OregOn Observer

The
Thursday, October 31, 2013 • Vol. 129, No. 17 • Oregon, WI • ConnectOregonWI.com • $1
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Oregon, WI 53575
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Oregon, WI 53575
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Photo by Anthony Iozzo
Kings of sectionals...again
The Oregon boys soccer team celebrates after a 1-0 win in double overtime during the WIAA Division 2 sectional final Saturday, Oct. 26, against Elkhorn at Waunakee High
School. Junior midfielder Nick Steidemann knocked in a penalty kick with 40 seconds left in the second overtime to send the Panthers back to state for the second straight
year.
Page 9
Learning a new perspective
Foreign exchange students bring diverse
backgrounds to OHS
Scott De LarueLLe
Unifed Newspaper Group
Fr om Azer bai j an t o
South Africa, eight for-
eign exchange students are
bringing a whole new per-
spective on life to Oregon
High School this year, as
they add to their own expe-
riences.
The students - Sebas-
t i a n Sc h e l l e r , Sa r a h
Muench, Bianca Helbach of
Germany, Claudia Steiner
of Austria, Therese Jordaan
of South Africa, Sabina
Osmanl i of Azerbai j an,
Hussein Badran of Lebanon
and Mathias Gregersen of
Denmark – are fitting into
their new surroundings and
enjoying the very different
pace and flavor of life in
the American Midwest.
For Badran, 16, the big-
gest change from his native
Lebanon is definitely the
cold weather.
“I’ve seen snow but I
have to go to the moun-
tains. We go for a half an
hour and then we freeze to
death,” he chuckled. “A
week ago it was 80 and now
it’s 45 outside. It’s just like
summer into winter, there’s
not much fall.”
Badran speaks English
extremely well, in part due
to the fact that he started
at age 3, even before he
Inside
The Oregon
Observer’s
annual special
section
highlighting
2012-13’s
Oregon-area
progress.
Pages 11-17
Turn to Exchange/Page 20
OSD
District
maintains
budget
Scott GirarD anD
Scott De LarueLLe
Unifed Newspaper Group
“Three years and hold-
ing steady,” said Oregon
School Board President
Courtney Odorico.
For the third year in the
row, the Oregon School
Board has maintained the
line on its budget, with a
total levy of $22,779,953
for the 2013-14 school year.
Due to a nearly 1 percent
drop in the area’s equal-
ized value, the mill rate will
go up slightly, though, to
$12.31 per $1,000 of prop-
erty value, up from $12.20
this year. For a homeowner
of a $250,000 home, that
will be a $3,077.50 tax bill,
up $27.50 from last year.
The mill rate has increased
each year since 2008, when
it was $10.50.
Oregon School District
administrator Dr. Brian
Busler said district budget
priorities remain focused on
parent comments from bud-
get engagement sessions
that district officials held a
few years ago.
“Par ent s val ued r ea-
sonable class sizes, pro-
viding additional help to
students that are strug-
gling, and maintaining the
Turn to District/Page 3
Oregon Focus
It’s a bustling autumn night in downtown Oregon. Bonnie and Jerry Thiel built their new restaurant, Mason’s on Main, in two historic buildings on South Main Street that they had renovated last year. The business opened in May and is going strong.
Alpine business park surging 12
Developments downtown 13
Housing is booming 14
New Brooklyn business park 15
2
October 31, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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850 Janesville St
Oregon, WI 53575
Bus: (608) 835-5100
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850 Janesville St
Oregon, WI 53575
Bus: (608) 835-5100
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850 Janesville St
Oregon, WI 53575
Bus: (608) 835-5100
dsliter@AmFam.com
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Photos by Mark Ignatowski
Oregon EMS craft fair
Shoppers browse the selection of arts and crafts at the 2013
Oregon EMS Association craft fair held Oct. 26 at Oregon Middle
School. Left, the Oregon Headliners 4H club sells baked goods at
the craft fair.
October 31, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
3
Photo submitted
Front row, from left: Keith Arndt, Sara Lubbers, Jami Hubatch, Sue Wickhem, Eileen Collins, Anita
Koehler, Pam Sengos, Carol Herrmann and Mary Kay Gillepsie; back row, from left: Jayney Wick,
Andrea Fuller, Tori Whitish, Tim Martinelli, Dawn Goltz and Michelle Kretschman; not pictured: Diane
Jaeggi, Carol Wilson, Nancy Outhouse, Abby Hood, Maria Schulz, Dan Howard, Dawn Hans, Kevin
Gasner and Pam Williams.
District staff
honored for positive
work
Scott De LarueLLe
Unifed Newspaper Group
When it comes to mak-
ing a difference in the lives
of Oregon students, district
administrators believe that its
teachers and support staff are
second to none.
To help publicize the good
deeds done by these folks, the
district recently announced
its 2013 Make A Difference
award winners, continu-
ing a trend that started a few
years ago with a discussion
between administrators and
school board members of
recognizing excellent work,
said Oregon School Dis-
trict Administrator Dr. Brian
Busler.
“We talked about setting
up a program where we could
recognize individuals,” he
said. “They are really improv-
ing students’ lives and this
great Oregon community and
we’re proud of them.”
The process is simple – the
school principals are asked
each year to nominate staff
members and accept nomina-
tions from staff members.
“Many times they come in
an email, or based on a con-
versation in a hallway, about
so-and-so and how they made
a difference in the lives of
students and/or fellow col-
leagues,” Busler said. “We
then provide them with the
‘Make-a-Difference’ award
and they receive some public
recognition in front of their
colleagues. Most people who
receive the award say, ‘Hey,
I really didn’t do anything
special.’ Well, that’s not true,
because they’ve done tre-
mendous things for years that
makes your heart warm and
makes you feel good about
fellow colleagues in the dis-
trict.”
Job well done
Oregon School Board
President Courtney Odori-
co said she’s witnessed so
many examples of “wonder-
ful work” done in the dis-
trict since her children began
attending district schools in
1999, both inside and outside
the classroom, it was due time
to recognize those people.
“These are folks who are
quietly doing their jobs,
always putting kids first
and in the true sense of the
award’s name, making a
real difference in the lives
of kids,” Odorico said. “It’s
important to recognize all the
positive things that happen on
a daily basis across the dis-
trict and let people know how
much we appreciate them and
how important their contribu-
tions are - big and small, to
the lives of our students.”
The awards have become
very meaningful for the
recipients.
“I have seen recipients cry
and tremble because they
are so deeply touched to be
receiving the award,” she
said. “Over the years, I have
had the honor of handing the
awards to several wonderful
people and honestly it some-
times gives me goose bumps,
hearing of the selfless and
loving things staff do for our
community’s kids.”
Award winners
Brooklyn Elementary –
Eileen Collins, Mary Kay
Gillespie and Diane Jaeggi;
Rome Corners Intermedi-
ate - Michelle Kretschman,
Maria Schulz and Tori Whit-
ish; Netherwood Knoll Ele-
mentary – Dawn Golz, Sarah
Lubbers, Pam Sengos and
Carol Wilson; Prairie View
Elementary – Keith Arndt,
Abby Hood and Nancy Out-
house; Oregon Middle School
– Kevin Gasner, Dawn Hans,
Dan Howard and Sue Wick-
hem; Oregon High School –
Andrea Fuller, Jami Hubatch,
Tim Martinelli and Pam Wil-
liams; district office – Carol
Hermmann, Anita Koehler
and Jayne Wick.
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Mark Your Calendar!
Holiday Open House
November 8, 9 & 10
Door prizes, refreshments, gifts
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Staff gets pat
on the back
Town of Oregon family survives house fire
Victoria VLiSiDeS
Unifed Newspaper Group
A Town of Oregon fam-
ily plans to rebuild their
home after a fire left their
house with an estimated
$125,000 worth of dam-
age.
Andrea and Raymond
Ripberger and their three
kids, ages 17, 13 and 12,
got out of the house sus-
taining no injuries after
smoke al arms sounded
from an alleged electri-
cal fire in their one-story
home around midnight last
Tuesday.
Andrea and Raymond
routinely prepare their kids
for emergency situations,
that included a fire drill at
the house, which helped
when the fire hit.
“We’re an Army fam-
i l y, ” Andr ea t ol d t he
Observer Monday after-
noon in a phone interview.
“Everybody was really
calm because we already
discussed it.”
Raymond i s a Maj or
with the Army National
Guard i n Madi son and
the family has moved 8-9
times, Andrea estimated.
Living in Fort Riley, Kan.,
the family had to be ready
if a tornado hit, another
way they are prepared for
emergencies.
Al t hough t he f a m-
ily wasn’t injured, they did
lose several pets including
their pet dog, a 7-year-
old Corgie, as well as pet
birds and fish. They were
able to save their Bernese
Mountain dog/Poodle mix
puppy, and fire personnel,
which included Oregon,
Brooklyn and Fitchburg
fire departments, saved a
pet cat, Andrea said.
With the house that they
resided in for about five
years uninhabitable, the
family stayed in a Middle-
ton hotel last week and
is currently staying at a
friend’s house. They did
not receive nor ask for
help from The Red Cross,
Andrea said.
The fire was in one of
the main-floor bedrooms
that no one was in at the
time, Andrea said. She and
Raymond first heard the
smoke alarm which went
off in a hallway near their
living room. Within about
5 minutes, Andrea woke
the kids up to go outside
while Raymond called 911
and extinguished some
of the flames with a fire
extinguisher, though the
fire was already too hot
for it to really do anything,
Andrea speculated.
Andrea said more smoke
was billowing by the min-
ute, but the family was
able to get out of the house
in a smooth manner. She
said a few items may be
recovered, but it’s “mostly
a loss,” although they have
not received the official
fire report yet. The fire was
reportedly contained to the
house.
The family plans to stick
around the Town of Ore-
gon and will rebuild their
house. They are thankful
for the support they have
received from neighbors
and fri ends, especi al l y
for people taking in some
of their pets, including a
small chicken coop they
had in their backyard.
All things considered,
Andrea said the kids have
handled the situation with
maturity and strength.
“Because we’ve moved
so much, t hey under -
stand that home is kind of
where the heart is,” she
said. “Although, it’s not
the way we want it, we’ve
stayed in hotels before
(and) we’ve rented houses
before. Being with their
loved ones, that’s what
mattered.”
comprehensive educational
programming,” he said.
“Overall, the district has
been in a financial posi-
tion to maintain student
programming and make
important investments in
the area of technology.”
The district got some
good news earlier in the
week, and will receive
$244,143 more in state
funding after the Wiscon-
sin Department of Public
Instruction announced the
final aid numbers. Oregon
was one of the 212 dis-
tricts statewide seeing an
increase in funding, and
will receive $18,637,974
for t he current school
ye a r a f t e r r e c e i vi ng
$18,393,831 last year.
District finance direc-
tor Kara Newton said the
money, along with a small-
er decrease in the district’s
equalization value than
expected, helped keep the
tax rate increase down. At
the annual meeting earlier
in the month, the rate was
expected to be $12.54.
Looking ahead to next
year, district business man-
ager Andrew Weiland said
enrollment has decreased
a bit, which will not affect
the budget this year, but
if the three-year “roll-off”
average doesn’t increase
next year, the district will
see a decrease i n per-
student funding from the
state.
“That’s something to
kind of keep in mind for
next year,” he said.
Focus groups
Earlier this month, the
district held three focus
group meetings to help
gauge public perceptions
and ideas on issues relating
to school funding. Busler
said he anticipates the con-
sultant report on the focus
groups to be ready for
presentation at the Mon-
day, Nov. 11 school board
meeting.
District: Also has focus groups
Continued from page 1
4
October 31, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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POSTMASTER: Send Address Corrections to
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Thursday, October 31, 2013 • Vol. 129, No. 17
Unified Newspaper Group, a division of
WoodWard CommuniCations,inC.
A dynamic, employee-owned media company
Good People. Real Solutions. Shared Results.
Opinion
General manager
David Enstad
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Advertising
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Mark Ignatowski, Scott De Laruelle
A
s many Baby Boomers
continue to work, figuring
out how to take control of
the retirement savings they have
earned can amplify the stressful
decisions of retirement.
We all know neighbors and
friends who are close to retiring
or have continued to hold out due
to uncertainty. For those retiring
soon, there are
several options
to consider
when deciding
how to handle
savings from
company-spon-
sored retirement
plans.
The old-
est members
of the Baby
Boom generation (born between
1946 and 1964) turned 65 in
2011. While they were in the
workforce, a seismic shift had
been taking place. The 1980s
and 1990s witnessed employ-
ers moving away from defined
benefit plans, such as pensions,
and toward defined contribution
plans, such as a 401(k).
The result is potentially the
largest transfer of wealth from
company plans to individually
controlled accounts in history.
According to the Urban Institute,
in 2013, investors surpassed the
$10 trillion mark in their defined
contribution plans and IRAs,
dwarfing the roughly $2.5 trillion
in assets in defined benefit plans.
In either case, retirees have
three basic options:
• Keep the funds in the plan for
as long as the plan allows
• Roll the funds over to an IRA
• Withdraw the funds in the
form of a lump-sum distribution
to a taxable account
There are advantages and dis-
advantages for all of them.
For the first option – keeping
assets in a company retirement
plan (whether it’s an old one
or transferred to a new one) –
advantages include continuing
to enjoy tax-deferred growth.
Participants also may be able to
borrow against the funds, should
they need them. And for boom-
ers who remain employed, some
plans will not require that par-
ticipants take distributions after
they reach age 70 ½ as long as
they continue to work, meaning
a longer period of tax-deferred
growth.
The major disadvantage, how-
ever, is giving up control and
flexibility. Here are some exam-
ples of that:
• Investment choices are often
limited to those selected by the
employer plan, and sometimes
the options inside the plan have
higher expenses than those avail-
able outside the plan.
• Some plans require the partic-
ipant to start taking distributions
by a set retirement age, and at
whatever rate that plan guidelines
mandate.
• Many plans do not allow
IRA stretch options such as non-
spouses taking inherited money
distributed over their lifetimes,
rather than in an immediately
taxable lump sum.
• The guidelines of the plan are
always subject to change. There
is no guarantee that they will stay
the same, especially if the com-
pany is sold or merges.
• Fees associated with the
administration of the 401(k) plan
may be greater than for other
account types.
One way to get the best of both
worlds – continued tax-deferred
growth and more control and
flexibility – is a retirement plan
rollover into an IRA. This can
be a direct rollover or an indirect
one, in which the employer-
sponsored plan issues a check
to the former participant, who
distributes the money to an IRA
within 60 days.
Another benefit of this strategy
can be that consolidating several
plans into one IRA is easier to
manage.
Rolling over at least part of
your 401(k) plan assets into a
Roth IRA is worth considering,
as there are no required minimum
distributions and all withdraw-
als are tax-free. But it’s not all
tax-free: The percentage of the
amount rolled over representing
gains in the account are taxed at
the individual’s ordinary income
rate.
The lump-sum-distribution can
be enticing, for obvious reasons.
If you have a large percent-
age of company stock in your
retirement plan, the IRS gives
a special tax break for taking a
lump-sum distribution of this
stock. This is called net unreal-
ized appreciation (NUA) and
allows an individual to pay ordi-
nary income tax on the original
cost of the stock rather than its
fair market value at the time of
withdrawal. Once the stock is
sold, capital gains taxes are paid
on this appreciation only.
The lump-sum cost is perhaps
the steepest of the options, and
there is a 10 percent premature
distribution penalty that applies
on top of the taxes if the par-
ticipant is under the age of 59 ½.
Perhaps most important of all,
the distribution will result in the
loss of tax-deferred growth of the
assets.
So if you have no immediate
need for the cash and the NUA
rule does not apply, it should be a
last option.
Because of the rise of account-
based defined contribution
401(k) plans and the drop in
guaranteed sources of income,
the retirement security of boom-
ers and future generations is
more dependent on individual
saving and rates of return.
That means more and more of
us bear the responsibility for cre-
ating income in retirement. As a
result, we need to understand not
just how to accumulate sufficient
assets but how to effectively
draw them down during what
could be a relatively long period
of time.
Jim Murphy is an Oregon resi-
dent and an investment adviser
representative with Neuen-
schwander Asset Management,
LLC in McFarland.
