AND THE EVANGELICAL COMMUNITY
· Socially conservative evangelical C|ristians support innigration reforn. 75º of evangelicals polled by CBS News support
immigration reform policies including an earned legalization and citizenship process for undocumented immigrants.
· More t|an 2CC of t|e nost proninent and respected leaders wit| Anerican evangelicalisn |ave affrned
an Evangelical Statenent of Principles for ¦nnigration Peforn, including leaders of nearly every evangelical
denonination, presidents of C|ristian colleges and seninaries, executives of trusted C|ristian ninistries and non
proft organizations, and pastors of sone of t|e largest, nost influential c|urc|es in t|e country.
· ¦n evangelical c|urc|es across t|e country, t|e |earts and ninds of our congregations are c|anging in support of
innigration reforn consistent wit| biblical values. More t|an 18C,CCC C|ristians |ave answered our call to `Pray for
Peforn¨ and continue to learn about Cods |eart for t|e innigrant.
· No natter |ow t|e House proceeds, we ask t|at reforn include t|e core elenents t|at nake it t|e rig|t t|ing to
do. provide innigrants in our nidst t|e opportunity to cone out of t|e s|adows and eventually earn citizens|ip,
address border security in a fair and effcient way, ensure t|at fanilies can stay toget|er or be reunited, and ensure
that future Americans can immigrate through new and orderly pathways that support our economy and encourage
legal immigration.
IMMIGRANTS AND FAMILIES
· About 5.5 million children in this country have at least one parent who is an illegal immigrant, according to an
estinate by t|e Pew Hispanic Center, and t|ey face constant fear of fanily separation.
· ¦nnigrants wit| fanily nenbers w|o nig|t sponsor t|en for green cards nay face a 15 to 2C year wait for t|ose
visas, being separated from their family for as long as a generation.
· As of Novenber of 2C12, t|ere were a total of 4,3CC,CCC innigrants waiting in t|e backlog for fanilybased
immigrant visas.
· There are more than 2.5 million siblings waiting for the 65,000 visas available each year
· As of Novenber 2C12, t|ere were nore t|an 3CC,CCC wives, |usbands and ninor c|ildren of legal pernanent
residents waiting for immigrant visas.
IMMIGRANTS AND SAFE COMMUNITIES
· Cur current broken systen undernines t|e trust and cooperation between police agencies and innigrant
communities that are essential to community-oriented policing.
· Undocunented innigrants, and t|eir fanilies and friends wit| legal status, fear t|at contact wit| t|e police will lead
to deportation, so crimes in immigrant communities go unreported and victims and witnesses are afraid to testify.
· Local law enforcenent resources are already scarce, to also enforce innigration laws signifcantly detracts fron
the core mission of local police to keep communities safe.
· Cur broken innigration systen creates opportunities for t|e truly dangerous crininals to |ide in our nidst, and it
continues to encourage criminal enterprises that prey upon immigrants.
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LEGISLATION BRIEF
T|is past June t|e US Senate passed a conpre|ensive innigration reforn (S. 744) bill by a vote of C8 to 32.
T|e bill would.
· More t|an S4C billion to en|ance border security
· DPEAM Act legislation
· A path to citizenship of about 13 years for qualified applicants
· Expands fanily and enploynent based visas, creates neritbased visa wit| selection t|roug| a points
system
· Substantial exenptions fron enploynentbased cap for t|ose including outstanding professors and
researc|ers, nultinational executives, US advanced STEM degree graduates, P|Ds, and spouses/
children of principal applicants
· Elinination of t|e diversity visa progran
· Creates an Cffice of Citizens|ip and New Anericans to address integration policy
· Mandatory use of an electronic employment verification system
· A new “blue card” agricultural work visa
· A new W visa for lesser-skilled temporary workers
· ¦ncreases t|e H1B visa nunbers and provides work aut|orization for H1B spouses
· Creates a new entrepreneur visa
The House of Representatives has opted to create multiple bills in order to tackle immigration reform. To date,
t|e House |as drafted t|e following legislation.
BORDER CONTROL - H.R.1417 BORDER SECURITY RESULTS ACT
· Requires evaluation of the current state of the border.
· Pequires developnent of specifc netrics to deternine w|en operational control and situational awareness
of all international and maritime borders is obtained.
· Pequires Covernnent Accountability Cffce (CAC) confrnation of w|en suc| netrics are satisfed.
· Pequires t|at DHS ac|ieve greater security and effciency at t|e ports of entry.
INTERIOR ENFORCEMENT - H.R.2278 STRENGTHEN AND FORTIFY ENFORCEMENT (SAFE) ACT
· Crants aut|ority to states and localities to enact t|eir own innigration laws (except for federal law
relating to unlawful enploynent, so long as t|ey are not stricter t|an federal law) and to enforce
federal, state, and local immigration law.
· Provides additional resources to U.S. ¦nnigration and Custons Enforcenent (¦CE), including increasing
t|e nunber of ¦CE officers and expands ¦CEs aut|ority to carry out enforcenent functions.
· Toughens penalties for unlawful entry and reentry, and makes it a crime to be unlawfully present in the
United States.
· Expands crininal offenses for t|ose w|o aid and abet illegal innigrants in t|e United States, including
new definitions of |arboring and transporting wit|in t|e United States.
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LEGISLATION BRIEF (CONTINUED)
· ¦ncreases visa and passport security and toug|ens penalties for fraud, counterfeiting, forgery, and
money laundering.
· Pequires t|at DHS establis| a bionetric entry and exit data systen.
· Expands grounds for renoval by anending t|e definition of aggravated felony and conviction.
· Encourages aliens to deport voluntarily.
