China offers olive branch to ASEAN

Father & Son, USN Retired
The Life Stories of Quintin Ramil, Sr. & Jr.
Speaking Good English
Our Life and Times
I
suppose the King’s English has been changed, if not corrupted, in different ways
through the course of history. When we read books with different settings or time pe-
riods, the English spoken is sometimes different, depending on the setting or period
of the story.
October 18-24, 2013
Philippine
Radio
AM 1450
M-F 7-8 PM
The original and first Asian Journal in America
550 E. 8th St., Ste. 6, National City, San Diego County CA USA 91950 | Ph: 619.474.0588 | Fx: 619.474.0373 | Email: asianjournal@aol.com | www.asianjournalusa.com
PRST STD
U.S. Postage Paid
Permit No. 203
Chula Vista
CA 91910
San Diego’s first and only Asian Filipino weekly publication and a multi-award winning newspaper! Online+Digital+Print Editions to best serve you!
October 18-24, 2013
(Continued on page 17)
Ofelia Dirige Community Lifestyle
Use Your Home to
Stay at Home .. p 4
(Continued on page 14)
13 dead, millions without power
in wake of Typhoon Santi
(Continued on page 8)
14th Annual Asian
Film Fest .. p 11
(Continued on page 17)
Look for the Asian Journal
at these

outlets ...
(Continued on page 16)
Jeane Napoles’s ‘Money bath’ pic catches
tax man’s eye amid corruption scandal
World Bank chief urges US to
break fiscal impasse
Emergency
Preparedness .. p 6
by Quint Ramil, Jr.
Chapter 6:
The Teenage Years
OCEANSIDE
1) Mission Kabayan Oriental
Market, 3753 Mission Ave,
#122, Oceanside
2) Mission Market & Restau-
rant, Mission Ave, Oceanside
3) Lisa’s Seafood Market,
Mission Ave, Oceanside
4) Mission Seafood, Mission
Ave, Oceasnside
SAN MARCOS
1) Filipino Depot, 1001 W.
San Marcos Blvd, #135, San
Marcos
2) Phil-Asian Market, 853 W.
San Marcos Blvd, San Marcos
3) Manila Harbor Restaurant,
W. San Marcos Blvd,
San Marcos
ESCONDIDO
1) K-k Orient Valley Market,
Broadway, Escondido
POWAY
1) Lumpia House, Twin Peaks
Ave, Poway
PENASQUITOS
1) Orient Valley Filipino Cui-
sine, 9951 Carmel Valley Rd,
San Diego
2) Ardel Bakery, Carmel
Valley Rd, San Diego
MIRA MESA
1) R & B Filipino Cuisine,
11257 Camino Ruiz, Mira Mesa
2) Hope Adult Health Day
Care, Camino Ruiz, Mira Mesa
3) Tiki Water Store,
Camino Ruiz, Mira Mesa
4) Mabuhay/Dax Travel,
10550 Camino Ruiz, Mira Mesa
5) Manila Fastfood Deli, Mira
Mesa Blvd, San Diego
6) PNB Mira Mesa,
Mira Mesa Blvd, San Diego
7) Postal Etc. USA, 9011 Mira
Mesa Blvd, San Diego
KEARNY MESA
1) 99 Ranch Supermarket,
Clairemont Mesa Blvd, San
Diego
2) VIP Restaurant, Claire-
mont Mesa Blvd, San Diego
3) EAST BUFFET, Miramar Rd,
San Diego
LA MESA
1) Hillex Center Water Store,
University Avenue, La Mesa
2) Fredcel Filipino Food,
University Ave, La Mesa
SPRING VALLEY
1) Kababayan Bakery &
Restaurant, 84236 Paradise
Rd., Spring Valley
PARADISE VALLEY
1) Reo Barbershop,
2323 Reo Drive, Paradise Hills
BONITA
1) Bonita Public Library,
Bonita Rd & Otay Lakes Rd
CHULA VISTA/EASTLAKE
1) Lisa’s Filipino Cuisine, 2260
Otay Lakes Rd, Chula Vista
2) Jochi’s Filipino Food,
Orange Ave, Chula Vista
3) Water Store, Palm Ridge
Plaza
4) Zambales Restaurant,
Palm Ave, San Diego
5) Dona’s Restaurant, 1830
Coronado Ave., San Diego
6) Saldana Dental, 665 H St,
Suite E, Chula Vista
NATIONAL CITY
1) Lisa’ Filipino Cuisine,
1210 E. Plaza Blvd, # 410,
National City
2) Bread De Luxe, 1420 E.
Plaza Blvd #D1, National City
3) Zion Salon & Barber, 1430
E. Plaza Blvd E-15, National
City
4) Filipino Dessert Plus,
E. Plaza Blvd, National City
5) Normy’s Hair Styling
Salon, 3400 E. 8th St,
National City
6) Conching’s Café/Res-
taurant, 3400 E. 8th Street,
National City
7) Alfonso Dental Care,
2340 E. 8th Street, Suite H,
National City
and more.....
additional neighborhood
Get your copy of the Asian Journal
PRINT Edition at these following outlets
nearest you (PARTIAL LIST ONLY)
Prince of Pop
Erik Santos @
Rancho Del Rey
Middle School
A photograph posted on social media sites by Jeane Lim-Napoles, the daughter of Manila business-
woman, Janet Lim-Napoles, show an extravagance that has attracted the eye of the tax man.
by Airea Calica, Philstar.
com | BANDAR SERI BE-
GAWAN, 10/10/2013 –
China offered an olive branch
yesterday to Southeast Asian
nations wary of its territorial
claims, displaying its growing
infuence at another summit
notable for US President Ba-
rack Obama’s absence.
Premier Li Keqiang called
for peace in the South China
Sea and expanded Chinese
trade with the 10-member As-
sociation of Southeast Asian
Nations (ASEAN) as he met
the bloc’s leaders in the oil-
fush sultanate of Brunei.
“A peaceful South China
Sea is a blessing for all. We
need to work together to make
the South China Sea a sea of
peace, friendship and coop-
eration,” Li said.
Li took the baton from
President Xi Jinping, who
underlined Chinese power by
occupying center stage earlier
this week at an Asia-Pacifc
summit in Bali while Obama
was stuck at home due to the
US government shutdown.
China asserts sovereignty
over most of the South China
Sea, including waters near the
coasts of its neighbors.
The Philippines, Vietnam,
Malaysia and Brunei -- all
ASEAN members -- have
competing claims to parts of
the sea, and Manila and Hanoi
have in recent years repeat-
edly accused China of becom-
ing more aggressive in the
dispute.
Abide by sea code – Noy
Also yesterday, President
Aquino took a diplomatic tack
and called on countries in-
volved in the dispute to abide
by the 2002 Declaration on
the Conduct of Parties (DOC)
in the South China Sea.
The DOC provides for the
exercise of restraint and de-
sisting from occupying areas
with conficting claims.
Without mentioning Pa-
natag Shoal, Ayungin Shoal
and even Mischief Reef that
China had already occupied,
Aquino called the attention of
countries to the provisions of
the DOC that China agreed to
(Continued on page 2)
Daily Telegraph,
10/10/2013 -- A YOUNG
Philippine woman who posted
pictures online of her lavish
life including one showing
her bathing in money is to be
charged with tax evasion.
By Simeon G. Silverio, Jr.

Recently, I wrote an article en-
titled “The Pinoy and his Carabao
English.” In the article, I noted that
the policemen in Makati, Philip-
pines, are now required to take a
refresher course in the English lan-
guage since they encounter a lot of
international tourists, businessmen
and diplomats in that premier city in
Metro Manila.

I wrote that the English language
was introduced by the Thomasites,
named after the ship Thomas, that
brought this group of American
teachers to the Philippines in the
early part of the American occupa-
tion at the turn of the twentieth cen-
tury. These teachers were so good
and strict that they produced the best
Filipino writers in English during
the period.

Even then, many Filipinos fnd it
hard to perfect their English lan-
guage skills because they must frst
think in their native dialect and then translate their thoughts into English as they speak or
write. Nonetheless, to the credit of their teachers, almost everyone blossomed into good
English speakers, if not writers because the language was the medium of instruction in
both the public and private schools until Filipino was used for teaching as well.

Thus, I theorized that Filipinos who migrate to the United States, Australia, Canada or Great Britain could easily
I learned to drive a jeep at
an early age because my uncle
and auntie were engaged in
the buy and sell business.
You can say they had a route
that started from Blumentritt
to La Mesa Dam. Yes this is
the same dam that my dad
helped build. Every day the
two of them would drive to
Blumentritt to buy grocer-
ies which included meat and
vegetables and different
ingredients. The jeep
would be packed at
the start and as they
proceeded towards
Novaliches their
customers along
the way would just
gather around them
at their designated
stops. By the time
what she was so good at doing
and that is to peddle the rest
of her goodies to her waiting
customers or “suki”. Eddie
they reached our place, they
would be about 90% sold
out. This is when Eddie and
I would take over the driving
as my uncle would rest and
fnish the required paperwork.
My aunt would remain doing
Philstar.com | WASHING-
TON (Xinhua) 10/13/2013
- World Bank President Jim
Yong Kim on Saturday urged
US policymakers to end the
ongoing fscal deadlock in a
timely manner to avoid nega-
tive spillovers on the global
economy.
"We are now fve days
away from a very dangerous
moment. I urge US policy-
makers to quickly come to a
resolution before they reach
the debt ceiling deadline,"
Kim said Saturday at a press
conference after the meeting
of Development Committee
of the World Bank and the
International Monetary Fund
(IMF).
US Treasury Secretary
Jacob Lew has told Congress
that the federal government
will reach its debt ceiling of
$16.7 trillion by Oct. 17 and
that failure to raise it would
lead to a catastrophic default.
"The closer we get to the deadline,
the greater the impact will be for the
developing world. Inaction could result
in interest rates rising, confdence fall-
ing, and growth slowing," Kim told
GMA News | 10/12/2013
-- Typhoon Santi, internation-
ally known as Nari, pounded
northern Luzon early Satur-
day, killing 13 people, ripping
roofs off thousands of build-
ings, and leaving more than
two million without power.
Santi tore into the coun-
try's northeast coast around
midnight (1600 GMT Friday),
toppling trees and pylons
as it cut a westward swathe
through the farming regions
of the main island of Luzon,
offcials said.
"While there were rela-
tively few casualties, a lot of
areas are still fooded," said
Eduardo del Rosario, head
of the National Disaster Risk
Reduction and Management
Council.
Witnesses in the coastal
town of Baler, near where
Santi made landfall, said
many large trees had been
felled and clean-up crews
with chainsaws were clearing
roads.