This material is derived from
sources believed to be reliable,
but its accuracy and the opinions
based thereon are not guaran-
teed. The content of this publica-
tion is for general information
only and is not intended to serve
as specific financial, account-
ing or tax advice. Copyright
2013, Neuenschwander Asset
Management, LLC. A Registered
Investment Adviser. 4893 Larson
Beach Road, McFarland, 838-
3330.
Put your retirement plan
assets in the right place
Murphy
Community Voices
Legislative opinion
Dane County moving forward
with major construction projects,
creating hundreds of new jobs
Dane County has big plans in
the year ahead. My 2014 county
budget makes smart investments
on important projects – projects to
improve public services, increase
efficiencies, save tax dollars and
create hundreds of new jobs.
From a new
highway garage
to centralize ser-
vices, a medical
examiners facil-
ity to serve law
enforcement and
families across
our county and
r e g i o n , a n d
mor e par ki ng
to better serve
business and vacation travelers at
our airport, we stand ready to put
nearly 500 people to work next
year.
A new Medical Examiner’s
Office just east of the Interstate/
Beltline interchange will provide
state of the art investigatory ser-
vices for Dane and several Wis-
consin counties. A new highway
garage next door will be heated
by methane gas from the near-
by county landfill and use solar
power, saving taxpayers utility
expenses.
Expanding our airport parking
ramp next year will add 1,600 new
parking spaces. Last year, over 1.6
million passengers flew out of the
Dane County Regional Airport.
The successes and future expan-
sions of local companies like Epic
and new direct flights added regu-
larly create a need for more park-
ing.
The orange barrels that line the
west side show the progress we
are making to reconstruct Mineral
Point Road and the well-traveled
Highway M between Madison and
Verona. My budget funds millions
for the next phase of this work to
add lanes and ease travel for com-
merce and commuters.
Two significant, previously
announced projects are also mov-
ing forward in 2014 thanks to
public and private funding.
Construction of two new multi-
use pavilions to replace aging
barn facilities on Dane County’s
Alliant Energy Center campus
will create 290,000 square feet of
space, ensuring prominent shows
like World Dairy Expo and Mid-
west Horse Fair call our com-
munity home for many years to
come. These new buildings also
bring the promise of new shows
and events, infusing new dollars
into our local tourism economy
and creating jobs.
The largest expansion in zoo
history, Arctic Passage, starts next
year as well. This innovative new
home for polar bears and grizzly
bears includes improved conces-
sions and refreshments for zoo
visitors – sales that support the
cost of operating our free, family
friendly zoo.
Dane County is set to embark
upon a busy year of bricks and
mortar that means hundreds of
family-supporting jobs and fin-
ished products to serve our tax-
payers better and smarter.
Joe Parisi is the Dane County
executive.
Parisi
October 31, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
5
Senior center to
host auction Nov. 2
Help out the Oregon
Senior Center and find
yourself some great items
(and maybe even some
earl y Chri st mas gi ft s)
at Sat urday’s auct i on,
including vintage toys,
antiques, gift certificates
to area restaurants and
bus i nes s es , ar t wor k,
Christmas decorations and
more, including a dollar
table. The event will also
feature a pie sale, with
a wide variety of tasty
treats.
The senior center’s fifth
annual auction is sure to
have plenty of things to
bid on starting at 9:30
a.m. (doors open at 9).
For more on what will be
available at the auction,
cal l 835-5801 or vi si t
oregonseni orcent erwi s
consin.com.
Oregon Senior Center
assistant to the director
Ann Stone said the event
is returning to the center
this year after being held
at Rome Corners Interme-
diate School last year. She
said the money raised dur-
ing the event goes to pay
for programming through-
out the year at the center.
In past years, the cen-
ter held a craft fair to
help raise money for pro-
gramming, but Stone said
eventually that format was
dropped in favor of an
auction.
“We decided to try it,
and it was a huge suc-
cess,” she said.
For people on the hunt
for collectible dolls and
antiques, the auction will
be the place to be Satur-
day, Stone said.
“We are going to have
the best fun ever,” she
said. “It’s going to be
great.”
Veteran’s Day Special
Show your Military ID and get a free entrée!
November 11
th
, 2013 • 11am - 10pm
Valid for dine-in only
Can’t be combined with other offers, discounts or coupons
Offer is not applicable to 16" or 24" pizza
2949 Triverton Pik Drive, Fitchburg WI
608-278-7800 • www.benvenutos.com U
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www.oregonpreschool.org
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Saturday
November 9
th

10:00 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
Games with raffle to follow
Netherwood Knoll Elementary School Gym
New for 2013
Grand prize raffle drawing!
One overnight stay at Chula Vista - Wisconsin Dells
Children bringing a non-perishable food item
will receive one free game ticket. Items will
be donated to the Oregon-Brooklyn Food
Pantry (limit one ticket per child).
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Three Gaits hosts 30th anniversary fundraiser
A local nonprofit orga-
nization that has helped
people with disabilities for
three decades is celebrating
its anniversary with a fund-
raiser event.
“A Night to Remember”
fundraiser will be an event
to celebrate Three Gaits’
30th anniversary of improv-
ing the lives of people with
different abilities through
therapeutic horsemanship.
The night will take place
at 5:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov.
2, at Legend at Bergamont
Golf Course in Oregon.
A Night to Remember is
a fundraising event that will
celebrate the inspiring work
that has taken place over
the last 30 years and will
offer a look forward to the
exciting opportunities that
lay ahead for Three Gaits.
It will be an evening of
fine wine, hors d’oeuvres,
dinner, dessert, silent auc-
tion and carriage rides.
The evening will allow
for plenty of opportunities
to learn about Three Gaits’
history and hear stories of
courage and determination
that people have shown
throughout their time at
Three Gaits – and the beau-
ty and leashed power of the
horses.
For additional informa-
tion please contact Dena or
Melissa at Three Gaits 877-
9086 or 3gaits@3gaits.org.
If you go
What: Three Gaits
Therapeutic Horsemanship
Center fundraiser
Where: The Bergamont
golf course, 699
Bergamont Blvd., Oregon
When: Nov. 2, 5:30 p.m.
More info: 877-9086,
3gaits@3gaits.org
Website: 3gaits.org
If you go
What: Oregon Senior
Center Fifth Annual
Auction
When: 9 a.m.,
Saturday, Nov. 2
Where: Oregon Senior
Center, 219 Park St.,
Oregon
Tina’s Home
Cleaning, LLC
Specializing in Residential Cleaning
Insured • 11 Years Experience
Reliable • Free Estimates
835-0339 • 513-3638
tinashomecleaning@gmail.com
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Horse Parade goes through downtown Oregon Nov. 9
The Oregon Horse Asso-
ci at i on and t he Oregon
Chamber of Commerce will
be presenting the Annual
Holiday Horse Parade Nov.
9. There will be an enter-
taining variety of horses
and costumes. Prizes are
offered for the categories of
“Best Holiday, Best Origi-
nal, and Best Group” cos-
tumes.
Santa (and often Mrs.
Clause) always makes an
appearance – many times
on the back of an adorable
Mi ni at ure Horse. Snow
queens, el ves, mount ed
snowmen, and various other
holiday figures have made
appearances. The children
are additionally excited to
be able to go back to the
Oregon High School park-
ing lot/staging area for a
close up and personal look
at the horses. A bake sale
will be at the area for an
additional treat.
All horsemen who would
care to ride need only to go
to oregonhorseassiciation.
org to download an applica-
tion.
The Associ at i on i s a
50- year - ol d cl ub who
focuses on community ser-
vices and education for
both horse and non horse
owners who have an inter-
est in horse related subjects
and skills. The parade pro-
vides a venue for those who
just love to admire horses
and start getting in the holi-
day spirit.
The parade begins at 1
p.m. in downtown Oregon.
If you go
What: Oregon Horse
Parade
Where: Downtown
Oregon
When: Nov. 9, 1 p.m.
Paul Keenan
On Friday, Oct. 25, 2013,
we lost a beloved husband,
fat her, grandfat her and
great-grandfather. Paul L.
Keenan, age 85, passed
away at Agrace Hospi -
ceCare in Fitchburg with
his family by his side. He
was born on July 21, 1928,
in Fitchburg, the son of
Nat han York and Mary
Theresa (White) Keenan.
Paul was united in mar-
riage to Lois Y. Camp-
bell on Feb. 17, 1951. He
served in the U.S. Army
from 1950 until 1952, dur-
ing the Korean War. Paul
worked 33 years for the
Wisconsin School for Girls/
Oakhill Correctional Center
as a craftsman painter. For
28 years, he held a second
job at Wisconsin Power
and Light. After his retire-
ment in 1989, he enjoyed
traveling, especially his
trip to Ireland, fishing with
his grandsons, working in
the yard and garden, bak-
ing, visiting with neigh-
bors and friends, and most
importantly, spending time
with his family. He was a
dedicated, caring, compas-
sionate man, who always
put people first. Paul was
a lifetime member of the
Holy Mother of Consola-
tion Catholic Church.
Paul is survived by his lov-
ing wife of 62 years, Lois;
son, Michael; daughter, Lisa
K e e n a n ;
gr andchi l -
dren, Nicko-
las (Jenni-
fer) Keenan,
Bradley, Erica, and Mark
Keenan; great-granddaugh-
ters, Olivia and Charlotte
Keenan; daughter-in-law,
Nancy Keenan; brother,
Robert (Janet) Keenan; sis-
ter, Helen Senger; and niec-
es, nephews, and friends. He
was preceded in death by
his sons, Steven and Kevin;
grandson, Jeremy Keenan;
and sisters, Dorothy Keenan,
Louise Stankevich, and Ger-
aldine Grotts.
Funeral services were held
at Holy Mother of Conso-
lation Catholic Church on
Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013, with
Father Gary Wankerl presid-
ing. Burial followed at St.
Mary’s Cemetery. Memorials
may be made in Paul’s name
to Agrace HospiceCare, Inc.
or the American Cancer Soci-
ety. The family would like to
thank Dr. Orest Kostelyna,
Dr. Jeremy Cetnar, and Dr.
Kim Kinsley; nurses, Shan-
non, Robin, Nicole; and all
of the Agrace HospiceCare
staff for the compassionate
care they provided. Paul will
be forever missed and never
forgotten. He leaves with his
family a lifetime of wonderful
memories. We will love you
always. Online condolences
may be made at gundersonfh.
com.
Gunderson Oregon
Funeral & Cremation
Care
1150 Park Street
835-3515
Paul Keenan
Obituaries
Community news
The Oregon Observer
strives to include as much
community news as pos-
sible, but all submissions are
subject to space and deadline
limitations.
Photos and submissions
longer than 200 words must
be in no later than 8 a.m.
Monday for consideration
for that week’s paper. Please
limit all other submissions to
400 words unless prior con-
sideration is given.
Remember, we want to
include everyone’s news, so
please be concise. Also, bear
in mind that time-sensitive
matters will take precedence.
Send your news t o
communityreporter@wcinet.
com with subject “Comm
News.”
Questions? Call Victoria
6
October 31, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Church Listings
BROOKLYN LUTHERAN CHURCH
101 Second Street, Brooklyn
(608) 455-3852
Pastor Rebecca Ninke
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Holy Communion
10 a.m. Fellowship
COMMUNITY OF LIFE
LUTHERAN CHURCH
PO Box 233, Oregon, 53575
(608) 286-3121
offce@communityofife.us
Pastor Eric Wenger
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Worship at 1111 S. Perry
Parkway, Oregon
COMMUNITY UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
Brooklyn
(608) 455-3344
Pastor Dave Pluss
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Worship
FAITH EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN
CHURCH
143 Washington Street, Oregon
(608) 835-3554
Pastor Karl Hermanson
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Worship
Holy Communion 2nd & last
Sundays
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
408 N. Bergamont Blvd. (north of CC)
Oregon, WI 53575
608-835-3082
fpcoregonwi.org
Pastor Le Anne Clausen de Montes
SUNDAY:
9:30 a.m. Blended Worship
10:30 a.m. Coffee Bar/Fellowship
11 a.m. All-ages activity

FITCHBURG MEMORIAL UCC
5705 Lacy Road, Fitchburg
(608) 273-1008
www.memorialucc.org
Pastor: Phil Haslanger
Associate Pastor Twink Jan-
McMahon
SUNDAY
8:15 and 10 a.m. Worship
GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN
CHURCH ELCA
Central Campus: Raymond Road and
Whitney Way
SATURDAY
5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY
8:15, 9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship
West Campus: Corner of Hwy. PD
and Nine Mound Road, Verona
SUNDAY
9 & 10:15 a.m., 6 p.m. Worship
(608) 271-6633
HILLCREST BIBLE CHURCH
752 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Eric Vander Ploeg, Lead Pastor
(608) 835-7972
www.hbclife.com
SUNDAY
8:30 am & 10:15 am Worship service
at Oregon High School PAC
Quest for grades 1-6 during 10:15
service
HOLY MOTHER OF CONSOLATION
CATHOLIC CHURCH
651 N. Main Street, Oregon
Pastor: Fr. Gary Wankerl
(608) 835-5763
holymotherchurch.41pi.com
SATURDAY: 5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY: 8 and 10:15 a.m. Worship
PEOPLE’S UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
103 North Alpine Parkway, Oregon
Pastor Jason Mahnke
(608) 835-3755
www.peoplesumc.org
Communion is the 1st & 3rd
weekend
SATURDAY
5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY
9 and 10:30 a.m. Worship
ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN CHURCH
625 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Pastor Paul Markquart and Pastor
Emily Tveite
(608) 835-3154
5 p.m. Saturday evening Worship
8 a.m. Traditional Sunday Worship
9:15 a.m. Sunday School & Coffee
Fellowship
10:30 a.m. New Community Worship
(9:30 a.m. Summer)
VINEYARD COMMUNITY CHURCH
Oregon Community Bank & Trust, 105 S.
Alpine Parkway, Oregon
Bob Groth, Pastor
(608) 835-9639
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Worship
ZWINGLI UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST - Paoli
At the Intersection of Hwy. 69 & PB
Rev. Sara Thiessen
(608) 845-5641
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Family Worship
• 7 p.m., Alcoholics
Anonymous meeting
at First Presbyterian
Church, every Monday
and Friday
• 7 p.m., Alcoholics
Anonymous closed
meeting, People’s United
Methodist Church, every
Tuesday
• 6:30-7:30 p.m.,
Diabetes Support Group
meeting, Evansville
Senior Center, 320 Fair
St. Call 882-0407 for
information. Second
Tuesday of each month
• 6:30-8 p.m., Parents
Supporting Parents,
LakeView Church,
Stoughton. Third
Tuesday of every month
• Relationship & Divorce
Support Group. State
Bank of Cross Plains.
Every other Monday
night at 6:30 p.m.
Support groups
Call 835-6677 to advertise on the
Oregon Observer Church Page
Coming up
Thursday, Oct. 31, Halloween
• 1:30-3:30 p.m., “Stepping On” Fall Prevention
Program, Oregon Senior Center, 835-5801
• 5-8 p.m., Village of Oregon Trick or Treating
Saturday, Nov. 2
• 9 a.m., Oregon Senior Center Public Auction, 219
Park St., 835-5801
• 5:30-9 p.m., Three Gaits 30th Anniversary Gala
“A Night to Remember,” at Legend at Bergamont
Clubhouse (699 Bergamont Boulevard, Oregon)
• 6:30 p.m., Card Party at the Oregon Masonic
Center, 201 Park St.

Sunday, Nov. 3
• Daylight Saving’s Time ends
• 7 a.m. to noon, VFW Pancake Breakfast & Bake
Sale, Oregon Middle School, 601 Pleasant Oak Drive,
Oregon
• 10 a.m. to noon, Marriage Conference, Bible Baptist
Church of Utica, 423-4610
Tuesday, Nov. 5
• 10:45 a.m. every Tuesday, Learn Tai Chi, Oregon
Senior Center
• 6:30 p.m., Delta Phi meeting, first Tuesday of the
month, various locations, 424-6485
Wednesday, Nov. 6
• 6:30 p.m., Book discussion/signing, “Making
Lemonade with Ben: The Audacity to Cope,” library
Thursday, Nov. 7
• 6-8 p.m., “Which Way Forward?” A Conversation
with Sen. Kathleen Vinehout, Firefly Coffeehouse, 114
N. Main St., Oregon
• 6-8 p.m., Oregon/Brooklyn Lions Club inaugural
Wine Tasting Event, Foxboro Golf Course, 1020
County Road MM
• 6:30 p.m., Optimist Club, Oregon Senior Center
Friday, Nov. 8
• 7:30 p.m., “The Drowsy Chaperone” Oregon High
School PAC, 456 N. Perry Pkwy.
