www.smdailyjournal.

com
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 63
A NEW BLOW
NATION PAGE 7
INTEL CHIEF: U.S.
ALLIES SPY TOO
NATION PAGE 8
PISCO A NEW
TRENDY DRINK
FOOD PAGE 19
WAVE OF HEALTH CANCELLATIONS HITTING
SMALL BUSINESSES
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
Former S.F.
49er’s DV
trial begins
Kwame Harris accused of seriously
injuring ex-boyfriend during argument
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Kwame Harris, the former San
Francisco 49er inadvertently outed as gay
by his arrest for allegedly seriously injur-
ing an ex-boyfriend during an argument at
a Menlo Park restaurant, began trial this
week for felony domestic violence.
Harris, 31, reportedly declined an offer
to settle the case and is instead in the
midst of jury selection for the trial on charges of domestic
violence and assault with force. He faces prison time if con-
victed.
However, Harris’ former boyfriend is refusing to testify in
the criminal trial and in February also dropped a civil law-
suit seeking damages for the alleged assault and emotional
distress. Even without alleged victim Dimitri Geier’s phys-
ical participation, prosecutors can submit as evidence his
Kwame Harris
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Seton Medical Center in Daly City mis-
takenly shipped a couple’s sheet-wrapped
stillborn daughter with other dirty laundry
to an outside vendor where the body was dis-
covered on a conveyor belt making its way
to a commercial washing machine, accord-
ing to a lawsuit filed by the parents
The heartbreak of the couple, Julio and
Rina N. Arriaza, after the Oct. 29, 2012,
death of their daughter Estefani after 36
weeks of pregnancy was “made horrific
beyond description” by what happened to
her body, according to the suit filed in San
Mateo County Superior Court against the
hospital and Seton Medical Center
Foundation.
The baby’s body was not only lost but
mishandled, leaving her “filthy, swollen
and mutilated” upon her return, the lawsuit
states.
“Imagine, the worst thing in the world
happens to you by losing a child and then it
gets worse,” said attorney Rafael Crespo Jr.
Seton Medical Center declined to com-
ment citing the pending litigation but the
suit claims Director James Schuessler apol-
ogized, accepted responsibility and gave
them a $2,500 check to cover burial
expenses. The suit also claims that
Schuessler assured the couple their daugh-
ter’s body had not been mishandled and the
funeral could proceed as scheduled.
“I think they appreciate he did come to
them but it never should have come to that,”
Crespo said.
Hospital sued for losing stillborn baby
Body found at laundry facility in Santa Cruz, pregnancy ‘made horrific beyond description’
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Woodside’s Michelle Spence, left, Dani Walsh, center, and Danielle La Force celebrate the Wildcats’ come from behind win
over Carlmont Tuesday night.The win leaves Woodside all alone in first place in the PAL Bay Division. SEE PAGE 11
A WILD WIN FOR WOODSIDE
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Representatives from Michaels Arts and
Crafts store have appealed a San Mateo
Planning Commission September denial of
its request to move to the former Borders
bookstore site on El Camino Real.
The appeal is scheduled to be heard by the
City Council Jan. 6, according to city plan-
ners.
Michaels’ lease at its current building on
Delaware Street near Kmart doesn’t expire
for another 16 months, but it applied to the
Craft store appeals to
council for relocation
Michaels wants to move to El Camino, planners say no
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Millbrae school officials are readying
plans for a parcel tax on the June 2014 bal-
lot to raise about $450,000 a year, however,
much depends on a community survey to be
conducted in January.
“It’s up to school district to really educate
community and public since we only have
grades K-8 and we’re recycling parents and
families constantly every couple of years,”
said Frank Barbaro, president of the
Millbrae Elementary School District Board
of Trustees. “We have to get back out there
and reeducate. We have families moving
into community and we’re the lowest funded
in the county.”
The budget for the 2013-14 school year is
projected to be about $17.145 million with
the new Local Control Funding Formula,
according to a staff report. The district is
going to be underfunded by approximately
Millbrae schools explore parcel tax
Next step is January community survey on potential measure
See APPEAL, Page 22 See TAX, Page 22
See HARRIS, Page 30
See BABY, Page 22
FOR THE RECORD 2 Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Actor Kevin Pollak
is 56.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1938
The radio play “The War of the
Worlds,” starring Orson Welles, aired
on CBS. (The live drama, which
employed fake breaking news reports,
panicked some listeners who thought
the portrayal of a Martian invasion
was real.)
“When love is not
madness, it is not love.”
— Pedro Calderon de la Barca, Spanish dramatist (1600-1681)
Actor Henry
Winkler is 68.
Comedian Ben
Bailey is 43.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A model presents a creation by designer Hu Sheguang from Sheguang Hu Haute Couture Collection at China Fashion Week
in Beijing.
Wednesday: Sunny. Highs in the mid to
upper 50s. Light winds... Becoming west
5 to 10 mph in the afternoon.
Wednesday night: Clear. Lows in the
mid 40s. North winds 5 to 10 mph.
Thursday: Sunny. Highs near 60.
Northeast winds around 5 mph in the
morning...Becoming light.
Thursday night: Clear. Lows in the upper 40s. Northwest
winds 5 to 10 mph in the evening...Becoming light.
Friday: Sunny. Highs in the 60s.
Friday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the upper 40s.
Saturday and Saturday night: Partly cloudy. Highs
around 60. Lows in the upper 40s.
Sunday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming
partly cloudy. Highs in the upper 50s.
Local Weather Forecast
In 1735, the second president of the United States, John
Adams, was born in Braintree, Mass.
In 1885, poet Ezra Pound was born in Hailey, Idaho.
In 1893, the U.S. Senate gave final congressional approval
to repealing the Sherman Silver Purchase Act of 1890.
In 1912, Vice President James S. Sherman, running for a sec-
ond term of office with President William Howard Taft, died six
days before Election Day. (Sherman was replaced with
Nicholas Murray Butler, but Taft, the Republican candidate,
ended up losing in an Electoral College landslide to Democrat
Woodrow Wilson.)
I n 1921, the silent film classic “The Sheik,” starring
Rudolph Valentino, premiered in Los Angeles.
In 1944, the Martha Graham ballet “Appalachian Spring,”
with music by Aaron Copland, premiered at the Library of
Congress in Washington, D.C., with Graham in a leading role.
In 1945, the U.S. government announced the end of shoe
rationing, effective at midnight.
In 1961, the Soviet Union tested a hydrogen bomb, the “Tsar
Bomba,” with a force estimated at about 50 megatons. The
Soviet Party Congress unanimously approved a resolution
ordering the removal of Josef Stalin’s body from Lenin’s
tomb.
In 1972, 45 people were killed when an Illinois Central Gulf
commuter train was struck from behind by another train in
Chicago’s South Side.
In 1974, Muhammad Ali knocked out George Foreman in the
eighth round of a 15-round bout in Kinshasa, Zaire, known as
the “Rumble in the Jungle” to regain his world heavyweight
title.
This year the average person will spend
$75.03 on Haloween costumes, candy
and decorations, according to the
National Retail Federation.
***
Horror novelist Stephen King (born
1947) does not open his house in Maine
to trick-or-treaters. He has done it a few
times, but one year they had 1,400
trick-or-treaters. That was the last year
he gave out candy.
***
Robert De Niro (born 1943) portrays
the monster created by Dr. Frankenstein
in the 1994 movie “Mary Shelley’s
Frankenstein.”
***
Afull moon rarely occurs on Halloween.
The last time it occurred was in 2001.
The next full moon on Oct. 31 will be in
the year 2020.
***
Bertrand Caillet is a werewolf that finds
love in Paris in the 1800s. It is the plot
of the classic horror novel “The
Werewolf of Paris” (1933) by Guy
Endore (1900-1970).
***
Do you know what lycanthropy is? See
answer at end.
***
Michael Jackson (1958-2009) and his
date walk through a graveyard. Suddenly
they are surrounded by zombies and
Michael becomes one. It is the plot of
the 13-minute video for the song
“Thriller” (1983).
***
Almost every country has a different
vampire myth. In China, vampires are
called Ch’ing Shih. They live under-
ground and get their power from the
moon. The Cretian vampire, called
Kathakano, can only be killed by chop-
ping of the head and boiling it in vine-
gar. In Polynesia, the Talamaur devours
the hearts of healthy men while they
sleep.
***
The common brown bat lives an aver-
age of 32 years. It is the longest lifes-
pan for a mammal of its size.
***
The largest species of spider in the
world is the venomous Goliath
Birdeater Tarantula, found in South
America. The biggest goliath spider on
record had a leg span of 11 inches across
and fangs 1 inch long.
***
In the movie “Poltergeist” (1982) the
houses built in the Cuesta Verde Estates
housing development were haunted
because the houses were built over a
cemetery. The movie had the famous
line “They’re here.”The word “polter-
geist” is German. It means “noisy
ghost.”
***
The Keene Pumpkin Festival, held
annually in New Hampshire, earned a
word record in 1996 for having the most
carved and lit pumpkins ever assembled
in one place. There were 13,044 jack-
o’-lanterns lining the town’s Main
Street.
***
The world’s largest popcorn ball
weighed 3,100 pounds and had a circum-
ference of over 20 feet. It was built in
2004 by volunteers in Sac City, Iowa.
***
The average 1-pound bag of candy corn
contains 294 kernels.
***
Snickers introduced the mini Fun Size
candy bar in 1968.
***
During the 1692 Salem Witch Trials, 24
people were convicted of the felony of
witchcraft. None were burned at the
stake. The accused witches were hanged.
***
Three witches create a potion in Act 4,
scene 1 of Shakespeare’s “MacBeth”
(1605). The ingredients of the boiling
cauldron include “eye of newt, and toe of
frog, wool of bat and tongue of dog.”
***
The oldest mummy ever found in North
America dates back to 7420 B.C. The
mummy was excavated from a cave in
Nevada in 1940, found lying on a fur
blanket with leather moccasins on his
feet.
Answer: In folklore, lycanthropy is
the magical ability to assume the form
and characteristics of a wolf.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall(at)smdailyjournal.com or
(Answers tomorrow)
CHESS GUILT PROVEN TOPPLE
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: Her fear of going to bed in the dark made
their daughter a — LIGHT SLEEPER
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
RAGCO
HOGDU
ROSWOR
RUYTEK
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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A:
Actor Dick Gautier is 76. Movie director Claude Lelouch is
76. Rock singer Grace Slick is 74. Songwriter Eddie Holland
is 74. Rhythm-and-blues singer Otis Williams (The
Temptations) is 72. Broadcast journalist Andrea Mitchell is
67. Rock musician Chris Slade (Asia) is 67. Country/rock
musician Timothy B. Schmit (The Eagles) is 66. Actor Leon
Rippy is 64. Actor Harry Hamlin is 62. Actor Charles Martin
Smith is 60. Country singer T. Graham Brown is 59. Actor
Michael Beach is 50. Rock singer-musician Gavin Rossdale
(Bush) is 46. Actor Jack Plotnick is 45. Actress Nia Long is
43. Country singer Kassidy Osborn is 37.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Eureka, No. 7,
in first place;Lucky Star,No.2,in second place;and
Gold Rush,No.1,in third place.The race time was
clocked at 1:44.77.
9 8 8
20 33 50 53 54 7
Mega number
Oct. 29 Mega Millions
4 6 34 49 56 29
Powerball
Oct. 26 Powerball
4 10 21 22 38
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
9 2 9 4
Daily Four
5 7 6
Daily three evening
11 25 33 35 41 10
Mega number
Oct. 26 Super Lotto Plus
3
Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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October 26, 2013 9:30am-8:00pm
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Hillsborough Antique Show & Sale
November 1, 11 am-8 pm
November 2, 11 am-7 pm
November 3, 11 am-5 pm
Adult: $10.00, Senior (65+): $8.00
The West's Premier Antique, Four Centuries of Antiques, Decorative Arts & Fine Art
Exhibitors from North America, Europe and Asia.
www.hillsboroughantiqueshow.com/
My Favorite Bead Show
November 1, 12 pm-6 pm
November 2, 10 am-6 pm
November 3, 11 am-5 pm
A dazzling array of loose beads, finished beaded jewelry and beading supplies
under one roof! The quality selection, along with special show pricing
direct from worldwide designers and manufacturers,
make this a must-see show for the public.
One low ticket price good for all three days [$8.00] or you can purchase
advance discounted tickets for $4.00 at http://www.ticketderby.com/
NEW POLICY-Children 8 and under are not permitted.
I
n the Mi l l brae Ci ty Counci l race, candidate
Doug Radtke raised $2,655 for the reporting
period from Sept. 22 to Oct. 19. He has raised
$4,605 total and spent $4,241.35 total. During this
period, he also gave himself a $2,165 loan. Expenses
included office expenses, campaign literature and mail-
ings, print ads, information technology costs and cam-
paign paraphernalia.
BURLINGAME
Disturbance. Police responded to a distur-
bance and found two people arguing over a
parking space on the 1200 block of
Bellevue Avenue before 6:29 p.m. on
Saturday, Oct. 26.
Found. Someone found jewelry and turned
it in to police on the 1800 block of El
Camino Real before 1:49 p.m. on Saturday,
Oct. 26.
Suspi ci ous acti vi ty. Officers responded
to report of a man who was trying to take
things from the rafters of a building but
found that he was a construction worker on
the 2200 block of Summit Drive before
7:54 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 26.
MILLBRAE
Possessi on of cont rol l ed substance
and false identificat i on. Police found
someone who was in possession of a con-
trolled substance and provided false identifi-
cation to officers on the 900 block of El
Camino Real before 12:27 p.m. Tuesday,
Oct. 22.
Vandalism. Vandalism was reported on the
first block of Hermosa Avenue before 7:30
a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 16.
Body of missing Burlingame
man found in Hillsborough
An elderly Burlingame man who went
missing on Monday was found dead Tuesday
afternoon in Hillsborough, police said.
Ivor Morris, 79, who lived in the 1600
block of Ralston Avenue and also went by
the name “Scotty,” went for a walk at about
9 a.m. Monday but never returned home,
police said.
His wife reported him missing later that
day, and told police he was likely on foot
because he had left his car behind.
Yesterday afternoon, at about 1:10 p.m., a
resident of Rowan Tree Lane in
Hillsborough called police to report seeing
a man down off of the road, Hillsborough
police said.
Officers responded and found a man’s body
in thick vegetation, police said. He was
pronounced dead at the scene, and was later
identified as Morris.
The San Mateo County Coroner’s Office is
investigating the death, but police said
there were no signs of foul play.
The spot where Morris was found is in a
hilly area adjacent to Interstate 280, nearly
eight miles from his home. Hillsborough
police Capt. Doug Davis said it is not clear
how he got there, but that it appears he trav-
eled on foot.
He said police have been told Morris was
an avid walker.
Ferry to expand
Wednesday, Friday services
The San Francisco Bay Ferry announced
yesterday the continuation of its Wednesday
and Friday excursion service between South
San Francisco’s Oyster Point and San
Francisco.
The service will be available through
Friday, May 16. This Wednesday and Friday
service, which had been scheduled to end on
Nov. 2, is being extended due to public
requests. The service operates between
Oyster Point and the San Francisco Ferry
Building and Pier 41, according to a press
release.
Service is also offered for weekday com-
muters between South San Francisco,
Alameda Main Street and Oakland’s Jack
London Square.
Police reports
Out to lunch
Officers responded to report of a man
parked under a tree for several hours but
found that he was merely enjoying his
lunch on the 1700 block of Trousdale
Drive in Burlingame before 5:24 p.m.
on Thursday, Oct 24.
Local briefs
4
Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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FEDERAL GOVERNMENT
• U. S. Rep. Anna Eshoo,
D-Pal o Al t o, an eight-year vet-
eran of the House Int el l i gence
Commi ttee and current ranking
member of the Subcommi ttee
on Communi cat i ons and
Te c hnol ogy, is part of a bipar-
tisan group of more than 70 House members who intro-
duced legislation to comprehensively reform U.S.
national security laws.
The legislation, known as the USA FREEDOM
Act, comes after revelations in recent months that the
U.S. intelligence community has trampled on the per-
sonal privacy and civil liberties of Americans by reg-
ularly collecting their “metadata” telephone records.
Metadata refers to telephone numbers, time and dura-
tion of phone calls, according to Eshoo’s office.
The legislation would increase transparency at the
secret court that reviews and approves the govern-
ment’s surveillance requests and make several other
reforms to shine light on our intelligence agencies,
including allowing Internet companies to disclose
estimates of the number of FISC orders they receive
each year, and how many users are impacted, according
to Eshoo’s office.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A Daly City man who allegedly left
his seriously injured passenger for
hours inside a crashed car off an
embankment before returning to move
the man into the driver’s seat ahead of
authorities’ arrival is standing trial
this week for felony drunk driving and
driving on a suspended license.
Henock Admassu, 24, has pleaded
not guilty to the charges and an addi-
tional charge of fleeing the scene of an
accident was dismissed at a prelimi-
nary hearing. The case was assigned to
a judge Monday and jury selection
began yesterday.
The odd chain of
events began just
before midnight
Dec. 10, 2012,
when Admassu
called 911 to say he
was involved in an
accident but disori-
ented and unclear
where he left the
vehicle containing
an injured passenger. About 45 min-
utes later, he arrived at his sister’s
home and awoke her with the same
story. They reportedly spent the next
few hours driving around looking for
the spot and called 911 again around 4
a.m. to report the vehicle’s location
300 feet down off an embankment off
Skyline Boulevard.
When Daly City police and the
California Highway Patrol arrived,
they reportedly spotted Admassu
pulling the passenger from a Dodge
Charger and pushing him back into
the driver’s side seat. Admassu was
uninjured in the crash and, seven
hours after, his blood alcohol level
was .05.
He remains free from custody on
$150,000 bail.
Driver starts trial for DUI crash, abandoning passenger
Henock
Admassu
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Astate legisla-
tive committee is planning to hold a
hearing in response to the deaths of
two Bay Area Rapid Transit track
inspectors who were struck by a train.
Assemblyman Roger Hernandez
said Tuesday that he was convening
the Nov. 7 hearing to “get to the
bottom” of the fatal accident,
which occurred when BART’s regu-
lar train operators and maintenance
workers were on strike.
Hernandez, a Democrat from West
Covina, chairs the Assembly
Committee on Labor and Employment.
San Francisco Assemblyman Phil
Ting requested the hearing.
Legislative hearing planned on BART worker deaths
5
Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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DUI driver in court
for killing couple
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A54-year-old driver accused of fatally slam-
ming into a Menlo Park couple walking their
dog and another vehicle
carrying four teenagers
once again side-stepped
appearing in court for the
collision that also injured
the victims’ dog and
orphaned their three
teenage children.
Marjorie Reitzell, of
Redwood City, was first
due in court Monday after-
noon but required medical care after complain-
ing of chest pains. The same was true yester-
day so she is now coming back to court today,
said District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe.
Reitzell will be charged with two counts of
gross vehicular manslaughter and two felony
counts of driving while under the influence
causing injury. Reitzell, who is on probation
for a separate driving while under the influ-
ence misdemeanor conviction last November,
asked for a court-appointed attorney and put
off a plea until her next court appearance.
Reitzell is accused of killing Balbir and
Kamal Singh just before 7 p.m. Oct. 24 as
they walked their dog on Chilco Street.
Reitzell, who is on probation for a 2012 DUI
conviction, reportedly struck the couple from
behind before going over a center divider and
hitting the second car head-on before coming
to rest against a tree. The couple died at the
scene and their Chihuahua was injured but sur-
vived. He was treated at the Peninsula Humane
Society.
Prosecutors have not released a specific
blood alcohol level for Reitzell but said it was
“significantly more than twice the legal
limit.” She had been drinking heavily all day,
according to the District Attorney’s Office.
In addition to the DUI conviction, Reitzell
also has previous drug-related convictions.
She remains in custody on $2 million bail.
Marjorie Reitzell
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Mateo police found an environmen-
tally friendly way to cut costs through its
purchase of an electric 2013 Zero DS Police
Motorcycle to help patrol downtown, the
department announced yesterday.
“This is an incredible opportunity for San
Mateo police to continue exploring the cut-
ting edge of promising technologies. We
are excited to be beta-testing the best appli-
cations for these new motors in keeping
with our city’s goals of sustainability and
lowering our carbon footprint, while
expanding our enforcement equipment and
tactics,” San Mateo Police Chief Susan
Manheimer said in a press release.
Police will be testing different uses of the
Zero motorcycle to determine how to use it
most efficiently and effectively. San Mateo
police chose to start testing the uses of the
bike by immediately adding it to its down-
town patrol unit.
“It was truly an easy decision for our
department to integrate Zero into our current
fleet of motorcycles. As a small community,
we wanted a motorcycle that could easily
maneuver its way through our downtown
traffic quietly and efficiently without dis-
rupting the community,” Deputy Police
Chief Michael Callagy said in a press
release.
Zero’s 100 percent electric powertrain is
quiet, doesn’t require routine maintenance
and the batteries are fully recyclable,
according to the Scotts Valley-based compa-
ny’s website. The motorcycles can last up to
135 city miles on one charge and can reach
speeds up to 95 mph, said John Lloyd, vice
president of Zero Motorcycles’ global sales
and a San Mateo resident.
“The motorcycles are able to last an entire
shift on one charge lowering the depart-
ments operating costs and allowing
resources to be extended for more security
and a safer community,” Callagy said in a
press release.
Unlike other electric vehicles, a Zero can
be charged from practically anywhere, only
requiring a 110 outlet, Lloyd said.
Zero partnered with cities like Monterey,
Santa Cruz and Scotts Valley law enforce-
ment agencies to develop a bike that suits
San Mateo police get electric
New Zero electric motorcycle to start patrolling downtown soon
By Kenny Martin
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Trivia buffs get ready, the South San
Francisco Library is hosting its 21st annual
trivia challenge this Friday.