Military and police res-
cuers trucked residents out
of fooded villages as the
weather improved after the
typhoon's 120 kilometres (75
miles) per hour winds swept
out to the South China Sea
later Saturday morning.
Government clerk Glenn Diwa, 34,
said she and her husband spent a sleep-
China offers olive branch to ASEAN
Father & Son, USN Retired
The Life Stories of Quintin Ramil, Sr. & Jr.
Speaking Good English
Our Life and Times
I
suppose the King’s English has been changed, if not corrupted, in different ways
through the course of history. When we read books with different settings or time pe-
riods, the English spoken is sometimes different, depending on the setting or period
of the story.
October 18-24, 2013
Philippine
Radio
AM 1450
M-F 7-8 PM
The original and first Asian Journal in America
550 E. 8th St., Ste. 6, National City, San Diego County CA USA 91950 | Ph: 619.474.0588 | Fx: 619.474.0373 | Email: asianjournal@aol.com | www.asianjournalusa.com
PRST STD
U.S. Postage Paid
Permit No. 203
Chula Vista
CA 91910
San Diego’s first and only Asian Filipino weekly publication and a multi-award winning newspaper! Online+Digital+Print Editions to best serve you!
October 18-24, 2013
(Continued on page 17)
Ofelia Dirige Community Lifestyle
Use Your Home to
Stay at Home .. p 4
(Continued on page 14)
13 dead, millions without power
in wake of Typhoon Santi
(Continued on page 8)
14th Annual Asian
Film Fest .. p 11
(Continued on page 17)
Look for the Asian Journal
at these

outlets ...
(Continued on page 16)
Jeane Napoles’s ‘Money bath’ pic catches
tax man’s eye amid corruption scandal
World Bank chief urges US to
break fiscal impasse
Emergency
Preparedness .. p 6
by Quint Ramil, Jr.
Chapter 6:
The Teenage Years
OCEANSIDE
1) Mission Kabayan Oriental
Market, 3753 Mission Ave,
#122, Oceanside
2) Mission Market & Restau-
rant, Mission Ave, Oceanside
3) Lisa’s Seafood Market,
Mission Ave, Oceanside
4) Mission Seafood, Mission
Ave, Oceasnside
SAN MARCOS
1) Filipino Depot, 1001 W.
San Marcos Blvd, #135, San
Marcos
2) Phil-Asian Market, 853 W.
San Marcos Blvd, San Marcos
3) Manila Harbor Restaurant,
W. San Marcos Blvd,
San Marcos
ESCONDIDO
1) K-k Orient Valley Market,
Broadway, Escondido
POWAY
1) Lumpia House, Twin Peaks
Ave, Poway
PENASQUITOS
1) Orient Valley Filipino Cui-
sine, 9951 Carmel Valley Rd,
San Diego
2) Ardel Bakery, Carmel
Valley Rd, San Diego
MIRA MESA
1) R & B Filipino Cuisine,
11257 Camino Ruiz, Mira Mesa
2) Hope Adult Health Day
Care, Camino Ruiz, Mira Mesa
3) Tiki Water Store,
Camino Ruiz, Mira Mesa
4) Mabuhay/Dax Travel,
10550 Camino Ruiz, Mira Mesa
5) Manila Fastfood Deli, Mira
Mesa Blvd, San Diego
6) PNB Mira Mesa,
Mira Mesa Blvd, San Diego
7) Postal Etc. USA, 9011 Mira
Mesa Blvd, San Diego
KEARNY MESA
1) 99 Ranch Supermarket,
Clairemont Mesa Blvd, San
Diego
2) VIP Restaurant, Claire-
mont Mesa Blvd, San Diego
3) EAST BUFFET, Miramar Rd,
San Diego
LA MESA
1) Hillex Center Water Store,
University Avenue, La Mesa
2) Fredcel Filipino Food,
University Ave, La Mesa
SPRING VALLEY
1) Kababayan Bakery &
Restaurant, 84236 Paradise
Rd., Spring Valley
PARADISE VALLEY
1) Reo Barbershop,
2323 Reo Drive, Paradise Hills
BONITA
1) Bonita Public Library,
Bonita Rd & Otay Lakes Rd
CHULA VISTA/EASTLAKE
1) Lisa’s Filipino Cuisine, 2260
Otay Lakes Rd, Chula Vista
2) Jochi’s Filipino Food,
Orange Ave, Chula Vista
3) Water Store, Palm Ridge
Plaza
4) Zambales Restaurant,
Palm Ave, San Diego
5) Dona’s Restaurant, 1830
Coronado Ave., San Diego
6) Saldana Dental, 665 H St,
Suite E, Chula Vista
NATIONAL CITY
1) Lisa’ Filipino Cuisine,
1210 E. Plaza Blvd, # 410,
National City
2) Bread De Luxe, 1420 E.
Plaza Blvd #D1, National City
3) Zion Salon & Barber, 1430
E. Plaza Blvd E-15, National
City
4) Filipino Dessert Plus,
E. Plaza Blvd, National City
5) Normy’s Hair Styling
Salon, 3400 E. 8th St,
National City
6) Conching’s Café/Res-
taurant, 3400 E. 8th Street,
National City
7) Alfonso Dental Care,
2340 E. 8th Street, Suite H,
National City
and more.....
additional neighborhood
Get your copy of the Asian Journal
PRINT Edition at these following outlets
nearest you (PARTIAL LIST ONLY)
Prince of Pop
Erik Santos @
Rancho Del Rey
Middle School
A photograph posted on social media sites by Jeane Lim-Napoles, the daughter of Manila business-
woman, Janet Lim-Napoles, show an extravagance that has attracted the eye of the tax man.
by Airea Calica, Philstar.
com | BANDAR SERI BE-
GAWAN, 10/10/2013 –
China offered an olive branch
yesterday to Southeast Asian
nations wary of its territorial
claims, displaying its growing
infuence at another summit
notable for US President Ba-
rack Obama’s absence.
Premier Li Keqiang called
for peace in the South China
Sea and expanded Chinese
trade with the 10-member As-
sociation of Southeast Asian
Nations (ASEAN) as he met
the bloc’s leaders in the oil-
fush sultanate of Brunei.
“A peaceful South China
Sea is a blessing for all. We
need to work together to make
the South China Sea a sea of
peace, friendship and coop-
eration,” Li said.
Li took the baton from
President Xi Jinping, who
underlined Chinese power by
occupying center stage earlier
this week at an Asia-Pacifc
summit in Bali while Obama
was stuck at home due to the
US government shutdown.
China asserts sovereignty
over most of the South China
Sea, including waters near the
coasts of its neighbors.
The Philippines, Vietnam,
Malaysia and Brunei -- all
ASEAN members -- have
competing claims to parts of
the sea, and Manila and Hanoi
have in recent years repeat-
edly accused China of becom-
ing more aggressive in the
dispute.
Abide by sea code – Noy
Also yesterday, President
Aquino took a diplomatic tack
and called on countries in-
volved in the dispute to abide
by the 2002 Declaration on
the Conduct of Parties (DOC)
in the South China Sea.
The DOC provides for the
exercise of restraint and de-
sisting from occupying areas
with conficting claims.
Without mentioning Pa-
natag Shoal, Ayungin Shoal
and even Mischief Reef that
China had already occupied,
Aquino called the attention of
countries to the provisions of
the DOC that China agreed to
(Continued on page 2)
Daily Telegraph,
10/10/2013 -- A YOUNG
Philippine woman who posted
pictures online of her lavish
life including one showing
her bathing in money is to be
charged with tax evasion.
By Simeon G. Silverio, Jr.

Recently, I wrote an article en-
titled “The Pinoy and his Carabao
English.” In the article, I noted that
the policemen in Makati, Philip-
pines, are now required to take a
refresher course in the English lan-
guage since they encounter a lot of
international tourists, businessmen
and diplomats in that premier city in
Metro Manila.

I wrote that the English language
was introduced by the Thomasites,
named after the ship Thomas, that
brought this group of American
teachers to the Philippines in the
early part of the American occupa-
tion at the turn of the twentieth cen-
tury. These teachers were so good
and strict that they produced the best
Filipino writers in English during
the period.

Even then, many Filipinos fnd it
hard to perfect their English lan-
guage skills because they must frst
think in their native dialect and then translate their thoughts into English as they speak or
write. Nonetheless, to the credit of their teachers, almost everyone blossomed into good
English speakers, if not writers because the language was the medium of instruction in
both the public and private schools until Filipino was used for teaching as well.

Thus, I theorized that Filipinos who migrate to the United States, Australia, Canada or Great Britain could easily
I learned to drive a jeep at
an early age because my uncle
and auntie were engaged in
the buy and sell business.
You can say they had a route
that started from Blumentritt
to La Mesa Dam. Yes this is
the same dam that my dad
helped build. Every day the
two of them would drive to
Blumentritt to buy grocer-
ies which included meat and
vegetables and different
ingredients. The jeep
would be packed at
the start and as they
proceeded towards
Novaliches their
customers along
the way would just
gather around them
at their designated
stops. By the time
what she was so good at doing
and that is to peddle the rest
of her goodies to her waiting
customers or “suki”. Eddie
they reached our place, they
would be about 90% sold
out. This is when Eddie and
I would take over the driving
as my uncle would rest and
fnish the required paperwork.
My aunt would remain doing
Philstar.com | WASHING-
TON (Xinhua) 10/13/2013
- World Bank President Jim
Yong Kim on Saturday urged
US policymakers to end the
ongoing fscal deadlock in a
timely manner to avoid nega-
tive spillovers on the global
economy.
"We are now fve days
away from a very dangerous
moment. I urge US policy-
makers to quickly come to a
resolution before they reach
the debt ceiling deadline,"
Kim said Saturday at a press
conference after the meeting
of Development Committee
of the World Bank and the
International Monetary Fund
(IMF).
US Treasury Secretary
Jacob Lew has told Congress
that the federal government
will reach its debt ceiling of
$16.7 trillion by Oct. 17 and
that failure to raise it would
lead to a catastrophic default.
"The closer we get to the deadline,
the greater the impact will be for the
developing world. Inaction could result
in interest rates rising, confdence fall-
ing, and growth slowing," Kim told
GMA News | 10/12/2013
-- Typhoon Santi, internation-
ally known as Nari, pounded
northern Luzon early Satur-
day, killing 13 people, ripping
roofs off thousands of build-
ings, and leaving more than
two million without power.
Santi tore into the coun-
try's northeast coast around
midnight (1600 GMT Friday),
toppling trees and pylons
as it cut a westward swathe
through the farming regions
of the main island of Luzon,
offcials said.
"While there were rela-
tively few casualties, a lot of
areas are still fooded," said
Eduardo del Rosario, head
of the National Disaster Risk
Reduction and Management
Council.