Saturday, Nov. 9
• 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Oregon Preschool Annual Fall
Carnival, Netherwood Knoll Elementary School Gym
• 1-2 p.m., Annual Holiday Horse Parade, downtown
• 7:30 p.m., “The Drowsy Chaperone,” OHS PAC
Community calendar
Thursday, October 31
Oregon Village Board Budget
Meeting #2 (of Oct. 28)
Friday, November 1
Oregon Village Board Budget
Meeting #3 (of Oct. 30)
Saturday, November 2
“Fashion Show” @ Oregon
Senior Center (of Oct. 29)
Sunday, November 3
Worship Service: Hillcrest
Bible Church
Monday, November 4
6 pm--LIVE--Oregon Village
Board Meeting
Tuesday, November 5
U.S. Army News
Wednesday, November 6
Dedication of Norm
Champion Park (of Oct. 13)
Thursday, November 7
Oregon Village Board
Meeting (of Nov. 4)
WOW 98 & 983
Monday, Nov. 4
AM—Diabetic Foot Care
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Wii Bowling
1:00 Get Fit
1:30 Bridge
4:00 T.O.P.S. Weight Loss
6:00 Lions Club
Tuesday, Nov. 5
8:30 Zumba Gold
9:00 ST Board Meeting
9:15 Stretch & Strengthen
10:45 Tai Chi
12:30 Sheepshead
12:30 Stoughton Shopping
1:00 Movie: The Shunning
1:15 Piano Class
Wednesday, Nov. 6
AM—Foot Care
9:00 CLUB
10:00 Shopping:
World of Variety
11:00 1/1 Computer Help
1:00 Get Fit
1:00 Euchre
6:00 VFW Meeting
Thursday, Nov. 7
AM-Massage/ Legal Counsel
8:30 Zumba Gold
9:00 Pool Players
9:15 Stretch & Strengthen
12:30 Shopping at Bills
1:00 Cribbage
1:00 Country Line Dancing
1:00 Diabetic Support
Friday, Nov. 8
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Wii Bowling
9:30 Blood Pressure
Monday, Nov. 4
Swiss Steak, Rice,
Broccoli Flowerets, W.W.
Bread, Cookie
VO: Soy Strips w/Onions
& Peppers
Tuesday, Nov. 5
Meatloaf, Mashed
Potatoes/Gravy Spinach,
Banana, Multi Grain Bread
VO: Soy in Gravy
Wednesday, Nov. 6
Cream of Potato Soup,
Crackers, Turkey Ham &
Swiss Cheese on Rye, Apple
Juice, Chocolate Cake
VO: Cheese on Rye w/
lettuce

Thursday, Nov. 7
Meat Balls in Gravy, Egg
Noodles, Carrots, Pineapple,
W.W. Bread
VO: Soy Beef Sauce
SO: Chef Salad
Friday, Nov. 8
Baked Fish, Rice Pilaf/
Butter, California Mix,
Peaches, Multi Grain Bread
VO: Rice W/ Soy
ORE 95 & 984
Thursday, October 31
Oregon School Board
Meeting (of Oct. 28)
Friday, November 1
OHS Radio Plays (of Oct.
19)
Saturday, November 2
“Alpaca Fest” (of Oct. 6)
Sunday, November 3
“Vintage Gardens” @
Oregon Library (of Oct. 2)
Monday, November 4
“Puppet Theater” @ Oregon
Library (of Oct. 21)
Tuesday, November 5
Movie: “King Kong” (1933)
Wednesday, November 6
Movie: “Wizard of Oz”
(1939)
Thursday, November 7
Movie: “Our Gang” (1938)
Village of Oregon Cable Access TV program times same for all channels. A
new program begins daily at 1 p.m. and repeats at 4, 7 and 10 p.m. and at 1, 4, 7
and 10 a.m. 900 Market St., Oregon. Phone: 291-0148;
email: oregoncableaccess@charter.net, or visit www.OCAmedia.com.
Community cable listings Senior center
Silence Is Golden
The value of silence in our noisy and busy world is easy to over-
look, and even though many of us would like a quieter environ-
ment, it can be almost impossible to find a truly quiet place in
much of the modern world. Cars, trucks and motorcycles with
loud mufflers are some of the worst offenders when it comes to
disrupting what little serenity we have. Loud music and boister-
ous parties are perennial disturbers of the peace as well. Since
loud and inconsiderate people are not likely to be convinced
of the errors of their ways, holy men and women have always
known the importance of sequestering themselves, going into
caves or sojourning in the wilderness. Some religious orders
even take vows of silence. Finding quiet time each and every day
pays big dividends to our spiritual and emotional health, and
probably our physical health as well. We should consider also
whether our lifestyle is contributing to a quieter world or if we
are one of those vexatious disturbers of the peace.
– Christopher Simon via Metro News Service
“Make it your ambition to lead a quiet life.”
1 Thessalonians 4:11
Trick-or-treating
Trick-or-treating hours are from 5-8
p.m. for the Village of Oregon and
the City of Fitchburg. Please dress
children to be seen while outside and
watch carefully while driving for
trick-or-treaters.
Masonic card party
On Saturday, Nov. 2, there will be
a Card Party at the Oregon Masonic
Center, 201 Park St. A light meal will
be served at 6:30 p.m., with euchre
following the meal. It is open to the
public.
Night to remember
The Three Gaits 30th Anniversary
Gala “A Night to Remember” will be
held from 5:30-9 p.m. Saturday, Nov.
2 at the Legend at Bergamont Club-
house (699 Bergamont Blvd.) The
cost is $55 per person.

VFW Pancake Breakfast &
Bake Sale
Enjoy pancakes, scrambled eggs,
sausage, coffee, juice milk and great
friendly conversation from 7 a.m. to
noon, Sunday Nov. 3 at Oregon Mid-
dle School, 601 Pleasant Oak Drive,
hosted by Brooklyn-McFarland VFW
Post 10272.
The cost is $5 per adult, $2 per
child 12 and younger.

Learn Tai Chi
People are invited to the senior cen-
ter to join Margaret Amyotte from
Sydney, Australia to practice the
ancient Chinese art of Tai Chi, which
combines meditation and movement,
making it a perfect activity for people
of all ages and abilities.
The cost is $3 per class, which
begins at 10:45 a.m. every Tuesday,
starting Nov. 5.
Book discussion/signing
Author Katherine Perreth will talk
about her book, “Making Lemonade
with Ben: The Audacity to Cope,” at
6:30 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 6 at the
Oregon Public Library. A book sign-
ing will follow.
Political discussion
Sen. Kathleen Vinehout will be at
the Firefly Coffeehouse, 114 N. Main
St,. Oregon, from 6-8 p.m. Thursday,
Nov. 7, to talk about state issues like
the budget, local control, education
and sand mining. Call 843-2272 for
information.
Wine tasting
The Oregon/Brooklyn Lions Club
will have its first Wine Tasting event
from 6-8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 7 at the
Foxboro Golf Course, 1020 County
Road MM.
Come for a silent auction, 12 differ-
ent types of wine to taste and appetiz-
ers including barbecue beef, pork and
cheese and meat trays. A donation of
$25 is asked.
Fundraiser for Josh Below
Family and supporters of an Oregon
man who was seriously injured in a
Sept. 14 auto accident are holding
a fundraiser the evening of Friday,
Nov. 8 at Viking Lanes in Stoughton
to help pay his medical expenses. For
information, call 873-5959.
Below remains in serious condition
and last week was transported from
Madison to a Milwaukee hospital that
specializes in traumatic brain injury,
where he is undergoing extensive
therapy and making good progress.
October 31, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
7
Thanksgiving
DeaDlines
November 27, 2013 Great Dane Shopping News
Display Advertising: Wednesday, November 20 at Noon
Classified Advertising: Thursday, November 21 at Noon
November 28, 2013 Community Newspapers
Display & Classified Advertising:
Friday, November 22 at Noon
December 4, 2013 Great Dane Shopping News
Display Advertising: Tuesday, November 26 at 5:00 p.m.
Classified Advertising: Wednesday, November 27 at Noon
Our offices will be closed November 28 & 29, 2013
For Results You Can Trust
845-9559 • 873-6671 • 835-6677
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The Pacific Northwest is Coming to Oregon!
Boy Scout Troop 50’s 19th Annual
Grilled Salmon Dinner
Saturday, November 9, 2013
from 4-8 p.m.
Rome Corners Intermediate School
1111 South Perry Parkway, Oregon
For more information,
please call Mark 658-1132
salmon@oregontroop50.org
Menu:
• Alder-Smoked Grilled
Salmon
• Cornbread
• Coleslaw
• Long Grain and Wild
Rice
• Homemade Desserts
• Hotdogs for the kids
Tickets
• Adults: $15.00
• Senior (60 and over):
$10.00
• Children (under 12):
$6.00
• Children 3 and under
are FREE!
$2.00 off
advance tickets!
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Residents celebrate new ‘fit course’
More than 200 parents,
students and community
members attended a ribbon
cutting ceremony on Sept. 26
in the back yard of Brooklyn
Elementary School.
The event celebrated the
purchase and installation of
10 new pieces of Fit Course
equipment along the school's
walking path.
Aft er Pri nci pal Kerri
Modjeski thanked the spon-
sors, the ribbon was cut, and
student demonstrators pro-
vided instruction on how to
use each piece of equipment.
Students, staff, and spon-
sors raised $19,000 during
the school's First Annual
Move-a-thon in May. The
Move- a- t hon pr ovi ded
opportunities for students
to move including climbing
the rock wall, dancing the
school's flashmob, energiz-
ing through yoga, running in
boot camp, walking on the
walking path, and playing
sponge tag.
The equipment and path
are open to the community.
Photos submitted
Luke Hamlette and Hailey Berman demonstrate the new strider.
Sponsors William Chung, School Board member Rae Voegler, Laura James, and Mark and Lucy
Doudlah join in cutting the ribbon. Students hand printed the banner earlier in the week.
Brooke Bastian works her abs on the inclined bench.
Haley Weidel and Brooke Bastian workout the shoulder rotator.
8
October 31, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
This page proudly sponsored by these fine businesses.
CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR
STATE BOUND OREGON PANTHERS!
Good Luck Panthers!
Your Hard Work &
Determination is
Being Rewarded.
Gerlach Wholesale
Flooring
112 Janesville St., Oregon
835-8276
The paper to turn to for the best in
Panther sports coverage and photos.
125 N. Main St, Oregon • (608) 835-6677
connectoregonwi.com
Proud to SuPPort orEGoN
SoCCEr
Diane Sliter Agency, Inc.
850 Janesville St
Oregon, WI 53575
(608) 835-5100
(608) 228-2200 mobile
Great Job Panthers!
Ed Hefty Construction
1036 Hillcrest Drive, Oregon
(608) 835-7804
edhefty.com
The Oregon boys soccer team
won 1-0 in double overtime
during the WIAA Division 2
sectional final Saturday, Oct. 26,
against Elkhorn at Waunakee
High School.
photo by Anthony Iozzo
Senior Valerie Jones and sophomore Emma Hughes both qualified for Saturday’s
WIAA Division 1 state cross country meet at the Ridges Golf Course in Wisconsin
Rapids. Jones finished third overall at the WIAA Division 1 Verona sectional, while
Hughes finished seventh.
Way To Go Panthers!
954 Janesville Street, Oregon
(608) 835-2500
Congratulations Panthers!
Good Luck at State!
BREITBACH CHIROPRACTIC
Serving the Community Since 1961
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8 - The Oregon Observer - October 31, 2013
SportS
Jeremy Jones, sports editor
845-9559 x226 • ungsportseditor@wcinet.com

Thursday, October 31, 2013
Anthony Iozzo, assistant sports editor
845-9559 x237 • sportsreporter@wcinet.com
Fax: 845-9550
For more sports coverage, visit:
ConnectOregonWI.com
The Oregon Observer
9
Boys soccer
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
Junior midfielder Nick Steidemann (10) rushes the crowd with teammates after a PK goal in double overtime for a 1-0 win during the WIAA Division 2 sectional final
Saturday, Oct. 26, against Elkhorn at Waunakee High School. The goal clinched the second straight state appearance for the Panthers.
Volleyball
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
Senior outside hitter Maddy Gits gets a dig Thursday, Oct. 24, in a WIAA Division 1 regional semifinal
against Wilmot Union. Oregon won 3-0 (25-16, 25-13, 25-12). The Panthers also defeated Milton in the
regional final.
Spikers take regional title
Anthony Iozzo
Assistant sports editor
Facing Milton for a third
time this season could have
been tricky for the Oregon
High School volleyball team
last Saturday in a WIAA Divi-
sion 1 regional final against
Milton.
The host Panthers swept
Milton the other two meet-
ings, but that didn’t guarantee
a win in the playoffs.
But the girls rose to the
occasion were able to pull
out another 3-0 sweep (25-
19, 25-20, 25-21) and win the
regional title.
Oregon had picnic in the
gym before the match to get
loose, raising the energy and
atmosphere, head coach Kris-
ten Kluck said.
“I don’t know that we
played differently, but we
played with a lot more inten-
sity and urgency,” she said.
Senior outside hitter Maddy
Gits led the Panthers with 27
kills, while senior setter Dani
Loomis had 20 assists.
Gits added 15 digs, and
junior middle hitter Riley
Rosemeyer had five blocks.
Oregon now travels to play
No. 2 Burlington at Wilmot
Union at 7 p.m. Thursday in
the sectional semifinal.
“Our struggle all season
has been to stop other teams
from going on runs,” Kluck
said. “Our big goal for prac-
tice these two days is to focus
on stopping runs. We have to
play error free volleyball.”
Oregon 3, Wilmot Union 0
The Panthers hosted Wilm-
ot Union last Thursday in a
regional semifinal and sur-
vived a back-and-forth game
one to win 3-0 (25-16, 25-13,
25-12).
Gits and Rosemeyer had 15
and nine kills, respectively.
Senior setter Jamie Wood
and Loomis each had 14
assists, while senior libero
Madi Klonsinski collected
two aces.
Senior outside hitter Regan
Pauls had 14 digs, and Klon-
sinski added 12. Rosemeyer
and Loomis each had a block.
No time to spare
Panthers earn second straight trip to state with PK in final 40 seconds
Anthony Iozzo
Assistant sports editor
A shootout was the last thing junior
midfielder Nick Steidemann and the
rest of the Oregon boys soccer team
wanted Saturday, but with only 40
seconds left in the second overtime, a
penalty kick showdown with Elkhorn
seemed imminent.
But that soon changed. In a physi-
cal game, with two yellow cards and
several fouls, it was one that changed
everything. Senior forward Shaw Sto-
rey was tackled in the penalty box on
a 50-50 ball, and it led to a penalty
kick for Steidemann.
Steidemann was able to bury the
ball in the back of the net past diving
senior goalie Riley Bruce, who fin-
ished with 19 saves, and the celebra-
tion began in a 1-0 win in the WIAA
Division 2 sectional final at Wauna-
kee High School.
Oregon (15-3-2) is going back to
state for the second straight year.
“First I didn’t know it was a PK.
I thought it was offside, and then I
knew it was a PK and was really ner-
vous. But I was also excited for the
opportunity,” Steidemann said.
But when the ball finally did go
past the goalie, Steidemann said the
nerves just washed away.
The Panthers did put other shots on
goal during the game, but none could
find its way past Bruce. But Elkhorn
wasn’t really putting up an offensive
attack of its own, paving the way for
a shootout, which levels the playing
field.
Head coach Kevin May said Ore-
gon would have been prepared for
anything, but he was glad the game
ended during play rather than be
decided on PKs.
“A call is a call, and it was a pretty
obvious foul, and I think it was the
right call,” May said. “We are ecstat-
ic. It is a tough way to end a sectional
final game with a PK, but it is what it
is and we will take it.”
In the final 10 minutes, the Panthers
had three shots, including a golden
opportunity by junior forward Mitch
Morhoff on a free kick from Steide-
mann. Morhoff dove into the box for
a header, but Bruce was there.