The trivia challenge pits teams of three
against each other in a competition to see
who can answer the most trivia questions
correctly. The questions, thought up by
library staff, cover a wide range of subjects,
from entertainment to government and liter-
ature.
Project Read, started by Leslie Shelton, is
a program that matches people 18 and over
with a tutor to help with specific skills, usu-
ally work related. Currently, Project Read in
north San Mateo County has 80 tutors and
120 learners from South City, Daly City and
Colma.
When South San Francisco started the
trivia challenge fundraiser in 1992, there
were only five to seven teams participating
and between 50 and 60 people would attend.
This year, there are more than 34 teams.
“After so many years of doing it, the sup-
port base is there,” said Fernando Cordova,
literary services coordinator at the South
A trivial pursuit at the South San Francisco Library
Project Read Trivia Challenge raises money for literary services
The San Mateo Police department’s new 2013
Zero DS Police Motorcycle.
JON VALLE
John Read,Marian Mann and David York from
the Androcles Pals team fielded by the Daly
City Host Lions at last year’s Trivia Challenge.
See ZERO, Page 20
See TRIVIA Page 20
6
Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Theresa (Tessy) Schembri
Theresa (Tessy) Schembri died peacefully
Sunday, Oct. 27, 2013, at the age of 98.
Wife of the late Joseph
Schembri. She is sur-
vived by her devoted sis-
ters Carmen Busuttil
(Joe) of San Bruno and
Mary Vella (the late
Saviour) of Mosta, Malta
and her children:
MaryAnn Saisi (Bob),
John Schembri (his late
wife Judy), Victor Schembri and Charles
Schembri (Lynda). Also survived by several
grandchildren and great-grandchildren.
She was born Aug. 1, 1915, in a house her
father built in the Bayview district of San
Francisco. She lived in San Francisco until
1964 when they moved to San Bruno. She
retired from Schlage Lock Company after
many years of service.
Family and friends are invited to visit
after 9 a.m. Monday, Nov. 4 at the Chapel
of the Highlands, 194 Millwood Drive at El
Camino Real in Millbrae. The funeral will
then leave the chapel and proceed to St.
Robert Catholic Church, 1380 Crystal
Springs Road in San Bruno where the funer-
al mass will be celebrated at 10:30 a.m.
Committal will follow at Holy Cross
Cemetery in Colma. In lieu of flowers
please make a donation to San Bruno
Catholic Worker House, St. Robert’s
Catholic Church or your favorite charity.
Charles Warren Stafford
Charles Warren Stafford, age 59, of
Belmont, died Oct. 23, 2013.
He was born to the late Violet Flora
McPerson and Jackson Dwight Stafford
Feb. 22,1954, in Oakland. Charles graduat-
ed from Mills High School in 1973. He
attended the College of San Mateo for a
short time and then he traveled around the
country.
Charles was an avid reader of the scrip-
tures and a genuine good person. He is now
reunited with his beloved mother and father,
as well as his dog Snoopy.
He is survived by his
sisters Jackie Panigada
of San Mateo and Sylvia
Dulay of Evansville,
Ind., as well as nephews
Jimmy and Eric Panigada
and Darren and Ryan
Dulay and niece
Alexandria Dulay.
A memorial service
will be celebrated 1 p.m. Friday, Nov. 1 at
the Chapel of the Highlands, El Camino
Real at 194 Millwood Drive in Millbrae.
Vivian R. Vanoi
Vivian R. Vanoi, a 65-year resident of
Millbrae, died Monday Sept. 28, 2013, at
the age of 92.
She spent 20 years as a real estate broker
in Millbrae but found more fulfillment as a
wife, mother, grandmother and great-grand-
mother. She was preceded in death by her
husband, Richard, and survived by her three
daughters Trina Hobbs, Carole Cappa and
Elaine Hughes, her eight grandchildren and
11 great-grandchildren.
“She will be deeply misses by all.”
Afuneral liturgy will be celebrated 12:30
p.m. Saturday at the Chapel of the
Highlands, El Camino Real at 194
Millwood Drive in Millbrae.
Committal will follow at Woodlawn
Memorial Park in Colma. Family and
friends may visit on Saturday after noon
until 12:30 p.m.
As a public service, the Daily Journal
prints obituaries of approximately 200
words or less with a photo one time on the
date of the family’s choosing. To submit
obituaries, email information along with a
jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.
Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity,
length and grammar. If you would like to
have an obituary printed more than once,
longer than 200 words or without editing,
please submit an inquiry to our advertising
department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Obituaries
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The Mid-Peninsula Water District
is having its first contested elec-
tion in years with the addition of
Belmont Councilman Dave Warden
into the four-person race for three
open seats.
Joining him are incumbents
Betty Linvill and Al Stuebing,
along with challenger Mike
Malekos. Longtime director David
Altscher is not seeking re-election
after first joining the board in
1999. Among the issues in the race
has been a recent embezzlement
scandal, reaching economies of
scale and ensuring water is provided
to its customers primarily in
Belmont, but also in portions of
San Carlos and unincorporated San
Mateo County. The candidates were
asked to answer the following ques-
tions in about 50 words.
What is the biggest chal-
lenge facing the district?
Li nvi l l : Our biggest challenge
is keeping user rates low. Our water
is purchased solely from the SFPUC
and their current retrofitting of the
regional water system is necessary
but costly. We have cut staff and
reduced operating expenses in an
effort to keep rates in check. This is
a priority.
Mal ekos: Above all, stability
of rates. Additionally, the board
should concentrate on restoring
confidence to its customers and the
public at large. It should ensure that
capital projects are done efficiently
and on time. And, that safe high-
quality water is provided at a fair
price.
Stuebing: Continued access to
affordable, high-quality water.
Demand on Hetch Hetchy is
increasing and supply will likely
decrease. We need to maintain our
contracted rights to keep our sup-
ply of water. And we need to contin-
ue to use water more efficiently. My
experience in energy efficiency will
help here.
Warden: The district’s biggest
challenge is to balance the increas-
ing costs of maintaining an aging
infrastructure with the need to keep
water and service rates from explod-
ing. We need to continually explore
cost reduction strategies in lieu of
never-ending rate increases as well
as to create a longer term financial
plan.
Do you feel as if the district
has taken the proper act i ons
si nce the recent embezzl e-
ment situation?
Li nvi l l : When this came to
light a forensic audit was promptly
ordered and insurance reimburse-
ment of our approximate loss has
been paid. Acertified fraud examiner
and a new CPAwere also engaged.
The 2013 audit results will be
reported at the next board meeting.
We invite the public to attend.
Mal ekos: This begs the ques-
tion, “how did this happen?” I agree
with measures taken; however, they
did not go far enough. The embez-
zlement occurred as a result of a fail-
ure to institute fundamental risk
management principles. Outside
consultants were retained to estab-
lish basic operating policies. If
elected, I’d serve as “watchdog.”
Stuebi ng: Yes. With guidance
from experts in the field, we have
installed financial controls that
will prevent future embezzlement.
Further, we have a new general
manager, a new administrative
services manager and new audi-
tors. All are focused on using
these controls for the protection
of the district and its customers.
Warden: Additional financial
controls are now in place; a new
auditor has been hired. However,
I’m critical of the complacency that
created such vulnerabilities in the
organization. If the responsible
manager had not taken ill, she
would likely still be stealing
money! Furthermore, budgetary
transparency and financial report-
ing deficiencies still remain.
Are there ways the district
can better reach economies of
scal e?
Li nvi l l : We belong to BAWSCA
for economies of scale. This
agency represents us, along with
23 other Bay Area cities and dis-
tricts, in the purchase of water from
San Francisco. On the expense
side, we belong to the Association
of California Water Agencies for
Legislative, Regulatory and Water
Management and sustainability
issues.
Mal ekos: I’d explore whether
it’s more efficient for the district to
merge with a larger water utility.
Large utilities operate at lower
costs and have the ability to spread
expenses over a wider customer
base. The result is a reduced cost of
service and the potential for reduced
rates.
Stuebi ng: There are options
worth exploring, like sharing
equipment or combining with
another agency, but scale itself
does not mean greater efficiency.
Water rates in Belmont are about
the same as Palo Alto’s and
Redwood City’s and lower than
Burlingame’s — larger cities with
the same water source and similar
territories.
Warden: The water district, with
its 17 employees and $10M in rev-
enue, should rely on other agencies
to be cost-effective. The district
should seriously consider sharing
finance and other administrative
roles with other agencies. For
example, the Belmont Fire
Department saves over
$500,000/year by partnering with
San Mateo and Foster City.
Water district candidates weigh in on issues
Age: 65
Occupation:
Incumbent,
commercial banker
Education: MBA
United States
University and
graduate Pacific
Coast Banking
School
Experience: Board seats including
former SF Financial Women’s
Association Treasurer, former Treasurer
of Richmond Area Multi-services, Inc.
nonprofit mental health agency, S.F.
Director and past president of Mid-
Peninsula Water District since 2007
City, years of residence: more than15
Family: Married
Betty Linvill
Age: 56
Occupation:
Retired utility
executive/Financial
services
professional
Education: BS,
business
administration and
finance from
University of San Francisco. MBA from
University of Phoenix.
Experience: Employed 20 years in
utility operations which included
management of office personnel and
field crews; 10 years in financial
services. Former member: Belmont
Finance Commission, Belmont Library
Task Force, Cipriani School Site Council
City, years of residence: Belmont, 18
years
Family: Married with three children
Michael Malekos
Age: 61
Occupation:
MPWD Director
Education: BS
Mechanical
Engineering, UC
Berkeley
Experience:Thirty
years of utility
leadership
experience, most recently as PG&E’s
Director of Account Services
City, years of residence: Belmont, 30
years
Family: Married, with two daughters
Al Stuebing
Age: 52
Occupation:
Belmont business
owner, medical
software
consultant
Education: BA
Computer Science,
UC Berkeley;
California
substitute teaching credential
Experience: Mayor, city of Belmont
(2002, 2005, 2012); councilman, city of
Belmont (1999-2007, 2009-present)
CIty, years of residence: Belmont,
more than 40 years
Family: Married
Dave Warden
STATE/NATION 7
Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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The Department of Psychiatry is seeking
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depressed, and anxious participants between
55-110 years old who are right-handed and do
not have other major medical problems
(including thyroid problems) for an MRI study.
Participants will have 3 appointments at Stan-
ford University for a total of 8-10 hours.
Compensation: $150. Contact the Emotion
Aging Study at (650)-723-2795
For general information about oarticipants rights, contact 1-866-680-2906.
EXAMINATIONS
and
TREATMENT
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REUTERS
The Sierra Nevada Corporation Dream Chaser flight vehicle is
readied for 60 mph tow tests at NASA’s Dryden Flight Research
Center in Edwards.
Mini space shuttle skids
off runway in test flight
By Marcia Dunn
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — A new, smaller version of
NASA’s space shuttle is recuperating from a rough first land-
i ng.
The Dream Chaser space plane is being designed by Sierra
Nevada Corp. It’s vying to carry astronauts to and from the
International Space Station in four or five more years.
The Nevada-based company tested a full-scale model at
Edwards Air Force Base in California on Saturday. A heli-
copter dropped the unmanned craft from 12,500 feet in a first
free flight reminiscent of NASA’s drop tests of the shuttle
prototype Enterprise in the 1970s.
Everything worked well for the automated Dream Chaser
model until the end, when the left landing gear deployed too
late and the test vehicle skidded off the runway.
Company space systems chief Mark Sirangelo said
Tuesday that damage was minor. The left gear was still
attached and the tire wasn’t even shredded, he said. The crew
cabin area was unscathed — astronauts would have been
uninjured, he said. The flight computers never stopped
working, and nothing critical was damaged.
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
and Stephen Ohlemacher
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Move over, web-
site woes. Lawmakers confronted the
Obama administration Tuesday with a
difficult new health care problem — a
wave of cancellation notices hitting
small businesses and individuals who
buy their own insurance.
At the same time, the federal official
closest to the website apologized for
its dysfunction in new sign-ups and
asserted things are getting better by
the day.
Medicare chief Marilyn Tavenner
said it’s not the administration but
insurers who are responsible for can-
cellation letters now reaching many of
the estimated 14 million people who
buy individual policies. And, officials
said, people who get cancellation
notices will be able to find better
replacement plans, in some cases for
less.
The Associated Press, citing the
National Association of Insurance
Commissioners, reported in May that
many carriers would opt to cancel poli-
cies this fall and issue new ones.
Administratively that was seen as eas-
ier than changing existing plans to
comply with the new law, which man-
dates coverage of more services and
provides better financial protection
against catastrophic illnesses.
While the administration had ample
warning of the cancellations, they
could become another public relations
debacle for President Barack Obama’s
signature legislation. This problem
goes to the credibility of one of the
president’s earliest promises about the
health care overhaul: You can keep
your plan if you like it.
“Based on what little information
the administration has disclosed, it
turns out that more people have
received cancellation notices for their
health care plans this month than have
enrolled in the (health care website),”
said Ways and Means Chairman Dave
Camp, R-Mich. He cited a news report
of 146,000 cancellations in his state
alone.
Health policy cancellations: New
blow for Obama administration
“Based on what little information the administration
has disclosed, it turns out that more people have received
cancellation notices for their health care plans this month
than have enrolled in the (health care website).”
— Ways and Means Chairman Dave Camp, R-Mich.
By Don Thompson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — California could
gain tens of millions of dollars annu-
ally in federal reimbursements for
prison health care under the nation’s
new health law, state and federal offi-
cials said Tuesday.
The money would come from
Medicaid reimbursements for inmates
who are treated in outside hospitals. It
would not help pay for health care
within prisons.
Anationwide study of prison health
care spending released by The Pew
Charitable Trusts cites an estimate
from California’s nonpartisan
Legislative Analyst’s Office that the
state could save nearly $70 million
annually.
The study assumes that California
will take full advantage of a change in
federal law that will make Medicaid
coverage available to low-income
childless adults, meaning more prison-
ers will be eligible.
Health reforms could help California prison spending
NATION 8
Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
PIGSKIN
Pick ‘em Contest
We are not responsible for late, damaged, illegible or lost entries. Multiple entries are accepted. One prize per household. All applicable Federal, State & Local taxes associ-
ated with the receipt or use of any prize are the sole responsibility of the winner. The prizes are awarded “as is” and without warranty of any kind, express or implied. The
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acting in violation of the rules; or to be acting in an unsportsmanlike manner. Entry constitutes agreement for use of name & photo for publicity purposes. Employees of the
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whatsoever for injuries, damages, or losses to persons and property which may be sustained in connection with the receipt, ownership, or use of the prize.
THE DAILY JOURNAL
Redwood General Tire Pros
and Original Nick’s Pizzeria & Pub
PRESENT THE NINTH ANNUAL
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Week Nine
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TIEBREAKER: Chicago @ Green Bay__________
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will determine the winner. Each week, the Daily Journal will reward gift certificates to Redwood
General Tire Pros and Original Nick’s. The Daily Journal Pigskin Pick’em Contest is free to play.
Must be 18 or over. Winners will be announced in the Daily Journal.
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Send entry form to: 800 S. Claremont Street, #210, San Mateo, CA 94402. You may enter as many
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By Lara Jakes and Julie Pace
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Facing lawmakers who
suggested U.S. surveillance has gone too
far, the national intelligence director on
Tuesday defended spying on foreign allies as
necessary and said such scrutiny of
America’s friends — and vice versa — is
commonplace.
Another top intelligence official said the
collection of phone records that prompted
outrage across the Atlantic actually was con-
ducted with the help of European govern-
ments. News reports that the National
Security Agency had swept up millions of
phone records in France, Spain and else-
where were inaccurate and reflected a misun-
derstanding of “metadata” that was in fact
collected by NATO allies and shared with the
United States, the director of the NSAtold a
congressional hearing.
The nation’s post-Sept. 11 surveillance
programs are coming under increased criti-
cism at home and abroad, capped by recent
revelations that the NSAmonitored German
Chancellor Angela Merkel’s cellphone and
those of up to 34 other world leaders. Those
reports relied on documents provided by for-
mer NSAanalyst Edward Snowden.
Congressional leaders who have been
staunch supporters of the NSAprograms are
now saying it is time for a close examina-
tion. The White House said Tuesday that
President Barack Obama had ordered a full
review of the programs and was considering
changes.
National Intelligence Director James
Clapper defended the secret surveillance that
sweeps up phone records and emails of mil-
lions of Americans as vital to protecting
against terrorists.
He played down European allies’ com-
plaints about spying on their leaders, say-
ing the allies do it, too.
“That’s a hardy perennial,” Clapper told a
House intelligence committee hearing.
He said during his 50 years working in
intelligence it was “a basic tenet” to collect,
whether by spying on communications or
through other sources, confidential informa-
tion about foreign leaders that reveals “if
what they’re saying gels with what’s actual-
ly going on.”
Committee Chairman Mike Rogers asked
whether allies had conducted the same type
of espionage against U.S. leaders.
“Absolutely,” Clapper responded.
Asked about collection of foreign phone
records, the NSA’s director, Gen. Keith
Alexander, testified that the U.S. did not col-
lect European records alone, as was reported
over the past week to an outcry of criticism
across Europe.
Alexander said the U.S. was given data by
NATO partners, often collected from else-
where around the world, as part of a program
to protect military interests. He disputed
that the program targeted European citizens,
but did not offer specifics. He called the
reports “completely false.”
As for efforts at home, the intelligence
leaders defended sweeping up records of U.S.
phone calls as necessary to combat terror-
ism. The Obama administration vigorously
opposes efforts to curtail the internal spy-
ing programs that have angered some
Americans.
Intel chief: U.S. spies on allies, they do it, too
REUTERS
General Keith Alexander, left, director of the National Security Agency, testifies at a House
Intelligence Committee hearing on Capitol Hill.
OPINION 9
Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Yes on Measure P
Editor,
As a local CPAand business owner,
I want to ensure that measures to sup-
port school districts are fiscally
sound and cost-effective. That is why
I am supporting Measure P.
First, it will help relieve the acute
overcrowding problems our school
district is facing, in both San Mateo
and Foster City, by adding school
capacity. Other improvements to
classrooms and labs will also be com-
pleted.
But what is most important to me is
the Measure P plan to support 21st-
century technology. The state has
implemented new, rigorous academic
standards called the Common Core.
To display their academic skills and
knowledge under these new standards,
all students will be required to take
computerized exams, commencing in
spring 2014. To prepare for this pro-
found shift in curriculum and instruc-
tion, our schools must be able to pro-
vide up-to-date technology to all stu-
dents, especially those without the
means to afford technology in their
own homes. The good news is that
Measure P is a sound financing mech-
anism for technology. Short-term
technology funding bonds have been
used for years to support school dis-
tricts that have limited funding for
such equipment. With strapped gener-
al funds due to unstable and unreliable
state funding, local sources of rev-
enue have been critical in providing
both facilities upgrades and educa-
tional technology. In fact, School
Services of California recently
endorsed this strategy to prepare for
the Common Core.
To provide the necessary learning
technology to keep our students
ahead of the curve, we need Measure P.
Please join me and support Measure P.
Gary Goldberg
Foster City
Letter to the editor
M
ost people think of a
municipal water agency
only when they get their
bill, or when the spigot runs dry. But
for the Mid-Peninsula Water District,
there has been interest because of a
recent case of alleged embezzlement
by a former district employee and
questions about the Board of
Directors’ oversight of its finances.
Though there have been other
instances of embezzlement in small
special districts, this situation
appears to be isolated. The district is
moving on with better controls and a
new general manager. Still, there is
something to be said for better over-
sight and new ideas.
Belmont Councilman Dave Warden
decided to throw his hat into the ring
when he heard there might not be a
contested election for the three open
seats. Warden is known as a stickler
for details who is definitely not afraid
of asking questions. He would like to
see more robust financial reporting
and an exploration of shared services.
Aprimary target for a partnership
would be the city of Belmont, accord-
ing to Warden, since the district pri-
marily serves that city. However, that
is one option among many that could
be explored. Warden is a great match
for this district at this time and would
ensure there are proper checks in
place to ensure embezzlement never
happens again and that the district
looks at ways to save money and con-
tinue to provide water at a good rate
for its customers.
Of the incumbents, Al Stuebing is a
solid choice. He recognizes the horri-
ble nature of the alleged embezzle-
ment and is leading the charge in
making sure proper controls are in
place. He has an easy nature, but firm
grasp on the possible paths the dis-
trict could take to ensure quality serv-
ice and low rates. He is an obvious
choice to return to the board.
Challenger Mike Malekos has a
good amount of utility experience
through Pacific Gas and Electric and
has the proper emphasis on maintain-
ing low rates and exploring a merger
with a larger water agency to achieve
better economies of scale.
The Mid-Peninsula Water District is
obviously in a transitional period
with an embezzlement scandal, new
management and opportunities to
explore shared services with other
agencies. To achieve fiscal stability,
it needs proper oversight and ener-
getic members of its Board of
Directors. Of the candidates, we high-
ly recommend Warden but also recom-
mend Stuebing and Malekos.
Malekos, Stuebing, Warden for water district How spooky can it get?
“W
e have to abandon the passive role we have
accepted as mere consumers of media; we
must see ourselves in a new light — or
rather see ourselves once again in a revolutionary light —
as citizen leaders with responsibilities to speak the truth.”
— Naomi Wolf, “The End of America” — in speaking of
liberals.
I don’t want to complete-
ly spook you out or any-
thing, but then I think of
what those determined and
obstinate tea party types
and the wimpy legislators
who have not stood up to
them and put them in their
place have been doing to
this country. When it comes
to being frightening, the
ghosts and goblins of
Halloween cannot come
close. And as I looked
through my notebook and
noticed all of the references
and quotes I had jotted down in relation to this debacle, I
just automatically marched to the desktop.