Witnesses in the coastal
town of Baler, near where
Santi made landfall, said
many large trees had been
felled and clean-up crews
with chainsaws were clearing
roads.
Military and police res-
cuers trucked residents out
of fooded villages as the
weather improved after the
typhoon's 120 kilometres (75
miles) per hour winds swept
out to the South China Sea
later Saturday morning.
Government clerk Glenn Diwa, 34,
said she and her husband spent a sleep-
Page 2 October 18-24, 2013 Asian Journal - (619) 474-0588 Visit our website at http://www.asianjournalusa.com
(Continued on page 9)
(Continued on page 14)
Law Offices of Chua Tinsay & Vega
www.ctvattys.com
by Atty. Caesar Cutaran, Esq.
Legal Buzz
Read Atty. Cutaran’s previous articles by visiting our
website at www.asianjournalusa.com
Hector, a U.S. citizen, fled a K1-
fancee visa petition on behalf of her
girlfriend, Feliza. A K-1 visa allows a
foreign national to enter the U.S. as a
nonimmigrant to marry a U.S. citizen
or a lawful permanent resident (LPR or
“green card” holder) within 90 days of
arrival in the U.S. Hector’s petition was
approved and Feliza came to the U.S.
via San Francisco, California using her
K-1 visa.
Soon after her arrival, Feliza found
out that Hector was already married.
Brokenhearted, she left the Bay Area
and moved to her relatives at Phoenix,
Arizona. There she met Abner, a U.S.
citizen, and they eventually married.
Abner fled an immigrant petition on
Feliza’s behalf and said petition was
approved. A few years later, misfor-
tune visited Feliza once again as Abner
turned abusive leading to their divorce
before Feliza can adjust her status to
that of a “green card” holder.
After her divorce with Abner, Feliza
self-petitioned based on the provisions
of the Violence Against Women Act
(“VAWA”). Under the Immigration
and Nationality Act (“INA”), a VAWA
self-petitioner is a foreign national who
married a U.S. citizen or LPR, resided
with the spouse in the U.S., and “during
the marriage … has been battered or
has been the subject of extreme cruelty
perpetrated by the alien’s spouse.”The
petition was granted and Feliza applied
for adjustment of her status to that of
an LPR or a “green card” holder. The
United States Citizenship and Im-
migration Services (“USCIS”) denied
her application stating that Feliza did
not marry Hector, her K-1 US citizen
petitioner. USCIS then placed Feliza
in removal proceedings. Before the
immigration judge (“IJ”), Feliza argued
that although she overstayed her original
K-1visa, her approved VAWA petition
allows her to adjust status or be entitled
to a cancellation of removal. The IJ was
not persuaded by Feliza’s arguments
and denied the adjustment of status
for Feliza’s failure to marry her K-1
fance. The cancellation of removal was
likewise denied as Feliza was unable
to show the required extreme hard-
ship. Feliza appealed to the Board of
Immigration Appeals (“BIA”) where the
rulings were affrmed.
Armed with a VAWA self-petition
approval, is Feliza entitled to adjust
her status to that of a lawful perma-
nent resident notwithstanding the fact
that she did not marry her K-1citizen
petitioner? The answer appears to be in
the negative.
In a case based on similar facts, Le
v. Holder, a recent decision by the U.S.
Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit
early this month, the court held that the
INA clearly mandates that a foreign
national entering the U.S. on a K-1 visa
must marry the K-1 petitioner or depart
the U.S. within 90 days of arrival.
In the scenario above, although it was
legally impossible for Feliza to marry
Hector, her K-1 petitioner already mar-
ried to another, such fact, under the Le
decision, “did not affect the possibility
of departing the United States once she
knew the marriage could not occur.”
Further, the Le case ruled that the im-
migration law is “unambiguous” in its
requirement that a K-1 visa holder’s
failure to marry his/her K-1 petitioner or
depart the U.S. within 90 days of arrival
bars the K-1 visa holder from adjusting
status and renders him/her removable
from the U.S.
It remains to be seen if the U.S. Court
of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit (which
includes California in its jurisdiction)
will rule similarly on this matter.
Atty. Cesar G. Cutaran is an as-
sociate in the law frm of Chua, Tinsay
and Vega (CTV) - a full service law
frm with offces in San Francisco, San
Diego, Sacramento and Manila. The
information presented in this article is
for general information only and is not,
nor intended to be, formal legal advice
nor the formation of an attorney-client
relationship. Call or e-mail CTV for
an in-person or phone consultation to
discuss your particular situation and/
or how their services may be retained at
(415) 495-8088; (619) 955-6277; (916)
509-7280; ccutaran@ctvattys.com
K-1 Visa Holder Must Marry K-1
Petitioner to Adjust Status
(Continued from page 1)
China
and which must be followed
while a legally binding Code
of Conduct (COC) was being
drawn up.
He called on ASEAN and China to
speed up the adoption of a COC.
Got any jar
stories to tell?
By Simeon G. Silverio, Jr.
A friend of mine shared this story with
me, author unknown
Mayonnaise Jar and BeerWhen things
in your life seem almost too much to
handle, when 24 hours in a day are not
enough, remember the mayonnaise
jar....... and the beer.
A professor stood before his philoso-
phy class and had some items in front of
him. When the class began, wordlessly,
he picked up a very large and empty
mayonnaise jar and proceeded to fll it
with golf balls.
He then asked the students if the jar
was full. They agreed that it was.So
the professor then picked up a box of
pebbles and poured them into the jar. He
shook the jar lightly. The pebbles rolled
into the open areas between the golf
balls. He then asked the students again if
the jar was full. They agreed it was.
The professor next picked up a box of
sand and poured it into the jar.
Of course, the sand flled up every-
thing else. He asked once more if the jar
was full. The students responded with a
unanimous “yes.”
The professor then produced two cans
of beer from under the table and poured
the entire contents into the jar, effec-
tively flling the empty space between
BALIK TANAW by Romy Protacio,
PhD English
The beginnings of the University of
the Philippine Concert Chorus (UPCC),
now more popularly known as “Korus”,
go back to the 1960s, a time marked by
great political unrest in the Philippines.
In response to the unstable national situ-
ation, UPCC, composed of university
students with a sincere passion to sing,
took their sentiments and patriotic pride
to the stage. UPCC started their interna-
tional tours in the early 70’s.
In 1974, UPCC was named one of the
world’s best choirs at the Lincoln Center
International Choral Festival in New
York. In 2012, UPCC joined three in-
ternational competitions and triumphed
in all of them: the Festival International
de Musical de Cantonigros in Catalonia,
Spain where they won First Prize in
the Folk Category and Second Prize in
the Mixed Category; the 9th Cantemus
Internacional Festival in Nyiregyhaza,
Hungary where they got the Gold
Diploma and Audience Prize; and the
prestigious IV International Harald
Andersen Chamber Choir Competition
in Helsinki, Finland where they were
named one of the six best choirs, mak-
ing them the very frst Asian choir to
make it that far. Upon the group’s return
to the Philippines, the Aliw Awards
Foundation feted Korus with its highest
award, the 2012 Lifetime Achievement
Award. The National Commission for
Culture and the Arts also recognized
Korus as one of the Ani ng Dangal 2013
awardees.
With a brilliant 51-year tradition of
compelling interpretations, vibrant
choreography, theatrical expressions,
eye-catching costumes, and a charisma
that is uniquely Filipino, UPCC has
UPCC Brings Christmas Joy
to Filipinos Abroad
UP Concert Chorus
Get into the “spirit” of the season dur-
ing Spooky Sleepover at the Zoo, and
meet animals that wear their colorful
costumes all year-round. Your ghostly
camp director, Dr. Zoolittle, and his
ghoulish experts will greet you at check-
in with a slithery animal friend.
Make your own personalized treat bag
to collect goodies throughout the eve-
ning, and take an exclusive bus tour that
will introduce you to some scary and
strange animals before delivering you to
“haunted” Camp Timbuktu, where you
and your child can settle down in your
tent.
After dinner at Camp, kids will “trick
or treat” while meeting and touching
some spooky animals—if you dare!
Back at camp, kids can participate in a
costume parade (be sure to bring your
costumes!) with prizes and be enter-
tained by Dr. Zoolittle’s ghost stories
and snacks around the campfre. Those
campers still awake can take an optional
night prowl through the Zoo.
You’ll wake up to a delicious buffet
breakfast at Sabertooth Grill, overlook-
ing Elephant Odyssey, and then watch
some of our animals get their Halloween
treats. Head home with a souvenir gift
and lots of happy memories.
Where: San Diego Zoo
Cost: $139 per adult, $119 per child
(ages 4–11), plus Zoo admission for
nonmembers.
Reservations: Call 619-718-3000.
Duration: Overnight
Audience: Families with children
ages 4 and older
Dates and Times:
4 p.m.–9 a.m.
Saturdays, October 19 and 26
San Diego Zoo
Spooktacular
Sleepover
10/19 & 10/26
Page 3 Asian Journal - (619) 474-0588 Visit our website at http://www.asianjournalusa.com October 18-24, 2013
MACYS
“Learning from industry leaders at Macy’s
is really a wonderful opportunity.”
We are now accepting applications for
the Spring 2O14 Workshop at Macy’s!
If you are a woman or person of color and
own your own business, we invite you to
apply for the Workshop at Macy’s! You’ll
gain insight from seasoned Macy’s pros
and Macy’s partners, and get the tools
you need to succeed and sustain growth
in the retail industry.
Apply today at macysinc.com/workshop
PICTURED: Alex Woo, Alex Woo Jewelry.
Past participant of The Workshop at Macy’s.
Page 4 October 18-24, 2013 Asian Journal - (619) 474-0588 Visit our website at http://www.asianjournalusa.com
Lifestyle
(Continued on page 10)
Use Your Home to Stay at Home: A Guide for
Homeowners Who Need Help Now™
National Aging in Place Week is October 15-21, 2013
AGING IN PLACE (Part 4) is brought
to you by The National Council on the
Aging (NCOA) www.ncoa.org
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G
overnment programs
provide an important
safety net to older
Americans with limited f-
nancial resources, and those
who run out of money paying
for the cost of help at home.
Several public programs help
older people who need help
due to a chronic condition.
Homeowners who qualify for
these programs may avoid us-
ing home equity.
Medicaid
Medicaid is a joint Federal-state
program that was designed to pay for
long-term care for older Americans
with low incomes and those who have
high health care expenses. Covered
services can include: care management,
homemaker, home health aide, per-
sonal care, adult day center, and respite
care. The supportive services that may
be available vary by state. In order to
qualify for Medicaid, you must meet
strict income and asset limits. However,
your home, regardless of its value, is not
counted when Medicaid determines your
eligibility for this program, so long as it
remains your main residence.