Bruce was also there on two gold-
en opportunities in the first three
Cross country
Jones,
Hughes race
to state meet
Jeremy Jones
Sports editor
Senior Valerie Jones and
sophomore Emma Hughes
each r an t o t hei r f i r st
WIAA Di vi si on 1 st at e
cross country individual
berths last weekend.
Jones, who ran at state
last year as a member of
the Panthers’ state quali-
fying team, earned Satur-
day’s WIAA Division 1
state meet berth by finish-
ing third overall in 16 min-
utes, 32 seconds.
“It was unbelievable,”
Jones said of her finish.
“I think we all got a little
caught up in the beginning.
I just went for it after the
first hill because it was
now or never.”
Her first year running
Turn to Statebound/Page 10
If you go
What: WIAA Division 2 state
semifinals against Marshfield
When: 2 p.m. Friday
Where: Time Warner Cable
Stadium at Uihlein Soccer Park in
Milwaukee
Turn to Sectionals/Page 10
Photo by Jeremy Jones
Senior Valerie Jones finished
third overall at Saturday’s WIAA
Division 1 Verona sectional with
a time of 16 minutes, 32 sec-
onds. Jones qualified for state.
If you go
What: Division 1 sec-
tional semifinal
When: 7 p.m. Thursday
Where: Wilmot Union
High School
10
October 31, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
minutes. Morhoff broke free
and had a 1-on-1 with Bruce
in the box, but his shot was
deflected away. A minute
later, senior defender Jon
Conduah received a pass in
the box, but Bruce caught his
shot.
“We were definitely frus-
trated at the end of the game,
and the recent past few games,
we have been able to capital-
ize and put those balls away.
Tonight we were just a little
off with connecting on those,”
May said. “The keeper did
make some pretty awesome
saves, especially in the second
half. But we stuck with it. I
kept telling them to dig a little
deeper and find a way and
good things happen.”
The game continued like
this, with Oregon holding pos-
session and rarely let a ball get
past midfield. Elkhorn was
held to no shots on goal in
regulation, and it mustered up
four in overtime.
Those four were attributed
by May to a tiring team after
playing hard for nearly 100
minutes, but even those shots
were no real threat. Oregon
senior goalie Jere Bauer easily
scooped up all four to hold the
game scoreless.
“We have preached defense
all along. No shots on goal
make it easy to keep a shut-
out,” May said. “… We are
going to continue to ride that
defensive wave at state to
make it all the way through to
get that title this year.”
The Panthers get another
shot at state, after falling in the
Division 1 quarterfinals last
season. This time, it will play
in the D2 semifinals at 2 p.m.
Friday against Marshfield (20-
4-2) at Uihlein Soccer Park’s
Time Warner Cable Stadium
in Milwaukee.
Last season, Steidemann
said the team was just happy
to make it to state, but this
time, the returners want the
golden ball. Oregon is ranked
No. 2 in the Wisconsin High
School Soccer Coaches poll.
“We definitely have higher
expectations with ourselves
this year,” Steidemann said.
“… This year, we had a goal
to make it back to state and
win state.”
The winner of that game
will play at 3 p.m. Saturday
in the D2 state championship
against the winner of White-
fish Bay, ranked No. 3, (17-5)
and Cedarburg (14-4-2).
Oregon 6, Sauk Prairie 0
The Panthers crushed Sauk
Prairie in the sectional final
last Thursday 6-0.
An early goal from Morhoff
with an assist to Shaw Storey
in the seventh minute was
all the Panthers needed, but
Steidemann added a PK and
another goal with an assist
to Storey in the second half.
Senior midfielder Sam Mosi-
man, senior Jon Powers and
Storey all added goals, as
well.
Sophomore midfielder AJ
Breitbach and sophomore
defender Zach Stone added
assists. Bauer collected two
saves, while Sauk Prairie
senior goalie David Flores
also had two saves.
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On the road
to state again
regIonAls
Oregon 4, Monona
Grove 0
Oregon 3, Waunakee 0
sectIonAls
Oregon 6, Sauk Prairie
0
Oregon 1, Elkhorn 0 (2
OT)
Continued from page 9
Statebound: Panthers crush Sauk Prairie
varsity, Hughes finished nine
seconds later in 16:41 – good
for seventh place – though even
after her race she had no idea
how runners qualified for state.
“I wanted to get to state, ”
Hughes said. “I thought it was
the top 15 runners that make it to
state, so I just wanted to do the
best I could on a tough course.”
Wi t h s ect i onal champi on
Stoughton placing three varsi-
ty scorers in the top five, all of
whom advanced automatically as
a team, Hughes earned the fifth
and final individual spot.
Though she won’t get to race
with her full team this year, “I’ll
take teammates any day,” Jones
said of Saturday’s WIAA Divi-
sion 1 state meet in Wisconsin
Rapids. “We’ll take the journey
together.
“I just want to go out and have
fun next week. That’s what I did
today and it worked out well.”
Pant hers head coach Doug
Debroux said there could not
have been a more fitting way
for Jones to end her high school
cross country career than to race
at state.
“We (the entire CC program)
are incredibly proud and happy
for her,” Debroux added.
Despite placing the team’s top
two runners in the top seven,
Oregon was unable to threaten
for the top two spots and a trip
to this weekend’s state meet as a
team, as it was nearly a minute
before the Panthers’ third runner
crossed the finish line.
A state qualifying team a year
ago, Oregon was a vastly differ-
ent team this season with only
Jones and sophomore Jen Brien
back on varsity from state a year
ago.
The Panthers finished sixth
overall Saturday with a team
score of 135.
For compari son, sect i onal
champion Stoughton placed all
five of its varsity runners in the
top 13 for a score of 38. Fort
Atkinson (99) finished second
and also advanced to Saturday’s
state meet as a team.
Junior Hannah McAnulty fin-
ished as the team’s third runner
in 37th place with a 17:34. Soph-
omores Kayla Wiedholz and Jen
Brien rounded out the pack as
the fourth and fifth runners.
Wi edhol z fi ni shed 40t h i n
17:49, while Brien, who battled
a foot injury this season, took
48th in 17:56. Sophomores Mad-
die LeBrun and Connie Hansen
also competed on varsity but did
not score.
Not doi ng a wal k t hrough
before two races this season,
Hughes said the pre-race walk-
through this weekend is going to
be invaluable.
“There were a couple of races
I didn’t walk the course before-
hand, I don’t know why, and it
really affected my race,” she
said. “I didn’t know where the
end was so I was going too slow
and when I did get to the end it
was like – what was that?
A cold and windy morning at
sectionals, at least one girl in the
field is hoping its even colder
this Saturday.
“I love the cold. I love awful
weather,” she said. “I race well
in rain and storms. When it’s
hot, I’m not having it.”
The Division 1 girls race gets
underway at 12:40 p.m. Saturday
at the Ridges Golf Course.
“I think it’s going to be very
nerve wracking, but I don’t think
I’ll be quite as nervous as today
at sect i onal s, ” Hughes sai d.
“Once you get to state you race
and the season’s over. I never
thought this would be possible
this year.”
Boys
A series of unfortunate events
once again left the Oregon boys
cross country team without a
state qualifier.
Junior Josh Christensen led the
team throughout the season, but
fell twice Saturday on his way
to a 36th-place finish in 17:58.
Sophomore Chris Cutter, who
had been the team’s top returner
entering this season, dealt with
sudden back spasms throughout
his race and was unable to finish
as one of the team’s top five run-
ners for the first time this season.
Christensen fell once coming
out of the woods and once on the
far side of the course near the
hill, yet he only ran one second
slower than at the same course
during the Verona Invitational
earlier this year.
“With two falls and the men-
tal game after the falls, he still
ran the same time,” Panthers
head coach Eri k Haakenson
said. “It shows how much he has
improved throughout the season.
“Who knows what could have
happened if he didn’t fall?”
Junior Ryan Barry, who joined
the team for the first time this
fall, led the Panthers in place of
Christensen and Cutter, posting
a lifetime best of more than 20
seconds as he finished 16th over-
all in 17:21.
“I just decided to try cross
country out and it turned out to
be one of the best decisions I’ve
made,” Barry said. ”It feels good
whether I go to state or not. I am
still not sure whether I am men-
tally ready to go to state because
it is my first year running.”
Sophomore Ben Janes stepped
up to finish as Oregon’s third
runner, covering the 5K course
in a personal best 18:12 – good
for 40th place. Junior Ben Vogt
finished five seconds and two
spots back in 18:17.
Senior Daniel Rau finished his
prep career as the team’s fifth
runner, placing 46th overall in
18:26.
Senior Vincent Selvey also
ran on varsity but did not score
as Oregon finished sixth overall
(out of 12) with 180 points.
Of the seven Panthers running
Saturday, only Rau and Selvey
won’t be back next year.
“Our eyes have been set on
state for the past two years,”
Haakenson sai d. “Each and
every year we get closer and
closer.
“There is a great group of
men on the team who are will-
ing to put in the time and effort
to achieve that goal, we will see
what happens next year.”
Last year’s WIAA Division
1 state runner-up, Madison La
Follette, won the sectional with
43 points – 27 ahead of second
place Lake Geneva Badger at
sectionals.
Both teams advanced to Sat-
urday’s state meet in Wisconsin
Rapids as a team.
The boys D1 race is set for
2:25 p.m.
Oregon’s last state qualifier
was Joe Gehrmann, who finished
98th overall in 2011.
Sectionals: Boys fall short of qualifying a runner to state
Photo by Jeremy Jones
Sophomore Emma Hughes finished seventh overall in 16 minutes, 41 seconds
Saturday, which qualified her for state with the final individual state qualifier.
Continued from page 9
Oregon Focus
It’s a bustling autumn night in downtown Oregon.
Bonnie and Jerry Thiel built their new restaurant, Mason’s on Main,
in two historic buildings on South Main Street that they had renovated
last year. The business opened in May and is going strong.
Alpine business park surging 12
Developments downtown 13
Housing is booming 14
New Brooklyn business park 15
12
October 31, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Oregon Focus
Business park ‘moving in right direction’
Lycon construction,
Trachte expansion
and new interest in
development
BiLL Livick
Unifed Newspaper Group
Local businessman Marty
Verhelst’s recent interest in
building a truck repair facil-
ity in the Alpine Business
Park in 2014 was just the
latest piece of good news
for the north side industrial
development this year.
Last spring, Lycon Inc.
began bui l di ng a l ong-
awaited Ready Mix con-
crete plant on about four
acres on the business park’s
northernmost lot. Public
works director Mark Below
said the company plans to
“fire it up and do some test
batches” this fall to make
sure equipment is working
per manufacturer specifica-
tions and then shut down
for the winter. He said the
plant will be up and running
for the beginning of the
construction season next
spring.
Also this year, Trachte
Inc. , t he fi rst company
to locate in the business
park back in 2008, built a
32,000-square-foot addi-
tion to its $3. 5 million
assembly facility. It also
added 13,500 square feet
of new concrete assembly
pads to the Cusick Parkway
operation.
“With Trachte adding
on and Lycon bui l di ng
now, the business park is
growing and doing well,”
observed Judy Knutson,
executive director of the
Oregon Area Chamber of
Commerce. “We’re defi-
nitely moving in the right
direction.”
Lycon Inc.
The exhaust tower loom-
ing over the business park’s
north side is the most obvi-
ous sign that things are
moving forward in the park.
Lycon Inc., which pur-
chased 80 acres in 2005
from t he Al pi ne Dai ry
for the business park, had
delayed construction of the
facility by more than six
years from its original plan,
largely due to the recession
and the accompanying lack
of residential and commer-
cial construction.
Lycon now owns almost
16.5 acres in the business
park, north of Braun Road
and east of Cusick Parkway.
The new ready mix produc-
tion facility is expected to
provide jobs for 12 or 13
people, village officials
said. The company scaled
back its facility to about
half the size of the plant it
had originally intended to
build.
Lycon paid for engineer-
ing to build a rail cross-
ing at Braun Road near the
park’s north entrance. The
tracks will go back in where
they’d been removed when
Braun Road was extended
into the business park a few
years ago.
The company plans to use
Message from the Village President
A productive year in
a vibrant community
The past year has been a
productive and worthwhile
year for the Oregon Village
Board. Economic develop-
ment, downtown projects,
and a variety of projects
that enhance our reputation
as a family friendly com-
munity have been areas of
emphasis.
There is always more
to be done than funds will
al l ow, and t he Vi l l age
Board strives to be fiscally
responsible as it prioritizes
its projects to complete.
Al t hough smal l , our
downtown has been called
“one of the most vibrant in
Dane County.”
Our downtown dining
attractions were enhanced
this year by Senor Peppers
moving to a larger location
and the opening of Masons
on Main. The increased
patronage moved the recon-
struction of the Jefferson
Street parking lot to the top
of the list for completion.
The lot will be essentially
completed by Oct. 31.
Not onl y does i t add
additional parking spaces,
it has a much more pleas-
ing appearance that is more
consistent with the rest of
downtown. Other enhance-
ments include a Dump-
ster corral, an attractive
fence to clearly delineate
the area, and removal of
impediments
in the center
of the lot.
Our vi l -
l age has a
r e put a t i on
of bei ng a
great pl ace
to reside as
documented
b y b e i n g
selected as a Top 100 Place
to Live by Money Maga-
zine. That reputation was
gained in part by being a
family-friendly community.
The Village Board is proud
of t hat di st i nct i on and
strives to enhance it with
appropriate actions.
We have been working
for several years on getting
a bike trail to Madison. The
middle section has been
difficult to finalize, but it
appears that the glitches
have been worked out and
construction will begin on
the first phase of the trail
in the spring. We will apply
for another Dane County
Recreation grant in the
spring to continue the work
on the trail.
Completion of this trail
i s much ant i ci pat ed by
our residents and will help
establish Oregon as a des-
tination among the Dane
County biking crowd. I
anticipate that the trail will
lure many bikers to our
wonderful downtown and
will benefit all restaurants
in town.
Ot her enhancement s
include the opening of an
enclosed dog park on Park
Street. The park is named
after Jon Blanchard, who
chaired the Park Board
for twenty-five years and
recently resigned from the
Park Board after a long and
distinguished tour of duty.
The Village is grateful to
Jon for his service.
The Village also moved
forward with the approval
of Little Free Libraries. The
libraries are an Eagle Scout
Proj ect wi t h assi st ance
from some residents.
The installation of addi-
tional way finding signs in
the downtown area makes
it easier for visitors to find
destinations downtown.
The Chamber of Com-
merce and Village Board
continue to work together
to move our village for-
ward. A noticeable example
is the community signs that
have been installed at 833
North Main and 989 Park
Street. We also continue to
work together on economic
development projects when
feasible.
Economic development
has been furthered by the
Photo by Jim Ferolie
Above is an aerial view of the Alpine Business Park looking south showing the new Lycon Inc. Ready
Mix Concrete plant and Trachte Inc. Below, construction crews are putting the finishing touches on the
Lycon facility.
Photo by Victoria Vlisides
Turn to Alpine/Page 16
Turn to Village/Page 15
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October 31, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
13
Oregon Focus
Message from the Chamber
Banner year all over Oregon
Economic development is
flourishing, and the past 12
months have been a banner
year in Oregon.
The Oregon Area Cham-
ber of Commerce (OACC)
supports both area busi-
nesses and the residen-
tial community to ensure
Oregon is a great place to
live, work and play through
our four core service areas:
Promote, Inform, Connect
and Advocate. We enjoy
worki ng on communi t y
wide initiatives with our
members and local govern-
ment.
Our passion is connecting
with and making a positive
difference for each one of
our members. At the same
time, we want to ensure that
our community continues to
be a family-friendly envi-
ronment.
Downt own i s rapi dl y
becoming a new “Taste of
Oregon” experience. The
relocation of Senor Pep-
pers Mexican Restaurant
and the addition of Mason’s
on Main and Lil Buddies
Popcorn & Chicago style
hot dogs have really com-
plimented other restaurants,
which include Firefly Cof-
feehouse, Maria’s Pizza
and Pizza Pit. Downtown
Oregon is quite a wonderful
dining destination.
With the new Oregon
Bike and Skate store down-
town next to Tri County
Appliance, downtown Ore-
gon is at full occupancy.
The improvement of the
Jefferson Street parking
lot is almost
c o m p l e t e
and provides
a c c e s s t o
all the local
businesses.
You c a n
really appre-
c i a t e a l l
t he peopl e
coming and
going while sitting on a
bench on Friday or Satur-
day night, or listening to
the concerts in the Triangle
Park. It is a delight to be
part of our vibrant commu-
nity.