The tea party types keep holding us hostage to their
demands — completely obsessed with what is obviously
their aim to sabotage “Obamacare” with no thought to the
consequences for anyone else. Too bad there haven’t been
enough undaunted congressmen and congresswomen to pro-
tect us from this threat to our democracy. It’s such a sad
comment on the human condition when people who are
obsessed with their own narcissistic aims can throw the
whole country out of whack and so many of our legislators
are so beholden to special interests that chaos results.
It was bad enough during George W’s administration. We
were duped while he and his mentally sclerotic cohorts
maneuvered us into unnecessary wars. Now we have to deal
with the antics of people with similar brain quirks who
have been doggedly pursuing ways to bring down the
Obama administration. You can’t help but wonder how some
people become so arrogant and narcissistic and what is
behind their behavior. As one wise commentator recom-
mended: “We must face reality instead of trying to make
reality fit our preconceived ideas of what reality should be.”
So how did those ultra-conservatives become so com-
pletely engulfed in their self-serving aims, closed to any
thoughts but their own and so dismissive of those of us
who believe government and democracy should operate for
everyone? What caused them to become so indifferent to
the welfare of the rest of us and so obsessed with being in
control? Nature or nurture?
Looking for some answers, I went to my book closet and
there I found three very interesting books that offer much
insight into the ultra-conservative mindset. One was writ-
ten about what made George W. tick: “Bush on the Couch”
(2004), by Justin A. Frank M.D. In describing Bush and
others like him (including his cohort Cheney) Frank wrote:
“He wants to do what he wants to do — and nobody can
stop him. The megalomaniac hates anybody else having
power — it is always a potential threat to his own.” Add
Jacob Weisberg, author of “The Bush Tragedy” (2008), in
referring to Bush 43: “Bush’s inflexibility is rooted in the
old family drama. At a temperamental level, the president
has almost no ability to accept blame or learn from mis-
takes.”
Also I found “The Republican Brain” (2012), by Chris
Mooney who writes at length about the problem of the
right wing mind and how it got that way. “Some of our indi-
vidual brain cells have latent ideological implications, and
may predispose us toward the adoption of beliefs that ‘feel’
right to us — religious beliefs and political beliefs, among
others.” Then he goes into our environment — especially
the influence of our family and “the region of the country in
which we live, the era, the political structures, the commu-
nication technologies in use.”
And his basic conclusion: “Part of the truce would require
conservatives to recognize that if you want knowledge, you
must go to a person (or better yet, a group of persons, like
the scientific community) that is adept at determining what
it actually is. You don’t just get to make it up for yourself
and deny what actual experts say because you’re sure you’re
right.” (Think global warming).
We don’t need Halloween to remind us that there are
spooks out there to harass us. We don’t need to hear anyone
yell “Boo” or even “Trick or Treat.” We who cannot fathom
how some people can be so recalcitrant are already spooked
enough by the tricks of the extreme right’s tactics which,
we can be sure, haven’t ended. As the Oct. 21 editorial in
one of our newspapers expressed: “What’s really scary is
that we might have to do it all again.”
“Our democracy is in danger. The danger has its roots in
money, power, social structure and history, but its ultimate
source is in the brains of our citizens.” — George Lakoff,
“The Political Mind.”
Since 1984, Dorothy Dimitre has written more than 700
columns for various local newspapers. Her email address is
gramsd@aceweb.com.
Editorial
San Mateo County Community College
District
Richard Holober
Tom Mohr
Belmont-Redwood Shores Elementary
School District
Rakesh Hegde
Amy Koo
Charles Velschow
Hillsborough City Elementary School
District
Lynne Esselstein
Don Geddis
Kaarin Hardy
San Bruno Park School District
Patrick Flynn
John Marinos
Henry Sanchez
San Carlos Elementary School District
Nicole Bergeron
Carol Elliott
Kathleen Farley
Sequoia Union High School District
Alan Sarver
Chris Thomsen
Belmont City Council
Warren Lieberman
Eric Reed
Charles Stone
Burlingame City Council
Michael Brownrigg
Russ Cohen
Ann Kieghran
Millbrae City Council
Reuben Holober
Ann Schneider
Redwood City Council
Jeff Gee
Diane Howard
John Seybert
San Bruno City Council
Marty Medina
Rico Medina
San Carlos City Council
Bob Grassilli
Matt Grocott
Cameron Johnson
San Mateo City Council
Josh Hugg
David Lim
Robert Ross
South San Francisco City Council
(two-year seat)
Karyl Matsumoto
South San Francisco City Council
(four-year seat)
Mark Addiego
Maurice Goodman
Pradeep Gupta
Measure P-YES
$130 million bond measure for the San Mateo-
Foster City Elementary School District
Measure R-YES
$174 parcel tax for the Belmont-Redwood
Shores Elementary School District
Measure U-YES
Increase of business license tax in Foster City
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BUSINESS 10
Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Dow 15,680.35 +111.42 10-Yr Bond 2.507 -0.005
Nasdaq 3,952.34 +12.21 Oil (per barrel) 97.93
S&P 500 1,771.95 +9.84 Gold 1,344.50
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Tuesday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Michael Kors Holdings Ltd., up 98 cents to $77.38
The high-end apparel company will join the Standard & Poors 500 index
at the end of trading Friday, replacing NYSE Euronext.
United States Steel Corp., down $2.05 to $25.47
The steelmaker’s quarterly revenue came in below Wall Street’s
expectaions.
Cummins Inc., down $7.01 to $127.90
The engine-maker gets hit by weakness in the mining industry and cuts
its profit and revenue forecasts for the year.
Nasdaq
Apple Inc., down $13.20 to $516.68
More iPhones were sold during the latest quarter, yet the company’s
earnings fell 9 percent as more people bought lower-priced models.
Nutrisystem Inc., up $3.11 to $18.13
The weight-loss company’s third-quarter adjusted earnings and revenue
beat expectations.
Volcano Corp., down $3.41 to $20.95
The medical-device maker issued a weak revenue forecast for the quarter
and the year, prompting a slew of downgrades.
Take-Two Interactive Software Inc., up 27 cents to $17.95
Industry watchers believe that the blockbuster “Grand Theft Auto”
provided a huge quarterly bump for the game maker.
The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., down $1.29 to $20.76
The tire maker’s quarterly profit soared 51 percent on strong sales across
the Americas, but revenue fell short of Wall Street expectations.
Big movers
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — The Dow Jones indus-
trial average is back in record territory.
Investors drove the Dow to an all-
time high Tuesday on expectations that
the Federal Reserve will keep its eco-
nomic stimulus program in place.
The Fed is in the middle of a two-day
policy meeting at which it’s expected
to maintain its $85 billion worth of
monthly bond purchases. That pro-
gram is aimed at stimulating economic
growth by keeping borrowing costs at
historic lows.
“The expectation that the Fed
remains clearly on hold is the catalyst
for this march higher,” said Quincy
Krosby, a market strategist at
Prudential Financial.
Stocks have surged to record levels
this year as the Fed’s stimulus has
helped corporations boost profits.
Relatively low yields on bonds have
also encouraged investors to buy
stocks.
The Dow rose 111.42 points, or 0.7
percent, to 15,680.35. The index last
climbed to a record Sept. 18 when the
Fed surprised financial markets by
announcing that it would continue it
stimulus because the economy had yet
to show strong enough growth.
Since then, the economy has endured
a 16-day partial shutdown of the gov-
ernment that has hurt consumer confi-
dence and likely crimped growth. For
that reason, many analysts and econo-
mists are predicting that the Fed will
continue its stimulus until early next
year.
On Tuesday, the Dow also got a big
boost from IBM. The technology com-
pany’s stock surged after it said it
would buy $15 billion more of its own
stock.
IBM gained $4.77, or 2.7 percent, to
$181.12, accounting for about a quarter
of the index’s gain.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index
also closed at a record, the 33rd time it
has closed at an all-time high this year.
The index rose 9.84 points, or 0.6
percent, to 1,771.95. It is on track to
log its best monthly performance of
the year. It is up 5.4 percent so far in
October.
Stocks have also been boosted this
month as corporations report third-
quarter earnings.
About half the companies in the S&P
500 have reported. So far, most are
doing better than expected. Companies
in the index are forecast to log growth
of 4.5 percent, according to data from
S&P Capital IQ.
The Nasdaq composite rose 12.21
points, or 0.3 percent, to 3,952.34.
The Nasdaq Stock Market was hit
with another glitch. Nasdaq indexes
weren’t updated from 11:53 a.m. to
12:37 p.m. because of a technical
problem that was caused by human
error, the exchange operator said in a
statement. Trading of Nasdaq-listed
stocks wasn’t affected.
On Sept. 4, the Nasdaq had a brief
outage in one of its quote dissemina-
tion channels, but trading wasn’t dis-
rupted. On Aug. 22 the exchange suf-
fered a three-hour trading outage that
was also attributed to problems with
the exchange’s price disseminating
system.
Two economic reports came in rela-
tively weak on Tuesday, which may
have signaled to investors that the Fed
will continue to delay any reduction of
its bond buying.
Retail sales fell 0.1 percent in
September, the weakest showing since
March, as auto sales dipped.
Americans’ confidence in the economy
fell this month to the lowest level
since April. People were worried about
the impact of the 16-day partial shut-
down of the U.S. government.
“The data that has been the most
attractive to (stock) markets seems to
be the data that maintains the status
quo,” said Brad Sorensen, the director
of market and sector analysis at the
Schwab Center for Financial
Research.
Dow at record high as Fed meeting begins
By Barbara Ortutay
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — LinkedIn Corp. posted a
loss for the third quarter on Tuesday, but the
results were stronger than Wall Street
expected as the professional networking
service boosted its user base and increased
revenue.
Such results have become routine for
LinkedIn. The company has surpassed ana-
lysts’ expectations in each of its 10 quarters
as a publicly traded company. Its outlook
for the current quarter, however, was below
estimates and its stock fell in extended trad-
ing after the results were released.
LinkedIn lost $3.4 million, or 3 cents per
share, in the July-September period com-
pared with earnings of $2.3 million, or 2
cents per share, in the same period a year
ago. Adjusted earnings were $46.8 million,
or 39 cents per share, in the latest quarter,
which beat analysts’ expectations by 7
cents.
Revenue rose 56 percent, to $393 million
from $252 million. Analysts predicted
$384.8 million, according to FactSet.
For the current quarter, LinkedIn forecast a
revenue range of $415 million to $420 mil-
lion, which is below Wall Street’s expecta-
tions of $438.9 million. LinkedIn typically
lowballs its forecasts.
The company raised its full-year revenue
guidance for 2013 to about $1.5 billion,
still slightly below analysts’ estimates of
$1.51 billion.
Sears considering
spinning off Lands’ End
NEW YORK — It’s like watching an old
friend slowly fall apart.
Sears was once the place where families
could go for an afternoon of one-stop shop-
ping for everything from clothing to appli-
ances to car parts. But it has struggled in
recent years amid declining sales and stiff
competition.
Now, Sears, which runs 2,500 Kmart and
Sears stores, is considering separating its
Lands’ End catalog business and Sears Auto
Center businesses from the rest of the com-
pany. The retailer also plans to continue
closing some of its unprofitable stores and
is selling some store leases in Canada.
The announcements came Tuesday as Sears
warned that it expects a loss of $582 mil-
lion in the third quarter on another drop in
sales. The company said that for the 12
weeks that ended Saturday its sales at stores
open at least a year fell 3.7 percent.
On the news, Sears shares rose $5.66, or
more than 10 percent, to $61.22 midday.
Earnings preview: Chevron’s
3Q expected to be flat
NEW YORK — Chevron Corp.’s oil and
gas production is rising, but weaker refinery
results and foreign exchange losses are
expected to offset those gains and keep
earnings flat for the company in the third
quarter.
Chevron, based in San Ramon reports its
third quarter earnings Friday.
Chevron is on track for higher production
compared with last year, thanks in part to a
quiet hurricane season this year in the Gulf
of Mexico. Last year, production was cur-
tailed because of Hurricane Isaac.
In its interim update for the quarter, issued
in early October, Chevron said oil and gas
production for the quarter was outpacing last
year’s quarter by 2.2 percent in the U.S. and
by 3.1 percent internationally.
LinkedIn posts 3Q net
loss but revenue grows
Business briefs
<< Big blow for Stanford defense, page 15
• World Series gets into crunch time, page 15
Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013
MAKE IT A FOUR PEAT: UPDATES ON CAÑADA GOLF, MENLO SOCCER AND MORE CSM SPORTS >> PAGE 12
By Eric Olson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LINCOLN, Neb. — College coaches and
administrators concerned about their tweet-
ing athletes also should be wary of their
tweeting fans.
Social media experts pointed to vitriolic
messages directed at football players from
Missouri and Nebraska last weekend as
examples of why schools should counsel
athletes on how to cope with criticism that
crosses the line from heckling to hate.
“What I worry about is some of the psy-
chological outcomes. Does it lead to
decreased self-esteem? Does it lead to
depression? Does it lead to guys not eating
and sleeping right?” said Jimmy Sanderson,
a Clemson researcher who collaborated on a
2012 study of how college athletes react to
negative encounters with fans on social
media.
College athletes have always been targets
for criticism, whether through the mail, on
radio shows or catcalls from the stands.
Because of Twitter and other platforms,
direct access to college and professional
athletes has never been greater. Most inter-
action is positive. But the messages can get
nasty when upset fans type words they sure-
ly wouldn’t say to an athlete’s face.
Last Saturday, after Missouri kicker
Andrew Baggett missed a short field goal in
overtime against South Carolina, he was
accosted on Twitter. There were comments
about his ability, homophobic slurs and
one tweet that said “go kill yourself every-
one in Missouri hates you.”
Baggett said this week that supportive
tweets outnumbered the negative “20 fold.”
“Nobody’s comment made me feel worse
than what I did on that field,” he said.
Players can struggle when heckling turns into hate
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Woodside’s Christine Alftin flies in for an attack during the Wildcats’ five-set win over
Carlmont.Woodside lost the first two sets before rallying for the victory, which moved it into
sole possession of first place in the PAL Bay Division.
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
While Christine Alftin is arguably the best
player in the Peninsula Athletic League, her
Woodside squad (10-1 Bay Division, 17-7
overall) is now the outright top team in the
Bay Division.
Entering into play yesterday tied with
Carlmont (9-2, 19-8) for first place in the Bay,
Woodside, after dropping the first two sets,
scored and emotional comeback win – 22-25,
12-25, 25-21, 25-23, 15-13.
The Scots kept Alftin in check early on, but
the 6-foot senior would not be denied, notch-
ing 34 match kills, including 11 kills in the
third set to help turn the tide, before tabbing
eight kills in the decisive fifth set. And as she
fired the powerful game-winning shot, the
team’s outpouring of emotion in front of its
home crowd culminated in what is thus far the
volleyball dogpile of the year.
“I’m overwhelmed,” Alftin said. “I’m so
proud of my team. Especially after that second
game, we just got crushed.”
Indeed. The last time the two teams met on
Oct. 3, the Scots surged from behind to over-
power the Wildcats in the final two sets. And
yesterday, the Scots nonchalantly picked up
right where they left off, capturing the first two
sets and looking poised to cruise to victory.
But Woodside made some big-time adjust-
ments, getting back into rotation after an
injury to sophomore Jesse Larkin midway
through the first set. The injury forced head
coach Kyle Mashima to shuffle his lineup. And
while Larkin soon returned, Woodside found
itself out of system until retooling to start
Game 3.
Impromptu pep talks from Alftin and fellow
senior Dani Walsh also paid off.
“We told [our teammates] we’re a team that
can come back,” Alftin said. “We’ve done it
before, and we can do it again.”
With Alftin moving up from the back row,
Woodside turned the tide in a hurry. And while
Walsh wasn’t the force to be reckoned with at
net she typically is, her on-court leadership
sparked Alftin big time.
Wildcats roar to victory
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
It’s the almost unfair and cruel reality
playing football in the NorCal Conference.
You can celebrate a huge victory on
Saturday. Maybe even a little on Sunday. But
come Monday, if you’re still dwelling on
your latest achievement, frankly you’re
already behind for the next game.
That’s life right now if you’re the College
of San Mateo. Forty-eight hours after taking
down rival City College of San Francisco
for the first time since 2009 in what one of
their team captains described as a spiritual
win, the Bulldogs are in full-on preparation
mode with a pending four- hour bus ride up
north to face the No. 1 ranked team in the
state — Butte College. Both teams are unde-
feated in 2013.
“I told the guys we’re 7-0 on Saturday, 7-0
on Sunday, 0-0 on Monday,” said CSM head
coach Bret Pollack. “It’s great because ...
you can’t look back. And so many people
want to look back and you have another
game coming. And it goes both ways. You
have to train yourself, wins and losses, the
same way because if it was a negative result,
you don’t want to hang on to it either. The
problem is, you can’t pick and choose. You
have to discipline yourself, stay in your rou-
tine, stay in the moment — and if you want
to celebrate more, then win next week.”
That’s easier said than done for the
Tests keep
coming for
the Bulldogs
See TWEETS, Page 16
See BULLDOGS, Page 16
See WOODSIDE, Page 16
SPORTS 12
Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
Warriors SF Harrison Barnes
to miss first two games of season
OAKLAND — Harrison Barnes will miss
at least the first two games of the regular
season for the Golden State Warriors with a
left foot injury.
Warriors coach Mark Jackson told
reporters following Tuesday’s practice that
shooting guard Klay Thompson will start in
the season opener against the Los Angeles
Lakers on Wednesday night. Jackson also
said that Thompson already had earned the
nod and will start even when Barnes returns.
Barnes has not played since the team’s
second preseason game Oct. 7. The Warriors
have said Barnes has “left foot inflamma-
tion.”
Barnes started every game he played as a
rookie last season, including the playoffs.
With all five starters back from last season,
Barnes and Thompson were competing to
remain starters after the Warriors signed
swingman Andre Iguodala this summer.
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The women from the Cañada College golf
team have done it again.
And that means, it’s a four-peat.
With a win on Tuesday at Riverbend in
Madera and a subsequent victory over
Reedley College, the Lady Colts captured
their fourth straight
Coast Conference
championship. They
accomplished their
15-0 march through
the season in style,
too. The Lady Colts,
led by Sarah Rotter’s
71 (1-under par), shot
a school record 300.
Rotter, who birdied
four of the last five
holes, also picked up
the Conference Most
Valuable Player with a 76 as her year aver-
age. That was one shot better than second.
And that award comes a year after Rotter fin-
ished second.
“It was really exciting,” Rotter said. “The
other player, she’s really great so I was hon-
ored to play next to her. It’s nice to know I
was able to bring my ‘A’ game and really
turn it on on the back side.”
“It was a really good match to watch,”
said Cañada head coach Rick Velasquez.
“The girls were just really excited to play
today. They really focused well.”
Velasquez said the win was sweeter consid-
ering his team had hit a bit of a plateau the
last couple of weeks and turned it up against
a good Reedley squad
“I wasn’t sure we could get off it,” he said.
“But we certainly did today.”
“It was really an intense match,” Rotter
said. “We’ve been neck and neck all season.
I think we just had a little more confidence.
I got some great advice from my assistant
coach and I really took it to heart.”
Laura Arellano shot a 73 for the Lady
Colts and hit 17 greens in regulation. Kristi
Wong shot a 74. Shannon Wong wasn’t too
far behind with an 82. Rayla Hernadez
turned in an 86 while Michelle Wong was
good for an 87.
“We’re just going to take it one round at a
time, one shot at time,” Rotter said about
her squad heading into the Northern
California championship on Nov. 11. “We
just hope to do our best, make it to state and
hopefully finish better than third. We go out
there knowing everyone really respects one
another and has each other’s back. That
gives us a lot of confidence.”
Menlo College soccer
Menlo College senior Natalie Ingram
scored her sixth and seventh goals of the
season during Menlo’s two-win week and
earned Cal Pac Offensive Player of the Week
honors for her efforts.
A native of San Jose, Ingram helped the
Lady Oaks to a 2-1 record last week that has
Menlo just one point out of second place in
the conference standings. A 2012 First
Team All-Conference performer and 2012
Cal Pac Newcomer of the Year, Ingram is cur-
rently third on Menlo’s all-time scoring list
with 23 career goals.
Ingram had a hand in her final match at
Wunderlich Field last week.
In a 4-3 thriller against Marymount,
Ingram scored an equalizing goal in the
62nd minute.
The Lady Oaks improve to 9-3 (6-2) while
Marymount falls to 9-6 (6-3).
The first goal of the match came just five
minutes in when Victoria Piazza found the
net for her fourth goal of the season cour-
tesy of an assist from Menlo senior Megan
McKee. Just over 20 minutes later, the Lady
Oaks extended its lead on a penalty kick
from Kayla Cisneroz that was set up by a
great run taken by Ingram who was fouled
by Mariner keeper Andrea Poeschel.
Cisneroz was clinical in her finish and was
rewarded with her first goal of the 2013 cam-
paign.
The remainder of the first half was domi-
nated by Marymount who found the net
twice, once in the 51st minute and once in
the 38th, to tie it a two-all heading into the
half.
Just five minutes into the half,
Marymount took its first lead of the match
courtesy of an unassisted goal from
Mackenzie Collard. Playing from behind
for the first time in the game sparked the
Menlo offense and proved the Lady Oaks
were not to be denied in their final game of
the season on their home turf.
But it was Ingram in the 62nd that equal-
ized and put open the door for Jocelyn
Aguilar to score the game-winner.
CSM water polo
With only two games remaining on the con-
ference schedule, second place is up for grabs
in the Coast Conference and the College of
San Mateo has its sights on it.
After a huge win over West Valley last week
and then a dominate showing against Ohlone,
the Lady Bulldogs will take on Cabrillo today
with the winner all but locking up second
place heading into the conference tourna-
ment.