Medicaid also allows the spouse of
a benefciary to keep the family home.
But there are limits on your ability to
gift the home or transfer this asset and
still be eligible for the program. In
addition, all states must try to recover
the money they spend on care from a
Medicaid benefciary’s estate after he
or she dies. A benefciary’s heirs may
need to sell the family home to pay the
Medicaid bill.
The rules for Medicaid eligibility and
treatment of the house are complicated
and vary from state to state. To learn
more, talk to a senior counselor or a
knowledgeable fnancial advisor.
Government Programs
Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)
The VA provides long-term care
services primarily to veterans with a
service-related disability, low-income
veterans, and former prisoners of war.
Eligible veterans typically receive nurs-
ing home care. The VA may also cover
some respite care, a homemaker, home
health aide, and adult day care. Eligible
veterans may also be able to pay for
home repairs and modifcations by
refnancing their home with a low cost
VA loan.
Medicare
Medicare, the national health insur-
ance program for seniors, mainly covers
medical care (doctors and hospitals).
This program will pay for a home heath
aide, but only while a benefciary needs
skilled nursing care or rehabilitation
therapies. Once you no longer need
skilled care, Medicare will stop paying
for home health care, even if you still
need help with everyday activities.
Other Public Resources
Your Area Agency on Aging offers a
wide array supportive services that can
include help with household chores,
meals served in community locations,
adult day care programs, senior centers,
protective services, and legal counsel-
ing. These programs are available free
or at very low rates. Due to limited
funding, however, there may be eligibil-
ity requirements and waiting lists.
Many communities provide low-cost
services to help impaired seniors to con-
tinue to live at home. These programs
may include Meals on Wheels, Dial-
a-Ride or other special transportation
programs for seniors, friendly visits
or telephone checks to elders who live
alone, light housekeeping, and help with
home modifcations or repairs. Faith and
charitable organizations can also help.
Your pharmacy or grocery store may
offer free home delivery.
Eldercare Locator can help you fnd
services and programs in your area: Call
1-800-677-1116 or check the web at
www.eldercare.gov. BeneftsCheckup:
A quick, confdential and free web
service that can connect you to federal
and state programs: http://www.ben-
eftscheckup.org/
The National Resource Center on Sup-
portive Housing and Home Modifcation
offers tips on how to assess home safety
for elders and funding for home modif-
cations: http://www.homemods.org/
Family Caregiving Alliance offers fact
sheets and other assistance to families
who are caring for a loved one:
http://www.caregiver.org/caregiver/
jsp/home.jsp
The National Reverse Mortgage Lend-
ers Association offers consumer pub-
lications, and a website with a reverse
mortgage calculator. They can also help
you to fnd a reverse mortgage lender in
your state: www.reversemortgage.org/
default.aspx or call them at 866-264-
4466 (toll free)
AARP’s website provides a detailed
overview of reverse mortgages that
includes a calculator to estimate how
much you can get from this loan: www.
rmaarp.com/
Where To Go For More Information
CONSUMER TIPS
Look at the big picture Your ability
to live at home is likely to change over
time. So it is important to look at your
fnancial situation beyond immediate
needs. Short-term solutions could be
risky if you require ongoing funds for
several years. It helps to save some of
your home equity so you have the option
of moving into a more ftting housing
arrangement.
Don’t wait until the last minute
Timing is critical when making deci-
sions about the home. You or your fam-
ily could end up facing a serious cash
crunch if you wait until a crisis to start
thinking about how to tap home equity.
To avoid stress, disappointment, and
costly delays, this strategy takes a lot
of advance planning. The longer you
wait, the harder it can be to fnd a good
solution.
Have ready cash for emergencies.
It helps to have a three-month emer-
gency fund of readily available cash,
such as a money market account or
shortterm certifcate of deposit. If this is
not possible, make plans and prepare for
how you would pay for an emergency.
If you run short, use credit cards
sensibly. Avoid salespeople who show
up at your door with a quick fx to your
fnancial problems.
Create a family budget.
A sudden change in health can disrupt
the best laid fnancial plans. Strong
monthly fnancial planning is necessary-
to keep family affairs running. The best
way to understand your family’s cash
fow needs is to create a budget.
Talk to your family. It can be diffcult
to talk about personal fnancial matters.
However, good communication can
bring a familytogether and reduce con-
fusion. Talk with family or other heirs
before taking out a loan. They will need
to pay offthe loan balance or repay Med-
icaid if they want to keep the home.
Don’t rush into any decision. If you
decide to take out a loan, consider all
the options to fnd the best solution for
your fnancial situation. Shop
around with different lenders to
check that the interest rate and fees are
competitive and fair. Make sure you
understand what you are signing. Ask
questions if you are confused. Get help
from a trusted family member or friend
who understands fnancial matters. Non-
proft counseling agencies can give you
free, independent advice.
The only time you need to act fast is
if you decide you do not want the loan.
Federal law gives you three days to
get out of a reverse mortgage or home
equity loan contract. You may cancel the
loan for any reason, but you must do it
in writing within three days.
Source:
Copyright 2005. The National Council
on the Aging, 300 D Street, SW Suite
801 | Washington, DC 20024 (202) 479-
1200 www.ncoa.org
ViralNova.com | 8/28/2013
Below are 20 wise marriage tips from
a man that was recently divorced. You
wouldn’t normally think that a divorced
man would give good advice on being a
husband, but this man has been through
enough hardship to know what is worth
fghting for:
MARRIAGE ADVICE I WISH I
WOULD HAVE HAD:
Obviously, I’m not a relationship
expert. But there’s something about my
divorce being fnalized this week that
gives me perspective of things I wish
I would have done different… After
losing a woman that I loved, and a
marriage of almost 16 years, here’s the
advice I wish I would have had…
1) Never stop courting. Never
stop dating. NEVER EVER take that
woman for granted. When you asked her
to marry you, you promised to be that
man that would OWN HER HEART and
to fercely protect it. This is the most im-
portant and sacred treasure you will ever
be entrusted with. SHE CHOSE YOU.
Never forget that, and NEVER GET
LAZY in your love.
2) PROTECT YOUR OWN
HEART. Just as you committed to
being the protector of her heart, you
must guard your own with the same
vigilance. Love yourself fully, love the
world openly, but there is a special place
in your heart where no one must enter
except for your wife. Keep that space al-
ways ready to receive her and invite her
in, and refuse to let anyone or anything
else enter there.
3) FALL IN LOVE OVER and
OVER and OVER again. You will
constantly change. You’re not the same
people you were when you got married,
and in fve years you will not be the
same person you are today. Change will
come, and in that you have to re-choose
each other everyday. SHE DOESN’T
HAVE TO STAY WITH YOU, and if
you don’t take care of her heart, she may
give that heart to someone else or seal
you out completely, and you may never
be able to get it back. Always fght to
win her love just as you did when you
were courting her.
4) ALWAYS SEE THE BEST in
her. Focus only on what you love. What
you focus on will expand. If you focus
on what bugs you, all you will see is
reasons to be bugged. If you focus on
what you love, you can’t help but be
consumed by love. Focus to the point
where you can no longer see anything
but love, and you know without a doubt
that you are the luckiest man on earth to
be have this woman as your wife.
5) IT’S NOT YOUR JOB TO
CHANGE OR FIX HER… your job is
to love her as she is with no expectation
of her ever changing. And if she chang-
es, love what she becomes, whether it’s
what you wanted or not.
6) TAKE FULL ACCOUNT-
ABILITY for your own emotions: It’s
not your wife’s job to make you happy,
and she CAN’T make you sad. You are
responsible for fnding your own happi-
ness, and through that your joy will spill
over into your relationship and your
love.
7) NEVER BLAME your wife If
YOU get frustrated or angry at her, it is
only because it is triggering something
inside of YOU. They are YOUR emo-
tions, and your responsibility. When you
feel those feelings take time to get pres-
ent and to look within and understand
what it is inside of YOU that is asking
to be healed. You were attracted to this
woman because she was the person best
suited to trigger all of your childhood
wounds in the most painful way so that
you could heal them… when you heal
yourself, you will no longer be triggered
by her, and you will wonder why you
ever were.
Allow your woman to JUST BE.
When she’s sad or upset, it’s not your
job to fx it, it’s your job to HOLD HER
and let her know it’s ok. Let her know
that you hear her, and that she’s impor-
tant and that you are that pillar on which
she can always lean. The feminine spirit
is about change and emotion and like a
storm her emotions will roll in and out,
and as you remain strong and unjudg-
ing she will trust you and open her soul
to you… DON’T RUN-AWAY WHEN
SHE’S UPSET. Stand present and
strong and let her know you aren’t going
anywhere. Listen to what she is really
saying behind the words and emotion.
9) BE SILLY… don’t take
yourself so damn seriously. Laugh. And
make her laugh. Laughter makes every-
thing else easier.
10) FILL HER SOUL EVERY-
DAY… learn her love languages and the
specifc ways that she feels important
and validated and CHERISHED. Ask
her to create a list of 10 THINGS that
make her feel loved and memorize those
things and make it a priority everyday to
make her feel like a queen.
11) BE PRESENT. Give her not
only your time, but your focus, your
attention and your soul. Do whatever
it takes to clear your head so that when
you are with her you are fully WITH
HER. Treat her as you would your most
valuable client. She is.
12) BE WILLING TO TAKE
HER SEXUALLY, to carry her away in
the power of your masculine presence,
to consume her and devour her with
your strength, and to penetrate her to the
deepest levels of her soul. Let her melt
into her feminine softness as she knows
she can trust you fully.
13) DON’T BE AN IDIOT….
And don’t be afraid of being one either.
You will make mistakes and so will she.
Try not to make too big of mistakes,
and learn from the ones you do make.
You’re not supposed to be perfect, just
20 Marriage Tips Everyone
Needs to Know
Page 5 Asian Journal - (619) 474-0588 Visit our website at http://www.asianjournalusa.com October 18-24, 2013
Business
Follow Asian Journal
on Twitter @asianjournal
A nutritional product made from
the anti-cancer properties of soybeans
developed by a Filipino scientist was
awarded the 2013 People’s Choice Ste-
vie Awards for Favorite New Consumer
Product and a bronze Stevie Award at
the 11th American Business Awards in
San Francisco.
Filipino research geneticist Alfredo
Galvez received the award for LunaRich
X, which he developed in partnership
with Reliv International, manufacturer
of patented nutritional supplements.
A research scientist at the Center of
Excellence in Nutritional Genomics at
the University of California in Davis,
and director of research for the Missouri
Plant Science Center in Mexico, Galvez
Pinoy scientist wins at American Biz Awards in San Francisco
Alfredo F. Galvez, Ph.D. is currently the Director of Research at the Missouri Plant Science Center and the Lead
Scientifc Advisor for @SoyLabs LLC.
said Lunasin’s discovery was a “lucky
mistake.”