At the north end of Ore-
gon, the business park is
filling up, with Lycon’s
new construction and the
Trachte expansion. Bill’s
Food Center is the anchor
of the North Main Street
shopping plaza, and we are
pursuing tenants for avail-
able space there.
The southeast side of
Oregon welcomes Lund-
grens’ Signs and Karate
America’s relocation to the
area. The new Headquar-
ters restaurant is under con-
struction and with the hotel
feasibility study complete,
the hotel project is still
being actively pursued. The
southeast side is quickly
becoming another gateway
to Oregon.
New residential building
has resumed on Oregon’s
west side, and Mueller Den-
tal’s new office on Alpine
Parkway is nearing comple-
tion.
T h e C h a mb e r o f
Commerce installed wel-
come/information signs on
each side of town to inform
the community of current
events taking place around
the village. Thank you to
Union Bank & Trust and
TecMarket Works for their
support with this project.
Oregon Summer Fest was
great fun. Participants in the
5k Classic Run/Walk were
not deterred by the rainy
weat her. Heavy crowds
came out to enjoy the car-
nival, music, parade, clas-
sic car show and great food.
Chamber members and
community residents gener-
ously volunteered their time
to make this event very suc-
cessful.
Speaki ng of Chamber
members, numerous local
businesses have opened
their doors for tours of their
facilities to better acquaint
the other chamber members
with their operations. We
invite anyone interested to
watch our online calendar
of events for information on
similar events in the future.
The OACC has had a
great deal of success with
our Chamber Connection to
Education Series offering
classes in human resources,
software and social media.
We are extremely posi-
tive about the next year.
Things to look forward to
include the Chamber’s 50th
anniversary, Summer Fest
(which will be better than
ever), continued growth
Knutson
Big investment pays off in downtown
BiLL Livick
Unifed Newspaper Group
When t he Vi l l age of
Oregon borrowed $5. 07
million in 2008 to renovate
the downtown, there was no
guarantee the effort would
result in the growth of new
business.
The proj ect i nvol ved
r epl aci ng under gr ound
infrastructure, including
the 72-inch stormwater cul-
vert that conveys runoff in
the Badfish Creek from the
west side of the village to
the east.
It al so i ncl uded new
st r eet pavement , si de-
walks, parking areas and
streetscape features such
as period lighting, benches
and information kiosks.
The work took place in two
phases in 2008 and ’09.
Vi l l a ge a dmi ni s t r a -
tor Mike Gracz thinks all
those improvements set the
stage for what’s happened
this year: the renovation
of two historic downtown
buildings, the relocation
of Señor Peppers Mexican
Restaurant and the open-
ing of Mason’s on Main, an
elegant 3,000-square-foot
restaurant and bar at 113 S.
Main St.
“All of the storefronts
downtown are filled right
now,” he said last week.
“It’s a great achievement.”
Sometimes when a com-
munity renovates its down-
town, it doesn’t pay off
right away, Gracz noted.
He thinks some of this
year’s progress would have
happened wi t hout t hat
work, but believes the reno-
vations did spur people and
businesses to come to the
area.
“It’s just made the down-
town alive again,” Gracz
said.
“Sometimes people cau-
tion you not to spend too
much money before the
development happens, but
I think it was necessary. A
lot of people were think-
i ng t he downt own was
starting to look a little bit
worn out, and I think it
was a really good idea that
we went ahead and did the
streetscape and decorative
lighting and things like
that.”
Gracz described it as “a
joint venture between the
business owners and the
village to get us where we
are now.”
The final piece of that
investment is happening
now with the rehabilitation
of the Jefferson Street park-
ing lot behind the row of
businesses on South Main
Street.
Restorations and
building a restaurant
The biggest downtown
business development this
year was Jerry and Bonnie
Thiel’s decision to build
Mason’s on Main. They
began renovating the histor-
ic buildings at 113 and 119
S. Main St. – both on the
National Register of His-
toric Places – last year and
completed the project early
this year. Then in March,
the couple announced their
intention to build and open
the 110-seat restaurant.
Named after the former
Masonic Temple, built in
1898 at 119 S. Main St.,
Mason’s on Main opened
in late May. The Thiels
partnered with their son,
Hans, and executive chef
Jonathan Cross on the res-
taurant, which features a
bistro/bar room on the north
side and a more formal,
upscale dining room in the
south room with seating for
65 to 70 diners.
Village officials wel-
comed the 35 new jobs the
restaurant created, as well
as the out-of-town visitors
the business draws to the
village.
“I think it’s going to
enhance everybody’s busi-
ness in the downtown,” Jer-
ry Thiel told the Observer
in June. “In that regard, I
think the community is the
winner.”
The bi st ro i ncl udes a
handsome dark-wood bar
along one side of the room
opposite an exposed brick
wall with historic photos of
the village.
Brick that was removed
t o cr eat e an openi ng
between the two buildings
has been reused to anchor
one end of the bar, and the
Thiels managed to salvage
a couple of heavy, historic
doors from the State Capi-
tol building to use for the
restrooms.
On the other side, an open
kitchen is adjacent to the
main dining room, where
each table is set with white-
linen tablecloths and nap-
kins, beneath the restored
original pressed-tin ceiling.
Oregon Area Chamber
of Commerce director Judy
Knutson said the Thiels
deserve much of the credit
for what she sees as a revi-
talized downtown.
“I’m very excited that the
downtown storefronts are
full,” she said. “It’s won-
derful to sit out there on a
Friday or Saturday night
and just watch all the peo-
ple walking around and the
cars going by.”
Finding a new home
Another key piece of the
downtown renewal is the
renovation of the historic
Netherwood Building and
the reopening of Señor Pep-
pers Mexican Restaurant.
Commercial developer
Paul Lynch, owner of the
6, 600-square-foot Neth-
erwood Building that was
also constructed in 1898,
renovat ed t he bui l di ng
in three phases and com-
pleted the work last year.
When Señor Peppers owner
Magalay Richter needed a
new space for her restau-
rant, Lynch created it in his
building.
Señor Peppers’ lease at
its former location on South
Main Street expired Jan.
31, and Richter thought she
might have to find another
Photo by Jeremy Jones
Pork tenderloin is one of the dishes offered at Mason’s on Main.
Turn to Mason’s/Page 16
Turn to Chamber/Page 15
‘It’s just made the
downtown alive
again.’
Mike Gracz
Village administrator
14
October 31, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Oregon Focus
Housing sees a big boom
Single family home
permits nearly
double
Mark ignaTowSki
Unifed Newspaper Group
If you’re looking for an
indicator that Oregon is
a good place to live, look
no further than the nearly
doubled number of new
single-family home starts
this year.
The village has seen 45
new building permits this
year through mid-October,
compared to just 26 in all of
2012, according to numbers
provided by the Village of
Oregon.
The bulk of those new
homes are in the Alpine
Meadows and Bergamont
subdivisions.
In fact, the numbers are
so good that Alpine Mead-
ows is almost all filled, said
Realtor Laurie Zoerb.
“We had such a busy
year , ” Zoer b t ol d t he
Observer.
Al pi ne Meadows has
t hree l ot s l eft t hat she
thinks will be built on by
next spring.
The Bergamont has had
a busy year, said Fiduciary
vice president Craig Rad-
datz. Fiduciary took over
ownership of the subdivi-
sion and golf course in 2007
and invested about $10 mil-
lion in the clubhouse and
pool area.
“Right from the start we
believed … that this was
going to be a premier Dane
County destination,” Rad-
datz said. “We have every-
thing that this was envi-
sioned to be.”
Both Raddatz and Zoerb
said Oregon is seen as a great
place to live because of its
family-friendly neighbor-
hoods, school system and
community feel.
“You’re that next layer
out,” Zoerb said about Ore-
gon’s relation to Madison.
“But the community still has
a lot to offer.”
Another reason people
have decided to build is that
they can’t find what they’re
l ooki ng for i n exi st i ng
homes, Zoerb said.
Features like three-car
garages and four bedrooms
upstairs are hard to come by
in existing homes, she said.
Those factors are playing
into the cost of homes, too.
Builders like Chris Schmidt,
owner of Classic Homes of
Madison, said his company
is building more homes that
cost upwards of $500,000.
“Pricewise, it’s kind of
creeping up a little bit,”
Schmidt said of the housing
market.
It’s difficult to determine if
the current housing trend will
continue, but Schmidt said
he hopes demand evens out a
bit in order to create a more
stable market.
“If you heat up too much
prices tend to go wonky,”
Schmidt said.
Still, Oregon is poised for
additional growth, particu-
larly in the Bergamont.
The subdivision had two
phases open this year with
33 total lots opening up. Of
those 33 lots, 28 have been
sold or are committed to,
Raddatz said.
Compared to 2009-2011
where the Bergamont had
about 20 lots sold during that
3-year period, 2012 saw 19
lots sold and have something
being built on them. With
about 200 lots left in the
subdivision’s master plan,
Raddatz said they hope to see
building for the next five or
six years.
“We are feeling pretty
strongly, that certainly the
next two years, we’d expect
the same type of perfor-
mance,” Raddatz said.
New home starts
Year New permits
2010 20
2011 22
2012 26
2013 45*
* as of Oct. 17
Photos by Mark Ignatowski
Above, heavy equipment is used to move dirt off Oakwood Road in the Bergamont subdivision. Below, workers install exterior bricks on a
new home in the Bergamont subdivision.
October 31, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
15
Oregon Focus
Chamber adds new signs, discusses new logo
ScoTT girard
Unifed Newspaper Group
The Oregon Chamber of
Commerce installed two
new signs in the village
just before Memorial Day
this year.
The signs, located out-
side Union Bank and Trust
at 883 N. Main St. and by
Sienna Crest at 981 Park
St., serve as a commu-
nity calendar of sorts, said
Chamber Executive Direc-
tor Judy Knutson
“There’s so many things
going on in Oregon, and
we want community mem-
bers to know what is going
on in town,” Knutson told
the Observer.
She said the response to
the signs in the commu-
nity, both by organizations
using it to promote events
and community members
who learn about events
from it, has been over-
whelmingly positive.
“Every time I am out and
about, people say I didn’t
know about this unless I
seen it on your sign, which
is what we want,” Knutson
said. “Last week we had
six events on two signs.
It’s wonderful.”
The new signs, which
r epl aced ol der ones ,
offer more space for not-
ing events on both sides,
though Knutson said they
try to limit it to one per
side when possible.
Discussion of new signs
began in January, Knutson
said, and they were able to
move through the process
quickly thanks to funding
help from Union Bank and
Trust and TechMart to go
along with chamber funds.
The signs mostly focus
on non-profi t or ot her
community events, Knut-
son said.
New logo
The village and chamber
had also discussed creating
a new logo and brand for
the area back in April.
At the time, chamber
director Brett Frazier spear-
headed the effort to iden-
tify a logo and tagline, “but
more than that an identifi-
cation of how we represent
ourselves both internally
and also to folks who are
visiting,” he said in April.
“You know, when they
see the logo they recognize
it; when they hear the tag-
line they’re proud of it,”
Frazier said. “And it could
be almost a formalization
of the things that we’re
already prideful about as a
community.”
However, Knutson said
no progress has been made
since because “people like
the horse,” referencing the
“Wisconsin Horse Capital”
brand the village has used
in the past.
“We’re still talking,” she
said.
at the business park, the
pump house/water tow-
er project and welcom-
ing more businesses to
the community. We have
many f un communi t y
events planned, as well.
We will continue to strive
to make Oregon a great place
to do business, while making
sure that Oregon continues
to be a dynamic commu-
nity. The OACC supports
Chamber members, helping
them to grow and thrive, pro-
viding the Oregon commu-
nity with resources to shop
and dine locally. In turn, the
support of all the businesses
and residents in the commu-
nity is greatly appreciated by
the Chamber.
Thank you to our mem-
bers, volunteers, sponsors,
the village, police depart-
ment, fire department and
residents of the community.
The Chamber is here to
help. If we can serve you
in any way, please do not
hesitate to call, email or
just stop by.
You can also visit our
website, oregonwi.com,
a n d Fa c e b o o k p a g e
(oregonwi ) for current
information about what is
going on in Oregon.
Judy Knut son i s t he
executive director of the
Oregon Area Chamber of
Commerce.
addition of The Headquarters
Restaurant on Wolfe Street,
the expansion of Trachte’s in
the Industrial Park, approval
of phases 3e and 4a in the
Bergamont subdivision, and
activation of the rail line by
the end of the year.
One of the major projects
that the Village Board will
work on during 2014 will be
analyzing the area on the east
side of U.S. Hwy. 14 for pos-
sible development opportuni-
ties.
We will also continue to
focus on economic develop-
ment as well as making some
decisions about our Capital
Improvement Plan. Engi-
neering work will begin on
the extension of North Perry
Parkway from the ice arena
to Park Street.
It has been a pleasure to
continue to serve our resi-
dents in 2013. I appreciate
your support and input.
Steve Staton is president of
the Oregon Village Board.
Photo by Victoria Vlisides
The Oregon Chamber of Commerce installed two new signs in the village just before Memorial Day
this year.
Brooklyn breaks ground
on Hwy. 92 business park
The Village of Brook-
lyn broke ground on a new
business park Sept. 27 after
more than a year and a half
of work by village officials
to receive a grant for the
project.
The process began in
spring 2012 when the vil-
lage applied for a $261,000
Community Block Devel-
opment Grant from Dane
County to build infrastruc-
ture for the park.
Following a review by a
county subcommittee that
evaluates applications for
these grants, the village was
left with a list of required
improvements it had to
make to remain eligible for
the grant.
The fi rst requi rement
was gaining approval from
the Capital Area Region-
al Planning Commission
(CARPC), a body that aims
to protect water quality and
oversees sewer expansion
requests.
The county subcommit-
tee also asked to see the
village get a firm purchase
price for the land, come to
an annexation agreement
wi t h t he Town of Rut -
land, receive a permit for
an access point to Hwy. 92
from the state Department
of Transportation and cre-
ate a tax-increment financ-
ing (TIF) district.
CARPC approved t he
project in early November
2012, leaving the village
with three months to final-
ize the other requirements,
based on the deadline the
CDBG subcommittee had
set.
The village received offi-
cial approval for the project
in late February 2013, and
began drawing up official
plans and asking for bids on
the project.
That all came to a head
in September when Village
President Nadine Walsten,
along with other village
officials, state Sen. John
Erpenbach, and representa-
tives from the construction
company held the village’s
first groundbreaking cere-
mony Walsten could recall.
“I’m just a bit …” Wal-
sten said just before the
ceremony, taking a pause to
choose her words, “giddy.”
Walsten said she expect-
ed the infrastructure to be
completed in mid-Novem-
ber, and the village has
already begun soliciting
businesses to develop in the
park with a focus on light
industry.
Image courtesy Village of Brooklyn
Brooklyn’s new business park is on State Hwy. 92 on the edge of the village.
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Chamber: Village a great place for business
Continued from page 13
Village: Activating rail line by end of year
Continued from page 12
16
October 31, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Oregon Focus
town for her popular res-
taurant.
She was relieved to only
move across the street.
Señor Peppers opened
in early April, and Rich-
ter later received the vil-
lage’s permission to add
six tables on a patio over-
looking the World War 1
monument.
With the move, she was
able to increase the restau-
rant staff from eight to 11
employees.
The restaurant itself
features large storefront
windows overlooking the
World War I monument in
the heart of the village. The
elevated patio area in front
was especially popular with
customers in the summer
and early fall, Richter said.
“Everyone says they
like it, and a lot of people
would rather sit outside
when the weather’s nice,”
she said.
Inside, the restaurant
has some beautiful canvas
murals of Mexico painted
by a Chicago-based artist,
and everything is new and
shiny, with seating for 68.
The food is the same
tasty fare that has drawn
customers from throughout
the area.
Richter said the menu
di dn’ t change much,
although there are a few
new items.
“These are family reci-
pes, mostly my grandmoth-
er’s recipes that I brought
from Mexico,” Richter
said.
The Netherwood Build-
ing was built on the south
side of the village square in
1898 by Italian workmen
who traveled to Oregon
from Chicago, according
to Melanie Woodworth,
a member of the Oregon
Area Historical Society.