AGRICULTURE WORKER PROGRAM - H.R.1773 AGRICULTURAL GUEST WORKER ACT
· Creates a twopronged H2C visa progran capped at 5CC,CCC per year t|at allows registered
employers to hire foreign workers based on a contract or at-will.
· Seasonal visa lengt|. 18 nont|s wit| a requirenent t|at t|e worker return to t|eir |one country for 3
months.
· Yearround visa lengt|. T|ree years wit| a t|reenont| requirenent to return |one for t|e frst tern,
18 nont|s eac| tern t|ereafter.
· Current experienced undocunented agricultural workers will be eligible to transition into t|is progran if t|ey
have worked 100 days in the two years after enactment.
E-VERIFY AND WORKSITE ENFORCEMENT - H.R.1772 LEGAL WORKFORCE ACT
· Preenpts all state and local laws and policies relating to enploynent verification.
· Mandates a phase-in use of an electronic employment verification system for all new hires and re-
verification of expiring work aut|orizations (wit|in 2 years of enactnent).
· ¦ncreases penalties for nonconpliance.
· Establis|es an affirnative defense to a c|arge of unlawful |iring or enploying an unaut|orized alien
if employer complies in good faith with the requirements of the System, with the burden shifting to
the government to prove “by clear and convincing evidence” that the employer knowingly hired an
unauthorized alien before an employer can be penalized.
HIGH SKILLED VISAS - H.R.2131 SUPPORTING KNOWLEDGE AND INVESTING IN LIFELONG SKILLS (SKILLS) ACT
· Creates a new visa category and allocates up to 55,CCC additional green cards for graduates of U.S.
universities wit| advanced STEM degrees.
· Allocates an additional 3C,CCC green cards between t|e EB2 (professional wit| advanced degrees
and persons wit| exceptional ability) and EB3 (professionals wit| a bac|elors degree and ot|ers)
categories.
· Pernits dual intent for foreign student w|o are enrolled in a course of study in a STEM field.
· Paises t|e H1B annual linit to 155,CCC and increases t|e exenption for graduates of U.S. universities
wit| advanced STEM degrees to 4C,CCC. Total of 195,CCC H1Bs annually.
LEGISLATION BRIEF (CONTINUED)
· Creates two categories of visas for entrepreneurs with a total cap of 10,000 per year.
· Venture capital backed entrepreneurs. nust |ave at least S5CC,CCC fron a qualifed venture capital
conpany or at least S1CC,CCC fron a qualifed angel investor. T|ese entrepreneurs would be given
conditional green cards (along wit| spouses and c|ildren) up to t|ree years to create |obs for at
least fve Anerican workers and two years to raise an additional S1,CCC,CCC in capital or generate
S1,CCC,CCC in revenue.
· E2 entrepreneurs. t|ose visa |olders w|o |ave naintained t|eir status in t|e U.S. for a nininun of
1C years and |ave created |obs for at least fve Anerican workers for a nininun of 1C years would
receive green cards.
· Creates an investor visa.
· Pevision of t|e existing EB5 progran, increased nininun investnent anount (currently S1,CCC,CCC
or S5CC,CCC, depending on t|e region), nake regional center progran pernanent.
· ¦nvestor nust create 1C |obs in t|e two years after being granted t|e conditional green card in order to
remove conditional status.
· Elininates diversity visa progran.
· Elininates t|e per country linits for enploynent based innigration and raises fanily based caps
· C|anges t|e fanily based innigration systen by elininating t|e 4t| preference fanily category of
brot|ers and sisters of U.S. citizens.
BORDER SECURITY, ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY, AND IMMIGRATION MODERNIZATION ACT (H.R. 15)
T|e House Denocrats introduced t|eir own conpre|ensive innigration reforn bill (H.P. 15) in early Cctober.
¦t is largely drawn fron S. 744, t|e bipartisan Senate conpre|ensive reforn bill, before nany of t|e anend-
ments that were added on the floor of the Senate, including the Corker-Hoeven amendment that added the
S4C billion `border surge.¨ ¦nstead H.P. 15 substitutes t|e border security provisions fron t|e Border Security
Pesults Act of 2C13 (H.P. 1417) (see above), and includes t|e following.
· Provides S8.3 billion to establis| situational awareness and operational control of |ig| traffic areas at
the southwest border
· Creates the Southern Border Commission from the Senate bill
· Allocates grants to affected localities in the southwest border region from the Senate bill.
· Pequires t|e Secretary to subnit a strategy for bionetric exit under t|e USV¦S¦T progran, or upon a
determination that such a program is unfeasible, submit a strategy for an alternative program providing
the same level of security.
H.R.15 also omits several provisions from the Senate bill, such as provisions regarding the removal of visa
overstays and the establishment of a visa overstay pilot program.
Sources: U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Migration Policy Institute. National Immigration Forum
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SPEAKERS: MONDAY EVENING
RANDEL K. JOHNSON, VICE PRESIDENT, U.S. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
Pandel l. Jo|nson |oined t|e U.S. C|anber of Connerce on Decenber 1, 1997. He is prinarily responsible for labor,
innigration, and enployee benefts issues pending before Congress. He is on t|e board of directors of t|e National ¦nnigration
Forun, t|e Lut|eran ¦nnigration and Pefugee Service agency and t|e Cuality Alliance Steering Connittee, working on issues
such as card check legislation, ergonomics, and blacklisting regulations; pension funding reform and health care; civil rights
and wage and hour; and comprehensive immigration reform, including visa and border policy. Johnson is widely recognized
as an expert in nedia on enploynent and innigration issues. Earlier, |e was a nenber of t|e Departnent of Honeland
Security Data Managenent ¦nprovenent Act Task Force on border entry and exit issues, as well as Pepublican labor counsel
and coordinator for t|e U.S. House of Pepresentatives Connittee on Education and t|e Workforce. Jo|nson is a graduate of
Denison University and t|e University Cf Maryland Sc|ool Cf Law and earned |is Master of Laws in labor relations fron t|e
Ceorgetown University Law Center. He received a graduate certifcate fron t|e Harvard lennedy Sc|ool of Covernnent for
Senior Managers in Covernnent and is a fellow of t|e College of Labor and Enploynent Lawyers.