Galvez shared that he discovered
an extraordinary plant peptide as an
accidental by-product of the work con-
ducted in a gene cloning laboratory at
the University of California in Berkeley
in 1996.
He named the by-product Lunasin
– a Filipino word for “to heal” or “to
remedy” –-which was shown to disrupt
cancer cell division and prevent tumor
formation.
He conducted further research on the
cancer-inhibiting peptide and found that
Lunasin, in its bioactive form, had the
ability to essentially turn off the bad
genes, and turn on the good genes in our
bodies. In other words, Lunasin, found
in miniscule quantities in soybeans,
makes cells less receptive to disease.
Galvez’s fndings were published in
the Journal of Cancer Research and
other prestigious journals. Since then,
Lunasin has become one of the most
heavily researched and scientifcally
supported nutritional compounds avail-
able today, with more than 50 published
papers from more than 25 research
institutions.
Lunasin is a naturally occurring
peptide that has been identifed as re-
sponsible for many of soy’s documented
health benefts, including cholesterol
support and general cellular health,
Galvez added.
Why credit cards
shouldn't be
'double-swiped'
ABS-CBNnews.com | MANILA,
10/09/2013 - "Don't double-swipe credit
cards" -- this is the message of the Credit
Card Association of the Philippines to
commercial establishments and retailers.
CCAP spokesperson Alan German said
the practice of "double-swiping" is being
discouraged since this may compromise
the data security of credit cardholders.
Double-swiping is the act of merchants
completing a second swipe of the card
at the Point-of-Sale (POS) system, even
after the transaction has been approved.
The CCAP said any credit, debit or
prepaid card should only be swiped us-
ing a POS terminal issued by the bank,
not the establishment's own POS system.
German said criminal groups are
now targeting establishments' own POS
systems, stealing payment card data and
PINs of customers.
"In many cases, the second swipe
results in the credit card’s full data to
be retained by the merchant in its own
system. Effectively, this unnecessary
practice increases the merchant's vulner-
ability to potential data compromise...
This loose data, so to speak, can then be
used to create counterfeit cards, engage
in identity theft, and perpetrate fraud,”
he said.
The CCAP spokesperson urged mer-
chants to use other record-keeping meth-
ods for their retail operations, instead of
double-swiping the cards.
"More often than not, the second
swipe is unrelated to authorization or
transaction settlements. Instead, it is
used to create a secondary record to sup-
port the merchant's accounting, reporting
or customer-relationship management
programs," German said.
"Instead of using customers’ payment
cards, merchants can explore alternatives
such as loyalty account numbers, trans-
action IDs, or truncated primary account
numbers to track customer activity, if
necessary."
German said card issuers and mer-
chants should understand the risks in
double-swiping the card, and should
undertake measures to protect their busi-
nesses.
He said CCAP is committed to
increasing data security awareness to
ensure that all stakeholders are aware of
potential vulnerabilities and associated
risks.
2013_ExpressSend_Brand_FIL_Print_HP_SD_Final.indd 1 7/2/13 1:14 PM
On Monday, September 23, Na-
tional CAPACD, in partnership with the
Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco
and the Asian American Partners in
Philanthropy (AAPIP), hosted a briefng
on the National CAPACD AAPI Poverty
Report.
The event featured panel discussions
around ways to address rapidly growing
poverty in AAPI communities. Speakers
during the event included Peggy Saika
of AAPIP, Malcolm Yeung of the China-
town Community Development Center,
Joshua Simon of the East Bay Asian
Local Development Corporation, Peggy
Jen of the Local Initiatives Support Cor-
poration, and National CAPACD’s Josh
Ishimatsu, author of the report.
AAPI Poverty Report – San
Francisco Briefing
Lunasin is one of the frst bioactive
compounds identifed to affect expres-
sion and promote optimum health at the
epigenetic level. The epigenome, which
literally means “beyond the genome,” is
a higher level of complexity within the
cell, he explained.
Last Thursday, Galvez presented to 30
medical doctors in Bacolod the Lunasin
technology.
He explained how the Lunasin tech-
nology is applicable to their various
disciplines and discussed possible clini-
cal trials in the country.
Galvez said LunaRich X was the only
nutritional product honored in the 2013
US Stevie Awards. The online poll for
Favorite New Products had more than
20,000 votes cast for its 34 product
categories.
Galvez was born and raised in San
Fernando, La Union. He fnished both
his BS in Plant Physiology and Genetics
and MS in Genetics and Plant Breeding
at the University of the Philippines-Los
Baños, and his PhD in Plant Physiol-
ogy and Genetics at the University of
California in Davis.
Galvez was one of the outstanding
Filipino-Americans in science and tech-
nology honored by President Aquino at
the 2010 Philippine Development Foun-
dation awards. (Story courtesy of Danny
Dangcalan of the Philippine Star)
Page 6 October 18-24, 2013 Asian Journal - (619) 474-0588 Visit our website at http://www.asianjournalusa.com
Te Offi cers and Staff of the
San Diego Asian Journal
would like to express their deepest
sympathy
to the family of
Narrie Babao
who passed away last Friday,
October 11, 2013
in San Diego California.
Narrie is the beloved husband of Zena
Sultana Babao, Asian Journal columnist.
For inquiries about memorial services,
please call Zena at 619.316.5742.
(Continued on page 14)
ASIAN JOURNAL
The first Asian-Filipino weekly in Southern California
An award-winning newspaper & San Diego’s most
widely circulated Asian-Filipino newspaper!
Ashley Silverio
Assistant Editor
In Pursuit of Excellence
Eugenio “Ego” Osin, (1946 - 1994)
Joe Cabrera, (1924 - 1996)
Soledad Bautista, (1917-2009)
Dr. Rizalino “Riz” Oades, (1935-2009)
The Asian Journal is published weekly and distributed in all Fili-
pino & Asian communties in San Diego County. Print publication date
is every Friday of the month. Advertising deadline is Wednesday prior
to publication date at 5 p.m. For advertising rates, rate cards, or in-
formation, call (619) 474-0588. Subscription by mail is available for
$50 per year (56 issues). The Asian Journal is not responsible for unso-
licited manuscripts and photographs but welcomes submissions. Entire
content is © 2012 copyrighted material by Asian Journal. Materials
in this publication may not be reproduced without specific permission
from the publisher.
Genevieve Silverio
Managing Editor
Simeon G. Silverio, Jr.
Publisher & Editor
Miles Beauchamp
Associate Editor
Santi Silverio
Associate Publisher
Perspectives
At Large...
Miles is Assistant to the Dean and Assistant Professor in the
Shirley Hufstedler School of Education at Alliant International
University where he teaches new media and diverse writing courses.
He has been with the Asian Journal since the 1990’s.
by Miles Beauchamp, PhD
Read previous articles by visiting our website at www.asian-
journalusa.com
by Benjamin Maynigo
Take It From
My Barber
(Continued on page 7)
by Dr. Ofelia Dirige
Founder, President & CEO Kalusugan
Community Services. www.flamwellness.org
Contemporary Asian
American Issues
By Miles Beauchamp

Most of the information below was
sent to me by a friend and somehow it
all makes sense. At least I think it does.
Nonetheless, don’t use any of it for medi-
cal advice – you know how “truthful”
some of the stuff you hear from friends
or get over the Internet can be (or espe-
cially if you read it here in this column).
Anyway, I hope this helps with all
those pesky health issues you might be
having.
Answering those silly little health
questions:
Q: I’ve heard that cardiovascular exer-
cise can prolong life; is this true?
A: Your heart is only good for so many
beats, and that’s it... don’t waste them on
exercise. Everything wears out eventual-
ly. Speeding up your heart will not make
you live longer; that’s like saying you
can extend the life of your car by driving
it faster. Want to live longer? Take a nap,
or two, or three. Or sleep late AND take
a nap – why take chances?
Q: Should I cut down on meat and eat
more fruits and vegetables?
A: You must grasp logistical effcien-
cies. What does a cow eat? Hay and corn.
And what are these? Vegetables. So a
steak is nothing more than an effcient
mechanism of delivering vegetables to
your system. Need grain? Eat chicken.
Beef is also a good source of feld grass
(green leafy vegetable).
And a pork chop can give you 100%
of your recommended daily allowance of
vegetable products.
Q: Should I reduce my alcohol intake?
A: No, not at all. Wine is made from
fruit. Brandy is distilled wine, which
means they take the water out of the
fruity bit so you get even more of the
goodness that way. Beer is also made out
of grain. Naturally you may want to go
easy on this “concentrated fruit and grain
product” because there can be some,
shall we say, side effects, but nothing is
perfect.
Q: How can I calculate my body/fat
ratio?
A: Well, if you have a body and you
have fat, your ratio is one to one. If you
have two bodies, your ratio is two to one,
etc. Sure, you can get one of those caliper
thingies, but hey, spend the money on
something better – like a hot fudge sun-
dae from 31 Flavors so you can get all
the necessary dairy calcium.
Q: What are some of the advantages
of participating in a regular exercise
program?
A: Can’t think of a single one, sorry.
My philosophy is: No Pain...Good! Now
if you like looking at slim bodies then
sure, join a health club and gawk all
you want (although you’ll probably get
thrown out of the place rather quickly
if you do it too much). Nope, sorry, I’ll
stick with the No Pain Plan.
Q: Aren’t fried foods bad for you?
A: YOU’RE NOT LISTENING!!!
Foods are fried these days in vegetable
oil. In fact, they’re permeated in it. How
could getting more vegetables be bad for
you? Now pay attention!
Q: Will sit-ups help prevent me from
getting a little soft around the middle?
A: Defnitely not! When you exercise
a muscle, it gets bigger (remember high
school gym class?). You should only
be doing sit-ups if you want a bigger
stomach. Who needs that? Personally,
I don’t have any use whatsoever for a
bigger stomach so I quit exercising years
ago. My stomach isn’t as small as I’d
like just yet so I plan to not exercise even
longer, but not exercising is a program I
can stick with.
Q: Is chocolate bad for me?
A: Are you crazy? HELLO...... Cocoa
beans! Another vegetable!!! It’s the best
feel-good food around! In fact, it’s one of
my very favorite health foods. I eat dif-
ferent kinds of chocolate whenever I get
the chance – which is often…very often.
As a matter of fact, I’m expecting my
Hershey’s Gold Card any day now.
Q: Is swimming good for your fgure?
A: If swimming is good for your fgure,
explain whales to me. Hmmmm? Didn’t
Getting Healthy
Emergency Preparedness
Are you prepared for an emergency?