Addressing parking
The Jefferson Street park-
ing lot had not been refur-
bished since 1977, public
works director Mark Below
said. Work on the project
began in late September
and is nearing completion.
Downt own busi ness
owners and village officials
had wanted to improve the
lot ever since the rest of the
downtown was updated in
2008 and ’09. The village
hired Payne and Dolan to
resurface and restripe the
lot at a cost of $74,000. The
work was overseen by the
engineering firm MSA Pro-
fessional Services, which
designed the changes.
The Village Board also
decided to create a “Dump-
ster corral” in the southwest
corner of the lot and install
a fence on its western
boundary.
The newly designed lot
contains 32 parking stalls,
four of which are designat-
ed for handicap parking.
The county’s emergency
warning siren was removed
from the lot and a new siren
will be erected near the
intersection of South Main
Street and South Perry
Parkway, at a cost of about
$25,000.
Village President Steve
Staton said finishing the lot
ties the entire downtown
together. He thinks that
between the village’s work
to improve the downtown
and the business communi-
ty’s investing there, the Vil-
lage of Oregon can be proud
of what it’s accomplished.
“It’s good to bring it up to
speed so that it looks like the
rest of the downtown,” Sta-
ton said. “I think we prob-
ably have the most vibrant
and busy downtown of any
small town in Dane County.
It’s a small downtown but
it’s very active and now also
very attractive.”
Mason’s: New to downtown
Continued from page 13
the long inactive rail line that’s joint-
ly owned by the Village of Oregon
and the City of Fitchburg. Trains have
not run on that section of track since
1997, Below said.
Wisconsin and Southern Railroad
is in the process of improving the line
from McCoy Road to West Nether-
wood Road in Oregon. Lycon plans to
use the rails only as far south as Neth-
erwood Road.
The rail cars will carry aggregate to
the Lycon plant to make concrete.
“Lycon can’t technically open the
plant until the line is open,” village
administrator Mike Gracz said. “The
railroad company is going to go to the
necessary commission meeting – the
Wisconsin River Rail Transit Com-
mission – in November, so it’s prob-
ably going to be the end of November
or sometime in December until the
line is technically activated.”
Trachte Inc.
Trachte Inc. is on the move and
adding jobs to its Oregon-based oper-
ations after suffering a recession-driv-
en slowdown that resulted in some
furloughs and layoffs less than four
years ago. The company’s core busi-
ness – modular assembly of prefabri-
cated buildings, mostly for the electri-
cal energy market – is back on track
and doing well, said Randy Trachte,
who owns the company along with his
brother, Ron.
“The part of our business that’s
going to the energy sector has been
very stable and trending up,” he told
the Observer.
The company developed a new
product line that is now being man-
ufactured at its Burr Oak Avenue
site. The need to use the Burr Oak
facility for the new production line
caused Trachte Inc. to build the
32,000-square-foot addition to its
Braun Road facility in the business
park.
“We were doi ng our modul ar
assemblies there (on N. Burr Oak) as
well as up on Braun Road, so this new
expansion on Braun Road allows us
to move all our modular assembly up
to Braun Road,” Randy Trachte said.
“That will open up 422 Burr Oak for
T-RAMS.”
The new product line, T-RAMS (an
acronym for Trachte Rapid Assembly
Modular Shelters), is an innovation
that “opens up a whole new market
for us,” Trachte said.
“We panelize one of our modular
buildings,” he explained. “Instead of
putting it together as a modular build-
ing, we send it out in pieces. Wall
sections are panelized and it allows
the product to go into shipping con-
tainers.”
Demand for the new product creat-
ed eight new jobs at Trachte Inc. early
this year, and Randy Trachte said the
company expected to add another 15
to 20 positions this year or next.
In addition to the T-RAM produc-
tion, the company started building
very large structures at its Braun Road
assembly site this year. They are so
large – 30-foot wide by 120-foot long –
that they have to be constructed outside
under a canopy on the concrete assem-
bly pads that Trachte built this year.
With close to 130 employees,
Trachte is one of the village’s largest
private employers.
Truck repair facility
About two weeks ago, Marty Ver-
helst told the Village Board he wants
to construct a 15,000-square-foot
building to be used as a truck repair
business on three acres in the busi-
ness park, with five to seven full-time
employees.
The building would be located on a
parcel near the intersection of West
Netherwood Road and Cusick Park-
way at the south entrance of the busi-
ness park.
Verhelst requested $100,000 of
tax incremental financing assistance
from the village to buy the land and
estimates he would invest $100,000
of his own money to improve the par-
cel and install a “crane infrastructure”
in the building. He would also use a
bank loan of $750,000 for the project.
He made an offer to buy the land
from Lycon Inc. and said the compa-
ny has until Oct. 31 to respond.
If he can reach an agreement with
Lycon, as well as with the village for
TIF assistance, Verhelst would begin
building next spring and start operat-
ing his estimated $1 million facility
by the fall.
Photos by Victoria Vlisides
Construction workers do
electrical work (above) on
Lycon’s outside and weld-
ing (left) on its interior
Thursday afternoon.
A redesign
of the
Jefferson
Street
parking
lot behind
the row
of South
Main
Street
busi-
nesses
is nearly
finished.
Photo by
Jim Ferolie
Alpine: Gaining momentum with new projects
Continued from page 12

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October 31, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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150 Places to Go
20TH ANNIVERSARY SALE! Storewide
Savings! WoodworkersDepot.com. M-F,
8-6, Sat. 8-4. Oneida St. off 41, right @
Subway, 2965 Ramada Way, Green Bay
800-891-9003 (wcan)
GUN SHOW NOV 1,2,3 Players Choice
Sports & Expo- Hwy JJ, Appleton Fri 3-8,
Sat 9-5, Sun 9-3. Adm. $6. 14 & under
free. 608-752-6677, www.bobandrocco.
co (wcan)
163 traiNiNG schools
DENTAL ASSISTANT Be one in just 10
Saturdays! WeekendDentalAssistant.
com Fan us on Facebook! Next class
begins 1/4/2014. Call 920-730-1112
Appleton (Reg. WI EAB) (wcan)
340 autos
2010 DODGE CHALLENGER, Black
with custom interior, 14,000 miles.
Automatic, Sirius radio. Asking
$19,000. Call 608-848-8295
2012 VW Jetta SE w/convenience pack-
age. Platinum Gray. Automatic. FWD.
8700 miles. Perfect condition. Asking
$15,000 Mike 608-212-1556
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Oregon Observer unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 845-
9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
342 Boats & accessories
SHOREMASTER DOCK & Lift Head-
quarters! New & Used. We do it all.
Delivery/Assembly/Install & Removals.
American Marine & Motorsports, Scha-
wano = SAVE 866-955-2628 (wcan)
355 recreatioNal Vehicles
4 MILLION Liquidation! 200 Pontoons &
Fiberglass must go! Buy it, Trade it, Store
it for FREE! Pay later! This sale will not
last! Finance 866-955-2628. american-
marine.com (wcan)
ATVS SCOOTERS & Go-Karts. Youth
ATV's & Scooters (80mpg) @ $49/mo.
Sport & 4x4 Atv's @ $69/mo. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports, Schawano
=Save= 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan)
DANE COUNTY’S MARKETPLACE.
The Oregon Observer Classifieds. Call
845-9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
360 trailers
TRAILERS @ LIQUIDATION Pricing.
Boat, ATV, Sled or Pontoons. 2 or 4
Place/Open or Enclosed. American
Marine, Shawano 866-955-2628 www.
americanmarina.com (wcan)
CLASSIFIEDS, 845-9559, 873-6671 or
835-6677. It pays to read the fine print.
402 helP WaNted, GeNeral
DEER VALLEY LODGE
Hiring Lifeguards
Weekends - Good Pay
Flexible scheduling
608-924-1600
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Oregon Observer unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 845-
9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
SIENNA MEADOWS- OREGON,
has immediate job opportunities
to join our compassionate Care
Specialist Team. We offer competitive
wages designed to attract and retain
quality staff. Various shifts available
both full and part time. Preferred
candidate will have a C.N.A. and all
state mandated courses completed.
Go to www.siennacrest.com to print
an
application today! Turn in your
completed application to :
Sienna Meadows, Chris Kiesz,
Manager 989 Park St, Oregon, WI
53575 608-835-0000 E.O.E.
TINA'S HOME CLEANING
Hiring personnel for residential
cleaning position. Days only. Become
a part of our growing Team!
Call 608-835-0339
tinashomecleaning@gmail.com
508 child care & Nurseries
BROWN DEER Family Daycare Stough-
ton / Pleasant Springs Licensed Fam-
ily Childcare 23 yrs. experience. Full &
Part Time Openings Available. $160p/
week. Music Program - Indoor Slide.
608-873-0711. Location - Experience
- References. On our website at: www.
browndeerdaycare.com
516 cleaNiNG serVices
CLEANING SERVICES Weekly, Bi-
weekly or Monthly will also organize with
great references. 608-774-3170
HOUSE CLEANING
Honest, Reliable, 20 years
Experience! Call Leslie
608-845-8646
HOUSE CLEANING
Quality Work
Free Estimates
Satisfaction Guaranteed
608-233-1137
THEY SAY people don’t read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didn’t you?
Call now to place your ad, 845-9559,
873-6671 or 835-6677.
548 home imProVemeNt
A&B ENTERPRISES
Light Construction/Remodeling
No job too small
608-835-7791
ALL THINGS BASEMENTY! Basement
Systems Inc. Call us for all your base-
ment needs! Waterproofing? Finishing?
Structural Repairs? Humidity and Mold
Control? Free Estimates! Call 888-929-
8307 (wcan)
HALLINAN-PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
**Great-Fall-Rates**
30 + Years Professional
European-Craftsmanship
Free-Estimates
References/Insured
Arthur Hallinan
608-455-3377
NIELSEN'S
Home Improvements/
Repairs, LLC
Kitchens/Bathrooms
Wood & Tile Flooring
Decks/Clean Eaves
*Free Estimates* Insured*
*Senior Discounts*
Home 608-873-8716
Cell 608-576-7126
e-mail zipnputts@sbcglobal.net

TOMAS PAINTING
Professional, Interior,
Exterior, Repairs.
Free Estimates. Insured.
608-873-6160
550 iNsuraNce
SAVE ON AUTO INSURANCE from the
major names you know and trust. No
forms. No hassle. No obligation. Call
Ready for my QUOTE now! Call
888-708-0274 (wcan)
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Oregon Observer unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 845-
9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
554 laNdscaPiNG, laWN,
tree & GardeN Work
SNOWMARE ENTERPRISES
Property Maintenance
Snow Removal
608-219-1214
560 ProfessioNal serVices
AIR CONDITIONER SALES, Service and
Installation. All pros are pre-screened
and relentlessly reviewed! Call now for
a no obligation estimate. 800-807-8559
(wcan)
APPLIANCE REPAIR
We fix it no matter where
you bought it from!
800-624-0719 (wcan)
BOOKKEEPING SERVICE
Payroll - Receivables - Payables
Inventory - Sales Tax
15 years using Quickbooks.
Reasonable.
608-692-1899
MULTIPLE HOME Window replacement
or installation. All pros are pre-screened
and relentlessly reviewed. Call now for
a no obligation estimate. 800-871-1093
(wcan)
MY COMPUTER WORKS - Computer
Problems? Viruses, Spyware, Email,
Printer Issues, Bad Internet Connec-
tions - FIX IT NOW! Professional, US
based technicians. $25 off service. Call
for immediate help. 888-885-7944 (wcan)
ONE CALL Does it All!
Fast and Reliable Electrical Repair
and Installations.
Call 800-757-0383 (wcan)
ONE CALL Does it All!
Fast and Reliable Plumbing Repairs
Call 800-981-0336 (wcan)
RECOVER PAINTING Currently offering
winter discounts on all painting, drywall
and carpentry. Recover urges you to join
in the fight against cancer, as a portion of
every job is donated to cancer research.
Free estimates, fully insured, over 20
years of experience. Call 608-270-0440.
Bill Newton, Ron Outhouse
835-5201 or 835-5970
We recommend septic
pumping every two years
B & R
PUMPING SERVICE
U
N
3
0
5
8
7
7
U
N
3
0
4
7
3
2
• Driveways
• Floors
• Patios
• Sidewalks
• Decorative Concrete
Phil Mountford 516-4130 (cell)
835-5129 (office)
Al Mittelstaedt 845-6960
U
N
3
1
1
0
6
6
PAR Concrete, Inc.
Increase Your sales opportunities…
reach over 1.2 million households!
Advertise in our
Wisconsin Advertising Network System.
For information call 845-9559 or 873-6671.
AUCTIONS
COMMERCIAL INCOME PRODUCING REAL ESTATE
AUCTION November 9th 10am Building Location:
211 W. High St., Orangeville, IL Building includes 4
residential apartments and 2 commercial tenants!
Details: 815-218-0705 www.advancedauction.com
(CNOW)
HELP WANTED- TRUCK DRIVER
OTR Drivers Needed Above Avg. Mileage Pay. Avg.
2500-3500 Miles/WK 100% No Touch. Full Benefts
W/401K. 12 Months CDL/A Experience 1-888-545-
9351 Ext 13 www.doublejtransport.com (CNOW)
Knight Refrigerated CDL-A Truck Drivers Needed. Get
Paid Daily or Weekly. Consistent Miles. Pay Incentive &
Benefts! Become a Knight of the Road. EOE. 855-876-
6079 (CNOW)
Gordon Trucking- A better Carrier. A better Career.
CDL-A Truck Drivers Needed. Up to $5,000 Sign-on
Bonus! Starting Pay Up to $.44 cpm. Full Benefts,
Excellent Hometime, No East Coast. EOE Call 7 days/
wk! GordonTrucking.com 866-565-0569 (CNOW)
Regional Runs Available- CHOOSE the TOTAL
PACKAGE f: Regular, Frequent HOME TIME; TOP PAY
BENEFITS, Mthly BONUSES, Automatic DETENTION
PAY & more! CDL-A, 6 mos. Exp. Req’d. EEOE/AAP
866-322-4039 www.drive4marten.com (CNOW)
Holtger Bros., INC. Utility Contractor, has Immediate
Opportunities in Telephone Industry. Foremen, CDL
Laborers, Cable Plow/Bore Rig Operators, Ariel Techs.
Training Offered. Travel required for All positions. Call:
920-664-6300 hbicareers@holtger.com www.holtger.
com EOE by AA (CNOW)
Drivers: Class A CDL Tractor/Trailer Daycab Drivers
Wanted. Competitive Pay, Frequent Home Time. JOIN
THE DEBOER trans TEAM NOW! 800-825-8511 www.
drivedeboer.com (CNOW)
MISCELLANEOUS
THIS SPOT FOR SALE! Place a 25 word classifed ad
in 180 newspapers in Wisconsin for $300. Call 800-227-
7636 or this newspaper. Www.cnaads.com (CNOW)
REAL ESTATE
Central Wisconsin, Charming, century old country
dream home! Log barn. Young orchard. 6 beautifully
wooded acres. Affordable. Twice reduced, $199,900.
Terms possible. 608-564-2625. Let’s visit. (CNOW)
SPORTING GOODS
New Lisbon Sports Club Gun Show November 15-16
Fri 3pm-8pm, Sat 9am-6pm. New Lisbon Community
Center. HWY 80 Exit-61 190/94. Guns, fshing, knives.
Browse/Lunch Dennis 608-562-3808. (CNOW)
Legals
Notice
PLeASe tAKe Notice tHAt tHe
ViLLAGe oF oReGoN PLAN coMMiS-
SioN WiLL HoLD A PUBLic HeARiNG
ReGARDiNG oRDiNANce No. 13.04,
AN oRDiNANce to RePeAL cHAPteR
19, RePeAL AND RecReAte cHAP-
teR 20, AND RePeAL AND RecReAte
SectioNS 17-522 AND 17-913 oF tHe
ViLLAGe oF oReGoN coDe oF oR-
DiNANceS, ReLAtiNG to HiStoRic
PReSeRVAtioN AND PRoPeRtY MAiN-
teNANce StANDARDS. tHe PUBLic
HeARiNG WiLL tAKe PLAce oN No-
VeMBeR 7, 2013, BeGiNNiNG At oR
SHoRtLY AFteR 6:30 P.M., AND WiLL
Be HeLD iN tHe BoARD RooM oN tHe
FiRSt FLooR oF tHe ViLLAGe HALL,
117 SPRiNG StReet, ViLLAGe oF oR-
eGoN, WiScoNSiN.