“I learned from the girls that if we apply
what we’ve been working on, in terms of the
system, that is does work,” said CSM head
coach Randy Wright about last week’s wins.
“The system matches up with our strengths
and it gives us the ability to be successful.”
Awin on the road against Cabrillo is huge
for two reasons, according to Wright. First,
there will most likely be a rematch during the
conference tournament and second, that
rematch will favor the team that establishes
superiority in today’s match.
“That’ll be a big game. They’ve had some
great finishes all year. They’ve beat some
teams we haven’t been able to beat,” Wright
said. “They’ve done a good job. I’m going to
say they have a speed advantage on us so we’re
going to have to protect the middle of the
pool where they are advantageous. I think that
our defense in the half court has really come a
long way. In terms of our offense, the flow of
it is what it’s all about. We’re not necessarily
going to the same card every time. They’re
accessing what gives us the best chance to be
successful. And then we’re going from there.”
CSM cross country
It’s a big a couple of tough weeks for the cross
country program at CSM.
While the middle of the year showed great
promise with the rise of a couple of new runners,
the injury bug has struck and the Bulldogs go
into the Coast Conference championships in
Salinas today hoping they’ve healed up well
enough to leave a solid mark and qualify for
state.
“If we can get five (good times) at the confer-
ence meet, I think we have a really good shot at
winning that,” said CSM head coach Joe
Mangan, with particular regard to his women’s
team.
The women performed very well at the Shasta
Invitational. They took first, second, fourth and
sixth place with Mei-Lin Okino winning the
whole thing.
But heading into the conference meet,
Alejandra Marin, Mangan’s No. 2, is one of
those runners coming back from injury.
On the men’s side, Mangan was down
Anthony Cortes (who finished second at
Shasta) and Francisco Vargas. He’s hoping both
will be ready for Tuesday’s event.
“If we got it all together, we can crack that top
10 and make it to the state meet,” Mangan said.
“Not to have one or two of those guys would be
detrimental. We don’t have that much depth.”
Cañada wins fourth straight conference title
College
Notebook
Sports brief
SPORTS 13
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTACLARA — Jim Harbaugh
is undecided whether he will allow
himself a day off during San
Francisco’s bye week. Even with a
whirlwind stretch of travel finally
over.
It all will depend on how prepared
the 49ers coach feels a few days
from now for the Carolina
Panthers, who come to town for a
Nov. 10 game at Candlestick Park.
The way his team is rolling right
now, who could blame Harbaugh for
wanting to keep on working?
After a road game at Tennessee
followed by a weeklong stay in
London before beating the winless
Jaguars on Sunday, Harbaugh is
happy to be back on familiar
ground, even citing the joy of look-
ing out at the green practice fields at
the training facility.
“One of the other bonuses of a
long stay away, you get nine days
away, is just how fresh your facility
feels when you get back and the
practice fields, the food, the com-
fort of your own
bed, your kids,”
Harbaugh said
as he began his
Tuesday news
c o n f e r e n c e .
“But, the facili-
ty we’ve been
in, the meeting
rooms, offices
that the fellas
have been in for the last six to nine
months now feel, ‘wow, it’s great to
be back.’ This is new, it’s not stale
bread anymore. It’s another bonus.
So, it gives you life and enthusi-
asm, which is a good thing.”
The 49ers (6-2) are riding a five-
game winning streak as they wel-
come what will be a much-needed
break for most players this week.
Though Harbaugh saw several regu-
lars on site Tuesday, including quar-
terback Colin Kaepernick and
defensive tackle Ray McDonald and
a couple of players rehabilitating
from injuries.
Still right in the race for a third
straight NFC West crown, the 49ers
are eager to keep a good thing
going. They have scored 30 or more
points in five straight games, and
have the NFL’s top-ranked running
game behind Frank Gore.
Harbaugh praised the offense,
defense and special teams.
“A lot of positives,” he said.
“Really a dramatic improvement in
terms of playing disciplined, sound
technique football. So, it’s a great
job by the fellas in that regard.
Execution’s been good, getting bet-
ter and you keep seeing that we can,
that there’s even, you play good
football and there’s room for
improvement, ways that we can
improve. So, that is the one of the
most encouraging things is that
we’re playing good and we can get
better.”
San Francisco hardly looks like
the team that lost back-to-back
games in Weeks 2 and 3 to Seattle
and Indianapolis — outscored 56-
10.
“No question I felt like we were a
good team then, but we really
focused in and just understanding
what we have to do in order to keep
on keeping ourselves in the right
position and in the right place,”
linebacker Patrick Willis said.
Harbaugh is holding a pair of
opportunity practices this week,
primarily for the young players
though many veterans have stuck
around like in previous years.
He remains hopeful that Michael
Crabtree, the team’s top wide
receiver last season, will return
from Achilles tendon surgery some-
time next month.
“That’s doable,” Harbaugh said.
“I’m not going to make any procla-
mations or profound statements,
but he’s right on track for, at some
point here, weeks.”
In addition, Mario Manningham
could return soon.
Manningham made 42 receptions
for 449 yards and one touchdown in
12 games and 10 starts last season
before injuring his left knee in a
loss at Seattle Dec. 23. He under-
went reconstructive surgery to
repair torn anterior cruciate and
posterior cruciate ligaments.
He has been practicing for two
weeks and the Niners must decide by
next Tuesday whether to add him to
the 53-man roster from the physi-
cally unable to perform list.
Harbaugh hasn’t allowed himself
to think about how much more his
offense might do with the additions
of Crabtree and Manningham. He
wants to get running back
LaMichael James back into the mix
first.
“We’ve really been focused on
what we have this week. Those
being the best available players,
and they’re all doing a real fine job
and how we could use them differ-
ently,” Harbaugh said. “Get
LaMichael in the mix. We want to
get that going. He’s too good of a
player not to be playing.”
Not es : As Harbaugh hinted
would happen, rookie DT Tank
Carradine was activated from the
reserve/non-football injury list
Tuesday and could play against the
Panthers. San Francisco cleared
roster room by waiving LB
Jermaine Cunningham. Carradine,
a second-round draft pick out of
Florida State, has been working
back from a torn ACL and resumed
practice Oct. 15.
Harbaugh happy with 49ers at season’s midpoint
Jim Harbaugh
SPORTS 14
Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Peninsula Athletic League girls’ tennis
tournament is set and for the first time, there
won’t be a champion.
That’s because by virtue of Carlmont and
Hillsdale finishing the regular season with
identical 13-1 records, both teams will play in
the team tournament and a final won’t be held.
Essentially, Carlmont, which earns the
No.1 seed by virtue of a tiebreaker with
Hillsdale, will host No. 4 seed and Ocean
Division champion Mills in one match.
Hillsdale, meanwhile, will host No. 3 Aragon
in another match. The winners of those two
matches earn automatic bids into the Central
Coast Section tournament.
Both matches begin at 3:30 p.m. today.
Normally, the Bay Division’s regular-sea-
son champion gets an automatic bid into CCS
and skips the team tournament, which anoints
the PAL’s second automatic bid. But because
two teams tied, they both will play in the team
tournament.
“It would be rough to give one team a com-
pletely free pass (into CCS),” said PALtennis
chairman Bill Smith. “To give one of those
teams a break and make the other play (in the
team tournament) doesn’t take into account
how close those two teams were.”
Carlmont and Hillsdale split their season
series this year. Hillsdale won the first match
4-3, while Carlmont won by the same score
the second time around.
The tie was made official after Tuesday’s reg-
ular-season finales. Carlmont cruised to a 7-0
win over Half Moon Bay, while Hillsdale
pulled out a 4-3 win over Aragon — which the
Knights will face again in what amounts to a
CCS play-in match today at Hillsdale.
Hillsdale coach Jackie Nachtigall is not
happy to have to face the Dons for two days in
a row, while Carlmont gets a much easier path
to CCS with the match against Mills. But that
is how the rules dictate the matches take place.
The one team who would have the biggest
gripe is Menlo-Atherton, which finished
fourth in the Bay Division.
In any other year, M-Awould be in the team
tournament, but because of the tie, the Bears
were the odd team out.
“I don’t like the rule,” said M-Acoach Tom
Sorensen. “I would say there is still one more
avenue for appealing to CCS and that at-
large.”
Menlo-Atherton and Aragon both finished
with 8-6 league records, but the Dons got the
bid to the PALtournament by virtue of sweep-
ing M-Aduring the regular season.
Despite falling short, Sorensen said his
team knew the situation.
“Everyone was prepared,” Sorensen said.
“We had our chances. We had a number of 4-3
(losses) to the teams ahead of us (in the stand-
ings).”
The team tournament will be followed by
the PAL individual tournament, which begins
next week.
Four have a shot at CCS tourney
Sangha finishes fifth at CCS
San Mateo’s Aman Sangha, who won the
Peninsula Athletic League championship for
the second year in a row last week, shot a 1-
over 72 to finish in fifth place at the Central
Coast Section championship at Rancho
Cañada West in Carmel and qualify for the
Northern California tournament.
She was the only player from the PAL t o
qualify for NorCals. Aragon’s Kelly Fang, who
was runner up to Sangha last week, was just
two shots back, finishing with a 74, good for
a tie for seventh place. Sangha’s teammate,
Lisa Sasaki, shot a 76 to tie for 14th. Sasaki
was fourth at the PALtournament last week.
Menlo’s Jesse Rong also shot a 76 to tie
with Sasaki and and Willow Glen’s Sterling
Hawkins.
PALteam champion, Aragon, finished ninth
in the team standings, shooting a 441, finish-
ing ahead of Mitty and Santa Catalina.
Palo Alto’s Michelle Xie won the individual
championship, finishing with a 2-under 69
and her won the team title, finishing with a
score of 391.
Sports brief
SPORTS 15
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STANFORD — The toughest test of
the year for Stanford’s defense just got
a whole lot tougher.
Fifth-year senior defensive end and
co-captain Ben Gardner is out for the
season with a left pectoral injury,
handing the sixth-ranked Cardinal (7-
1, 5-1, Pac-12) a major blow before
facing No. 2 Oregon (8-0, 5-0) on
Nov. 7. Stanford coach David Shaw
said Gardner will undergo surgery to
repair the dam-
aged muscle.
Shaw said
“there’s a
chance” that fel-
low starting
defensive end
Henry Anderson
could return
against the
Ducks but he will
make the final decision after
Anderson practices this weekend,
which both teams have off. Anderson
has missed the last six games since he
hurt his knee in a victory against
Army on Sept. 14.
The timing of Gardner’s injury
could not be worse for Stanford’s
defense. Oregon is averaging 632.1
yards and 55.6 points per game. Both
rank second in the nation behind
Baylor.
“If we’re not fully manned, it’s
ridiculously difficult,” Shaw said.
Gardner hurt his left arm in
Stanford’s win over Washington on
Oct. 5. He had played through pain —
saying last week that, at times, his
arm “shuts down” — until a collision
in the third quarter of Stanford’s 20-12
victory at Oregon State last Saturday
sidelined him for good. Shaw said the
injuries are unrelated.
Gardner, who made most of the
defensive line adjustments, ends his
collegiate career with 17 1/2 sacks
and 34 tackles. He is hoping to land
in the NFL, where he could be a possi-
ble late-round pick.
“While this is not the way I had
imagined my college playing days
ending, all I can do is look up and
thank God for one heck of a ride,”
Gardner wrote in a statement released
by the school. He also encouraged his
teammates to “beat Oregon and keep
this thing rolling.”
Injuries and location aside, the
matchup at Stanford Stadium next
week sets up similarly to the one in
Eugene a year ago.
Last season, the Cardinal toppled
top-ranked Oregon 17-14 in overtime
en route to a conference title and the
school’s first Rose Bowl victory in
41 years. In the first 10 games before
that contest, the Ducks looked
unstoppable, leading the Football
Bowl Subdivision with 54.8 points
per game and never scoring fewer
than 42 points. Oregon averaged 325
yards rushing before the Cardinal held
them to 198.
“Defensively, it was one of those
performances I’ll never forget,” line-
backer A.J. Tarpley said. “The No. 1
thing was tackling. With those guys,
if one guy is out of their lane or not
doing their job, even if you are there
and you miss a tackle, they have the
elite athletes to score a touchdown
from anywhere on the field.”
The Cardinal defense has still been
dominant, at times, despite the recent
rash of injuries. In the past two weeks
alone, Stanford has shut down UCLA
(10 points) and Oregon State (12
points) in victories.
Oregon, led by Heisman Trophy
hopeful Marcus Mariota at quarter-
back, presents all kinds of other chal-
lenges — notably more speed and
misdirection. If Anderson can’t play,
Shaw said former tight end Luke
Kaumatule, linemen Anthony Hayes
and Aziz Shittu, and outside line-
backer Blake Lueders will be counted
on to fill the gap.
Stanford DE Gardner
out for rest of season
Ben Gardner
By Howard Ulman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOSTON — The banner hangs
from a light pole on the sidewalk
outside Fenway Park.
It’s a profile of David Ortiz with
that infectious smile and the words
“OCTOBER BASEBALL” beneath
i t .
He is, literally, the face of the
Red Sox franchise.
This is, once again, his time of
year.
“I don’t think you could ever ask
for more out of an individual than
what he does on and off the field,”
Boston ace Jon Lester said. “The
guy’s got a heart of gold.”
And a bat that keeps smacking
balls past fielders and over fences.
One win from his third champi-
onship in 10 years, Ortiz will take
a .733 World Series batting aver-
age into Game 6 on Wednesday
night against the St. Louis
Cardinals. Only Billy Hatcher did
better in a single series, .750 in
1990 for the Cincinnati Reds
when they swept the Oakland
Athletics.
But such
World Series
displays are
nothing new to
the only player
left from the
team that won
the Red Sox
their first cham-
pionship in 86
years.
St. Louis saw that on Ortiz’s first
at-bat of the 2004 Series when he
hit a three-run homer in Boston’s
11-9 win. He batted .308 in a four-
game sweep.
The Colorado Rockies saw it in
2007 when he went 3 for 5 in a 13-
1 rout in Game 1. That time, he hit
.333 in another sweep.
Now, he enters the potential
clincher with 11 hits in 15 at-bats
in this Series. He has two homers,
two doubles, six RBIs, five runs
and four walks.
Ortiz has one-third of Boston’s
hits against St. Louis, while the
rest of the Red Sox are batting
. 151.
“I was born for this,” he said.
Strikeouts in this Series? None.
And the best designated hitter in
baseball even fields flawlessly at
first base.
In three games in St. Louis under
NL rules, Ortiz handled all 23
chances without an error after
playing just six games there —
also without an error — during the
regular season.
Indeed, it’s been a charmed
month for Big Papi, who has even
legged out a few infield hits lately
— albeit with the second baseman
often playing 50 feet or so out in
right field.
Slugger. Speedster. Fielder.
Is there anything David Ortiz
can’t do?
Pitch?
“Hopefully, it won’t get to that
point,” manager John Farrell said
Tuesday.
How about making more than
one out in a game?
Ortiz hasn’t done that either in a
World Series in which he’s all but
locked up the MVPaward if the Red
Sox can finish off the Cardinals.
“He’s a guy that you still have
the ultimate respect for because of
what he’s done in the biggest situ-
ations,” Boston outfielder Daniel
Nava said.
Hot ‘Papi’ one win from third title
David Ortiz
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOSTON — Michael Wacha had a
funny way of preparing for his World
Series start that’s supposed to save
the season for the St. Louis Cardinals.
The 22-year-old October ace spent
Tuesday afternoon on the tarmac at
the St. Louis airport when the team
plane got grounded by mechanical
problems.
No telling when the Cardinals
would arrive in Boston, trailing the
Red Sox 3-2 going into Game 6 on
Wednesday night.
“Everyone is just watching
movies,” Wacha said from the plane,
a couple of hours into the delay.
“They’ve got dinner on here for us
and stuff. Everyone is just walking
around. Nobody is in a bad mood or
anything like that. The attitude is
pretty good.”
His teammates were probably con-
fident, too, considering what the
rookie has done this postseason.
He’s 4-0 with a 1.00 ERA in four
starts, including a win over John
Lackey and the Red Sox in Game 2.
Lackey will again oppose the tall
right-hander.
“I don’t think anything will be
much different,” Wacha said. “I just
try to approach every game the same.
I don’t think it’s going to be too
much different. We know the next two
games are must-wins. It all starts with
me tomorrow night.”
Heady stuff for a guy who was
pitching at Texas A&M less than a
year and a half ago, a guy who began
this season in Triple-A.
Then again, look at what he’s done.
He came within an out of a no-hitter
against Washington in his final start
of the regular season, only to give up
an infield single. With the Cardinals
facing a 2-1 deficit in the best-of-five
division series, he took a no-hit bid
into the eighth inning to win at
Pittsburgh.
He twice outpitched Cy Young
Award favorite Clayton Kershaw to
win MVP honors in the NL champi-
onship series, then beat Boston with
his family in the seats at Fenway
Park.
Cards hope to fly high with Wacha
Bulldogs. City College of San Francisco
was a tough test, no doubt about it. And
CSM passed with flying colors. The
Bulldogs overcame penalty flag after penal-
ty flag, plus a pair of key injuries in last
Saturday’s 30-25 win.
“The guys fought through that,” Pollack
said. “And I felt at times they felt like we
were playing two teams out there. And I
understand. But to feel sorry for yourself and
give less effort, and get frustrated, that isn’t
going to solve the problem. It’s going to
make it worse.”
What solved the problem then, was a trio
of huge plays on offense and a defense that
held the Rams to almost 300 yards under
their season average. But that’s over and
done with and a tougher test awaits up in
Butte.
“The analogy I used is this,” Pollack said.
“You can’t drive home tonight looking
through the rear view mirror. You’re not
going to go very far. And everybody wants
to look back at all the great things we did —
well, create new great things. And you can
always live in the moment with new things.
That was my message to them. Look
through the windshield and not the rear view
mirror. Good job. Move on.”
CSM might be looking to move forward,
but there’s a team in Butte that can bring
that drive to a screeching halt. And just like
CCSF, the Roadrunners have not lost to the
Bulldogs since a 40-23 decision in 2009. In
three games since, Butte has beat CSM by
1, 34 and 8 points respectively.
“They’re a different animal,” Pollack said.
“Different animal from the personnel, dif-
ferent animal from the way they play.
There’s a ton of different things within a
defense that we’re looking at.
“It’s power against power,” Pollack con-
tinued. “I would fathom that we’re the only
two teams that run more than we pass in
Northern California. And our philosophies
are close and similar in nature — on how to
play football. They’re set up to stop the run
and run the ball. We’re set up to stop the run
and run the ball.”
Both teams will take to the ground often
next Saturday in Oroville. Butte comes in as
the state’s best rushing attack with 356 of
its 513 yards of total offense per game com-
ing via the rush. It’s a daunting task for the
Bulldogs who have to basically come up
with a way to stop a team that is a mirror
image of themselves.
The Roadrunners are very efficient with
the rush and come at you in waves. They
have six players with at least 100 yards
rushing on the season. And their seventh
guy might only have 88 yards on the
ground, but he’s the quarterback and he has
five rushing touchdowns — good for second
on the team. Hence, Saturday’s focus can’t
all go on Kendall Williams (946 yards,
seven touchdowns, 8.2 yards per carry),
because players like Robert Frazier or
Armand Bokitch can burn you.
“The (running) back is always there. It’s
just, they just have different guys,” Pollack
said. “The issue with them is multi-forma-
tions, different personnel packages. Every
offense has its form of deception. Butte’s is
all its formations, personnel packaging. It
presents its challenges and problems. We
call it, ‘Look at the birdie.’ Every offense
has its own ‘Look at the birdie’ to slow
down the defense and make them confused.
And Butte’s strength is that. They have a
good offensive line. They’re patient.
They’re very dedicated to their run. You ain’t
going to scare them out of it. Ever. And
that’s how we are too. You’re going to have
to defend if for four quarters.”
The Roadrunners have proven they can
defend anyone’s rushing attack for the full
60 minutes. They come into the game
allowing just 48.7 yards per game while
CSM is running the ball at a 271.9 yards-
per-game rate. Butte’s front seven is among
the most intimidating in the state. They’re
recorded 27 sacks, 75 tackles for loss and
their defense as a whole has 11 players with
at least 20 tackles on the season.
The key for CSM might be going to the
air. Butte has allowed 196 yards passing.
For that, quarterback Casey Wichman will
have to build on one of his best passing per-
formance of the season last Saturday against
the Rams. Twice, Wichman connected on
long touchdown passes.
“Whenever you have a running game,
your quarterback better be efficient,”
Pollack said. “They’re going to sell out to
stop the run and you have to make the big
plays. You either have to be efficient or
explosive. It’s going to be one of the two.”
Kickoff for what those in the JC football
circle are calling the Game of the Season, is
scheduled for 1 p.m. Saturday in Oroville.
16
Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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by
Nebraska’s Kenny Bell dropped a couple
passes, including one in the end zone, dur-
ing a loss to Minnesota. Like Baggett, Bell
expressed appreciation for encouraging
tweets, but he clearly was troubled by caus-
tic ones. Especially disturbing was a tweet
that played off the fact Bell’s dog had been
hit by a car. That person later apologized on
Twitter.
“Tonight was the first night that I have
been truly bothered by the hateful com-
ments by people,” Bell wrote in back-to-
back tweets. “That being said.... It takes so
much more effort to be mean an hateful than
it is to be positive an supportive. I just
don’t understand it.”
It would be unrealistic to cut off players
from social media — though some coaches
have tried — because online communica-
tion is ingrained in the culture and can be
beneficial, Sanderson said. An athlete can
use Twitter to build an online identity,
which helps with networking, job searches
and promoting the team and university.
Southern California last year began list-
ing football players’ Twitter handles on
online biographies and in weekly game pre-
views available to fans and media.