Being prepared for a disaster is impor-
tant to the health and safety of our com-
munities. In California, disasters occur
in many forms that include wildfres,
storms, outages, high winds, foods,
landslides, tsunamis, terrorism, extreme
heat, thunderstorms and earthquakes.
These events have occurred in San Diego
and in some cases wildfres, landslide
and extreme heat happened several times
in the last decade.
Disasters are events that disrupt ser-
vices such as transportation, electricity,
gas and water. They directly or indirectly
cause threats to our community and more
specifcally the health and well-being of
families. The San Diego community has
been alerted by government, university,
health, and community groups to be
prepared in cases of emergency. Are you
ready?
October is National Fire Prevention
Month and it serves as an excellent time
to re-examine our emergency prepared-
ness plan. October is also a month when
our region seems to experience more
high winds and severe weather condi-
tions, so having a “POWER” plan should
be one of your top priorities at this time
of the year.
Two of the most important things one
can do to be prepared are assembling
an emergency supply kit and creating a
plan for your family. SDG& E has an
excellent disaster plan outlined below
especially during outages and fres. The
videos below show in a graphic way
how you can be prepared for emergency
during outages and fres. SDG&E sup-
ports programs that promote emergency
preparedness and encourage safety at
home and in our neighborhoods.
Click here to read about ways SDG&E
is helping customers become prepared
for an emergency: http://bit.ly/14yPHIp
#ESPSDGE
Emergency Preparedness:
SDG&E “Power” Plan
Make a Kit and a Plan
What’s your plan…? If power goes
out tonight how is your family prepared?
Click on this short video on Emergency
Preparedness from SDG&E and get
your family prepared for a potential
emergency: http://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=285PTi7MdBA #ESPSDGE
Living in Southern California means
that we should be prepared for an
earthquake at all times. Here’s a video
on how SDG&E is helping San Diegans
prepare for an emergency: http://www.
youtube.com/watch?v=285PTi7MdBA
#ESPSDGE
Outages: How to Stay Safe
The most common reasons for outages
are storms and high winds but… did you
know Mylar balloons can cause a power
outage? Click this video to fnd out
more ways to stay safe when there is a
power outage: http://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=pmIKeEDvZV4 #ESPSDGE
Anytime the power goes out, it’s
important to know what to do and how
to be safe. Click here to fnd out how
SDG&E is helping people like you
prepare for a power outage: http://www.
youtube.com/watch?v=pmIKeEDvZV4
#ESPSDGE
SDG&E Fire Season Safety
Fire Season in Southern California is
now here and there is several ways to
prepare yourself to keep you and your
family safe! Click here and fnd out
why fre safety is important to SDG&E:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T-
imkIoLBRk #ESPSDGE
Here are some GREAT tips for keep-
ing your family and home safe during
fre season! http://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=T-imkIoLBRk #ESPSDGE
Portable Generator Safety
A portable generator can provide
power during an emergency. If you
have a portable generator or someone
who does, please watch and or share
this video: http://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=MhBNOH0ymRQ #ESPSDGE
Questions about your portable genera-
tor? Here are some tips from SDG&E
on how to stay safe when using the
generator: http://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=MhBNOH0ymRQ #ESPSDGE
Make sure you have your “power”
plan ready today!
Keep Connected
Have you updated your emergency
contact information with SDG&E? You
can do this online on My Account, your
personalized and secure, one-stop-shop
Light &
Shadows
Read Zena Babao’s previous articles by visiting our website at
www.asianjournalusa.com
by Zena Sultana Babao
By Zena Sultana Babao
“When the trees their summer splen-
dor change to raiment red and gold;
When the summer moon turns mellow
and the nights are getting gold; When
the squirrels hide their acorns and the
woodchucks disappear; Then we know
that it is autumn, loveliest season of the
year.” – Author Unknown
Autumn is defnitely near when the
arrival of night becomes noticeably ear-
lier and the leaves start to turn. Autumn
… when all around us is ablaze with
color, with the sweet cool breeze kissing
and caressing our skin, heightening our
senses and bringing out the poet in us.
Autumn is, as most poets say, the
crowning glory of the year!
But I’m just dreaming! Though San
Diego is blessed with a fantastic weather
all year round – the real autumn belongs
somewhere else. Here, we don’t really
experience the four temperate seasons
of the year: winter, spring, summer and
fall. Neither does our version of autumn
bring us all its colorful glory. Although
I wish it does!“Pumpkins in the corn-
felds, gold among the brownLeaves
of rust and scarlet, trembling slowly
downBirds that travel southward, lovely
time to play
Nothing is as pleasant, as an autumn
day!”
There is no doubt that autumn or
fall has defnitely started, what with
an overcast sky and off-and-on drizzle
the past few days. The coolness is just
enough to dissipate the summer warmth
… enough to be wearing sweaters again,
but not yet cold enough for winter coats.
What makes autumn, or fall as everyone
calls it here in the West Coast, so won-
derful and a favorite of many? Answers
come in many forms, but denote a simi-
lar theme. Among them are the follow-
ing:--- Autumn is so picturesque. The
riot of colors flls the air with sweetness
and glory.--- It’s a very inspiring season,
a pretty awesome time of the year!---It
is a release from the heat of the long hot
summer.---Autumn/fall is the perfect
time to get together with wonderful
friends and have a fall party.--- I feel
more refreshed during autumn.--- At
the beginning of fall, we have one extra
hour to do what we have to do, but most
of us use it to go to sleep.---It’s windy
and cool, and I love it when the breeze
blows my hair all over my face.---With
the kids back in school, the house is
once again neater and quieter.--- The
perfect time to cuddle with my loved
one and whisper sweet things in her
ear. ---Fall has an energy about it that
seems to bring out the best in my mood.
---The crisp air motivates me to shop for
a new wardrobe.---Fall is magical. Even
more so than spring when everything
comes alive once more! ---Anticipation
of the big holidays coming up: Hal-
loween, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving
Day and Christmas. --- The fun days are
here again!For others, autumn may seem
to denote a time of melancholy as the
poem Autumn Dreams by Mortimer C.
Brown suggests:
“I know the year is dying, soon the
summer will be dead.
I can trace it in the fying, of the black
crows overhead;
I can hear it in the rustle, of the dead
leaves as I pass,
And the South winds plaintive sighing,
through the dry and withered grass.
Ah, ‘tis then I love to wander, wander
idly and alone,
Listening to the solemn music, of
sweet nature’s undertone;
Wrap in thoughts I cannot utter,
dreams my tongue cannot express,
Dreams that match the autumn
sadness,In their longing tenderness!”

To me, autumn is not a sad season at
all. Every season has its pleasure, and
autumn is no exception. It’s a perfect
time for refection, for opening our
hearts and minds to this beauteous sea-
sonal dance of joy. According to Eliza-
beth Barrett Browning, during autumn
“the Earth is crammed with Heaven and
every common brush afre with God.”
In contrast to this year’s onset of
autumn, last year was really warm. It
was just like summer again – “Indian
Summer”! The informal term “Indian
summer” dates back to the 18th century
in the United States to defne the spell
of warm, quiet, hazy weather that occurs
in October or even in early November.
It’s a kind of a transition-weather as the
thunderstorms and severe weather gives
way to a tamer, calmer period before the
turbulence of winter starts.
We don’t know if there’s another
“Indian Summer” along the horizon in
the days up ahead. Maybe “Indian sum-
mer” will visit us again, or maybe it will
not. Cool days are much better for me!
If you love Fall/Autumn as much as I
do, “let yourself be silently drawn by the
strongest pull of what you really love.”
Picturesques Images of Autum
“If you don’t get it, you just don’t get
it.” - The Washington Post.
“Jeff Bezos got it! In fact, he totally
got it.” - my barber.
The latest news that shocked Washing-
ton, D.C. is the sale of The Washington
Post paper by the Graham family to
Amazon’s founder and Chief Executive
Offcer (CEO) Jeff Bezos.
How will the change of ownership af-
fect the paper itself, its employees, and
its current policies and character as the
provider of local, national, and interna-
tional news? Will it continue its role as
a mover and shaker as it universalizes
local knowledge and localizes universal
knowledge?
WASHINGTON, D.C.
My barber always hears this at the
barbershop, “Nothing happens in the
world without the knowledge or some
infuence, directly or indirectly, of
Washington, DC”
This explains the fact that almost all
countries, especially the developing
ones are represented in the Capital. This
is either through their embassies or
even through law, lobby and PR frms
who aggressively advocate for their
causes. So are non-government organi-
zations, trade and business associations,
religious, educational, and charitable
institutions, large and multinational
companies, and of course, political con-
stituents. Through them causes become
known and debated on!
For academic and professional re-
searchers, Washington, D.C. is always
the place to go. The Library of Con-
gress has a copy of almost every book,
fction or non-fction on earth. The
country desks at the State and Com-
merce departments give you access to
information (demographics, economic,
political, etc.) for every country. For
more details, the CIA makes the
non-confdential data available to the
public. Of course stored and hidden,
but retrievable when necessary, data col-
lected by the National Security Agency
(NSA) abroad and locally, affrms the
overwhelming reach of Washington.
THE WASHINGTON POST Links
Every active player mentioned above
could not have survived Washington
without being affected by the indis-
putable infuence of The Washington
Post. Either as subscriber, reader or
most specifcally, a recipient of what
the paper provides namely: local, na-
tional, and international news, facts, and
views. It covers almost every feld of
endeavor – science, art, sports, enter-
tainment, politics, business, and many
more.
In fact, even passive players including
residents have been and continue to be
touched by the paper to their dying day
depending on what Jeff Bezos would
eventually do.
Personally, I did have exposure and
links to The Washington Post. It goes as
far as when I was one of 6 among 2,882
American Field Service scholars from
59 countries gathered in Washington,
who was interviewed by the paper. It
landed on Page A11 of the paper on July
19, 1964.
Then, in 1977 after my family and
I escaped from the Marcos dictator-
ship, we came to Washington, D.C.
recognized as “political refugees” both
by the United Nations and the United
My Links to The Washington
Post and Amazon’s Jeff Bezos
Page 7 Asian Journal - (619) 474-0588 Visit our website at http://www.asianjournalusa.com October 18-24, 2013
(Continued from page 8)
Unauthorized sale
(Continued from page 6)
Emergency
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CLASSIFIED AD with our
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suffce to overcome the presumption
that the second lot, acquired during the
marriage, is conjugal.
For his part, the buyer argued that he was
a buyer in good faith, but the Supreme Court
rejected his claim and said that a purchaser
in good faith is one who buys the property of
another without notice that some other person
has an interest in it. The buyer had construc-
tive notice that the property is conjugal
because it was registered in the name of both
husband and wife. The buyer even had actual
knowledge since the wife told him that the
property in conjugal.