Peggy Haag
Village clerk
Published: october 24 and 31, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
Notice oF PUBLic HeARiNG
oN tHe ReZoNiNG ReQUeSt
FoR A PoRtioN oF Lot
496 oF tHe BeRGAMoNt,
FRoM PB PLANNeD
BUSiNeSS to tR-6 tWo-
FAMiLY ReSiDeNtiAL & A
PoRtioN oF Lot 496 & A
PoRtioN oF Lot 497 oF
tHe BeRGAMoNt FRoM PB
PLANNeD BUSiNeSS to MR-8
MULti-FAMiLY ReSiDeNtiAL
ViLLAGe oF oReGoN
PLeASe tAKe Notice that the
Planning commission of the Village of
oregon will hold a public hearing at 6:30
p.m. on tHURSDAY, November 7, 2013 in
the Board Room of the oregon Village
Hall, 117 Spring Street, oregon, Wiscon-
sin, to consider the rezone application
of the Bergamont Real estate Holding
company LLc, owner of the property of
a portion of Lot 496 of the Bergamont
oregon, Wisconsin, from PB Planned
Business to tR-6 two-Family Residential
and a portion of Lots 496 and 497 of the
Bergamont, oregon, Wisconsin, from PB
Planned Business to MR-8 Multi-Family
Residential pursuant to Section 17.105(2)
(f) and (g) of the Village code, described
as:
Lots 496 (165/0509-112-2316-1) and
497 (165/0509-112-2327-1) of the Ber-
gamont, Village of oregon, Dane county
A map of the area requested to be re-
zoned is on fle at the offce of the Village
Clerk. Offce hours of the Clerk are 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.
Subsequent to the hearing, the com-
mission intends to deliberate and act
upon the request.
Peggy S.K. Haag
Village clerk
Published: october 24 and 31, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
RUtLAND PLANNiNG
coMMiSSioN
NoVeMBeR 4, 2013
6:30 P.M.
Agenda:
1. call meeting to order.
2. Roll call.
3. Approval of September meeting
minutes.
4. Appearance by representatives of
the Barbara Banks (former clarice every)
property regarding potential splits.
5. Discussion and necessary action
on Dane county ordinance Amendments
17 and 18 regarding changes to the co-1
conservancy District and establishing
the A-B transitional Agriculture-Busi-
ness District.
6. Discussion/update/necessary ac-
tion on items from previous meetings:
* town of Rutland comprehensive
Plan.
* Hwy 138/14 Park’n’Ride and impact
on comprehensive plan.
* Update on north and south end ter-
minations of new Hwy 14.
8. Adjournment.
Dawn George, clerk
Published: october 31, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
RUtLAND toWN BoARD
MeetiNG
NoVeMBeR 5, 2013
AGeNDA:
1. Appearance by Dane co. Sheriff
Dept. representative.
2. constable Report.
3. Racetrack matters: monthly re-
port, schedule changes (if necessary),
and discussion and necessary action on
racetrack deed restriction document.
4. operator’s License application for
Ronda Wethal.
5. Rutland church and cemetery
matters.
* Update on landscaping and grave
platting with action as necessary.
6. Discussion regarding Alliant work
along old Stone Rd.
7. Planning commission report.
8. consent Agenda:
* Minutes october 1, 7, 23 and 24
meetings.
* treasurer’s Report.
* Vouchers and checks.
9. correspondence.
10. consideration of adoption of
oregon Fire and Senior citizen Budgets.
11. consideration of adoption of
Brooklyn Fire and eMS budgets.
12. Receive and take necessary ac-
tion on fnal audit report.
13. Flood plain update as necessary.
14. FUDA update.
15. Land Rental issues.
16. Road issues.
17. Further discussion and action as
necessary on Design engineers RFPs.
18. Further work on 2014 budget re-
garding wages.
19. Adjournment.
Dawn George, clerk
Published: october 31, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
AGeNDA
oReGoN toWN BoARD
tUeSDAY, NoVeMBeR 5, 2013
6:30 P.M. (PLeASe Note tiMe
cHANGe)
oReGoN toWN HALL
1138 UNioN RoAD
oReGoN, Wi 53575
6:30 P.M. BoARD MeetiNG
1. call town Board meeting to order.
2. Reading and Approval of minutes
from previous meeting.
3. Financial Report and Acceptance.
4. Appearance of Bill Buglass from
Payne & Dolan.
5. Public comments.
6. Presentation of eagle Scout proj-
ects.
7. Discussion and possible Action
re: the Anderson Farm Park progress.
8. communication and Action of the
Dane county Board – Bollig
9. Fire & eMS Report (oregon – Van
Kampen, Belleville – clark & Brooklyn).
10. Discussion and possible Approv-
al re: Fire & eMS budgets.
11. Park committee Report and Ac-
tion – Root.
12. Discussion and possible Action
re: using impact fees for equipment at
Della Park.
13. Discussion and possible Action
re: funding of oregon to Badger State
bike path.
14. Assessor’s Report and Recom-
mendation – Blomstrom.
15. Building inspection Services Re-
port – Arnold.
16. constable’s Report – Wackett.
17. Plan commission Report and
Recommendation - Weber.
18. Public Works and toRc Report
– Ace.
19. Discussion and possible Action
re: participation in joint municipal road
bid.
20. Discussion and possible Action
re: purchase of a road grader.
21. Discussion and possible Action
re: fberglass poles in lawns.
22. Discussion and possible Action
re: hourly pay rate of relief snowplow
drivers.
23. Discussion and possible Action
re: Potential impacts of the state’s 2012-
13 Budget Bill.
24. Discussion and possible Action
re: Senior center – Van Kampen.
25. Discussion and possible Approv-
al re: 2014 senior center budget.
26. Board communications/ Future
Agenda items.
27. Set date for Budget Hearing.
28. Approval of payment vouchers
– Arnold.
29. clerk’s Report – Arnold.
30. Adjournment.
Note: Agendas are subject to amend-
ment after publication. Check the offcial
posting locations (town Hall, town of
oregon Recycling center and oregon
Village Hall) including the town website
at www.town.oregon.wi.us or join the
town’s e-mail list to receive agendas at
townoforegon@mailbag.com. it is possi-
ble that members of and possibly a quo-
rum of members of other governmental
bodies of the town may be in attendance
at any of the meetings to gather informa-
tion; however, no action will be taken by
any governmental body at said meeting
other than the governmental body spe-
cifcally referred to in the meeting notice.
Requests from persons with disabilities
who need assistance to participate in
this meeting or hearing should be made
to the Clerk’s offce at 835-3200 with 48
hours notice.
Posted: october 29, 2013
Published: october 31, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
toWN oF RUtLAND
BUDGet HeARiNG &
toWN MeetiNG & BoARD MeetiNG Notice
tUeSDAY, NoVeMBeR 20, 2013 - 6:30 P.M.
Notice is hereby given that on tuesday, November 20, 2013, at 6:30 p.m. at the Rutland town Hall, a PUBLic HeARiNG will
be held to review the proposed 2014 budget. the detailed proposed budget is available for inspection by contacting the clerk
at 455-3925.
A Special town Meeting will be held immediately following the public hearing for the purpose of adopting the 2014 levy,
and authorizing highway expenditures in excess of $10,000 pursuant to 80.01(3), Wis. Stats., Question and Answer Period and
discussion about proposed town hall.
the town Board will meet immediately following the Budget Hearing and Special town Meeting to adopt the budget.
SUMMARY oF PRoPoSeD 2014 BUDGet
2013 BUDGet 2014 BUDGet % change cHANGe
ReVeNUeS
General Property taxes $644,474.00 $680,779.00 $36,305.00
other taxes & General charges $201.00 $190.00 $-11.00
intergovernmental Revenues $146,401.00 $147,848.00 $1,447.00
Licenses & Permits $26,625.00 $28,700.00 $2,075.00
Public charges for Services $20,569.00 $20,575.00 $6.00
interest & Misc. Revenues* $64,723.00 $186,045.00 $121,322.00
total Revenues $902,993.00 $1,064,137.00 17.85% $161,144.00
eXPeNDitUReS
Reserve Accounts $41,500.00 $41,500.00 $0.00
General Government $155,717.00 $155,080.70 -$636.30
Public Safety $160,977.00 $173,194.25 $12,217.25
Public Works $491,739.00 $534,734.10 $42,995.10
Health & Human Services $32,171.00 $39,860.00 $7,689.00
Debt Service/capital Purchases $20,889.00 $119,767.95 $98,878.95
total expenses $902,993.00 $1,064,137.00 17.85% $161,144.00
*includes projected carryover
cash Balance January 1
(Advance tax Roll collections excluded)
Reserve Accounts $443,136.00 $485,719.16
Unreserved Accounts $169,402.00 $254,527.30
total cash Balance January 1 $612,538.00 $740,246.46 20.85%
tAX LeVY $644,474.00 $680,779.00 5.63% $36,305.00
total Anticipated expenditures $902,993.00 $1,064,137.00
Less total Anticipated Revenues $258,519.00 $383,358.00
Amount Required for Levy $644,474.00 $680,779.00 5.63%
town Mill Rate $2.66 $2.79 4.89% $0.13
Dawn George, clerk
Published: october 31, 2013
WNAXLP
October 31, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
19
572 sNoW remoVal
PLOWING, BLOWING, Residential and
commercial. 608-873-7038
SNOW REMOVAL sidewalks and drive-
ways Stoughton area. Free estimates.
608-438-6512
586 tV, Vcr &
electroNics rePair
REDUCE YOUR Cable Bill! Get whole-
home Satellite system installed at NO
COST and programming starting at
$19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade to
new callers, so call now. 888-544-0273
wcan
606 articles for sale
20+ MID SIZED Moving Boxes from Two
Men and a Truck. Call to make an offer.
608-873-6671 or 608-213-4818
3 CUBIC Foot FRIGIDAIRE Freezer.
Purchased new in 2002. White.
$80. OBO 608-669-2243.
FOOSBALL TABLE - hardly used & in
great condition $75.00. Bar with 2 stools,
top has removable glass shelf & inside
has 4 glass shelves, this was used out-
side for 1 summer $65.00 Call 873-8106
638 coNstructioN &
iNdustrial equiPmeNt
FARMI 3PT Logging Winch's,
Valby 3pt PTO Chippers, New 3pt
Rototillers, Loader Attachments and 3pt
Attachments, New Log Splitters. www.
threeriversforestry.com
(866) 638-7885 (wcan)
646 firePlaces,
furNaces/Wood, fuel
ANTHROCITE COAL in 50 lb bags.
Clean burning. 4 sizes available. Prices
starting at $10.50 per bag. 920-838-2200
(wcan)
SEASONED SPLIT OAK, Hardwood.
Volume discount. Will deliver. 608-
609-1181
648 food & driNk
ENJOY 100%GUARANTEED, delivered
to the door Omaha Steaks! SAVE 74%
plus 4 FREE burgers - The Family Value
Combo - ONLY $39.99. ORDER today.
888-676-2750 Use Code 48643XMT or
www.OmahaSteaks.com/mbff79 (wcan)
SHARI'S BERRIES: ORDER mouthwa-
tering gifts! 100% satisfaction guaran-
teed. Fresh-dipped berries from $19.99
+ plus s/h. Save 20% on qualifying gifts
over $29! Call 888-479-6008 or visit
www.berries.com/happy (wcan)
652 GaraGe sales
STOUGHTON- 1911 Koshkonong (West-
Koshkonong-Church) 11/2 10am-5pm.
Household, family, items for everyone
666 medical & health suPPlies
ATTENTION SLEEP Apnea sufferers
with Medicare. Get FREE CPAP replace-
ment supplies at little or no cost. Plus
Free home delivery. Best of all, prevent
red skin sores & bacterial infection. 888-
797-4088 (wcan)
MEDICAL GUARDIAN Top-rated medi-
cal alarm and 24/7 monitoring. For a
limited time, get free equipment, no
activation fees, no commitment, a 2nd
waterproof alert button for free and more.
Only $29.95 per month. 877-863-6622
(WCAN)
SAFE STEP WALK-IN TUB Alert for
Seniors. Bathrooms falls can be fatal.
Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Thera-
peutic Jets. Less than 4 inch step-in.
Wide door. Anti-slip floors. American
made. Installation included. Call 888-
960-4522 for $750. off (wcan)
668 musical iNstrumeNts
AMP: LINE 6 Spider IV 75 watt guitar
amp. Tons of built in effects, tuner, and
recording options. Like new, rarely used,
less than 2 years old. Asking $250 OBO.
call 608-575-5984
GUITAR: FENDER American made
Standard Stratocaster guitar. Tobacco
burst finish, mint condition. Includes
tremelo bar, straplocks, and custom fit-
ted Fender hard-shell case. Asking $950
OBO. Call 608-575-5984
676 PlaNts & floWers
PROFLOWERS ENJOY SEND FLOW-
ERS for any occasion! Take 20% off
your order over $29! Go to www.Proflow-
ers.com/ActNow or call 877-592-7090
(wcan)
688 sPortiNG Goods
& recreatioNal
3 DAY Gun Show. Jansens Hall, 1245
Whitewater Ave (Hwy12&89) Fort
Atkinson. Nov 1 (3-8pm), Nov 2 (9-5),
Nov 3 (9-3pm). Info: 920-285-6908 or
262-443-2278
WE BUY Boats/RV/Pontoons/ATV's &
Motorcycles! "Cash Paid" NOW. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports Super Center,
Shawno. 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan).
690 WaNted
DONATE YOUR CAR-
FAST FREE TOWING
24 hr. Response - TaX Deduction
United Breast Cancer FOUNDATION
Providing Free Mammograms
& Breast Cancer Info.
866-343-6603 (wcan)
692 electroNics
DIRECTV OVER 140 channels only
$29.99 a month. Call now! Triple Sav-
ings. $636.00 in Savings, Free upgrade
to Genie & 2013 NFL Sunday ticket free!
Start saving today. 800-320-2429 (wcan)
DISH TV RETAILER. Starting at $19.99/
mo for 12 mos. High Speed Internet
starting at $14.95/month (where
available) Save! Ask about same day
installation! Call now -
800-374-3940 (WCAN)
SAVE ON CABLE TV, Internet, Digital
Phone, Satellite. You've Got A Choice!
Options from ALL major service provid-
ers. Call us to learn more! CALL Today.
888-714-5772 (wcan)
696 WaNted to Buy
TOP PRICES Any kind of scrap me
al Cars/Batteries/Farm Equipment Free
appliance pick-up Property Clean Out
Honest/Fully Insured/U Call-We Haul
608-444-5496
WE BUY Junk Cars and Trucks.
We sell used parts.
Monday thru Friday 8am-5:30pm.
Newville Auto Salvage, 279 Hwy 59
Edgerton, 608-884-3114.
705 reNtals
GREENWOOD APARTMENTS Apart-
ments for Seniors 55+, currently has 1
& 2 Bedroom Units available starting at
$695 per month, includes heat, water,
and sewer. 608-835-6717 Located at 139
Wolf St., Oregon, WI 53575
OREGON BERGAMONT Duplex. 3 BR,
2.5 Bath, 2 fireplaces, 2 car garage,
finished lower level, screened porch.
Available
December 1 $1600+ 608-212-0420
STOUGHTON- ONE-BEDROOM Appli-
ances included. Garage. No Pets- No
Smoking. Now Available 608-873-3432
720 aPartmeNts
ROSEWOOD APARTMENTS for Seniors
55+, has 1 & 2 bedroom units available
starting at $695 per month. Includes
heat, water and sewer. Professionally
managed. 608-877-9388 Located at 300
Silverado Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589
STOUGHTON 2BR $725. includes
heat, water/sewer. No dogs, 1 cat is Ok.
E.H.O. 608-222-1981 ext 2 or 3.
740 houses for reNt
HOLLANDALE COUNTRY Home on
working farmette. 3 bedroom, 2 bath
Laundry off kitchen. Approx. 1700
sq. ft, 2 car plus detached garage, all
appliances. Landowner plows driveway.
No animals, no smoking. 35 minutes to
Epic. Completely renovated: electrical,
plumbing, insulation. $1100. month Call
Cathy 608-967-2481.