ARNE M. SORENSON, PRESIDENT AND CEO, MARRIOTT INTERNATIONAL INC.
Arne M. Sorenson is President and C|ief Executive Cffcer of Marriott ¦nternational, ¦nc., a leading global lodging conpany
wit| nore t|an3,8CC lodging properties in 72 countries and territories and reported revenues of nearly S12 billion in fscal
year 2C12. Mr. Sorenson is also c|airnan of Marriotts Clobal Diversity and ¦nclusion Council, w|ic| conplenents t|e
efforts of t|e Marriott Board of Directors Connittee for Excellence to nonitor and evaluate t|e progress of t|e conpanys
strategy to promote an increasingly diverse workforce, as well as ownership, customer and vendor communities around the
world.Previously, |e was Marriotts president and c|ief operating offcer.Prior to |oining Marriott in 199C, Mr. Sorenson was a
partner wit| t|e law frn Lat|an & Watkins in Was|ington, D.C., w|ere |e specialized in nergers and acquisitions litigation.Mr.
Sorenson is a graduate of t|e University of Minnesota Law Sc|ool and of Lut|er College in Decora|, ¦owa.
ROB JESMER, PARTNER, FP1 STRATEGIES
Pob Jesner was executive director of t|e National Pepublican Senatorial Connittee (NPSC), reporting directly to t|en
C|airnan and Senator Jo|n Cornyn, w|ere |e oversaw an effort t|at netted fve seats for Pepublicans and raised over S2CC
nillion. Prior to t|e NPSC, Jesner lived in Texas, w|ere |e nanaged Senator Cornyns reelection canpaign. He spent t|e 2CCC
election cycle as regional political director (PPD) for t|e Sout|east at t|e Pepublican National Connittee (PNC), serving as t|e
liaison between state parties, canpaigns and t|e connittees c|airnan. As an PPD, Jesners prinary focus was nanaging
t|e getoutt|evote operation in Tennessee and Missouri, an effort consisting of 12C staff nenbers and over S1C nillion spent
between t|e two states. Previously, fron 19992CCC, Jesner worked at t|e National Pepublican Congressional Connittee
(NPCC) as a feld representative and national feld director and t|en becane c|ief of staff for Alabana Congressnan Mike
Pogers in Decenber 2CC2. He earned |is bac|elor of arts in political science and connunications fron t|e University of Saint
Thomas and currently resides in Arlington, Virginia.
DAYANA TORRES, PRESIDENT, DREAMERS OF VIRGINIA
Dayana Torres, a DPEAMer fron Fairfax, Virginia, arrived in t|e United States in 2CC3 fron Bogota, Colonbia. S|e is currently a
sop|onore at t|e Honors College of Ceorge Mason University and is na|oring in Conputer Science. S|e speaks fluent Englis|
and Spanis| and is profcient in Frenc| and Mandarin C|inese. Beyond |er acadenic interests, s|e is involved in |er connunity
as t|e cofounder and current president of Dreaners of Virginia (DCV).
GLENN HAMER, PRESIDENT AND CEO, ARIZONA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
Clenn Haner is t|e President and CEC of t|e Arizona C|anber of Connerce and ¦ndustry. Since |e assuned t|is position
in 2006, Hamer has overseen the organization’s development into one of the most respected pro-business public policy
organizations in Arizona. Haner is a nenber of t|e board for t|e Creater P|oenix Black C|anber of Connerce and t|e Tucson
Hispanic C|anber of Connerce. He also serves as t|e CoC|air of t|e governors Solar Energy Task Force and as a nenber of
t|e Arizona Peady Education Council. Earlier, Haner served as executive director of t|e Solar Energy ¦ndustries Association and
the director of business development and government relations for First Solar.
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SPEAKERS: MONDAY EVENING (CONTINUED)
JOHN FEINBLATT, CHIEF ADVISOR, POLICY AND STRATEGIC PLANNING, NEW YORK CITY MAYOR MICHAEL R. BLOOMBERG
Jo|n Feinblatt was appointed C|ief Advisor to Mayor Mic|ael P. Bloonberg for Policy and Strategic Planning in February 2C1C
and leads the Mayor’s national coalitions on guns, immigration reform and infrastructure investment. He serves as the Mayor’s
c|ief advisor on crininal |ustice policy and liaison to t|e state court systen, t|e citys fve elected District Attorneys and t|e
state crininal |ustice systen. Prior to |oining t|e Bloonberg adninistration, Feinblatt was t|e founding director of t|e Center for
Court ¦nnovation and t|e Midtown Connunity Court, w|ic| is now t|e nodel for over CC connunity courts in t|is country and
abroad. Feinblatt |as served on t|e Connission on t|e Future of Probation, t|e Connission on t|e Future of New York State
Courts and t|e Connission on Alternatives to ¦ncarceration. He |as served on t|e board c|air of Bowery Pesidents Connittee,
one of New York Citys largest independent agencies serving t|e |oneless. He is a coaut|or of Cood Courts. T|e Case for
ProblenSolving Justice, publis|ed in 2CC5 by T|e New Press, and a contributor to articles and opinion pieces fronLaw and
Policy, T|e New York Tines and ot|er publications. Mr. Feinblatt is a graduate of Wesleyan University and t|e Colunbus Sc|ool
of Law at Cat|olic University.