For a buyer dealing with land registered in
the name of and occupied by the seller whose
capacity to sell is restricted, the buyer must
show that he inquired into the seller’s capac-
ity to sell. In the case of a property registered
under the name of both spouses, the authority
of one of them to sell is restricted, meaning
that he or she must get the other’s consent
because the property is presumed to be conju-
gal. In fact, the wife was in actual, visible and
public possession of the property at the time
the transaction was being made. Thus, at the
time of sale, buyer knew that wife has a right
to or interest in the property and yet he failed
to obtain her conformity to the deed of sale.
Hence, buyer cannot now invoke the protec-
tion accorded to purchasers in good faith.
Interestingly, the Court ordered the husband
to return the purchase money to the buyer.
In return, the buyer was ordered to reconvey
(return) the property to the spouses. But,
what if the husband does not have the money
anymore to return the purchase money? Will
this mean that the buyer is not obligated to
reconvey the property? Although the Court
was not clear about this, our opinion is that
regardless of whether the husband is able to
return the purchase money, the property will
go back to spouses. This is because the sale
is void, which means that there was no sale at
all. But the buyer is not without recourse. He
can enforce payment of the purchase price,
which may ultimately mean executing on
the husband’s one-half share in the conjugal
property. The wife will still be entitled to her
half share. The buyer would have no one to
blame but himself if he is not able to fully
recover his money.
Atty. Rogelio Karagdag , Jr. is licensed
to practice law in both California and the
Philippines. He practices immigration law
in San Diego and has continuously been a
trial and appellate attorney in the Philippines
since 1989. He travels between San Diego
and Manila. His offce address is located at
10717 Camino Ruiz, Suite 102, San Diego,
CA 92126. He also has an offce in the
Philippines at Suite 1718, Manila Execu-
tive Regency, 1200 J. Bocobo Street, Ermita,
Manila, 1000, with telephone numbers
(632)522-1199 and (632)554-0412. Please
call (858)348-7475/(858)536-4292 or email
him at rkaragdag@attyimmigration.com. He
speaks Tagalog fuently. Articles written in
this column are not legal advice but are hy-
potheticals intended as general, non-specifc
legal information. Readers must seek legal
consultation before taking any legal steps.
for your energy information.
Log in to MyAccount today and be
sure we have the most current informa-
tion on hand so that SDG&E has the best
way to keep you informed in the event of
a power outage.
Do you or a loved one require 24-hour
electricity for a medical device?
The Medical Baseline Allowance
Program provides an additional amount
of gas and electricity at the lowest rates
for residential customers and allows us
to proactively contact you in the event of
an emergency. Anyone with a qualifying
medical need can apply for the allow-
ance. Sign up for the Medical Baseline
Allowance Program today! SDG&E
also has a program for temperature sen-
sitive customers.
Have a Plan
Using a small standby generator for
electricity during an outage can keep
your home and business running smooth-
ly. Follow these tips in order to run your
generator safely and properly:
Store your generator outside in a dry
location to avoid carbon monoxide poi-
soning.
Never plug a generator into any
electric outlet in your home or business.
It can be deadly.
Follow all instructions on properly
“grounding” the generator.
Turn off the generator for at least fve
minutes when refueling to avoid starting
a fre.
Keep extension cords out of the way
so they don’t present a tripping hazard.
Visit SDG&E’s generator safety page
for more information.
Don’t Be in the Dark
Hazardous weather conditions and
high winds are two common causes for
power outages. SDG&E’s nearly 150
weather stations across the county help
monitor wind and weather along power
lines and this information is updated
several times an hour on our website.
To view outages in your area, visit our
outage map.
Download the SDG&E app today
to view the outage map on your smart
phone!
For more information about how you
and your family can be prepared in an
emergency, visit http://www.sdge.com/
safety/emergency-preparedness/emer-
gency-preparedness.
Just one more way SDG&E is connect-
ing its customers to solutions.
OTHER DISASTER PLANS
There are many other written disaster
plans. One of them is the San Diego
County Offce of Emergency Services
Family Disaster Plan and Personal Guide
that was published so residents can be
prepared the next time a major disaster
strikes the region. It is a simple publica-
tion that gives an evacuation check list
and a family disaster plan and personal
survival guide. More information can be
obtained from the Offce of Emergency
Services, County of San Diego, 5201
Ruffn Rd, Ste O, San Diego, CA 92123-
9914.
A more comprehensive and detailed
handbook is that published by the Coun-
cil of Community Clinics in partnership
with Project Concern International. The
handbook provides families with an
easy to use, quick reference, all hazards
guide that will help them safely prepare,
respond and recover if they become
involved in a disaster event. Call (619)
542-4300 for more information.
ANNOUNCEMENT!!!!!
YOU ARE INVITED TO ATTEND
“KALUSUGAN COMMUNITY
SERVICES 21ST AND FILIPINO
AMERICAN WELLNESS CENTER
11TH ANNIVERSARY
CELEBRATION”
“Honoring Our Volunteers: KCS’s
Golden Nuggets”
November 16, Saturday,
10:00 AM to 2:00 PM
1419 East 8th Street,
National City, CA 91950
For more Information
and RSVP, call (619) 477-3392
SAMPLE TWEETS
FIRE SEASON is here and there are
many ways to ensure you and your fam-
ily will be safe: http://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=T-imkIoLBRk #ESPSDGE
PREPARED FOR AN UNEXPECTED
EMERGENCY? See the ways @SDG&E
is helping customers prepare for the
unexpected: http://bit.ly/14yPHIp
#ESPSDGE
by Carla P. Gomez, Inquirer.net |
BACOLOD CITY, Negros Occidental
, 10/12/2013 – One of the offcers of
the Organization for the Prohibition of
Chemical Weapons that won the Nobel
Peace Prize is a Filipino.
Franz Ontal, 49, head of inspector
training of OPCW, grew up in Victorias
City, Negros Occidental. And his family
and alma mater in Negros Occidental
could not be any prouder.
“Our family is deeply proud of Franz,
his teammates in the feld, the OPCW
and their courageous work over these
many years, implementing the Chemical
Weapons Convention and eradicating
stockpiles of the world’s most ter-
rible weaponized toxins,” said Ontal’s
Manhattan-based brother, Rene, in a
FaceBook chat with the Philippine Daily
Inquirer on Saturday.
Brother Ray Suplido of the Univer-
sity of Saint La Salle in Bacolod City
said Ontal serves as a good example to
students and to others as one who uses
his knowledge and skills in the service
of humanity.
“Ontal’s being part of the organization
is a great honor and pride for La Salle
Bacolod, which inculcates in its students
the need to work for causes that beneft
the people,” he said.
Ontal is the fourth of six children of
the late Dr. Pat Ontal, a company physi-
cian at Victorias Milling Company, and
the former Lydia Teves Gamboa.
According to Rene Ontal, his brother
graduated from La Salle High School
Bacolod in 1980, completed his degree
in Biology in 1985 and began pre-med
studies at La Salle College Bacolod
before immigrating to the New York
metropolitan area. There he eventually
served as a paramedic and emergency
medical technician instructor with the
New York City Emergency Medical
Services, then under the New York
City Health and Hospitals Corporation,
which later merged with the New York
City Fire Department.
In 2005 Rene said his brother left New
York City for The Hague, Netherlands,
to begin his service with the OPCW, frst
as a medic for the chemical weapons
inspector and disposal teams and later as
head of inspector training, a position he
still holds.
The OPCW won the Nobel Peace
Prize for its extensive efforts to
eliminate chemical weapons that have
haunted the world from Hitler’s gas
chambers to the Syrian battlefelds.
Formed in 1997, the OPCW, which is
based in The Hague, worked to enforce
the Chemical Weapons Convention, the
frst international treaty to outlaw an en-
tire class of weapons. It had kept a low
profle until last year when the United
Nations asked its help to investigate
alleged chemical weapons attacks in
Syria.
In explaining their work in Syria to
CNN, Franz Ontal said they tried to get
as much information as they could about
what they were doing.
“We want to know what the target
site looks like; we want to know what
we are after. The information we get is
what’s going to inform the inspectors
about the kind of protective equipment
they are going to wear,” he said.
Filipino is part of Nobel Peace
Prize winning group
Investigators take samples from sand near a part of a missile that was sus-
pected of carrying chemical agents, according to activists, in the countryside of Ain
Terma, Syria. The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, a watch-
dog group, was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday, Oct. 11, 2013. AP
Page 8 October 18-24, 2013 Asian Journal - (619) 474-0588 Visit our website at http://www.asianjournalusa.com
(Continued from page 1)
(Continued from page 6)
Getting Healthy
(Continued on page 7)
Our Life and
Times
Read Sim Silverio’s previous articles by visiting our website
at www.asianjournalusa.com
by Simeon G. Silverio Jr.
(Continued on page 8)
Read previous articles by visiting our website at www.asian-
journalusa.com
by Atty. Rogelio Karagdag, Jr.
Member, State Bar of California &
Integrated Bar of the Philippines
Phil - Am
Law 101
PHIL-AM LAW 101 by Atty. Rogelio
Karagdag, Jr., Member, State Bar of
California & Integrated Bar of the
Philippines
We have encountered several cases
where a co-owner sold a property he
jointly owned with another person,
usually his spouse (conjugal) or siblings
(inherited). Sadly, the seller usually re-
sorted to the criminal act of forging his
co-owners’ signatures either in the deed
of sale or in the power of attorney.
In the particular case of a husband
selling conjugal property with the wife’s
consent, and even over her objection,
the Philippine Supreme Court ruled in
Ravina vs. Abrille (2009) that the sale
is void.
The case involved two lots located in
Davao City. The frst lot was acquired
by the husband before their marriage.
The second lot was acquired by the
spouses in 1982 while they were already
married. Since the law in effect at that
time was still the Civil Code, the proper-
ty regime of the marriage was governed
by the conjugal partnership of gains,
which simply says that all incomes
earned and properties acquired dur-
ing the marriage are considered owned
in common by the husband and wife.
Properties that belonged to one spouse
before the marriage remained his or her
separate property. (In contrast, marriag-
es from August 3, 1988 are governed
by the Family Code which observes the
absolute community of property regime,
under which even assets acquired before
the marriage are owned in common by
the spouses).
Several years into the marriage, the
spouses separated. Husband moved out
of the house. Wife was forced to sell or
mortgage their movables to support the
family and the studies of her children.
For his part, husband sold the two lots.
Wife objected and notifed the buyer of
her objections, but the sale proceeded.
It appears on the said deed that wife did
not sign on top of her name.
Wife went to court to void the sale.