“This is how people communicate today,
especially those from the generation of our
current student-athletes. Why not embrace
it?” USC spokesman Tim Tessalone wrote in
an email to The Associated Press. “It also
helps our fans engage with our players and
vice versa. Sure, there will be some mis-
takes, but that’s all part of the learning
process for college kids.”
Tessalone said he’s not aware of any USC
players having serious problems in interac-
tions with fans.
Major athletic programs typically address
social media with their athletes. Athletes
generally are told to think twice before hit-
ting the send button so they don’t put out
something that embarrasses themselves,
the team and the university. At Nebraska,
athletes are urged to not lash out at people
who criticize them, but there is no policy
on what they should do if they are inundated
with negativity.
“It might be something we need to get
into based on things that have transpired,”
said Keith Zimmer, Nebraska’s associate
athletic director for life skills.
Continued from page 11
TWEETS
Continued from page 11
BULLDOGS
With Woodside trailing 20-19 in Game 3,
Alftin scored back-to-back kills to seesaw the
advantage in the Wildcats’favor. With the score
deadlocked at 20-20, Walsh delegated as
Woodside set a midcourt chance for Alftin. And
as the dynamic hitter approached for a pipe
shot, Walsh spurred her teammate with a spirit-
ed cry of: “Get up!”
The rally cry seemed to reverberate through
the rest of the match. Woodside’s front row of
Larkin, Heilani Hoeft, and Haili Hoeft com-
manded the net through Game 4. Then, to start
Game 5, Walsh ripped consecutive kills to give
the Wildcats an early lead which they would not
relinquish.
“We put a lot of pressure on ourselves and we
knew a lot was riding on this game,” Walsh
said. “After the second set, we just put it all
together and Christine stepped up, and we were
able to come back.”
Looking forward, Woodside now holds its
fate in its own hands. With three more games
remaining in league, however, the Wildcats still
have some tough customers to face, including a
matchup with Burlingame on Thursday, and
next Thursday’s season-finale against Menlo-
Atherton.
“If we can maintain our momentum into
Burlingame and win there, it doesn’t matter how
we do against M-A, because we can still lose (to
them) and be co-league champions,” Mashima
said.
Despite the loss, Carlmont fronted a well-bal-
anced attack, with 22 kills from senior Ella
McDonough. Sophomore blocker Alexis
Morrow tabbed five blocks, and senior Bailee
Roces scored 11 service points in Game 2,
including three aces.
Carlmont is now in a second-place tie in the
Bay Division with its next opponent, Menlo-
Atherton.
“It was a tough loss,” McDonough said. “But
we’re just going to use it as a lesson, and come
back Thursday against Menlo-Atherton.”
Other Bay results
South City went the distance to upset
Burlingame – 22-25, 17-25, 25-22, 25-20, 15-
13. Burlingame’s Bianca Alvarez tabbed 13
kills and Isabell Walker had 43 assists.
Menlo-Atherton downed Hillsdale – 25-19,
25-22, 25-11. Pauli King paced the Bears with
15 kills, while Devin Joos tabbed 11 kills.
Aragon defeated San Mateo – 25-19, 31-29,
25-20.
Ocean Division results
Sequoia downed Half Moon Bay – 25-11, 25-
14, 25-20. Sequoia’s Angela Huddelson, Joy
Robinson, and Rachel Fink notched seven kills
apiece.
Westmoor (8-3, 18-15) swept El Camino –
25-22, 25-11, 25-15. Westmoor’s Hanna
Ticzon and Roni Nievera had a team-high six
kills apiece. Junior libero Marlene Alcantara
notched 23 digs.
Mills breezed past Jefferson – 25-16, 25-10,
25-4. Adrienne Lee had a match-high 14 kills
for the Vikings, while Nabeela Rizvi con-
tributed four kills.
Terra Nova defeated Capuchino – 25-11, 25-7,
25-23.
Continued from page 11
WOODSIDE
SPORTS 17
Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 4 4 0 .500 230 186
Philadelphia 3 5 0 .375 176 211
Washington 2 5 0 .286 173 229
N.Y. Giants 2 6 0 .250 141 223
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 6 1 0 .857 196 120
Carolina 4 3 0 .571 170 96
Atlanta 2 5 0 .286 166 184
Tampa Bay 0 7 0 .000 100 163
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Green Bay 5 2 0 .714 212 158
Detroit 5 3 0 .625 217 197
Chicago 4 3 0 .571 213 206
Minnesota 1 6 0 .143 163 225
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 7 1 0 .875 205 125
San Francisco 6 2 0 .750 218 145
Arizona 4 4 0 .500 160 174
St. Louis 3 5 0 .375 165 198
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 6 2 0 .750 179 144
N.Y. Jets 4 4 0 .500 143 211
Miami 3 4 0 .429 152 167
Buffalo 3 5 0 .375 176 213
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 5 2 0 .714 187 131
Tennessee 3 4 0 .429 145 146
Houston 2 5 0 .286 122 194
Jacksonville 0 8 0 .000 86 264
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 6 2 0 .750 197 144
Baltimore 3 4 0 .429 150 148
Cleveland 3 5 0 .375 148 179
Pittsburgh 2 5 0 .286 125 153
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Kansas City 8 0 0 1.000 192 98
Denver 7 1 0 .875 343 218
San Diego 4 3 0 .571 168 144
Oakland 3 4 0 .429 126 150
Thursday’sGame
Carolina 31,Tampa Bay 13
Sunday’sGames
Kansas City 23, Cleveland 17
New Orleans 35, Buffalo 17
New England 27, Miami 17
Detroit 31, Dallas 30
N.Y. Giants 15, Philadelphia 7
San Francisco 42, Jacksonville 10
Oakland 21, Pittsburgh 18
Cincinnati 49, N.Y. Jets 9
Arizona 27, Atlanta 13
Denver 45,Washington 21
Green Bay 44, Minnesota 31
Open:Baltimore,Chicago,Houston,Indianapolis,San
Diego,Tennessee
Monday’sGame
Seattle 14, St. Louis 9
NFL GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Toronto 13 9 4 0 18 44 30
Tampa Bay 12 8 4 0 16 40 33
Montreal 13 8 5 0 16 37 23
Boston 10 7 3 0 14 30 17
Detroit 12 6 4 2 14 27 33
Ottawa 12 4 6 2 10 35 38
Florida 12 3 7 2 8 26 42
Buffalo 14 2 11 1 5 23 41
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 12 8 4 0 16 38 29
Carolina 12 4 5 3 11 26 36
N.Y. Islanders 12 4 5 3 11 37 39
Columbus 11 5 6 0 10 31 29
Washington 12 5 7 0 10 34 38
New Jersey 12 3 5 4 10 26 37
N.Y. Rangers 11 4 7 0 8 18 37
Philadelphia 11 3 8 0 6 20 30
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Colorado 11 10 1 0 20 35 16
Chicago 13 8 2 3 19 45 38
St. Louis 10 7 1 2 16 38 25
Minnesota 13 6 4 3 15 30 31
Nashville 12 6 5 1 13 23 32
Winnipeg 14 5 7 2 12 34 40
Dallas 12 5 6 1 11 31 36
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 12 10 1 1 21 48 20
Anaheim 13 10 3 0 20 42 33
Vancouver 14 9 4 1 19 41 39
Phoenix 13 8 3 2 18 43 40
Los Angeles 13 8 5 0 16 36 33
Calgary 11 5 4 2 12 34 39
Edmonton 14 3 9 2 8 36 54
NOTE:Two points for a win,one point for overtime
loss.
Tuesday’sGames
N.Y. Rangers 3, N.Y. Islanders 2
Anaheim 3, Philadelphia 2
Montreal 2, Dallas 1
New Jersey 2,Tampa Bay 1
Chicago 6, Ottawa 5
St. Louis 3,Winnipeg 2
Toronto 4, Edmonton 0
Phoenix 3, Los Angeles 1
Wednesday’sGames
Boston at Pittsburgh, 5 p.m.
Toronto at Calgary, 5 p.m.
Detroit at Vancouver, 7:30 p.m.
San Jose at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m.
Thursday’sGames
Anaheim at Boston, 4 p.m.
Buffalo at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m.
Nashville at Phoenix, 7 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
Volleyball
Notre Dame-Belmont at Mitty, 6:30 p.m.
Girls’ tennis
PAL team tournament semifinals, TBD, 3:30 p.m.;
Mercy-Burlingame at King’s Academy, 3:30 p.m.
Girls’ water polo
Aragonat Menlo-Atherton,Burlingameat Sequoia,
4 p.m.; Carlmont at Castilleja, 5 p.m.
Boys’ water polo
Serra at St. Francis, 3:30 p.m.; Carlmont at Menlo
School, 4 p.m.; Aragon at Menlo-Atherton,
Burlingame at Sequoia, 5:15 p.m.; Sacred Heart
Prep at St. Ignatius, 5:30 p.m.
THURSDAY
Girls’ tennis
PAL team tournament final, TBD, 3:30 p.m.; Notre
Dame-Belmont at St.Francis,2:45 p.m.;Castillleja at
MenloSchool,SacredHeart Prepat Crystal Springs,
3:30 p.m.
Volleyball
Hillsdale at Burlingame, Menlo-Atherton at Carl-
mont, Woodside at San Mateo, Aragon at South
City,Mills at Half Moon Bay,Jefferson at El Camino,
Westmoor at Terra Nova, Capuchino at Sequoia,
5:45 p.m.
Boys’ water polo
Capuchino at Mills, 3 p.m.; Terra Nova vs. Priory at
Menlo School,Hillsdale at Half Moon Bay,4:15 p.m.
Girls’ water polo
Hillsdale at Half Moon Bay, Terra Nova at Menlo
School,3 p.m.; San Mateo vs.Mercy-Burlingame at
Mills, 4:15 p.m.
Volleyball
Notre Dame-Belmont at St. Ignatius, 6:30 p.m.
FRIDAY
Football
Sequoia at Sacred Heart Prep, Woodside at San
Mateo, 2:45 p.m.
NHL GLANCE
WHAT’S ON TAP
NFL
BUFFALOBILLS —Released DT Jay Ross. Signed
WR Cordell Roberson to the practice squad.
CINCINNATI BENGALS—Placed CB Leon Hall on
the injured reserve list.Signed LB J.K.Schaffer from
the practice squad.Waived DE DeQuin Evans.
CLEVELANDBROWNS —Signed OL Reid Fragel
fromthepracticesquadof Cincinnati.SignedWRAr-
manti Edwards. Placed WR Travis Benjamin on
injured reserve. Re-signed WR Tori Gurley to the
practice squad.
DALLAS COWBOYS —Released DE Jason Vega.
Released RB Davin Meggett from the practice
squad. Signed DE Everette Brown.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS —Re-signed TE Weslye
Saunders to the active roster. Signed OT Xavier
Nixon to the practice squad. Waived CB Daxton
Swanson.
NEWENGLANDPATRIOTS—Acquired DT Isaac
Sopoaga and a 2014 sixth-round draft pick from
Philadelphiafor a2014fifth-rounddraft pick.Placed
OL Sebastian Vollmer on injured reserve.
TAMPABAYBUCCANEERS—Claimed DB Bobby
Felder off waivers from Minnesota.
WASHINGTON REDSKINS —Waived S Jordan
Pugh.
NBA
DALLAS MAVERICKS—Announced the resigna-
tion of Gersson Rosas, general manager.
UTAHJAZZ—Exercised the club contract options
on G Alec Burks and C Enes Kanter.
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Name Dave Wallace
pitching coach.
CHICAGOWHITE SOX —Agreed to terms with
1B-DH Jose Abreu on a six-year contract.
MINNESOTATWINS —Sent LHP Pedro Hernan-
dez outright to Rochester (IL).
TORONTO BLUE JAYS —Extended their player
development contract with New Hampshire (EL)
through the 2016 season.
NHL
COLUMBUSBLUEJACKETS—ReassignedFCody
Bass to Springfield (AHL).
MINNESOTAVIKINGS —Waived TE Chase Ford.
Signed DE Justin Trattou.
MONTREAL CANADIENS —Assigned F Patrick
Holland to Hamilton (AHL).
NEWJERSEYDEVILS—Recalled G Keith Kinkaid
from Albany (AHL).
WINNIPEGJETS —Recalled D Ben Chiarot from
St. John’s (AHL). Placed D Paul Postma on the in-
jured reserve list, retroactive to Oct. 27.
TRANSACTIONS
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Boston 0 0 .000 —
Brooklyn 0 0 .000 —
New York 0 0 .000 —
Philadelphia 0 0 .000 —
Toronto 0 0 .000 —
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Miami 1 0 1.000 —
Atlanta 0 0 .000 1/2
Charlotte 0 0 .000 1/2
Washington 0 0 .000 1/2
Orlando 0 1 .000 1
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Indiana 1 0 1.000 —
Cleveland 0 0 .000 1/2
Detroit 0 0 .000 1/2
Milwaukee 0 0 .000 1/2
Chicago 0 1 .000 1
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Dallas 0 0 .000 —
Houston 0 0 .000 —
Memphis 0 0 .000 —
New Orleans 0 0 .000 —
San Antonio 0 0 .000 —
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Denver 0 0 .000 —
Minnesota 0 0 .000 —
Oklahoma City 0 0 .000 —
Portland 0 0 .000 —
Utah 0 0 .000 —
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Golden State 0 0 .000 —
L.A. Clippers 0 0 .000 —
L.A. Lakers 0 0 .000 —
Phoenix 0 0 .000 —
Sacramento 0 0 .000 —
Tuesday’sGames
Indiana 97, Orlando 87
Miami 107, Chicago 95
L.A. Clippers at L.A. Lakers, late
Wednesday’sGames
Miami at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Brooklyn at Cleveland, 4 p.m.
Boston at Toronto, 4 p.m.
Washington at Detroit, 4:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at New York, 4:30 p.m.
Orlando at Minnesota, 5 p.m.
Charlotte at Houston, 5 p.m.
Indiana at New Orleans, 5 p.m.
Atlanta at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.
Memphis at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Utah, 6 p.m.
Portland at Phoenix, 7 p.m.
Denver at Sacramento, 7 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Golden State, 7:30 p.m.
Thursday’sGames
New York at Chicago, 5 p.m.
Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m.
NBA GLANCE
vs. Seattle
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/8
vs.Carolina
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/10
@Saints
1:25p.m.
FOX
11/17
@Redskins
5:40p.m.
ESPN
11/25
vs.Rams
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/1
vs.Titans
1:05p.m.
CBS
11/24
vs.Philly
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/3
@Giants
10a.m.
CBS
11/10
@Houston
10a.m.
CBS
11/17
vs.Phoenix
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/2
@Montreal
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/26
@Ottawa
2p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/27
@L.A. Kings
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/30
vs.Canucks
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/7
vs. Buffalo
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/5
@Tampa
10a.m.
FOX
12/15
@Dallas
1:30p.m.
CBS
11/28
@Jets
10a.m.
CBS
12/8
@Winnipeg
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/10
at 76ers
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/4
vs.Lakers
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/30
@LAC
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/31
vs.Kings
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/2
at Spurs
5:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/8
at Minnes.
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/6
@Memphis
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/9
18
Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NATION
By Martin Crutsinger
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Alot can change in six
weeks.
When the Federal Reserve last met in mid-
September, almost everyone expected it to
start reducing the stimulus it’s given the
U.S. economy to help it rebound from the
Great Recession.
It didn’t. The Fed pulled a surprise by
deciding not to slow its $85 billion-a-
month in Treasury and mortgage bond pur-
chases. Its bond buying has been intended
to keep long-term loan rates low to support
the economy.
And now? After a 16-day partial govern-
ment shutdown and a batch of tepid eco-
nomic data, no one thinks the Fed will
reduce its stimulus when it meets Tuesday
and Wednesday. Many analysts now predict
the Fed will maintain the pace of its bond
purchases into next year.
Blame the uncertainty surrounding
Congress’ budget fight and renewed ques-
tions about the economy’s health.
“I think March is now the earliest that
any reduction in bond purchases will hap-
pen,” said Diane Swonk, chief economist at
Mesirow Financial.
By then, Fed members expect to have
seen several months of stronger job
growth. They also expect Congress to have
resolved its budget impasse.
If the Fed does start slowing its stimulus
in March, it will have left its policy
unchanged not just this week but also at its
next meeting in December and at its subse-
quent meeting in late January. The delay
would signal a dimmer economic outlook.
The January meeting will be the last for
Chairman Ben Bernanke, who is stepping
down after eight years. President Barack
Obama has chosen Vice Chair Janet Yellen
to succeed Bernanke.
Assuming that Yellen is confirmed by the
Senate, her first meeting as chairman will be
in March. Many economists think no major
policy changes will occur before a new
chairman takes over.
Dimmer view of economy makes Fed pullback unlikely
By Christopher S. Rugaber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — A hazy picture of the
U.S. economy has emerged from the most
recent snapshots of retail sales, housing,
manufacturing, the job market and the confi-
dence of consumers.
The figures reflect higher borrowing costs,
slower hiring and rising uncertainty just
before much of the government shut down
Oct. 1 — all trends that the Federal Reserve
is trying to assess at a policy meeting this
week.
Taken together, they portray an economy
that was stumbling even before the shut-
down, which further slowed growth.
Still, many Americans have managed to
keep up their purchases in recent weeks.
Their spending has raised hopes that if
Congress can reach a long-term budget
agreement in coming months, economic
growth will pick up.
“One of the things that’s really holding
back the economy is this fog of uncertain-
t y,” said Mark Vitner, an economist at Wells
Fargo.
One major factor behind the uncertainty:
Congress and the White House agreed on
Oct. 16 to reopen the government — but
only until Jan. 15, when a new deal must be
reached. That raises the threat of another
shutdown.
Nor is it clear when the Fed will begin to
pull back on its stimulus for the economy.
And the sloppy rollout of the Obama admin-
istration’s health care program has added to
the reluctance of many small businesses to
hire, Vitner said.
All this has made the Fed’s task of evaluat-
ing the economy even harder than usual. The
Fed is considering when to slow its $85 bil-
lion in monthly bond purchases. Those pur-
chases are intended to keep borrowing rates
low to spur growth. Chairman Ben Bernanke
has noted that the Fed’s policy decisions are
“data dependent.”
Yet most of the economic data that will be
released in coming weeks will be distorted
by the government shutdown. For example,
the October jobs report, due Nov. 8, may
show a rise in the unemployment rate only
because of the temporary layoff of govern-
ment workers and contractors.
“This is a very difficult time for the Fed,”
Vitner says. “The data is not all that clear,
and there are a lot of structural shifts in the
economy.”
Those shifts include an aging workforce,
which means more older workers are retiring
and dropping out of the work force. Their
exodus has artificially lowered the unem-
ployment rate, making that key gauge of the
economy less reliable.
Blurry view of U.S. economy complicates Fed’s task
REUTERS
A sign advertising jobs is posted along a street in Brooklyn, N.Y.
FOOD 19
Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Michelle Locke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Peruvian government believes it has a
diplomatic solution to a spirited problem.
The problem? Not enough Americans are
familiar with pisco, a Peruvian liquor that
has been riding a popular wave of trendy
South American cuisines to become an up-
and-comer on the cocktail scene. The solu-
tion? Appoint 10 U.S. bartenders to serve as
official pisco ambassadors for the grape
brandy.
“Crazy, right?” says Todd Thrasher, of
Restaurant Eve, PX Bar and TNT Bar in
Alexandria, Va., and one of the 10 pisco
plenipotentiaries. “When I started my job,
my parents were like, ‘What? You’re going
to be a bartender?’ Then all of a sudden
you’re a Peruvian pisco ambassador. ”
Admittedly, a total promotional stunt. But
perhaps a clever one. In the spirit world, it
isn’t easy being the new kid in town. And
it’s not enough to be cool. To catch on, you
also have to be tasted. And what better way
to make that happen than to teach the folks
who shake your drink?
Once obscure — and still so in much of the
country — pisco is showing up in a growing
number of bars and liquor stores. It is made
in Peru and Chile, and both countries claim
Pisco: Liquor hot enough
to have ambassadors?
See PISCO, Page 20
Pisco has gone from little-known to a spirit that most serious bars carry at least one brand of,
and maybe two or three.
FOOD/LOCAL 20
Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EXPIRES: November 30, 2013
JACK’S RESTAURANT & BAR: SAN BRUNO
1050 Admiral Court, Suite A
San Bruno, CA 94066
Phone: (650) 589-2222 | Fax: (650) 589-5042
iLoveJacks.com
pisco as their national spirit, spurring intense
debate on who had it first.
Either way, its clean taste and faintly fruity
aroma makes pisco an easy partner for the
sorts of citrusy cocktails Americans love.
Pisco is a grape spirit that has not been aged
in wood, leaving it clear.
The new world of pisco goes well beyond
the classic pisco sour and pisco punch cock-
tails. At the PISCO Latin Lounge in San
Francisco, which opened five years ago and is
believed to be the first modern U.S. bar devot-
ed to pisco, guests get an authentic version of
pisco punch, which was invented in 1880s
San Francisco. But folks also can try flights of
pisco intended to demonstrate the nuances the
spirit can have depending on the grapes used
to make it.
PISCO owner James Schenk has watched as
pisco has gone from little-known to a spirit
that most serious bars carry at least one brand
of, and maybe two or three. Meanwhile, pisco
has been featured at major events, including a
headliner event at last year’s South Beach
Wine & Food Festival.
“The great thing about it is that five years
ago, no one had pisco,” says Schenk. “Now,
there’s an insurgence of people beginning to
really introduce and explain to all these bars
and restaurants — you can have one, you can
have two or three.”
In Peru, the government has imposed sever-
al strict production standards, including a pro-
hibition on adding anything to the distilled
spirit, not even water, as well as mandating
that the spirit rest for three months in a neutral
container — never a wooden barrel.