SENATOR JOHN E. SUNUNU, FORMER REPUBLICAN SENATOR, NEW HAMPSHIRE
Forner Senator Jo|n E. Sununu is an ad|unct senior policy advisor at Akin Cunp in Was|ington, D.C. Beginning in 1997, |e
served for t|ree terns in t|e U.S. House of Pepresentatives, representing New Hanps|ires 1st District. He t|en represented
t|e state for six years as t|e youngest nenber of t|e U.S. Senate. As one of t|e few nenbers of Congress wit| a tec|nical
background, Sen. Sununu rose quickly to earn a seat on the House Appropriations Committee and serve as vice chairman of
the Budget Committee. As a senator, he served on committees such as Commerce, Finance, Banking and Foreign Relations.
Sununu earned bac|elors and nasters degrees in nec|anical engineering fron t|e Massac|usetts ¦nstitute of Tec|nology and
a Master of Business Adninistration fron Harvard University.
DANIELLE BURR, PRINCIPAL, NAVIGATORS GLOBAL
Prior to |oining Navigators Clobal, Danielle Burr served as a W|ip Liaison in t|e United States Senate offce of Pepublican W|ip
Jon Kyl, where she helped the Senate leadership develop legislative strategy and served as a liaison to the advocacy community
to help build support for Senate Republicans’ legislative priorities. She also advised Republican senators and staff on Senate
floor procedures and Conference rules. Fron 2CC52CC8, Burr served as senior director of legislative affairs for t|e Associated
Builders & Contractors, ¦nc., and served as a frequent spokesperson before t|e print and broadcast nedia on t|e industrys
legislative issues. She was a co-founder and chair of the Coalition for a Democratic Workplace, which comprised more than
500 organizations dedicated to preventing the passage of card check legislation. Burr also has served as a government
relations associate at APCC Worldwide, one of t|e worlds largest public affairs frns. S|e is a graduate of Towson University in
Maryland.
JEFF LUNGREN DIRECTOR, CONGRESSIONAL AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS DIVISION, U.S. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
Jeff Lungren is t|e director of t|e U.S. C|anber of Connerces Congressional and Public Affairs Division, focusing on |ealt|
care, innigration and labor issues. Most recently, |e |andled Hill outreac| and connunications for t|e Calen ¦nstitute, a
nonproft |ealt| care t|ink tank, during consideration of |ealt| reforn in 2CC9 and 2C1C. Lungren previously served as a
special assistant to forner President Ceorge W. Bus| in t|e W|ite House Cffce of Legislative Affairs. During |is tenure at t|e
W|ite House, Lungren also briefed t|e vice president on legislative and oversig|t natters as t|e No. 2 person in |is legislative
affairs offce. Earlier in |is career, Lungren served in a nunber of senior connunications positions on Capitol Hill. He |andled
messaging and communications for the House Judiciary Committee from 2001 to 2007, where he was responsible for such
|ig|profle issues as t|e USAPATP¦CT Act and its 2CCC renewal, innigration and border security, and nedical liability reforn.
Lungrens work garnered |in recognition by National Journal in its 2CC3 `T|e Hill People¨ profles of top Capitol Hill aides.
Lungren is a graduate of t|e University of Notre Dane and resides in Alexandria, Virginia.
GALEN CAREY, VICE PRESIDENT, GOVERNMENT RELATIONS, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF EVANGELICALS
Calen Carey is responsible for representing t|e National Association of Evangelicals (NAE) before Congress, t|e W|ite House
and t|e Courts. He works to advance t|e approac| and principles of t|e NAE docunent, `For t|e Healt| of t|e Nation. An
Evangelical Call to Civic Pesponsibility.¨ Before |oining t|e NAE staff, Carey was a longtine enployee of World Pelief, t|e relief
and developnent arn of t|e NAE. T|ere, |e was known as a leading evangelical voice on refugee, innigration, and international
relief and development issues.
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SPEAKERS: TUESDAY MORNING
BRUCE JOSTEN, EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT FOR GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS, U.S CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
P. Bruce Josten, Executive Vice President for Covernnent Affairs, is t|e secondranking offcer at t|e U.S. C|anber of
Connerce and t|e organizations senior governnent and political affairs executive. Josten is t|e senior nanager of six
na|or divisions wit|in t|e U.S. C|anber, including Congressional and Public Affairs, Econonic Policy and Political Affairs and
Federation Pelations. Josten is t|e key arc|itect of t|e U.S. C|anbers resurgent position as leader of t|e business connunitys
policy and grassroots activities in t|e 1C4t| t|roug| t|e 111t| congresses. His persistent efforts resulted in t|e passage of
t|e frst balanced budget in 29 years and t|e frst tax cut in 1C years, and |e |elped forn t|e Alliance for Energy and Econonic
Crowt| and becane its c|ief spokesperson. At t|e national level, |e succeeded in organizing T|e Coalition. Anericans Working
for Real Change. Josten is a frequent commentator on national legislative, political and economic issues affecting the business
community, its employees and the economy. He graduated cum laude from Harvard with a degree in the social sciences. Josten
also serves on t|e Deans Advisory Connittee of Public Affairs for T|e Ceorge Was|ington University Craduate Sc|ool of
Political Managenent and is a board nenber of t|e United States Capitol Historical Society.
GROVER NORQUIST, PRESIDENT, AMERICANS FOR TAX REFORM
Crover Norquist, a native of Massac|usetts, |as been one of Was|ingtons nost effective issues nanagenent strategists for
over two decades. Norquist is president of Anericans for Tax Peforn (ATP), a coalition of taxpayer groups, individuals and
businesses opposed to |ig|er taxes at t|e federal, state and local levels. ATP organizes t|e taxpayer protection pledge, w|ic|
asks all candidates for federal and state offce to connit t|enselves in writing to oppose all tax increases. To date, President
Ceorge W. Bus|, 193 House nenbers and 41 senators |ave taken t|e pledge. Cn t|e state level, 7 governors and 1,221 state
legislators |ave taken t|e pledge. Mr. Norquist is aut|or of t|e book Leave Us Alone. Cetting t|e Covernnents Hands Cff Cur
Money, Cur Cuns, Cur Lives. T|e book is an optinistic look at |ow t|e conservative novenent can and will grow during t|e next
25 years.