OREGON 325 Pine Way. 2
Bedroom+den, 2 1/2 Baths, 2 Car
Garage, full basement, yard, shed and
deck. C/A, dishwasher, Jacuzzi tub and
more. $1295/month. www.apexrents.com
608-255-3753
STOUGHTON AREA: 2 bdrm, 2 bath-
rooms, 2 car attached garage, very com-
fortable one story home, fenced back
yard, shared riding lawn mower, very
nice quiet neighborhood in rural subdivi-
sion between Madison and Stoughton.
Pets welcome. $1,100. Call Brady 608-
286-5282
750 storaGe sPaces for reNt
ALL SEASONS SELF STORAGE
10X10 10X15 10X20 10X30
Security Lights-24/7 access
BRAND NEW
OREGON/BROOKLYN
Credit Cards Accepted
CALL (608)444-2900
C.N.R. STORAGE
Located behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Convenient Dry Secure
Lighted with access 24/7
Bank Cards Accepted
Off North Hwy 51 on
Oak Opening Dr. behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Call: 608-509-8904
DEER POINT STORAGE
Convenient location behind Stoughton
Lumber
Clean-Dry Units
24 HOUR LIGHTED ACCESS
5x10 thru 12x25
608-335-3337
FRENCHTOWN
SELF-STORAGE
Only 6 miles South of
Verona on Hwy PB.
Variety of sizes available now.
10x10=$50/month
10x15=$55/month
10x20=$70/month
10x25=$80/month
12x30=$105/month
Call 608-424-6530 or
1-888-878-4244
NORTH PARK STORAGE
10x10 through 10x40, plus
14x40 with 14' door for
RV & Boats.
Come & go as you please.
608-873-5088
RASCHEIN PROPERTY
STORAGE
6x10 thru 10x25
Market Street/Burr Oak Street
in Oregon
Call 608-206-2347
STORAGE INSIDE - RV - AUTO - BOAT
& PONTOON. @ very low prices. Pick-
up, Winterizing, Delivery. We Do It All!
American Marine, Schawano. 866-955-
2628. americanmarina.com (wcan)
UNION ROAD STORAGE
10x10 - 10x15
10x20 - 12x30
24 / 7 Access
Security Lights & Cameras
Credit Cards Accepted
608-835-0082
1128 Union Road
Oregon, WI
Located on the corner of
Union Road & Lincoln Road
VERONA SELF-STORAGE
502 Commerce Pkwy.
10 X 5 - 10 X 30
24/7 Access/Security lit.
Short/long term leases
608-334-1191
801 office sPace for reNt
OREGON OFFICE SPACE
500 sq ft, 2 room suite with signage.
120 Janesville St. Call 608-575-1128
STOUGHTON 209 E Main St.
Retail or Office space. 1000 sq ft.
Beautifully remodeled. $766. per month
utilities included.
608-271-0101
STOUGHTON 211 E Main St.
3400 sq. ft. Retail space plus 1800 sq.
ft. display or storage space. Beautifully
remodeled $1900/mo plus utilities. 608-
271-0101
STOUGHTON 307 S Forrest
Retail or Office space. 400 sq. ft. $299/
month utilities included.
608-271-0101
VERONA- OFFICE/WAREHOUSE
1000 Sq Ft.$500 +Utilities.
608-575-2211 or
608-845-2052
820 misc. iNVestmeNt
ProPerty for sale
FOR SALE BY OWNER: Near Copper
Harbor & Lake Medora, MI. 80 wooded
acres. $69,500 OBO. Montreal River
runs through land. CFR taxes. Terms
available. More land available 715-478-
2085 (wcan)
FOR SALE BY OWNER: Near Copper
Harbor & Lake Medora, MI. 80 wooded
acres. $69,500 OBO. Montreal River
runs through land. CFR taxes. Terms
available. More land available 715-478-
2085 (wcan)
883 WaNted:
resideNtial ProPerty
OREGON AREA DUPLEX.
Will pay cash. Call 608-835-0046.
970 horses
TIM NOLAN ARENA Horse Sale - Nov.
2, 2013. Tack 9am. Horses Noon. Reg.
Quarter & Paint Horses first, then all
breeds. Consignments start 11/01 from
9am-7pm, and on 11/02 at 9am. . NO
call in consignments. N11474 State Hwy
110, Marion, WI www.timnolanarena.com
(wcan)
WALMERS TACK SHOP
16379 W. Milbrandt Road
Evansville, WI
608-882-5725
THEY SAY people don’t read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didn’t you?
Call now to place your ad, 845-9559,
873-6671 or 835-6677.
990 farm: serVice
& merchaNdise
RENT SKIDLOADERS
MINI-EXCAVATORS
TELE-HANDLER
and these attachments. Concrete
breaker, posthole auger, landscape rake,
concrete bucket, pallet forks, trencher,
rock hound, broom, teleboom, stump
grinder.
By the day, week, or month.
Carter & Gruenewald Co.
4417 Hwy 92
Brooklyn, WI, 608-455-2411
905 auctioN sale dates
AUCTION - 1692 sq. ft. spec home to
be moved. Glenn & Suzanne Goessl,
Owners. Located at W5618 Jolly Ave,
Medford, WI. Saturday, Nov. 9 - 1:00pm.
Completely finished. Seller will help
move. Nolan Sales, LLC. Marion, WI
Reg WI
Auctioneer #165 & #142. www.
nolansales.com for details. (wcan)
ImmedIate OpenIngs!
CleanPower is looking for part-time
cleaners in Oregon. Work 6:00-9:15 p.m.
Mon.–Fri., $9.25 per hour.
apply online at
www.cleanpower1.com
or call (608) 242-1500, ext. 102
EOE/AA employer
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** DRIVERS **
FULL-TIME DRIVERS FOR REGIONAL WORK
$1,500 SIGN-ON BONUS
$750 GUARANTEE WKLY
Tractor-trailer drivers needed for the Walgreen’s Private
Fleet Operation based in Windsor, WI. Drivers make hand
deliveries to Walgreen’s stores within a regional area (WI,
IL, IA, MN, ND, SD). Workweek is Tues. ~ Sat. All drivers
must be willing & able to unload freight.
* Earn $21.25/hour (OT after 8 hours) or $0.4650/mile
*Full Beneft Pkg. includes Life, Dental, Disability &
Health Insurance with Prescription Card
*401kPensionProgramwithCompanyContribution
*PaidHolidays&Vacation
*Homeeverydayexceptforoccasionallayover
Driversmustbeover24yearsold,have18monthstractor
trailerexp.or6monthsT/Texp.withacertifcatefroman
accredited driving school & meet all DOT requirements.
Send resume to
b.kriel@callcpc.com
or call CPC Logistics at 1-800-914-3755
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Fabricators
Wolf Appliance, Inc., the premier provider of
quality appliances is seeking Fabricators to join
our 2nd and 3rd shift manufacturing teams at
our Fitchburg facility. We offer a clean, climate
controlled environment.
Compensation is up to $15.69 per hour, plus an
additional .40 cents for 2nd shift or an additional
.50 cents per hour for 3rd shift. Employees are
eligible for incentive pay up to $3.19/hr after 6
months. Benefts offered include: medical, dental,
and vision insurance, free life insurance, pension,
401k, holidays, vacation and personal days.
Qualifcation testing may be required. EOE.
Please apply online at
www.subzero-wolf.com
U
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University Housing is looking for experienced and
energetic individuals to join our Residence Hall
Facilities Custodian team. We are a fast-paced, dynamic
operation with emphasis on high quality standards
and excellent customer service with daily contact with
student residents.
The positions available are limited-term employment
for approximately 6 months.
$11.397 per hour
How to Apply: Complete University Housing application:
available at www.housing.wisc.edu/jobs/temp, or email
hr@housing.wisc.edu or call 608-262-2766 to obtain a
copy of application.
University Housing Human Resources
625 Babcock Drive
Madison, WI 53706-1213
Phone: 608-262-2766
Fax: 608-265-8724
hr@housing.wisc.edu
EOE/AAE
CUSTODIAN
1st, 2nd and 3rd SHIFTS
Limited Term Employment (LTE)
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www.qpsemployment.com
APPLY ONLINE TODAY AT:
Baraboo - Mauston - Richland Center
608-647-8840
608-487-9260
Sparta
WELDER - FORKLIFT
MACHINE OPERATOR
MAINTENANCE
www.qpsemployment.com
APPLY ONLINE TODAY AT:
Madison
608-819-4000
Monroe
608-325-4690
WELDER - FORKLIFT
MACHINE OPERATOR
MAINTENANCE
SELL IT
NOW…
in the
Classifieds!
835-6677 or
connectoregonwi.com
20
October 31, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
When You Need Immedi at e Care
Two Conveni ent Locat i ons
Stoughton Hospital Urgent Care
900 Ridge Street, Stoughton
(608)873-2264
6 a.m. - 11 p.m.
Daily, including weekends & holidays

Oregon Urgent Care
990 Janesville Street, Oregon
(608)835-5373
Saturday & Sunday
Noon - 10 p.m.

Effective Nov. 1, 2013
Additional Hours
Monday - Friday
5 p.m. - 10 p.m.
stoughtonhospital.com
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Make Christmas even more magical
for your little ones with a
Personalized
Letter from Santa
For Only
$
5
Each letter is customized, so order one for each child in the family. All letters are
printed on Holiday stationery and will be postmarked North Pole, Alaska.
Please fll out the form below (1 form per child) and send with your payment to:
Oregon Observer, Attn: Letters to Santa, 125 N. Main St., Oregon, WI 53575
Orders with payment must be received by Wednesday, November 27, 2013.
Letters will be mailed in time for Christmas.
Child’s First Name __________________________ Boy / Girl Age ________
Child’s Last Name _________________________________________________
Child’s Mailing Address ____________________________________________
City ________________________________________________________
State ____________________________ Zip _______________________
First Name of Sibling(s) (Please Specify Boy or Girl) _________________ Boy / Girl
________________________Boy / Girl _______________________ Boy / Girl
________________________Boy / Girl _______________________ Boy / Girl
Name & Type of Pet(s) _____________________________________________
Snack Child Leaves for Santa _______________________________________
Toy Child Wants __________________________________________________
Something child has accomplished during last year ______________________
________________________________________________________________
Letter Requested by (Name) ________________________________________
Relationship to Child ______________________________________________
Daytime Telephone ______________________________________________
125 N. Main St., Oregon, WI 53575
(608) 835-6677
learned his native Arabic.
He said English is taught
there because it’s used wide-
ly in business.
“Anyone in Lebanon from
old people to very young
people, everyone can speak
English,” he said.
Badran has been in the
country since Aug. 10, and
other than the weather, he’s
acclimated very quickly.
He said part of the reason is
because of the people he’s
met so far.
“I’ve heard Wisconsin
people are really nice, so I
knew it would be like this,”
he said. “Everything is so
clear and organized and so
strict, rules about everything,
and I kind of saw that com-
ing. But the weather, no, no.
I’m not adjusting.”
Growing up in the Middle
East, about an hour from
Lebanon’s capital of Beirut,
Badran said his experience
is quite different than what
many of his peers expect
when they talk to him about
home.
“Sometimes, they ask if
we have camels,” he said.
“No.”
And driving in Lebanon is
much worse than Oregon, he
said.
“It’s narrow streets, cra-
zy drivers,” Badran said.
“Sometimes we’re in the
car here and somebody
stops, and I’m like, ‘Why
are you stopped?’ and they
are checking either side.
I’m like, ‘Why, just go on
(laughs).’”
One of t he r eas ons
Badran’s transition has been
so smooth is his neighbor is
Gregerson, who is also 16.
“Our families are really
good friends, so a few weeks
before school started, we
spent a lot of time together,”
Gregerson said.
Like Badran, Gregerson
has also been to the ‘States
before.
“I was in New York,
Miami Key Lago and Key
West a few years ago,” he
said. “To swim with dolphins
was really cool, and the
Empire State Building was
really cool to see.”
Gregerson said he’s gotten
along very well with his host
family, who hit it off right
from the start.
“After I was in the car with
them for 10 minutes, it just
started to feel at home,” he
said. “I have a sister who is
one year older then me and
one sister who is three years
younger, which is nice. I have
to adjust. I had a brother back
home, so I was only used to
having a brother, but it’s fun
to have a sister, too.”
Helbach is the young-
est of the students at 14, and
her school experience is a
bit different. Growing up
near Frankfurt, she’s used
to a much larger school than
OHS.
“We have lots of buildings,
so between classes we have to
go out, where here you go in
at 8 o’clock and go out at 3:30
and you don’t even know
what the weather is like,” she
said.
Wisconsin: Beer
amateurs?
Scheller, 16, hails from a
suburb of Munich, the home
of Octoberfest or “Wiesn.”
While 16-year-olds can drink
beer in Germany, Scheller
has to abide by different rules
here. Which doesn’t mean he
doesn’t have an opinion on
how Americans handle their
“bier.”
“We went to New Glarus
for the Octoberfest, but of
course it was quite differ-
ent than the original one,” he
chuckled. “That is the price I
pay. I saw people having beer
in plastic bowls, and it’s sup-
posed to be in glasses.”
The Austrian, Steiner, has
(not surprisingly) been asked
if she’s from Down Under,
something she’s resigned to
getting used to.
“One guy said ‘Are you
from Austria or Australia?’”
Steiner said. “I said, ‘Austria.’
He said, ‘Oh, the one with the
kangaroo?’ ‘’No, we don’t
have kangaroos.’ It’s kind of
funny.”
When she’s not learning
new card games with her host
family, she’s kicking back
and enjoying that beacon of
American culture, “Duck
Dynasty.”
“I watch it at home, too.
It’s really nice,” Gregerson
chimed in said.
Muench, 16, wishes she
could drive a car in America
(it costs $2,000 for a driver’s
license in Germany), but
that’s against the rules of her
exchange program. So she’s
satisfied being a passenger
and traveling to Madison for a
variety of events.
“Madison is very beautiful,
but it’s very different from
Hamburg,” Muench said.
“For me, it’s very small here,
but it’s very clean.”
Jordaan, 19, spent last
semester at OHS and will
only be at the school for the
fall semester. Growing up
in the southern hemisphere,
she’s not used to Decembers
and Januaries being so cold.
“It snowed for six months,
which annoyed me.” she said.
Another change she’s less
than excited about is the cur-
few law in the U.S.
“We don’t have one
back home, it’s just kind of
relaxed,” Jordaan said. “No
one cares if you’re out until 3
in the morning.”
Osmanli, 17, said she was
advised to take it easy on the
heavy academics during her
time here.
“People in my organiza-
tion, said, ‘Don’t take AP
(advanced placement classes),
you don’t need it,” she said.
“You’re not coming here
to study. I’m trying to learn
subjects that will help my lan-
guage, not like studying biol-
ogy or chemistry in English.
I’m here to learn customs and
cultural traditions.”
Osmanli said she didn’t
anticipate people being as
friendly as they have been, as
her brother warned her after
doing an exchange program
in West Virginia.
“He said, ‘Don’t expect
everyone to talk to you, you
are in a new community, and
it’s a high school, there are
adult people and everyone
has their own character,’” she
said. “I didn’t see it, because
Wisconsin really has friendly
people, all the kids, teachers,
everyone.
“Maybe in some other
states people would reject you
because you’re from some
other country. Here, people
are different.”
Exchange: 8 exchange students from many countries having fun in Oregon
Continued from page 1
Scott De Laruelle photos
Foreign exchange students expanding their horizons at Oregon High School this semester are, from left: Hussein Badran (Lebanon),
Mathias Gregersen (Denmark), Therese Jordaan (South Africa), Sarah Muench (Germany), Sabina Osmanli (Azerbaijan) Bianca Helbach
(Germany), Sebastian Scheller (Germany) and Claudia Steiner (Austria).
Host an
exchange
student
If you’re thinking
about hosting a foreign
exchange student next
year, Oregon High
School counselor
Janell Schneider could
give you many reasons
why the experience
would be worthwhile
and “life-changing.”
“It’s such a pleasure
to be able to work
with the exchange
students,” she said.
“They bring so much
culture and diversity
to our school. Their
positive attitude and
energy is contagious.
I am so appreciative
of the Oregon families
that have opened their
door and heart to host
these students.”
Schneider said a boy
from Brazil needs a
family beginning in
January. For more
information on hosting
an exchange student,
call Schneider at
835-4370.
‘I’m here to learn
customs and
cultural traditions.’
Sabina Osmanli

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