Officials also are working on promoting
Peruvian pisco — after all, there is a rivalry
going on — hence the bartender “ambassa-
dors.” Those U.S. mixologists got a trip to
Peru to learn more about pisco and come up
with cocktail recipes.
JUDGMENT DAY
Start to finish: 5 minutes
Servings: 1
Absinthe
1 1/2 ounces pisco
1/2 ounce elderflower liqueur
1/2 ounce lime juice
1/2 ounce lemon juice
1/2 ounce simple syrup
1 egg white
Ice
Pour a splash of absinthe into a coupe or
tumbler, then roll around to coat the glass.
Pour out the absinthe, then place the glass in
the freezer to chill.
Combine the remaining ingredients in a
cocktail shaker. Cover and shake vigorously.
Add ice and shake again, then strain into the
chilled glass.
CUZCO
Start to finish: 5 minutes
Servings: 1
Kirsch
Ice
2 ounces pisco
3/4 ounce Aperol
3/4 ounce simple syrup
1/2 ounce lemon juice
1/2 ounce grapefruit juice
Grapefruit twist
Pour a splash of kirsch into a Collins glass,
then roll around to coat the glass. Pour out the
kirsch, then place the glass in the freezer to
chill.
In an ice-filled cocktail shaker, combine the
remaining ingredients. Shake, then strain
into the chilled glass. Garnish with the grape-
fruit twist.
Continued from page 19
PISCO
police needs, Lloyd said.
The relatively quiet engine allows officers
to communicate more effectively when rid-
ing alongside one another. The SMPD’s
Zero will start out on the narrow but level
downtown streets; however, it has been said
to perform well on rougher terrains, said San
Mateo police Sgt. Dave Norris.
“Highly reliable and nimble, and operat-
ing at truly minimal fuel costs, the Zero
motorcycle offers our officers a hybrid per-
formance option that is equally comfortable
on San Mateo’s roadways as it is winding
through tough-to-navigate terrain in both
urban and rural environments,” Norris said.
The bikes are meant for cities like San
Mateo or San Francisco where maneuver-
ability is critical, Lloyd said.
“What police look for in any type of vehi-
cle they use, but especially for motorcycles,
it has to be able to perform in very tight and
confined areas. It needs to be able to operate
at slow speeds but at the same time be able
to get up to very high speeds,” Lloyd said.
The police kit model motorcycles range
from about $17,000-20,000. Annual fuel
costs are cut down between 80-90 percent
and maintenance costs are cut down between
75-95 percent, Lloyd said.
“It’s a high-tech vehicle that’s simple to
maintain, and that’s what police depart-
ments really want,” Lloyd said.
The company is in the midst of an eight-
week evaluation phase with the Los Angles
Police Department to continue to develop
identify uses for the bikes and law enforce-
ment agencies across the world have begun
to use Zero motorcycles as a reliable alter-
native to traditional motorcycles, Lloyd
said.
“Everybody’s watching operating costs
and that’s a big thing when it comes to
cities and city management. Zero motorcy-
cles greatly reduce the burden of fuel, main-
tenance and all types of operating costs,”
Lloyd said.
San Mateo police officers have already
given the electric motorcycle praise saying
it’s just, if not more, responsive than a tra-
ditional motorcycle, Norris said.
The San Mateo Zero will be on the streets
soon, but it’ll be easier to see than it will be
to hear.
samantha@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 5
ZERO
San Francisco main library. “It has legs of
its own.”
Alisa Clancy, from the radio show
Morning Cup of Jazz on KCSM, will be the
MC for the trivia challenge. Also in atten-
dance will be ZAP Think Tank, the group
that won the trivia challenge last year.
“The room is full of kindred spirit, and it’s
fun when you don’t know the answer but one
of your teammates does,” said Kathryn
Verwillow, one of the winning contestants
of ZAP Think Tank.
The team’s name came from the dorm the
three of them lived in during college. Some
of the questions Verwillow recalls her team
answering correctly that the other teams got
wrong include “What corporation owns
See’s Candies?” and “What is the slang word
for a British garbage collector?” For the
curious, the answers are Berkshire Hathaway
and dustman, respectively.
Cordova Verwillow jokingly credits her
knack for knowing random trivia questions
to a “misspent youth” and just paying atten-
tion daily.
ZAP Think Tank will be attempting to
defend its title Friday.
Through entry fees and corporate spon-
sors, the South San Francisco trivia chal-
lenge is projected to make $20,000, all of
which will go to the lit service programs at
the library, said Holly Fulghum-Nutters, the
program manager for Project Read.
The challenge takes place at the South San
Francisco Conference Center. Doors open at
5:30 p.m. and the event starts at seven. The
trivia challenge lasts for about an hour and a
half. The event is open to the public, at $30
a person. The last day to enter a team in the
competition is Wednesday, Oct. 30 (the cost
is $400 per team of three). This entry fee
includes a dinner and goes to supporting
library literary services such as Project
Read. For more information email Holly
Fulghum-Nutters at fulghum-nutters@plsin-
fo.org.
Continued from page 5
TRIVIA
FOOD 21
Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Cal i f or ni a Cateri ng Company
at Emerald Hills Lodge & Golf Course
938 Wi l mi ngt on Wa y, E me r a l d Hi l l s , CA 94062
( 650) 369- 4200 c a c a t er i ngc ompa ny. c om
Join us for Family Night Buffet
$7 Children 6-12 $15 Adults
2
nd
and 4
th
Wednesdays
6:30-8:00 Buffet Bar Open at 5:30
Buffet Includes: 5 Hot Items, Soup, Salad,
Other Cold Items, Coffee & Dessert
10/23 Prime Rib
11/13 Lamb Shank
11/27 Salmon Provencal
Eggplant’s blandness makes it a terrific host for spices.
Study: Gold star nutrition ratings appear to work
PORTLAND, Maine — A nutritional rating system using
gold stars affixed to price labels on grocery store shelves
appears to have shifted buying habits, potentially provid-
ing another tool to educate consumers on how to eat health-
ier, according to a new study.
The independent study examining a proprietary gold star
system used in Maine-based Hannaford Supermarkets sug-
gested it steered shoppers away from items with no stars
toward healthier foods that merited gold stars.
“Our results suggest that point-of-sale nutrition informa-
tion programs may be effective in providing easy-to-find
nutrition information that is otherwise nonexistent, difficult
to obtain or difficult to understand,” the researchers wrote in
the study, published last week in the journal Food Policy.
It’s the most rigorous scientific study focusing on Guiding
Stars, which was instituted in 2006 in Hannaford stores and
is now licensed for use in more than 1,800 stores in the U.S.
and Canada.
Researchers from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the
Food and Drug Administration and the University of Florida
focused on the cereal aisle, where it can be challenging to
make healthy choices amid conflicting health claims and a
multitude of sugary offerings targeting children.
Starbucks unveils ‘tea bar’ in New York City
NEW YORK — Starbucks is opening a new cafe in New
York City, and it won’t serve any coffee.
The Seattle-based company on Thursday plans to open its
first Teavana “tea bar,” where people can order specialty
drinks and small dishes in a trendy, cafe-like setting. The
sweets, flatbreads, salads and other food range in price from
about $3 to $15. Drinks range in price from $3 to $6, and
include novelties such as carbonated teas.
The menu of food and freshly made drinks is a change for
Teavana, a chain of about 300 shops that sell boxed and
loose tea and accessories. Teavana stores are mainly in shop-
ping malls, but Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz said he plans
to expand the footprint to include more locations in urban
areas. Already, it has opened traditional Teavana shops in
New York City.
By Sara Moulton
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
This dish is my idea of a one-size-
fits-all appetizer for the looming holi-
days, whether we’re talking about
Hanukkah, Thanksgiving or
Christmas.
It’s particularly apt for Hanukkah
because the eggplant is “fried” in oil
— and oil is one of the holiday’s cen-
tral symbols. The good news is that
the eggplant is pan-fried — not deep-
fried — and vegetarian, so it’s still rea-
sonably healthy. Heck, if you built a
bigger version, you could even turn it
into a vegetarian entree.
Buying fresh eggplants is key.
Whatever its size — and they range
from thin Asian strains to big and bul-
bous Italian-Americans — an eggplant
should have a very shiny skin and be
firm and smooth to the touch. Also, it’s
best to cook it as soon as possible
after you buy it. Eggplants don’t like
the refrigerator; they tend to deterio-
rate quickly in the cold.
I did salt my eggplant here, but more
for flavor than any other reason. I defi-
nitely didn’t want to extend the prep
time by salting and letting it sit for
hours; we’re already spending a lot of
time in the kitchen cooking for the
holidays. I chose small eggplants for
this recipe, mainly because I wanted
one-bite tastes, but also because the
skin on the smaller eggplants usually
is more tender. But if all you can find is
the larger guys, just slice them into
rounds, then cut the rounds into quar-
ters.
The eggplant’s blandness makes it a
terrific host for spices. I went Middle
Eastern here, with cumin, smoked
paprika and cayenne. But you’re wel-
come to roll instead with a curry or
Cajun mix, or with chopped dried
herbs. However you spice it, the
recipe’s yogurt-cucumber sauce, which
consists of exactly three ingredients
and requires only 5 minutes to prep,
provides a lovely cooling counter-
point.
One note about the breading proce-
dure: it’s important to knock off the
excess flour, let the excess egg mixture
drip off, and to tap off the extra bread-
crumbs. If you don’t, you’ll end up
with an over-breaded slice of eggplant
and too few crumbs. Breading the egg-
plant keeps it from absorbing too
much oil. The end result is wonderfully
creamy. My husband, no fan of egg-
plant, scarfed up these tasty little bites
with no complaint.
FRIED SPICED EGGPLANT
WITH CUCUMBER-GARLIC SAUCE
No small eggplants at the grocer?
About 1/2 pound of a larger one can be
substituted, but you’ll need to cut it dif-
ferently. Start by cutting the larger
eggplant into 1/3-inch-thick slices, as
directed. Then cut each slice into quar-
ters. Proceed as directed in the recipe.
Start to finish: 40 minutes (20 min-
utes active)
Servings: 6
1 small eggplant (1/2 pound and
about 2 inches wide), cut crosswise
into 1/3-inch-thick slices
Kosher salt
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon smoked paprika
1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon cayenne (to
taste)
1 large egg
1 tablespoon water
1 cup panko breadcrumbs
2 1/2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive
oil, divided
2-inch piece seedless cucumber
1/2 cup fat-free plain Greek yogurt
1 small clove garlic, minced
Chopped fresh parsley, to garnish
Heat the oven to 350 F. Sprinkle the
eggplant slices lightly on both sides
with salt. Transfer to a large colander,
then set in the sink and let drain for 15
minutes.
Meanwhile, in a medium bowl com-
bine the flour, cumin, paprika and
cayenne. In a second bowl, whisk the
egg and water. In a third bowl, place
the breadcrumbs.
Pat the eggplant slices dry. One at a
time, dip each slice first in the flour,
shaking off the excess, then the egg,
letting the excess liquid drip off, then
the breadcrumbs, knocking off the
excess crumbs (they will clump).
In a large skillet over high, heat 1
1/2 tablespoons of the oil. Add the
eggplant slices, reduce the heat to
medium and cook until golden, about 2
minutes. Flip the slices, add the
remaining tablespoon of olive oil and
cook until golden on the second side,
about 2 minutes. Transfer the slices to
a sheet pan. Bake on the oven’s middle
shelf until the slices are tender (a knife
will go through them easily), about 15
minutes.
While the eggplant is baking, grate
the cucumber on the coarse side of a
grater. In a small bowl, combine the
grated cucumber with the yogurt, garlic
and a bit of salt.
To serve, transfer the eggplant slices
to a platter and top each with a gener-
ous spoonful of the yogurt sauce.
Sprinkle with parsley.
Fried appetizer that’s still healthy
Food briefs
DATEBOOK
22
Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 30
Skype Online Video Conferencing.
10:30 a.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Learn how to open a free account, set
up your equipment and software,
make simple conference calls over
the Internet, create and maintain a
contact list and use other provided
features. Free. For more information
email conrad@smcl.org.
Halloween Storytelling at Balsam
Hill. 11 a.m. Balsam Hill, 1561 Adrian
Road, Burlingame. Babies, toddlers
and pre-schoolers are invited to
enjoy not-too-scary Halloween tales
with storyteller John Weaver. All chil-
dren are encouraged to dress up in
costume and bring new, unwrapped
toys to donate to the Central County
Fire Department for local children in
need. For more information contact
Lisa Clark at
lclark@balsambrands.com.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon to
1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
Fourth Ave., San Mateo. Admission is
free, but lunch is $17. For more infor-
mation call 430-6500 or go to sanma-
teoprofessionalalliance.com.
Halloween Makeup Contest. 3:30
p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. Split up into
teams of two to four and transform
one of your teammates into a mon-
ster or an animal or another charac-
ter. For ages 13 to 18. Free. For more
information email conrad@smcl.org.
Halloween Crafts at the Library. 4
p.m. Menlo Park Library, 800 Alma St.,
Menlo Park. There will be a
Halloween-tastic craft session for
your enjoyment. For more informa-
tion call 330-2530.
Halloween story time and crafts. 4
p.m. San Mateo Public Library, 55 W.
Third Ave., San Mateo. Listen to
spooky stories, make stuffed bats
and wear a costume. Free. For more
information call 522-7838.
Hair Salon partners up with chari-
ties. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. ‘Sharkeys Hair It
Is’ Hair Salon, 1050 El Camino Real,
Suite C, Belmont. ‘Sharkeys Hair It Is’
opened in September. They are a
Locks of Love participant and part-
ner with a local church, Mid-
Peninsula Boys and Girls club and
Samaritan House. They are holding a
free haircut event for Samaritan
House.
Off the Grid: Burlingame. 5 p.m. to 9
p.m. Broadway Caltrain Station on
California Drive and Carmelita
Avenue, Burlingame. There will be a
10-vendor lineup. For more informa-
tion call (415) 274-2510.
Trick-or-Treating at Serramonte
Center. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Serramonte Center, 3 Serramonte
Center, Daly City. Children of all ages
are invited to trick-or-treat at partici-
pating stores in costume. For more
information go to www.serramonte-
center.com.
Learning Disabilities:
Understanding Learning
Differences. 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave.,
Millbrae. Russel Wong, M.A., a learn-
ing disabilities specialist at Foothill
College, will discuss the different
types of learning disabilities, charac-
teristics of each disability and the
psychological factors associated
with them. Free. For more informa-
tion call 697-7607.
The Club Fox Blues Jam. 7 p.m. to 11
p.m. 2209 Broadway, Redwood City.
$5. For more information go to
rwabluesjam.com.
Hillbarn Theater presents ‘Lettice
and Lovage.’ 8 p.m. Hillbarn Theater,
1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City.
Tickets start at $23 and can be pur-
chased at www.HillbarnTheater.org
or by emailing boxoffice@hill-
barntheater.org.
Dragon Productions presents ‘Rich
and Famous,’ a play by John
Guare, directed by Meredith
Hagedorn. 8 p.m. The Dragon
Theater, 2120 Broadway, Redwood
City. A surreal comedy with music
that is part vaudeville, part absurd
and an entirely funny romp through
the perils of being a successful artist.
Tickets range from $25 to $35 and
can be purchased at www.drag-
onproductions.net. Runs through
Nov. 3.
THURSDAY, OCT. 31
Interweave Knitting Lab. Mariott
San Mateo, 1770 S. Amphlett Blvd.,
San Mateo. Interweave Knitting Lab
is an exciting, four-day event that
explores everything knitting. Free.
For more information go to
www.interweaveknittinglab.com.
Bay Area Free Small Business
Forum. 8 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. South
San Francisco Conference Center,
255 S. Airport Blvd., South San
Francisco. Small business owners are
invited to learn how to elevate their
online presence. This event is free,
but requires advanced registration at
smallbusinessforum.web.com.
Banjo and Guitar Serenade. 1:15
p.m. Peninsula Temple Beth El Senior
Friendship Club, 1700 Alameda de las
Pulgas, San Mateo. Randy Lee talks
about metaphor in song and music
and performs ‘Danny Boy,’ ‘The Girl
From Ipanema’ and many other note-
worthy songs. $1. For more informa-
tion call 378-2717.
FRIDAY, NOV.1
Portola Art Gallery exhibit. 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Allied Arts Guild, 75 Arbor
Road, Menlo Park. The Portola Art
Gallery presents Jan Prisco’s ‘Local
Color: New Painting of the San
Francisco and Monterey Peninsulas’
and ‘Fall Splendor.’ This exhibit will
run Monday to Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5
p.m., through Nov. 30.
‘Prints Matter’ and ‘Flowers and
Water.’ 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Pacific Art
League of Palo Alto. 227 Forest Ave.,
Palo Alto. ‘Prints Matter,’ a regional
competition and juried exhibition of
38 prints by 25 California artists, will
be featured in the main gallery. Free.
For more information email gallery-
manager@pacificartleague.org.
Project Read’s 21st Annual Trivia
Challenge Fundraiser. 5:30 p.m. to 9
p.m. South San Francisco Conference
Center, 255 S. Airport Blvd., South San
Francisco. Enjoy an evening of fine
dining and fun trivia competition.
$30 donation fee. For more informa-
tion and to RSVP call 829-3871.
John Blues Boyd and Friends. 6
p.m. to 9 p.m. Marvin Gardens Pub-n-
Grill, 1160 Old County Road, Belmont.
Mississippi Bluesman John Blues
Boyd brings the Blues to Belmont. He
and his Band open with a Show Set.
Further sets include Session Jams
with guest musicians.
Making Dreams Come True: The
Time is Now. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sequoia
High School (multi-purpose room),
1201 Brewster Ave., Redwood City.
This is a community event benefit-
ting immigrant youth. There will be a
dinner and raffle. All proceeds from
the event will be used for Sequoia
High School Dream Club
Scholarships. Tickets are available at
the door: $10 for adults, $5 for stu-
dents and parents. Free for children
under 10. For more information
email Jane Slater at jslater@seq.org.
Ah Sam Florist Holiday Open
House. 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. 2645 El
Camino Real. A celebration of the fall
and winter seasons. Discover
enchanting decor. Gorgeous
tablescapes. Artisan gifts. Free. For
more information email
lori@ahsam.com.
BHS Musical — Curtains. 7 p.m.
Burlingame High School Auditorium,
1 Mangini Way, Burlingame. $15 gen-
eral admission, $10 for students, sen-
iors and children. For more informa-
tion call 558-2854.
Jimmy Bosch live at Club Fox.
Doors open at 8 p.m. Show starts at
10:30 p.m. Club Fox, 2209 Broadway,
Redwood City.Tickets are $25 (for the
first 100 people) and $30.
Hillbarn Theater presents ‘Lettice
and Lovage.’ 8 p.m. Hillbarn Theater,
1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City.
Tickets start at $23 and can be pur-
chased at www.HillbarnTheater.org
or by emailing boxoffice@hill-
barntheater.org.
Pacifica Spindrift Players presents
‘Social Security,’ a comedy by
Andrew Bergman. 8 p.m. Muriel
Watkin Gallery, 1050 Crespi Drive,
Pacifica. Tickets are $25 for adults
and $20 for seniors and students but
will be half-priced during opening
week. Runs through Nov. 24. For tick-
ets call the reservation line at 359-
8002.
Dragon Productions presents ‘Rich
and Famous,’ a play by John
Guare, directed by Meredith
Hagedorn. 8 p.m. The Dragon
Theater, 2120 Broadway, Redwood
City. A surreal comedy with music
that is part vaudeville, part absurd
and an entirely funny romp through
the perils of being a successful artist.
Tickets range from $25 to $35 and
can be purchased at www.drag-
onproductions.net. Runs through
Nov. 3.
SATURDAY, NOV. 2
San Mateo History Museum
Docent Training Program. 7:45 a.m
to 5 p.m. San Mateo County History
Museum, 2200 Broadway, Redwood
City. Lunch provided. Free. For more
information call 299-0104 ext. 231 or
email education@histyory shocwcas.
California Classical Chinese Dance
Competition. 9 a.m. Skyline College
Theater, 3300 College Drive, San
Bruno. Help foster cultural exchange
and promote the beauty and good-
ness of Chinese dance. Tickets are
$10 and can be purchased by calling
(415) 431-3161. Registration details
can be found at www.feitian-califor-
nia.org/chinese-dance-competition.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
commission to take over the 2925 S.
El Camino Real earlier this year.
Michaels’ application included
repainting the exterior of the building,
installing a new sign and other interi-
or improvements, according to staff
reports. The Zoning Administrator
denied Michaels’ request in April,
prompting it to appeal to the Planning
Commission. It was denied during a
Sept. 10 hearing.
The denial was based on the city’s
Rail Corridor Transit Oriented
Development Plan that was enacted in
2005. It was adopted to allow, encour-
age and provide guidance for the cre-
ation of transit-oriented development
within a half-mile radius of the
Hillsdale and Hayward Park Caltrain
station, said Art Henriques, contract
project planner for the city. The TOD is
also supportive of pedestrians and
bicyclists, Henrique said.
“You’re encouraging higher density
of mixed uses and ability for people to
more easily utilize transit,” Henriques
said.
The zoning classification is meant
to encourage more residential or office
buildings in the area so people will
have easy access to public transit;
consequentially cutting down on car
trips and reducing vehicle emissions,
Henrique said.
Based on the TOD, retail businesses
in the area are limited to 15,000 square
feet; however, grocery and drug stores
are exempt. The El Camino Real site is
approximately 25,000 square feet and
Michaels’ current location is about
30,000 square feet.
The city changed the zoning rules in
the east area around the Hillsdale
Caltrain station, including the 2925 El
Camino building, in May 2011. After
Borders left, the property owner need-
ed to maintain it as a retail space with-
out a six-month gap for a new store to
grandfather in under the non-conform-
ing allowance.