ALBERTO R. CARDENAS, CHAIR, AMERICAN CONSERVATIVE UNION
Al Cardenas is t|e c|air of t|e Anerican Conservative Union and a partner at t|e law frn Tew Cardenas LLP, and |e |as been
naned one of Was|ingtons top lobbyists by T|e Hill newspaper. Cardenas is also on t|e Board of Trustees at Florida A&M
University. Cardenas is active in t|e Pepublican Party and |as served t|ree terns as ViceC|airnan and two terns as C|airnan
of t|e Pepublican Party of Florida. He was also appointed to t|e Executive Connittee of t|e Pepublican Party. Cardenas was
t|e frst Hispanic to lead a na|ority state party and is t|e only Hispanic Pepublican Party C|airnan in Florida History.
DR. BARRETT DUKE, VICE PRESIDENT FOR PUBLIC POLICY AND RESEARCH, THE ETHICS & RELIGIOUS LIBERTY COMMISSION OF THE SOUTHERN BAPTIST CONVENTION
Dr. Barrett Duke is Vice President for Public Policy and Pesearc| for t|e Sout|ern Baptist Conventions Et|ics & Peligious
Liberty Connission, w|ic| is t|e Sout|ern Baptist Conventions agency for addressing social, noral, and religious liberty
concerns. ¦n t|is capacity |e connunicates Sout|ern Baptist convictions to elected and public offcials in order to influence
t|e developnent of sound public policy. As Director of t|e Connissions Pesearc| ¦nstitute, Duke oversees t|e Connissions
research and the collection of information on the pressing moral and religious liberty issues of the day. Duke is a Founding
Fellow of t|e Pesearc| ¦nstitute and works wit| a group of distinguis|ed fellows w|o gat|er twice a year to s|are researc|
on today’s crucial moral and religious liberty issues. He also has an active writing ministry. His writings include “The Christian
Doctrine of Peligious Liberty,¨ in First Freedon. T|e Baptist Perspective on Peligious Liberty, 2CC7, and `Being Salt and Lig|t in a
Post C|ristian Culture,¨ in T|e Mission of Todays C|urc|, 2CC7.
FRANK KEATING, PRESIDENT AND CEO, AMERICAN BANKERS ASSOCIATION
Frank leating is t|e President and CEC of t|e Anerican Bankers Association. Fron 1995 to 2CC3 leating served as t|e 25t|
governor of Ckla|ona, t|e second governor and only Pepublican in Ckla|ona |istory to serve for consecutive terns. Before
being elected governor, |e served as Assistant Secretary of t|e Treasury and Associate Attorney Ceneral under President Peagan.
Following |is two terns as governor, leating accepted a position as President and CEC of t|e Anerican Council of Life ¦nsurers
before joining the American Bankers Association in 2011.
SHERIFF MARGARET A. MIMS, SHERIFF, FRESNO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA
Margaret Mins |as been a peace offcer since January 198C. S|e was elected to t|e offce of S|eriff in Novenber, 2CCC,
beconing t|e 25t| person and frst wonan to |old t|at offce in Fresno County. S|e was t|e frst fenale deputy s|eriff sergeant
to supervise feld patrol units and t|e frst fenale deputy s|eriff to attain t|e ranks of lieutenant, captain and assistant s|eriff
in t|e |istory of t|e Fresno County S|eriffs Cffce, w|ic| was establis|ed in 185C. Mins is a nenber of t|e Fresno Cultural
Arts Rotary Club and the Caruthers Kiwanis Club and is on the Board of Directors of the Marjoree Mason Center, a local
women’s shelter. She is a past member of the Fresno County Rape Counseling Service Board of Directors. She is a member
of t|e California Peace Cffcers Association, t|e California State S|eriffs Association and t|e Anerican Legion Auxiliary.
Mins is a graduate of Fresno Pacifc University, and |as a Masters Degree in Public Adninistration fron National University.
S|e is a graduate of California PCSTs (Peace Cffcer Standards & Training) Supervisory Leaders|ip ¦nstitute and t|e Senior
Managenent ¦nstitute for Police coordinated t|roug| Boston University and t|e lennedy Sc|ool of Covernnent at Harvard.
SPEAKERS: TUESDAY MORNING (CONTINUED)
TOM NASSIF, PRESIDENT AND CEO, WESTERN GROWERS
Western Crowers President and CEC Ton Nassif was broug|t to t|e 75yearold trade association representing 9C percent of
the fresh fruits, vegetables and nuts in California and Arizona in February 2002. He has been an active Christian his entire life,
initiating Bible studies at t|e Departnent of State in Was|ington, D.C., and at t|e U.S. Enbassy in Pabat, Morocco. He was
involved in t|e National Prayer Breakfast w|ile in Was|ington and participated in Bible studies at t|e Pentagon and W|ite House
and in Congress. He founded t|e Antioc|ian Crt|odox C|ristian C|urc| in La Jolla, California, and was its frst Paris| Council
Chairman. For the past several years he served as sub-deacon and now as deacon in the church. He is an ordained clergyman
at St. Ant|ony t|e Creat Crt|odox C|ristian C|urc| and serves t|ere on t|e Saturday evenings and Sundays. He was |onorably
disc|arged fron t|e United States Arny in 19C8.
