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UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING EE 559 Z: Advanced Topics in Smart Distribution Grid: Utility and Customer Integration

2010 Fall Quarter CLASS SCHEDULE Instructor: Prof. S. S. Venkata (venkata@ee.washington.edu) Prof. Kevin Schneider (kevin.schneider@pnl.gov) EEB 003, M. 6:00 - 9:20PM Eric Sortomme (esortomm@u.washington.edu) Instructor: EEB 215J M 1:00-6:00 PM TA: EEB M346 W 7:00-8:30PM, Sat. 12:00-1:30PM Course Outline: This is the third course on Smart Grid graduate course sequence continues with the theme related to the distribution side of the power and energy system. It will cover the topics of renewable generation technologies and integration, microgrids and distributed generation, advanced protection, advanced distribution automation, demand response applications, data management and digital control. Prior background in the topics related to distribution systems is advised. The first four classes taught by Dr. Kevin Schneider, PNNL, will introduce students to the analysis techniques necessary to examine the emerging generation of smart grid technologies. Particular focus will be given to end use loads, Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles (PHEVs), energy storage, demand response, and Volt/Var optimization. Work will be conducted in the GridLAB-D simulation environment which is an open source software packed developed by the Department of Energy. The last six classes will be taught by Professor S. S. Venkata on advanced topics related Smart Distribution Grid identified in the schedule below.

Class: TA: Office Hours:

Required Text Books:

1. William H. Kersting, Distribution System Modeling and Analysis, CRC Press, Second Edition, 2004. 2. M. A. El-Sharkawi, Electric Energy: An Introduction, CRC Press, 2005.

Prerequisite: Supporting materials:

EE 351: First Course on Power Systems Proficiency in MATLAB and/or C++ is expected. 1. EE 559 X: Class notes (Spring 2010) and EE 559 Y (Summer 2010) 2. IEEE Transactions Papers available on IEEE Xplore via UW digital (on-line) library. 3. T. Gnen, Electric Power Distribution System Engineering, McGraw-Hill, 1986. ISBN: 0-8493-5806-X. 4. Distribution System Protection Manual, McGraw-Edison Power Systems, 1990. 5. Westinghouse Electric Utility Ref. Book, Vol.3, Distribution Systems, 1965. 6. IEEE Power and Energy Magazine, July/August 2007 Issue 7. James Burke, Power Distribution Engineering, Mercel Dekker, 1994. ISBN: 0-8247-9237-8. 8. A. J. Pansini, Electrical Distribution Engineering McGrawHill, 1983. 9. E. Lakervi, E.J.Holmes, Electricity Distribution Network Design, IEE series, 1989. 10. www.powerlearn.org 11. J. Gers and E. J. Holmes Protection of Electricity Distribution Networks 2nd Edition, 12. R. E. Brown, Electric Power Distribution Reliability, Marcel Dekker Inc., 2002, ISBN: 0-8247-0798-2.

Grading Policy: 1. Homework Assignments: 2. Final Project a. Presentation: b. Report: 30% 70% 35% 35%

Course Schedule: ________________________________________________________________________ Lecture Day/Date Section(s)/ Topic(s) ________________________________________________________________________ 1 M/10/4 Introduction to detailed load modeling for distribution system analysis 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 M/10/11 M/10/18 M/10/25 M/11/01 M/11/08 M/11/15 M/11/22 M/11/29 M/12/06 PHEV, PEV, and energy Storage methods and Integration Demand Response applications and simulations Volt/Var Optimization Integration and simulation of wind, solar and other renewable energy systems Direct digital control of smart grid Advanced and adaptive distribution protection Cyber Security & Interoperability Standards Data sensing, management, mining and exchange DG/DER/Microgrids operation, control and protection with new topologies

11 M/12/09 Final project presentations and reports ________________________________________________________________________ If time permits, the following Smart Transmission and Generation topics will be covered: 1. Reintroducing Nuclear Generation 2. Next generation of EMS - New automation functions 3. Wide area sensing, Communications, control and protection, synchronized phasor measurements, PMU's 4. Congestion management 5. Power system dynamics and control