The seasonal business Spirit
Halloween Superstores and Gator Bob
were denied applications for tax certifi-
cates and are also appealing to operate
at the El Camino Real site. But any
large-scale retail store would not be
consistent with the TOD ordinance,
Henrique said.
Spirit Halloween Superstore had
occupied the building until Nov. 22,
2011, and returned around June 4,
2012, according to staff reports. Part
of the petitioners’ appeal requested the
Planning Commission find the proper-
ty continued to be used as retail store
after Borders left. The city granted
Spirit Halloween Superstore a tempo-
rary tax certificate for it to stay in busi-
ness at the location while the petition
is still under appeal, Henrique said.
San Mateo wants Michaels to main-
tain a retail store in San Mateo, but the
site it applied for is not consistent
with the intentions of the TOD,
Henrique said. With state regulations
requiring cities to cut down on pollu-
tion by 2020, the city is thinking
about the necessity of long-term eco-
friendly policies, Henriques said.
samantha@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
APPEAL
The couple’s tragedy began Oct. 28,
2012, when Rina Ariazza felt little
movement by the baby and, in an
appointment the next day, a doctor
confirmed the absence of a heartbeat.
Estefani Belen Arriaza was stillborn
that night. After the couple spent a
half hour with their baby, a female
nurse took her from the operating
room and the couple went to a hospital
room where the following day they
made burial arrangements at Cypress
Lawn and discharged.
On Nov. 1, 2012, Schuessler, a nun
and a social worker went to Rina
Arriaza’s home to explain that the hos-
pital had lost Estefani’s body when
housekeeping took the wrapped body
away with other linen and placed it in
the laundry. The body was then
shipped with the laundry to a vendor in
Santa Cruz where workers discovered it
on the conveyor belt.
During the conversation, Schuessler
assured the couple the hospital would
take action to prevent similar future
errors and said that the baby’s body
was still in acceptable shape for the
scheduled funeral.
However, according to the suit, dur-
ing the Nov. 2, 2012, funeral service
Julio Arriaza touched his daughter one
last time before the casket was closed
and was shocked when her sleeve
moved revealing transparent cello-
phane wrapped around her arm. The
family, given no explanation for the
wrap, asked to see the full body and
found it appearing “bloated, swollen
and mutilated, unlike the description
given.” Three days later, the social
worker told the couple Schuessler
issued the check. The couple did not
accept the money, Crespo said.
The couple are seeking damages for
emotional distress and negligence
along with legal costs.
They are still devastated, Crespo
said.
A case management conference is
scheduled for Feb. 20, 2014.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
BABY
$3.72 million, the report stated. The
new funding formula will send $2.1
billion more to school districts that
have high numbers of students from
lower-income families, who have lim-
ited English proficiency or are foster
children. During the first year, the for-
mula gives school districts more con-
trol over state aid by eliminating ear-
marks for state-mandated programs,
except for special education funding.
There is still uncertainty in the district
about how its budget will be affected
by the changes.
The proposal was discussed at a
school board study session Monday.
Members of the public who attended
the meeting gave positive feedback
and the district absolutely needs the
funding, Barbaro said. Right now, the
district is in the process of trying to
get community input to see if parents
and the general community would sup-
port it.
Other trustees would like to see a par-
cel tax pass soon, including Trustee
Denis Fama, who believes a parcel tax
is really important to help bolster the
district’s programs.
“The next step is get out more com-
munications to the community in gen-
eral,” Fama said. “Funding from the
state has been somewhat sporadic and
we would be able to, in the short term,
sustain programs and reward teachers
when we have a good cash flow. We
will have to be very specific of its use
though.”
The last parcel tax went to Millbrae
voters in June 2008 and didn’t pass.
The district would have received
$400,000 to $492,000 from the $78-
per-parcel tax to go toward reinstating
music, library, instructional and tech-
nology aides and custodians in the
school, along with protecting teachers
from layoffs and maintaining pro-
grams. A two-thirds majority vote,
66.66 percent, is needed for this type
of measure to pass and 66.29 percent
of voters said yes in 2008, while
33.71 percent voted no.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
TAX
COMICS/GAMES
10-30-13
tuesday’s PuZZLe sOLVed
PreViOus
sudOku
answers
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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aCrOss
1 Sleep sites
5 Like river bottoms
10 Speckled fsh
12 Dress
13 Beach footwear
14 Craw
15 Latin I verb
16 Pub pint
18 Strong soap
19 Lake sport
22 Wedding site
25 Stopped momentarily
29 Pitcher’s place
30 Wireless
32 Scale unit
33 Blinding light
34 Bedouin’s domain
37 Weaker, as an excuse
38 Rented
40 Many wks.
43 — Beta Kappa
44 Occupied
48 Eye feature
50 Sickly
52 Far afeld
53 Casts
54 Seance invitee
55 Org.
dOwn
1 Bikini tops
2 Untold centuries
3 Western resort (2 wds.)
4 RR terminal
5 Three before V
6 “— cost you!”
7 Easter fower
8 Cone producer
9 Even so
10 Mao — -tung
11 Cabbage salad
12 Booster rocket
17 Gloss target
20 Nightmare
21 Brook sound
22 —, amas, amat
23 Costello and Rawls
24 Canned fsh
26 Restaurant extras (2 wds.)
27 Red-waxed cheese
28 Kind of straits
31 Above, to a bard
35 Return the favor
36 Sigh of contentment
39 Dainty swallows
40 Come together
41 — von Bismarck
42 Round Table titles
45 Hawaiian strings
46 Stitched
47 Fabric meas.
48 Cleaning cloth, often
49 — King Cole
51 JFK posting
diLBert® CrOsswOrd PuZZLe
Cranky girL®
PearLs BeFOre swine®
get FuZZy®
wednesday, OCtOBer 30, 2013
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Pick up information or
expand your interests to fnd a way to make important
contacts, reach new goals and improve your life.
sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — You should take
a challenge or unusual situation in stride. Don’t make
a big deal or draw attention to what you are doing. If
you make a sudden or unexpected change, you’ll catch
others off-guard and gain the advantage.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — You’ll spark
interest in whatever you do. Share your outlook
and intentions. A contract, settlement or
investment will have a positive outcome. A better
position is within your reach.
aQuarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Make a decision
based on what you need, not what others want.
Be strong and consider your motives. Justification
will come through honesty, integrity and knowing
what you want.
PisCes (Feb. 20-March 20) — Do what you can for
others, and you will get favors in return. Financial
matters look positive, and investments will be worth
your while. An unusual connection with someone will
blossom into a relationship.
aries (March 21-April 19) — Research what you need
to know before you plunge into a conversation that
might affect your reputation. You can win or lose the
confdence of others with your comments.
taurus (April 20-May 20) — Choose what you want
to do and with whom you want to do it. Take a position
of leadership, but remain a team player. Your masterful
way of handling people will be your ticket to success.
geMini (May 21-June 20) — Step back and consider
who is treating you well and who isn’t. Cut your
losses and weed out the people and projects that are
weighing you down instead of picking you up.
CanCer (June 21-July 22) — What you share
with others will lead to exciting activities,
projects and proposals. Pay close at tention to
what’s going on at home. An emotional situation
must be handled carefully.
LeO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Refuse to let anyone railroad
you into something that you don’t want to pursue.
Ask questions, but avoid arguments. Look and listen
carefully before making a major decision.
VirgO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Talk is cheap, but
sometimes frugality is what’s called for. Stay within
your budget, but offer something new and exciting, and
you will have everyone entranced.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Your past professional
performance and jobs that brought you the most
joy will help you decide what direction to take now.
Contact former co-workers and make a proposal.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 23
THE DAILY JOURNAL
24
Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
Employment Services
110 Employment
HAIRDRESSER AND Barber needed.
Hair station for rent SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO Call Linda, (650)588-6717
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
DISHWASHER WANTED
New San Carlos Restaurant
Email: Max@johnstonsaltbox.com
Call (512)653-1836
DRY CLEANERS / Laundry, part time,
30+ hours a week. Counter, wash, dry
fold help. Apply LaunderLand, 995 El Ca-
mino, Menlo Park.
110 Employment
ELECTRONIC ARTS, Inc. has a Soft-
ware Engineer II opening in Redwood
City, CA. Develop and support tools that
enable audio designers to get high-quali-
ty voice content and sound effects into
games. For more info and to apply, go to
careers.ea.com
ELECTRONIC ARTS, Inc. has the fol-
lowing job openings in Redwood City,
CA:
• Marketing Analyst (Internal Title: MM,
Analytics): Perform statistical modeling
and forecasting.
• Senior Statistician: Build statistical
models and apply predictive analytics
techniques.
For more info and to apply, go to ca-
reers.ea.com.
Established Independent
Small Business is expanding.
Now Accepting Applicatons For:
• Bookkeepers
• Administrative Assistants
• IT Technician
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
• PAID INTERNSHIPS
FOR TAX PROFESSIONALS
Apply in Person Monday - November
4, 2013, 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
1501 El Camino Real Suite I
Belmont CA 94002
For more information,
call (650)595-5604 Ext 12
RESTAURANT -
Cook for American breakfast . Full time
or Part time, for Pantry Restaurant. Apply
1855 S. Delaware St., San Mateo.
(650)345-4544
110 Employment
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES +
SALES MGR- (jewelry exp req)
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
PROCESS SERVER, FT/PT, Car &
Insurance. Deliver legal papers,
(650)697-9431
TAXI & LIMO DRIVER, Wanted, full
time, paid weekly, between $500 and
$700 cash, (650)766-9878
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
180 Businesses For Sale
SELLING SALON in downtown San Ma-
teo. Please call (510)962-1569 or
(650)347-9490
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257895
The following person is doing business
as: Techstacker, 233 King St., RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94062 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Tech-
crowds, LLC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Libility Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 06/20/2013
/s/ Jeremry Hurley /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/02/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13).
25 Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 524299
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
SOLOMON TEAL & CELES TEAL
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Solomon Teal & Celes Teal
filed a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Zellia Faith Teal
Proposed name: Zellia Faith Teal Quar-
ters-Styles
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December 3,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/16/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/10/2013
(Published, 10/30/13, 11/06/2013,
11/13/2013, 11/20/2013)
CASE# CIV 524464
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
JACKIE KARL
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Jackie Karl filed a petition with
this court for a decree changing name as
follows:
Present name: Jackie Karl
Proposed name: Jackie Heights
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December
11, 2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J,
at 400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/23/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/18/2013
(Published, 10/30/13, 11/06/2013,
11/13/2013, 11/20/2013)
203 Public Notices
CASE# CLJ 524488
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Brian Hale Piepgrass, Giselle Marie
Schmitz
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Brian Hale Piepgrass, Giselle
Marie Schmitz filed a petition with this
court for a decree changing name as fol-
lows:
a) Present name: Brian Hale Piepgrass
b) Present name: Giselle Marie Schmitz
a) Proposed name: Brian Piepgrass Hale
b) Proposed name: Giselle Marie Hale
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on November
19, 2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J,
at 400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/11/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/09/2013
(Published, 10/16/13, 10/23/2013,
10/30/2013, 11/06/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257920
The following person is doing business
as: SomaPsyche Therapy, 1201 Geral-
dine Way #1, BELMONT, CA 94002 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Soma Psyche Therapy, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Betsy Aida Maldonado /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257932
The following person is doing business
as: Aber Advisors, 1336 Cloud Ave.,
MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Menlo
Manor, LLC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 10/01/2013.
/s/ Stephen Aber /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257840
The following person is doing business
as: L. C. & Sons Building Services, 1411
Crestwood Dr., SOUTH SAN FRANCIS-
CO, CA is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: 1) Luis Ceja, same ad-
dress 2) Marcial Ceja, same address, 3)
Teresa Ceja, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by a General Partner-
ship. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Luis Ceja /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257823
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Stikerfy, 2) Sticker Frames, 642
Joanne Dr., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Donald Pitts, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Donald Pitts /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257721
The following person is doing business
as: Wellentouch Therapeutic Massage,
987 Vista Grande, MILLBRAE, CA 94030
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Cornelia Rinderknecht Eller. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Cornelia Rinderknecht Eller /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257995
The following person is doing business
as: Orchids Cleaning Services, LLC, 847
Rollins Rd., #2, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Orchids Cleaning Services,
LLC, CA. The business is conducted by
a Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 10/15/2013.
/s/ Marisol Gonzales /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258044
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: L and L Warehouse, 1432 Al-
varado Ave., BURLINGAME, CA 94010
is hereby registered by the following
owners: Harold Gevertz, 123 W. 3rd St.,
San Mateo, CA 94402, Rosalie Gevertz,
123 W. 3rd St., San Mateo, CA 94402,
Barry Gevertz, same address, Dolores
Gevertz, 1749 Lake St., San Mateo, CA
94403 . The business is conducted by a
General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 05/29/1986.
/s/ Barry Gevertz /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13, 11/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257665
The following person is doing business
as: Story Geek, 53 Penhurst Ave., DALY
CITY, CA 94015 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Carl D. Pascua,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 09/16/2013.
/s/ Carl Pascua /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13, 11/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257919
The following person is doing business
as: A One Groups Company, 416 St.
Francis Blvd., DALY CITY, CA 94015 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Zaw Win, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Zaw Win /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13, 11/06/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258018
The following person is doing business
as: State Plumbing and Heating Sup-
plies, 1000 American St., SAN CARLOS,
CA 94070 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Mitchell Enterprises, Inc.,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
08/05/1959
/s/ Earl L. Mitchell /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13, 11/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257827
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Complete Cleaning, 1312 Ma-
ple St., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is here-
by registered by the following owners:
Gloria Martinez-Escobar, and Jeovanny
Escobar, same address The business is
conducted by a Married Couple. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Gloria Martinez-Escobar /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/23/13, 10/30/13, 11/06/13, 11/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258078
The following person is doing business
as: Bayview Apartments, 851 N. Am-
phlett Blvd., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Gilberts Bay View Enterprises, LLC, CA.
The business is conducted by a Limited
Liability Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ William F. Gibert /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/23/13, 10/30/13, 11/06/13, 11/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258118
The following person is doing business
as: Wilkinson and Associates, 710 Bair
Island Rd., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063
is hereby registered by the following
owner: William P. Wilkinson, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ William P. Wilkinson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/23/13, 10/30/13, 11/06/13, 11/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258174
The following person is doing business
as: ML Construction, 928 Terminal Way,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Jelani An-
derson, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Jelani T. Anderson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/23/13, 10/30/13, 11/06/13, 11/13/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257900
The following person is doing business
as: Optical 102, 1750 El Camino Real,
#102, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Dr.
Robert Elliston, 2601 Martinez Dr., Bur-
lingame, CA 94010. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 12/21/1999.
/s/ Robert R. Elliston /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/02/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/23/13, 10/30/13, 11/06/13, 11/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257839
The following person is doing business
as: Twin Motor Company, 215 S. El Dor-
ado St., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Emmanuel B. Sibug and Gloria M. Sibug,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a General Partnership. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on Nov. 12, 2013.
/s/ Emmanuel B. Sibug /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/23/13, 10/30/13, 11/06/13, 11/13/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258188
The following person is doing business
as: Phyziquest Vitality Sciences Institute,
407 N. San Mateo Dr., SAN MATEO, CA
94401 is hereby registered by the follow
ing owner: Phyziquest Vitality Enterpriz-
es, Inc., CA The business is conducted
by a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 01/01/2005.
/s/ Aaron Parnell /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/30/13, 11/06/13, 11/13/13, 11/20/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258179
The following person is doing business
as: Talenti Consulting Services, 138 Ex-
eter Ave., SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Lihn-Phuong Ho, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 10/16/2013.
/s/ Lihn-Phuong Ho /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/30/13, 11/06/13, 11/13/13, 11/20/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258216
The following person is doing business
as: TNatcha Thai Massage, 517 S. B St.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Charnwisut
Khachondechakul, 512 19th Ave, Apt. D,
San Mateo, CA 94401. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Charnwisut Khachondechakul /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/23/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/30/13, 11/06/13, 11/13/13, 11/20/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257670
The following person is doing business
as: Chinese Medicine Pro, 144 Albacore
Ln., FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Scott
Whitfield same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Scott Whitfield /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/30/13, 11/06/13, 11/13/13, 11/20/13).
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
CHANGE IN OWNERSHIP OF
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE
Date of Filing Application: Aug. 26, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
UCBAYLL, LLC
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
330 N. Bayshore Blvd.
SAN MATEO, CA 94401
Type of license applied for:
47-On-Sale General Eating Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
October 30, 2013
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
WILLIE F. ROBERSON
Case Number: 123840
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Willie F. Roberson. A
Petition for Probate has been filed by
Varee Wycoff, CLPF in the Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo.
The Petition for Probate requests that
Varee Wycoff, CLPF be appointed as
personal representative to administer the
estate of the decedent.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: November 27, 2013
at 9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the peti-
tion, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hear-
ing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent cred-
itor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal de-
livery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal qutho-
ity may affect your rights as a creditor.
You may want to consult with an attorney
knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Lawrence Solorio
5150 Sunrise Blvd., Ste.D-1
FAIR OAKS, CA 95826
(916)536-1773
Dated: October 17, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on October 23, 30, November 6, 2013.
26
Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
203 Public Notices
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF
CALIFORNIA FOR THE COUNTY OF
SANTA CLARA
CASE NO. 111-CV-193645
STATEMENT OF DAMAGES PUR-
SUANT TO CCP SECTION 425.11
Ed Summerfield
Plaintiff,
vs.
ROBIN Gan, aka Ee HAN GAN, aka
JERRY OWEN; LINDA GAN, aka MEI
SHAY GAN, JASON LIAO, aka JASON
GAN; and DOES 1 through 30, inclusive,
Defendant
Pursuant to CCP §425.11, Plaintiff, Ed
Summerfield submits the following State-
ment of Damages heretofore upon De-
fendants ROBIN Gan, aka Ee HAN GAN,
aka JERRY OWEN; LINDA GAN, aka
MEI SHAY GAN, JASON LIAO, aka JA-
SON GAN by way of Service by Publica-
tion on and states as follows:
(1) Plaintiff's medical and hospital ex-
penses at this time are estimated in ex-
cess of the amount $500k
(2) Loss of wages or earnings at this time
in the amount of $1 million
(3) Diminution of earnings capacity in the
amount of $1 million
(4) Plaintiff's future medicals in an
amount of $500k
(5) General damages consisting of physi-
cal pain and suffering by plaintiff and
mental distress and shock to said plaintiff
caused by accident and injuries descri-
bed in the complaint on file herein, in ex-
cess of the amount of $582,298.19.
(6) For punitive damages in the amount
of $256,000
(7) For costs of suit incurred herein
$10,000
(8) For expectation damages in the
amount of $285,714.29
(9) For such other and further relief as
the Court may deem just and proper.
Dated: October 9, 2013
Respectfully Submitted,
Ed Summerfield, Plaintiff in Pro Per
____________________________
Ed Summerfield, Plaintiff in Proper
(Published in the San Mateo Daily Jour-
nal, 10/23/13, 10/30/13, 11/06/13,
11/13/13)
210 Lost & Found
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
ART PAPER, various size sheets, 10
sheets, $20. (650)591-6596
ART: 5 charcoal nude figures, unframed,
14” x 18”, by Andrea Medina, 1980s.
$40. 650-345-3277
RUB DOWN TYPE (Lettraset), hundreds
to choose from. 10 sheets for $10.
(650)591-6596
296 Appliances
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both (650)520-3425
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both (650)520-3425
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
OSTER MEAT slicer, mint, used once,
light weight, easy to use, great for holi-
day $25. (650)578-9208
PRESSURE COOKER Miromatic 4qt
needs gasket 415 333-8540 Daly City
296 Appliances
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
298 Collectibles
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1953 CHEVY Bel Air Convertible model.
Sun Star 1:18 scale.Blue. Original box.
$20 cash. (650)654-9252
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
2003 AMERICAN Eagle silver proof dol-
lar. Original velvet box and COA. $70
Cash. (650)654-9252
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK HAMILL autographed Star Wars
Luke figure, unopened rarity. 1995 pack-
age. $75 San Carlos, 650-255-8716.
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SILVER PIECE dollar circulated $30 firm
415 333-8540 Daly City
STAR WARS 9/1996 Tusken Raider ac-
tion figure, in original unopened package.
$5.00, Steve, SC, 650-255-8716
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90., (650)766-
3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 SOLD!
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
BARBIE BLUE CONVERTIBLE plus ac-
ccessories, excellent shape, $45., SOLD!
LARGE ALL Metal Tonka dump truck.
as new, $25, SOLD!
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
STAR WARS R2-D2 action figure. Un-
opened, original 1995 package. $10.
Steve, San Carlos, 650-255-8716.
STAR WARS, Battle Droid figures, four
variations. Unopened 1999 packages.
$60 OBO. Steve, 650-255-8716.
TONKA DUMP Truck with tipping bed,
very sturdy Only $10 SOLD!
TONKA METAL Excavator independent
bucket and arm, $25 SOLD!
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
302 Antiques
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
APPLE Harmon Kardon speakers, sub-
woofer, one side rattles. In San Carlos,
$40, 650-255-8716.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SANYO C30 Portable BOOM BOX,
AM/FM STEREO, Dolby Metal Tape
player/recorder, 2/3 speakers boxes, $50
650-430-6046
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SLIDE PROJECTOR Air Equipped Su-
per 66 A and screen $30 for all
(650)345-3840
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
3 DRAWER PLATFORM BED Real
wood (light pine, Varathane finish). Twin
size. $50 (650)637-1907
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
AUTUMN TABLE Centerpiece unop-
ened, 16 x 6, long oval shape, copper
color $10.00 (650)578-9208
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLONDE Wood, 6 drawers,
31” Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45.
(650)592-2648
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINA CABINET, 53” x “78” wooden
with glass. Good shape. $120 obo.