REBECCA TALLENT, DIRECTOR OF IMMIGRATION POLICY, BIPARTISAN POLICY CENTER
Pebecca Tallent is t|e Director of ¦nnigration Policy at t|e Bipartisan Policy Center (BPC), before w|ic| s|e served as c|ief of staff
for Senator Jo|n McCains offce. Tallent started |er career on Capitol Hill in Senator McCains offce in 2CC1. ¦n 2CC3, s|e noved
to the House of Representatives to work for Representative Jim Kolbe, focusing on legislative policy areas including immigration,
energy, transportation, agriculture and public land use. ¦n 2CC5, Tallent returned to McCains offce and continued |er work on
immigration and environmental policy, helping to draft several comprehensive immigration reform bills including the “Border
Security and ¦nnigration ¦nprovenent Act¨ in t|e 1C8t| Congress, t|e `Secure Anerica and Crderly ¦nnigration Act¨ in t|e 1C9t|
Congress, and t|e `STP¦VE Act¨ and `Conpre|ensive ¦nnigration Peforn Act of 2CC7¨ in t|e 11Ct| Congress. Tallent also served
as a senior policy advisor on t|e McCainPalin presidential canpaign and traveling donestic policy advisor for Covernor Sara|
Palin. Tallent attended Carleton College in Nort|feld, Minnesota, and |ails fron Tucson, Arizona.
DOUGLAS HOLTZ-EAKIN, PRESIDENT, AMERICAN ACTION FORUM
Douglas HoltzEakin is t|e President of t|e Anerican Action Forun and nost recently was a connissioner on t|e
congressionally c|artered Financial Crisis ¦nquiry Connission. Since 2CC1, |e |as served in a variety of inportant policy
positions suc| as C|ief Econonist of t|e Presidents Council of Econonic Advisers, Ct| Director of t|e nonpartisan
Congressional Budget Cffce and Director of Donestic and Econonic Policy for t|e Jo|n McCain presidential canpaign.
Following t|e 2CC8 election, HoltzEakin was t|e President of DHE Consulting, an econonic and policy consulting frn providing
insight and research to a broad cross-section of clients. He has held several positions at many Washington-based think tanks
suc| as t|e C. Peterson ¦nstitute for ¦nternational Econonics, t|e Maurice P. Creenberg Center for Ceoecononic Studies and
t|e Council on Foreign Pelations. He |as also been a visiting fellow at t|e Anerican Enterprise ¦nstitute, Heritage Foundation
and Anerican Fanily Business Foundation. HoltzEakin also |as conducted researc| in areas of applied econonic policy,
econonetric net|ods and entrepreneurs|ip, beginning at Colunbia University. At Syracuse University |e becane a Trustee
Professor of Econonics at t|e Maxwell Sc|ool, C|airnan of t|e Departnent of Econonics and Associate Director of t|e Center
for Policy Pesearc|. HoltzEakin serves on t|e boards of t|e Tax Foundation and National Econonists Club and on t|e Pesearc|
Advisory Board of t|e Center for Econonic Developnent.
KEITH J. FONTENOT, VISITING SCHOLAR, BROOKINGS INSTITUTE; FORMER ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR FOR HEALTH PROGRAMS, CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE
leit| J. Fontenotis a visiting sc|olar in t|e Engelberg Center for Healt| Peforn at t|e Brookings ¦nstitution. A veteran of
budgeting and analysis for large donestic |ealt| and |unan resources prograns, |e |oined Brookings after leaving t|e Cffce of
Managenent and Budget (CMB), w|ere |e spent four years as t|e Associate Director for Healt|. ¦n t|at capacity |e oversaw t|e
Healt| and Hunan Services budget for |ealt|related prograns, including Medicare, Medicaid and |ealt| reforn. He |oined CMB
in 2CC9 fron t|e Congressional Budget Cffce (CBC), w|ere |e was Deputy Assistant Director for Healt| and Hunan Pesources
in the Budget Analysis Division. There he oversaw cost estimates and related analysis for health, education and income security
prograns and was deeply involved in |elping t|e CBC prepare for |ealt| reforn legislation. Fron 2CC1 to 2CC7, |e was c|ief
of t|e CMBs Healt| Financing Branc|, w|ere |e was responsible for t|e Medicare and Medicaid prograns and related |ealt|
issues. Fron 1998 to 2CC1 |e was t|e Assistant Deputy Connissioner for Policy in t|e Social Security Adninistration, |elping
to establis| t|e new offce and nanage a S4C nillion researc| budget. Before t|at, |e was C|ief of t|e ¦ncone Maintenance
Branc| in CMB fron 198C to 1998, w|ere |e oversaw incone security prograns, including Social Security. He began |is federal
career as a budget exaniner at CMB for Social Security and ot|er retirenent prograns in 1982. Mr. Fontenot |olds a M.A. in
public policy fron Duke University and a B.A. fron t|e Cld Doninion University.
JOEL PRAKKEN, SENIOR MANAGING DIRECTOR, CO-FOUNDER, MACROECONOMIC ADVISORS
¦n 1982, Joel Prakken, C|ris Varvares and Laurence Meyer founded t|e econonic consulting frn Laurence H. Meyer &
Associates, Ltd., w|ic| was renaned Macroecononic Advisers in 199C wit| Prakken as t|e new C|airnan. Earlier, |e was a
senior econonist at t|e world |eadquarters of t|e ¦BM Corporation and served wit| t|e Federal Peserve Bank of New York.
He |as |eld positions on t|e faculties of New York Universitys Craduate Sc|ool of Business, t|e Econonics Departnent of
Was|ington University, and t|e Clin Sc|ool of Business at Was|ington University. Prakken |as written papers for t|e Council of
Econonic Advisers, t|e Anerican Council for Capital Fornation and t|e Center for t|e Anerican Study of Business. His topics
include tax reforn, budget policy, nonetary policy and t|e inpact of tec|nology on productivity. He |as testifed frequently on
t|ese topics before connittees in bot| t|e House of Pepresentatives and t|e Senate. Prakken conpleted |is undergraduate
degree in econonics at Princeton University, and |e |olds a P|.D. in econonics fron Was|ington University in Saint Louis.
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HOST ORGANIZATIONS
PARTNERSHIP FOR A NEW AMERICAN ECONOMY
T|e Partners|ip for a New Anerican Econony brings toget|er nore t|an 5CC Pepublican, Denocratic, and
¦ndependent nayors and business leaders w|o support innigration reforn as a way of creating |obs for
Americans today.
Website: PenewCurEconony.org
Twitter: ¸PenewCurEconony
Facebcck. Facebook.con/renewoureconony
Key Contacts:
Jereny Pobbins | Director
|ereny¸renewoureconony.org | 2127884357
Alex latz | Connunications Director
alex¸renewoureconony.org | C177213779
C|ris Stinenan | Field Director
chris@renewoureconomy.org
BIBLES, BADGES AND BUSINESS FOR IMMIGRATION REFORM
Bibles, Badges and Business for ¦nnigration Peforn (BBB) is a national network of conservative and
moderate faith, law enforcement and business leaders working together to educate and support members of
Congress as they consider reforms to our immigration system. With its unique perspective, BBB has become
a driving force in t|e innigration debate. BBB is a pro|ect of t|e National ¦nnigration Forun and t|e National
¦nnigration Forun Action Fund.
Website: bbbinnigration.org | ready4reforn.org
Twitter: @bbbimmigration
Facebcck. Facebook.con/bbbinnigration
Key Contacts:
Ali Noorani | Executive Director National ¦nnigration Forun
anoorani¸innigrationforun.org<nailto.anoorani¸innigrationforun.org~ ¯ 2C23C9CC91
Patty First | Canpaign Manager BBB
pattyfirst¸rabengroup.con | 2C23C21999
Nora Feely | Field Director BBB
nfeely¸innigrationforun.org | 3143C38413

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HOST ORGANIZATIONS (CONTINUED)
U.S. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
T|e U.S. C|anber of Connerce is t|e worlds largest business federation representing t|e interests of nore
than 3 million businesses of all sizes, sectors, and regions, as well as state and local chambers and industry
associations.
Website: USC|anber.con
Twitter: ¸USC|anber | ¸freeenterprise
Facebcck. Facebook.con/usc|anber | Facebook.con/freeenterprise
Key Contacts:
Pandy Jo|nson | Senior Vice President Labor, ¦nnigration, and Enployee Benefits
r|o|nson¸usc|anber.con | 2C24C35448
Any Nice | Executive Director ¦nnigration Policy
anice¸usc|anber.con | 2C24C35C94
Lisa Atkins | Director ¦nnigration Policy
latkins¸usc|anber.con | 2C24C35C74
FWD.US
FWD.us is an organization started by key leaders in t|e tec| connunity to pronote policies to keep t|e United
States and its citizens conpetitive in a global econony=including conpre|ensive innigration reforn and
education reform.
Website: FWD.us
Twitter: @FWD_us
Facebcck. Facebook.con/FWDus
Key Contacts:
Kate Hansen | Communications Director
Kate@fwd.us
Alida Garcia | Director of Coalitions & Policy
Alida@fwd.us
Jen Martin | Field Coordinator
Jen@fwd.us
MEDIA COVERAGE
N.C. lawmakers wooed by groups pushing immigration overhaul | Charlotte Observer | October 7, 2013
While the immigration debate has been put on the back burner in Washington, national and local business
|eavyweig|ts are working be|ind t|e scenes and using t|eir fnancial nig|t to press House Pepublicans to
bring legislation overhauling the immigration system to a vote.
Utah University Presidents Call for Immigration Reform | The Salt Lake Tribune | September 19, 2013
Eig|t presidents fron Uta| universities are urging t|e House to conpronise on innigration reforn t|at
includes a path to citizenship for those in the country illegally.
Florida roundtable on immigration issues with Congressman Diaz-Balart | NBC Latino | September 09, 2013
During the August congressional recess, Florida Republican congressman Mario Diaz-Balart has been doing what
nany ot|er innigration reforn proponents |ave been busy doing talking to different groups about t|e need to
reforn t|e nations current innigration laws. Cn Tuesday, DiazBalart spoke to a snall group of Latino business
leaders in t|e section of Miani known as Little Havana. ¨T|ey talked about t|eir concerns, and it was all very
helpful,” says the Congressman.
Let’s Not Reduce Our Strength as a Magnet Economy | Wall Street Journal | September 6, 2013
CpEd by Joe Creen, President of t|e University of Miani | Anerica |as a lot to be proud of. And |ig| on t|e list is
t|e fact t|at so nany people t|roug|out t|e world see t|e US as a beacon of opportunity, a place w|ere t|ey can
nake t|e best use of t|eir energy and talent. ¦t is a good c|allenge to |ave, if only we can deal wit| it sensibly.
Farmers need a guest worker program | The Pueblo Chieftan | September 2, 2013
CpEd by Don S|awcroft, President of t|e Colorado Farn Bureau | Today, it seens t|at alnost everyone is in
agreenent t|at our current innigration systen is broken and needs to be fxed. Weve seen nany proposals in
t|e US House, and t|e passage of a Senate bill. ¦ an encouraged to see t|is large and conplicated issue being
addressed in our nation’s capital.
Business Leaders in Nashville meeting make case for immigration reform | Associated Press | August 28, 2013
NASHV¦LLE, Tenn. = Proninent business leaders and Pepublicans |eld a forun in support of innigration reforn
today. The idea was to keep the immigration reform alive during the congressional recess and build support among
the public and members of Congress.