(650)438-0517
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
CURIO CABINET 55" by 21" by 12"
Glass sides, door & shelves $95 OBO
(650)368-6271
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 drawer 61" wide, 31" high,
& 18" deep $50., (650)592-2648
DRESSER - all wood, excellent condition
$50 obo (650)589-8348
DRESSERlarge, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
304 Furniture
HEADBOARD, QUEEN-SIZE,HALF-
MOON shape,decorated with small
stones,very heavy. Free to take away!
(650-342-6192)
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 medal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white
pen and paper holder. Brand new, in
box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
PRIDE MECHANICAL Lift Chair, Infinite
postion. Excellent condition, owner’s
manual included. $400 cash only,
(650)544-6169
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99., (650)592-2648
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TEAK BASE and glass cover cheese
holder. Great for holidays. $18.
(650)341-6402
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV CABINET, brown wood, 3 shelves, 2
doors, brass hardware, 34 3/8wx20
1/2dx28 3/8h good condition. $35
(650)347-5104
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057.
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
BRADFORD COLLECTOR Plates THAI
(Asian) - $35 (650)348-6955
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
ICE CREAM MAKER - Westbend 4 qt.
old fashion ice cream maker, brand new,
still in box, $30., (650)726-1037
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO (650)345-5502
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
OSTER BREAD maker (new) $45.,
(650)520-3425
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
306 Housewares
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40. for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
6-8 MISC. TOOLS - used, nail tray with
nails, $15., (650)322-2814
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman, 10”, 4 long
x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 10" mitre saw with 100 tooth
carbon blade $60 SOLD!
PROFESSIONAL MORTAR BOX Like
New $25 (650)368-0748
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
FILING CABINET, 4-drawer, letter $25
(650)341-8342
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20.00 (650)871-7200
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS - (50) for $50., SOLD!
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, anti-oxident proper-
ties, new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WALKER, Foldable with
wheels. $15 (650)756-7878
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN - (7) Olde Brooklyn
lanterns, battery operated, safe, new in
box, $100. for all, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56” square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
BABY BJORN Little Potty Ideal 4
travel/early training,(650)595-3933
BLUE/WHITE DUCK shaped ceramic
teapot, hand painted, made in China.
$18. (650)341-6402
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
310 Misc. For Sale
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BREVILLE JUICE Maker multi speed
(Williams Somoma) never used $90
(650)994-4783
BRIEFCASE 100% black leather
excellent condition $75 (650)888-0129
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
DOLLS: NEW, girl and boy in pilgrim
costume, adorable, soft fabric, beautifully
made. $30. 650-345-3277
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. SOLD!
GOLD COLORED ONE 3-pce. Martex
towel set(bath, hand, face),. Asking $15.
Call (650)574-3229
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HOT SANDWICH maker elec, perfect,
$9.95 (650)595-3933
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks. 9 months
worth, $60., (650)343-4461
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
KITCHEN POTS 3 stainless steel, 21/2
gal., 4 gal., 5 gal. $10 all. (650)574-3229
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $7., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOW RIDER magazines 80 late 1999 all
for $80 (650)873-4030
LUGGAGE, BLACK Samsonite with roll-
ers, 3 compartments, condition clean,
never used. makeshift handle, $40
(650)347-5104
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12”Lx
5”W , $12. both, SOLD!
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, SOLD!
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO (650)593-8880
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
ONE 3-PCE. clay colored Martex towel
set (bath, hand, face), . Asking $15. Call
(650)574-3229
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
33" wide x 20 inches deep. 64.5 " high.
$70.00 (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PATIO ARMILLARY vintage iron 18" rd,
$60 obo email green4t @ yahoo.com
PET CARRIER Excellent Condition Very
Clean Size small "Petaire" Brand
$50.00 (650)871-7200
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
27 Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Big name in big
trucks
5 Gunk
9 TV’s Dick Van
__
13 When doubled, a
Northwest city
14 Give a makeover
15 Line holder
16 Home sound
system
18 Texts: Abbr.
19 Decline from
disuse
20 Some
Beethoven
works
22 “Veni, vidi, vici”
man
23 Memorable
“Rocky” line
26 Little Leaguer,
say
27 Automated intro?
29 __ del Fuego
30 Stay a step
ahead of
32 Many millennia
33 Eloquent
38 “__ baby!”
39 Zapped
40 Rapper who
played Left Ear
in “The Italian
Job”
43 Software test
version
44 Agnus __
47 Reason to pile
onto the team bus
49 Promoting
51 Botanist’s study
52 Nostalgic
souvenir
53 River in a 1957
Best Picture title
55 Hero whose
catchphrase
begins 16-, 23-,
33- and 47-
Across
57 Work on, as a
popsicle
58 Q.E.D. part
59 Levels
60 Tiny arachnid
61 “Gadzooks!”
62 Puts the kibosh
on
DOWN
1 Fruity cocktail
2 Butler in the
Batcave
3 Awards for ads
4 “How Life
Imitates Chess”
author Garry
5 Earl with a tea
6 Above, to Keats
7 Start of some
Keats titles
8 Having little
talent for
9 H.G. Wells’
island
physiologist
10 “Darn tootin’!”
11 Small cask
12 Golf star Ernie
13 Off, in
mobspeak
17 Royal seat
21 Exiled Amin
23 Google-owned
video site
24 Yank since 2004
25 Bert Bobbsey’s
sis
28 Hot-sounding
European
capital
31 Elbow
33 Tuck away
34 “I’ve got proof!”
35 Elegantly
feminine
36 Infernal
37 Greeting from
Down Under
38 Physicians’ org.
41 Id controller
42 Chris of “Tommy
Boy”
44 Dented
45 Keys in
46 Stravinsky and
Sikorsky
48 Native New
Zealander
50 Enclose, as pigs
52 Parcel (out)
53 Airline to
Amsterdam
54 Xbox 360
competitor
56 Quick snooze
By Jeff Chen
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
10/30/13
10/30/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
310 Misc. For Sale
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SCARY DVD movies, (7) in cases, Zom-
bies, Date Movie, Labyrinth, in original
boxes. $10/all. (650)578-9208
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, SOLD!
TRIVIAL PURSUIT - Master Game/Ge-
nus Edition. Has all cards. Mint condi-
tion. Asking $10. (650)574-3229
USB VEHICLE charger any mini USB
device $20 (650)595-3933
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEBER BARBEQUE - 28”, limited ed.
w/Coca-Cola logo, $45., SOLD!
WEST AFRICAN hand carved tribal
masks - $25 (650)348-6955
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WIN SIZE quilt Nautica brand New in pkg
Yellow/White/Black Trim “San Marino"
pattern $ 40 Firm (650)871-7200
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
310 Misc. For Sale
XMAS DECORATIONS: 6 unique, hand
painted, jointed new toy soldiers, holding
musical instrument. $34. 650-345-3277
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap $75.
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
UKULELE STILL in box unused, no
brand $35 (650)348-6428
312 Pets & Animals
2 BEAUTIFUL canaries for sale. good
singers, $50 each Call evenings,
(650)592-6867
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
ALPINESTAR MOTORCYCLE JEANS
Twin Stitched. Internal Knee Protection.
Tags Attached. Mens Sz 34 Grey/Blue
Denim $50.00 (650)357-7484
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
316 Clothes
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
INDIAN SARI $50 (650)515-2605
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
SILK SCARF, Versace, South Beach
pattern 100% silk, 24.5”x34.5” made in
Italy, $75. $(650)591-6596
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
316 Clothes
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored, green lapel &
hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMAN;S LEVI'S Jacket Pristine cond.,
faded Only $29 (650)595-3933
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
70 SPREADER cleats, 1” x 8” for 8”
foundations. $25. (650)345-3840
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $30.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
USED LUMBER pieces 5 2x4's, 2 2x6's,
3 plywood sheets ALL $30.00
650-341-8342
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
BICYCLE MAGNA -Great Divide Excel-
lent Condition Like New SSF Area
SOLD!
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. (650)341-1861
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
CAMPER DOLLY, excellent condition.
Used only once. $150. (650)366-6371
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler$20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
318 Sports Equipment
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
STATIONARY BIKE, Volt, Clean, $15
(650)344-6565
STATIONERY BIKE, $20. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057.
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
322 Garage Sales
GENUINE
ESTATE SALE/
MOVING SALE
Tons of good stuff!
Clothes, furniture,
pool table,
Lifetimes of goods
Saturday
November 2nd
ONLY
148 Costa Rica Ave
x St. Howard Ave
Burlingame
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Rugs
THROW RUG, 8’ x 11’, black and gold.w/
fring, beautiful,clean. $50. SOLD!
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
335 Garden Equipment
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
NIKON FG 35mm SLR all black body.
Vivitar 550FD flash. Original owner. $99.
Cash (650)654-9252
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens. 28mm-210mm. Fil-
ter and lens cap. Original owner. $99.
Cash. (650)654-9252
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
001 BMW 530I Sedan with 121k miles
automatic looks and drives very nice
clean Car Fax and everything is working
comes with 3000 miles free
warranty #4529 on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2001 AUDI A4 Avanti Wagon Quattro
with 127k miles in excellent conditions
and fully optioned .ready for everyday
driving or weekend clean Car
Fax.www.autotradecentercars.com
#4441 on sale for $6995.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
2001 MBZ ML 320 SUV with 133 k miles
mid size all wheel drive SUV comes with
third row seating and lots of nice factory
options and winter package.# 4430 on
sale for $6995.00 plus fees, (650)637-
3900
2001 PORSCHE 911 Carrera 4 cabriolet
automatic steptronic with 90k miles come
with new soft top and a hard top naviga-
tions and much more.# 5033 on sale for
$26995.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 MBZ CLK Cabriolet with only 80k
miles automatic clean Car Fax free 3000
miles warranty. runs great come with
powertop.www.autotradecentercars.com.
new tiers #4439 on sale for $9995.00
plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 PT Cruiser Limited automatic with
121k miles come with all power package
and 3 months warranty in excellent con-
ditions#4515 on sale for 4995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
2002 SUBARU Outback Wagon LL Bean
automatic with 158k miles one owner
clean Car Fax automatic in excellent
conditions all power package leather
moon roof and more. #4538 on sale for
$5950.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
28
Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
620 Automobiles
2004 FORD Explorer Eddie Bauer SUV
with 146k miles all options and third row
seating. www.autotradecentercars.com
#4330 come with warranty please call for
more info on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2005 TOYOTA Prius package 4 with 97k
miles loaded with navi key less , JBL and
much more.
www.autotradecentercars.com.
#4537 with clean car fax and free war-
ranty on sale for $9700.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$3,000, Call Glen @ SOLD!
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
620 Automobiles
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
TOYOTA ‘00 CAMRY LE, 4 dr, auto,
clean title, smogged. 129K miles, $3,800.
(650)342-6342
VW ‘01 BEETLE, Turbo Sport, 97K
miles, auto, $5,800. (650)342-6342
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
2000 TOYOTA Tacoma P.U. with 143k
miles regular cab short bed with 5 speed
manual transmission cold air conditions
clean Car Fax and 3000 miles free war-
ranty. #4527 on sale for $6995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
BOX OF auto parts. Miscellaneous
items. $50.00 OBO. (650) 995-0012.
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Asphalt/Paving
NORTHWEST
ASPHALT REPAIR
Driveways, Parking Lots
Asphalt/Concrete
Repair • Installation
Free Estimate
(650)213-2648
Lic. #935122
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Mantels • Chair Rails •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Carpets
COLEMAN'S
CARPET SERVICE
Green, Soap free,
Detergent Free Carpet Cleaning!
Dry in a few hours! $99.00!
2 Room minimum!
Call Gisele (510)590-7427
Contractors
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
• General Errands • Event Help
New Client Promotion
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Cleaning
Concrete
Concrete
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
Construction
SPI CONSTRUCTION INC
• Remodels • New Additions
• Kitchens • Bathrooms
For all your construction needs
(650)208-8855
Lic. #812356
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
REDWOOD FENCES
AND DECKS
• Chain Link
• Ornamental Iron
Quality work at reasonable rates
(650)703-0344
License #289279
VICTOR’S FENCES
and House Painting
•Interior •Exterior
Power Wash
•Driveways •Sidewalk •Houses
Free Estimates
(650)583-1270
or (650)808-5833
Lic. # 106767
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Gutters
RAIN GUTTERS
• Gutters and downspouts,
• Rain gutter repair,
• Rain gutter protection (screen),
• Handyman Services
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
29 Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Hauling
by Greenstarr
Chris’s Hauling
Licensed Bonded and Insured
Since 1985 License # 752250
www.yardboss.net
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Tom 650.355.3500
Chris 415.999.1223
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Landscaping
by Greenstarr
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Tom 650. 355. 3500
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Washing
EXTERIOR
CLEANING
SERVICES
- window washing
- gutter cleaning
- pressure washing
- wood restoration
- solar panel cleaning
(650)216-9922
services@careful-clean.com
Bonded - Insured
Windows
ASSOCIATED WINDOW
CLEANING
Services include:
Gutter Cleaning, Air duct
Cleaning, Pressure Washing,
Window Cleaning and more.
10% off any one service.
Free estimates call
(650)583-0420
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Painting Plumbing
Tree Service
Window Washing
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
PAIN & STRESS RELIEF
$29 UP
Weight loss, Migraine, Stroke,
Fatigue, Insomnia, PMS, HBP,
Cough, Allergies, Asthma,
Gastrointestinal, Diabetes
(650)580-8697
Acupuncture, Acupressure Herbs
1846 El Camino Real, Burlingame
Accept Car & work injury, PPO
Health & Medical
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
LOCAL/WORLD 30 Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Insurance
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
Massage Therapy
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
testimony at a preliminary hearing and are
expected to present expert witnesses in
domestic violence issues.
Harris has pleaded not guilty to all
charges in the Aug. 12, 2012, incident in
which prosecutors say Harris left his former
partner with broken orbital bones and a
metal plate in his head. Defense attorney
Alin Cintean previously said that Geier
threw the first punch and his client was
charged because of who got injured in the
altercation.
The encounter between the men, who were
no longer dating, began at Su Hong restau-
rant when Harris allegedly grew upset that
Geier poured soy sauce on a place of rice.
The men argued for seven minutes and Harris
said he would no longer take Geier to the air-
port as planned, according to the civil suit.
As the men left to remove Geier’s belong-
ings from Harris’ car so that he could instead
take a cab, Harris tried pulling the other
man’s pants down and accused him of steal-
ing his underwear, according to the suit.
Geier unsuccessfully tried pushing Harris
away but the bigger man shook him vio-
lently and punched him in the arms, the suit
stated.
Geier allegedly hit Harris three times in
the face but Harris “seemed only to grow
more agitated” and punched him in the face
several times until he fell, the suit stated.
Harris is free from custody on $75,000
bail.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Wet roads lead to Belmont crashes
Light morning rain and slick roads led to a
pair of crashes on Ralston Avenue in
Belmont Tuesday, a police spokesman said.
The first accident occurred just east of
Hiller Street at 7:55 a.m., when a Volvo sta-
tion wagon lost traction on the wet road and
crashed into trees on the south side of
Ralston Avenue, Belmont police Capt. Pat
Halleran said.
The driver was not injured, and a portion
of the roadway was closed for about 20 min-
utes while the vehicle was towed.
A chain-reaction crash involving four
vehicles then occurred just west of Hallmark
Drive at 8 a.m., when Lexus rear-ended a
Ford sedan and caused two more vehicles to
move forward and hit the cars in front of
them, Halleran said.
No one was seriously injured, he said. The
driver of one of the cars complained of neck
pain but refused medical attention, he said.
Belmont police are reminding residents
that driving conditions are changing with
the arrival of cold, wet weather, and recom-
mended that drivers check their windshield
wipers and headlights to make sure they’re
in good condition.
Also, drivers should slow down and allow
more braking distance when roads are slick,
police said.
Steve Jobs’ home
gets historic designation
The Silicon Valley home where Apple co-
founder Steve Jobs grew up and built some
of his first computers is now on the city’s
list of historic properties.
The historical commission in the city of
Los Altos voted unanimously for the his-
toric designation on Monday night. Any
proposed renovations to the modest, ranch-
style home now require additional review.
The home, where Jobs and his foster par-
ents moved in 1968, is currently owned by
Patricia Jobs, Steve Jobs’ sister. The com-
mission didn’t need her permission for the
designation, although she could appeal it to
the city council.
Continued from page 1
HARRIS
Local briefs
By Christopher Bodeen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIJING — Chinese police are circulating
a list of eight suspects wanted in connection
with an apparent suicide car crash near
Tiananmen Square in Beijing that killed five
people and injured dozens, a hotel manager
said Wednesday.
Seven of the eight suspects on the list
had names typical of the Turkic Muslim
Uighur ethnic group native to the restive
northwestern region of Xinjiang, said the
manager, who gave only her surname, Wu.
She said the other individual appeared to
be ethnically Chinese.
Wu, who runs the guesthouse attached to
the Beijing liaison office of Xinjiang’s
Karamay city, declined to give other details.
Employees at a dozen other Beijing hotels
refused to discuss the order in a likely sign
that police have banned talk of their inves-
tigation into the attack Monday in the capi-
tal’s political heart, where China’s commu-
nist leaders live and work.
Chinese media reports Wednesday made
no mention of the investigation, although
several reported on the condition of those
injured, who included three Filipino citizens
and one Japanese man.
Chinese police seeking eight
following Tiananmen attack
REUTERS
Paramilitary police officers stand guard near Tiananmen Gate on a hazy day in Beijing, China.
WORLD 31
Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Albert Aji and Dusan Stojanovic
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DAMASCUS, Syria — The U.N. confirmed
an outbreak of polio in Syria for the first time
in over a decade on Tuesday, warning the dis-
ease threatens to spread among an estimated
half-million children who have never been
immunized because of the civil war.
The grim finding added another layer of
misery to a brutal conflict that has already
killed more than 100,000 people and uproot-
ed millions. The aid group Save the Children
urged a “vaccination cease-fire” to try to pre-
vent an epidemic of the highly contagious
disease.
Meanwhile, hopes for a negotiated settle-
ment to the three-year conflict appeared ever
more distant as Syria’s President Bashar
Assad sacked a deputy prime minister for
meeting Western officials to discuss the pos-
sibility of holding a peace conference — the
latest blow to diplomatic efforts to bring the
country’s warring parties to the negotiating
table.
At least 10 cases of polio among babies and
toddlers were confirmed in northeastern Syria,
the World Health Organization said — the
first outbreak of the crippling disease in 14
years. Nearly all Syrian children were vacci-
nated against polio before the civil war
began.
WHO spokesman Oliver Rosenbauer said
the U.N. agency was awaiting lab results on
another 12 suspected cases, mostly children
under 2.
“This is a communicable disease. With
population movements it can travel to other
areas,” Rosenbauer said. “So the risk is high
of spread across the region.”
Regionally, neighboring Lebanon and
Jordan are likely to be at particular risk
because the two countries have absorbed the
bulk of Syrian refugees fleeing war-torn areas,
where it’s more likely that children haven’t
been vaccinated. The poorest refugees often
crowd, several families together, into apart-
ments and dilapidated shacks.
The polio virus usually infects children in
unsanitary conditions through consuming
food or drink contaminated with feces. It
attacks the nerves and can kill or paralyze,
spreading widely and unnoticed before it
starts crippling children.
In an interview with the Associated Press in
Damascus, UNICEF Executive Director
Anthony Lake said his organization and WHO
planned to immunize 2.4 million children
throughout Syria. He said he had begun dis-
cussions with senior Syrian officials to
access war zones, but hadn’t started negotiat-
ing with rebels.
“Vaccinations and immunizations have
absolutely no political content. They have
no relationship to any military issues and
therefore there is every reason ... (to) believe
we will gain access into these communities,”
he said.
Syria said it had launched a vaccination
campaign around the country days after the
Geneva-based WHO said it had received
reports of children showing symptoms of
polio in Syria’s Deir el-Zour province. But
the campaign faces difficulty with lack of
access.
Save the Children urged a “vaccination
cease-fire” in Syria “to prevent the current
polio outbreak from turning into an epidem-
ic.”
U.N. confirms polio outbreak in Syria
REUTERS
Syrian health workers administer polio vaccination to a girl at a school in Damascus.
Woman on Concordia
bridge: I was captain’s lover
GROSSETO, Italy — A Moldovan dancer
who had been on the bridge of the Costa
Concordia cruise ship when it crashed into a
reef off Italy electrified the captain’s
manslaughter trial Tuesday by testifying
reluctantly that the two were lovers.
Domnica Cemortan, 26, only made the
admission after being warned by the judge
that she risked criminal charges if she didn’t
answer the question.
The ship’s former captain, Francesco
Schettino, is the sole defendant on trial in
the Tuscan town of Grosseto. He is charged
with manslaughter for the 32 people who
died in the crash, with causing the shipwreck
on the night of Jan. 13, 2012, and with aban-
doning ship while many passengers and crew
were still aboard. He risks 20 years in jail if
convicted.
Earlier in the day, ship mantre d’Antonello
Tievoli testified that 10 days before the
crash, he had asked Schettino for a favor:
Would the captain sail close to the island of
Giglio during the Mediterranean cruise
because the crewman’s family lived there?
Israel releases
26 Palestinian prisoners
JERUSALEM — A spokeswoman for
Israel’s prison service says Israel has freed
26 Palestinian prisoners.
The prisoner release is the second of four
rounds, part of a deal that set in motion the
current Israeli-Palestinian peace talks.
Spokeswoman Sivan Weizman said 21
prisoners were released to the West Bank and
five to Gaza early Wednesday.
Boisterous celebrations kicked off in the
Palestinian territories as the prisoners were
released. Many in Israel oppose the move
and view the men as terrorists who have com-
mitted grisly crimes against Israelis.
Atotal of 104 convicts are expected to be
released over the coming months as part of
the U.S.-brokered deal.
Around the world
32 Wednesday • Oct. 30, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL

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