New Jersey set up a press event at a local small business and had small business owners urge reform | NJ Today
August 20, 2013
Cranford pizzeria owner Anthony Scuderi is among a group of small business owners calling on federal lawmakers
to address innigration reforn. `Most restaurants today ¦ would attenpt to say naybe 5Cº of t|en, enployees
are probably innigrants. T|ey cone |ere because of t|e |obs. Cf course if we didnt need t|en, t|ey wouldnt be
coning |ere,¨ Scuderi, owner of ¦L Ciardino, said.
Pennsylvania economy benefits from immigration reform | The Times Tribune | August 18, 2013
CpEd by Cene Barr, PA C|anber President and Dave Bonsick, President of PA Tec| Council | A successful business
connunity nust enbrace c|ange and adapt to a constantly evolving econonic environnent. Cver t|e past
3C years, Pennsylvanias econony |as becone nore diverse and includes nultiple disciplines in tec|nology,
nanufacturing, life sciences, energy and even fln.
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MEDIA COVERAGE (CONTINUED)
Hatch: Immigration reform would create more jobs | The Salt Lake Tribune | August 15, 2013
Sen. Crrin Hatc| |oined |ig|tec| entrepreneurs T|ursday to argue t|at innigration reforn would create nore |obs
= not take t|en away fron Anericans = by bringing in nore top foreign engineers and scientists businesses need
for brainpower to expand and be conpetitive.
Immigrants are driving the housing recovery | CNN | July 19, 2013
CpEd by Jo|n Feinblatt, C|ief Policy Adviser to New York City Mayor Mic|ael Bloonberg and Jason Marczak,
Director of Policy at Anericas Society/Council of t|e Anericas. | Big, bold ideas |ave driven growt| t|roug|out our
history, making America the most prosperous nation in the world. And right at the heart of this culture of innovation
are Anericas universities, w|ere 53º of all basic researc| in t|is country takes place.
Keep STEM smarts here | Sun Sentinel | July 24, 2012
CpEd by Donna E. S|alala, President of t|e University of Miani. | Big, bold ideas |ave driven growt| t|roug|out our
history, making America the most prosperous nation in the world. And right at the heart of this culture of innovation
are Anericas universities, w|ere 53º of all basic researc| in t|is country takes place.
America has room for more skilled immigrants | Washington Examiner | April 2, 2012
CpEd by Cristobal Conde, Forner CEC of SunCard Data Systens | As an innigrant, ¦ left t|e world ¦ knew in |opes
of achieving more for myself and my family in what is still the land of opportunity and the globe’s great meritocracy.
Immigration debate should be about economics, not politics | Detroit Free Press | February 27, 2012
CpEd by Mic|ael P. Bloonberg, Mayor of New York City and Pick Snyder, Covernor of Mic|igan | W|at do Jereny
Lin of t|e lnicks and Nicklas Lidstron of t|e Ped Wings |ave in connon? Bot| owe t|eir success to innigration
and bot| are creating |obs and strengt|ening our econony.
Immigration reform a key step to creating jobs in US | El Paso Times | February 26, 2012
CpEd by Bill Hannond, President and CEC of t|e Texas Association of Business | Policynakers continue to
address ways to increase jobs to boost the economy, from training and education initiatives to curbed government
spending and reforned tax policy.
To Spur the Economy, US Must Reform Legal Immigration | Wall Street Journal | January 13, 2012
CpEd by Pic| Beyer, C|airnan and CEC of Freescale Seniconductor | We live in a tec|nologydriven world. Virtually
every aspect of our lives is nade safer and nore productive t|roug| t|e benefts of nodern electronics. ¦t is
clear that the future of our global economy is based on engineering and applied technology. However, American
industries are at risk due to a shortage of engineering talent. American students simply are not gravitating to
engineering and tec|nology felds.
The Immigration Solution for Job Growth | Wall Street Journal | October 19, 2011
The recent debate about immigration reform has made me wonder if we have lost sight of what we are and who we
are. We are a society of people w|o |ave cone |ere fron elsew|ere. T|is nelting pot |as nade t|e United States
the greatest and most prosperous nation on earth. We draw our strength and character from those who landed
here with nothing more than hope and dreams.
A New Immigration Consensus | Wall Street Journal | May 2, 2011
CpEd by Mic|ael P. Bloonberg, Mayor of New York City | Last nont|, President Cbana convened a diverse group
of business executives, nayors, law enforcenent leaders, ninisters and advocates at t|e W|ite House to discuss a
problen t|at t|reatens Anericas econonic future=our broken innigration systen.
ENGAGE ON SOCIAL MEDIA
#Ready4Reform
Use t|e offcial |as|tag #Peady4Peforn in all of your posts to connect your content to t|e broader conversation,
making it easier for the immigration reform community and the general public to see and amplify the Americans for
Reform message.
Spread the Word on Twitter
Tweet about your experiences in Was|ington, your personal reasons for supporting innigration reforn, key
facts related to the issue, and special quotes and other moments from the week, and be sure to use the hashtag
#Peady4Peforn. Consider including your t|e |andles of your Pepresentatives in Congress in your tweets.
Visit anericans4reforn.org/social for draft tweets.
Share Graphics and Photos on Facebook, Instagram, Google+ and Other Platforms
Take photos from your time in Washington and share them on your personal and organization’s social media
c|annels, including Facebook, ¦nstagran, Coogle÷ and ot|er platforns. Be sure to include t|e |as|tag
#Peady4Peforn on all of your content to tie it to t|e broader conversation. Visit anericans4reforn.org to s|are
immigration infographics like the ones below.
Visit Americans4Reform.org/social for Tweets, Graphics and other Social Media Content
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AMERICANS4REFORM.ORG
#READY4REFORM

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