During the trial, husband claimed that
he purchased the frst lot while he was
still single, while the second lot was
acquired during the marriage from funds
derived from the sale of another prop-
erty which he also purchased while he
was still single. In other words, husband
claimed that the money used to purchase
the second lot came from his exclusive
funds.
The Supreme Court said that to
address the issue, it is imperative to
determine: (1) whether the lots are
exclusive properties of the husband or
conjugal properties, and (2) whether its
sale by husband was valid considering
the absence of wife’s consent.
The Supreme Court agreed with hus-
band that the frst lot was his exclusive
property, since he acquired it under his
own name alone before the marriage.
However, as regards the second lot, the
Supreme Court cited Article 160 of the
Civil Code which provides, “All proper-
ty of the marriage is presumed to belong
to the conjugal partnership, unless it be
proved that it pertains exclusively to the
husband or to the wife.”
Since the second lot was acquired
during the marriage, it is presumed to be
conjugal, and husband has the burden of
proving that it is his exclusive property.
However, no evidence was adduced to
show that. His bare assertion would not
Unauthorized Sale of Common
Property
fnd jobs, especially in the government
because with their facility with the lan-
guage, they could effectively deal with
their clients. In contrast, immigrants
from non-English speaking countries
like the Chinese, Japanese, Vietnam-
ese and others have diffculty fnding
jobs since they cannot not effectively
communicate in English, hence they are
forced to put up their own businesses
instead. By working hard, putting extra
long hours and using cheap, if not free
labor, of their immediate families, their
businesses become successful and they
become economically independent.
Ironically, they then hire the Filipinos as
workers and employees.
Political reward
But things changed when Cory
Aquino toppled the Marcos dictatorship
in the Philippines in 1986. As a political
reward, she brought many of her nation-
alist supporters to power who encour-
aged her to free top political prisoners
including the die-hard communists, and
also to adopt Pilipino as the medium of
instruction in public schools. They rea-
soned that with English, Filipinos could
not think effectively, thus hindering
the country’s development. They cited
Japan, which uses its native language in
its education system, as an example.
The result, however, was the opposite.
Instead of helping the country, the in-
ability of many Filipinos to effectively
communicate in English seemed to
have hindered the advancement of their
professional careers. And it caused ad-
ditional drawbacks.
For one thing, I fear that it may further
widen the gap between the rich and the
poor. This is because English continues
to be used as a medium of instruction
in private schools. As a result, private
school students, who usually come from
the middle and higher income families
as they can afford to pay for their educa-
tion, corner mostly the high-paying
managerial jobs. Before, when they
could speak English well, talented pub-
lic school graduates could pass through
the cracks in the ceiling and become top
executives themselves. Many success
stories have been documented regarding
this. Because of the lower percentage of
public school graduates succeeding due
to their limited mastery of the English
language, the poor will become poorer
and the rich will become richer.
“Texting”
Another recent development that I
believe harms the Filipinos ability to
speak fuent English is the introduction
of “texting” with the use of cell phones.
This involves the keying of letters to
form texts and messages in a cell phone
to be transmitted to another cell phone,
a cheaper way of communication com-
pared to speaking over the phone itself.
To save further on the cost of sending
out messages, the senders abbreviate
or omit words at the expense of proper
grammar and spelling. They get used
to this habit that when they do formal
writing, they get confused and fail to
remember, if not fail how to to speak or
write correctly.
This reminds me of my experience
here in the United States. I notice that
a lot of Americans are not able to spell
even the simple words like “receipt”
correctly. Often times, whenever they
write this word down, they spell it as
“reciept”. I believe this is because of
the practice of schoolteachers to give
priority in encouraging the development
Speaking Good English
(Continued on page 8)
of the student’s process of thinking over
correct spelling. I was told that when
the students are asked to write essays,
they are encouraged to write down their
thoughts frst, even if the words they are
using are not spelled correctly.
“Write down the words by the way
they sound, if you do not know the cor-
rect spelling,” this must have been the
teachers’ instruction.
When we were students in the Philip-
pines, our spelling was also corrected
in addition to grammar whenever our
teachers went over our term papers. I
guess spelling and grammar are ignored
here in the U.S. so as not to intimidate
or deter students from expressing their
thoughts freely.
Highlighted
This problem was highlighted when
African-American comedian Bill Cosby
noted in a television interview that in
many communities, especially in his
own Black community, English is not
spoken grammatically correct. As a re-
sult, these communities have developed
their own distinct lingo, quite different
from the proper usage of the English
language. I remember during one Oscar
awards ceremony, when a top lady
Black comedian named “Wanda” was
performing. She asked Bill Cosby, who
was in the audience, for his thoughts.
Cosby, annoyed at the way the Black
woman comedian was talking, curtly
said: “We spoke correct English!”
It was a putdown before a nationwide
television audience and it was not left
unnoticed in the newspapers’ coverage
of the awards night the next day.
Cosby received both criticisms and
praises for his comments in the televi-
sion interview (not the Oscar award
remark). Some leaders in the Black
community criticized him for putting
down his own people. Others however,
praised him for his frankness and for
telling the truth, a self-critical action
that they believe would beneft their
community. To those who accused
Cosby of being against the black com-
munity, they pointed out the fact that
Cosby has donated millions of dollars
of his own money to the beneft of the
African-Americans. They agreed with
Cosby when the comedian commented
that some people in their community
have a wrong sense of values by buying
expensive sneakers instead of putting
food on their table.
“For a man to abandon his child,”
Cosby also noted, “is no longer consid-
ered a shame, but has become a com-
mon practice!”
Sociologists, in fact, have coined
a name, “Eubonics,” describing this
distinct usage of the English language
by some African Americans. They
theorized that this kind of English is
evolving into a separate language.

Changed
I suppose the King’s English has been
changed, if not corrupted, in different
ways through the course of history.
When we read books with different
settings or time periods, the English
spoken are sometimes different, depend-
ing on the setting or period of the story.
Hence we have “English” as spoken in
the South or the one spoken in the New
England states.
But this should not give the Filipinos
an excuse for developing their own ver-
sion of the English language. They may
eventually fnd themselves understand-
ing only each other and may be isolated
from the rest of the world. In this age
of globalization when international out-
reach is needed for a country to survive,
the inability of the Filipinos, who are
already hampered by their strong, some-
time unintelligible accents, to speak
proper English, may prove harmful to
their progress as a people. - AJ
think of that did you? Q: Is getting in
shape important for my lifestyle?
A: Hey! ‘Round’ is a shape! In fact,
round is a great shape – it’s the shape of
coins, of suns, moons, planets, cakes,
pies, eyes, CDs, and more coins. Like I
said, round is a great shape – enjoy it!
Well, I hope this has cleared up any
misconceptions you may have had about
food and diets. With magazines, televi-
sion, the Internet, and nosy friends, there
is so much misinformation out there it’s
pathetic. We simply need to do what
we have to do to feel good, be “rela-
tively” healthy, and just let it go. And
fnally remember: “Life should NOT be
a journey to the grave with the intention
of arriving safely in an attractive and
well preserved body, who needs that? I’d
rather skid in sideways - Chardonnay in
one hand - chocolate in the other - body
thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and
screaming ‘WOO HOO, what a ride!’”
Page 9 Asian Journal - (619) 474-0588 Visit our website at http://www.asianjournalusa.com October 18-24, 2013
(Continued from page 2)
Got any jar stories
Spiritual Life
Balintataw
Read Virginia Ferrer’s previous articles by visiting our web-
site at www.asianjournalusa.com
by Virginia H. Ferrer
October is the month of the
Most Holy Rosary
“The Most Holy Virgin in these last times
in which we live has given a new efficacy
to the recitation of the Rosary to such an
extent that there is no problem, no matter
how difficult it is, whether temporal or
above all spiritual, in the personal life
of each one of us, of our families…that
cannot be solved by the Rosary. There
is no problem, I tell you, no matter how
difficult it is, that we cannot resolve by
the prayer of the Holy Rosary.” -- Sister
Lucia dos Santos, Fatima seer
Ako
Isang hamak na nilalang sa mundong ito
meron dapat gampanan sa kapwa ko tao
at sa Diyos na mahal ang tanging hangad ko
gumawa ng kabutihan masaya na ako.
Hangad ko’y mahubog mga murang isipan,
sa tamang landas ng magulong buhay,
sa tulong ng Diyos at mga kaibigan,lahat ng ito’y
maisasakatuparan.
Tulad ng mga rosas na maraming tinik,
sadyang ganyan ang buhay sa ating paligid
huwag patatalo huwag magpapadaig,l
oob’y lakasan nasa Diyos ang pag-ibig.
the sand. The students laughed.
“Now,” said the professor, as the
laughter subsided, “I want you to rec-
ognize that this jar represents your life.
The golf balls are the important things --
your family, your children, your health,
your friends, your favorite passions,
God -- things that if everything else was
lost and only they remained, your life
would still be full.
“The pebbles are the other things that
matter like your job, your house, and
your car. The sand is everything else --
the small stuff. “If you put the sand into
the jar frst,” he continued, “there is no
room for the pebbles or the golf balls.
The same goes for life. If you spend all
your time and energy on the small stuff,
you will never have room for the things
that are important to you.
“Pay attention to the things that are
critical to your happiness. Play with
your children. Take time to get medical
checkups. Take your partner out to din-
ner. Play another 18. There will always
be time to clean the house, and fx the
disposal. Take care of the golf balls frst,
the things that really matter. Set your
priorities. The rest is just sand.”
One of the students raised her hand
and inquired what the beer represented.
The professor smiled. “I’m glad you
asked,” he said.“It just goes to show you
that no matter how full your life may
seem, there’s always room for a couple
of beers.”
***
When I shared this story with another
friend of mine, this second friend shared
with me a Vietnamese fable that have
been passed on through several genera-
tions.
According to this fable, there was
once a boy who wanted to have a
monkey for a pet. There were a lot of
monkeys in a jungle near their village
but it was very hard to catch any of
them. They were fast and swift, and
could swing from one tree to another or
go up to the top of the trees where they
would be unreachable by humans.
Then, the father of the boy noticed
that the monkeys like to eat coconuts.
He conceived of a way to catch a
monkey using a coconut as bait. He got
one coconut that is small enough to be
placed inside a glass jar. He placed it
on the ground and he and his son hid
behind a tree. After a while, one monkey
came down and tried to get the coconut
inside the jar with his right hand. But
the opening of the jar was too small for
him to remove the coconut while hold-
ing it with his hand. All of a sudden, the
father of the boy jumped on the monkey
and caught it.The moral of the story?
The more we cling to our material pos-
sessions, the more we will lose what we
cannot do without – including our soul
and the most important things in life.
***
The story reminded me of yet another
feature story on the Animal Planet
channel about one community where
many wild ducks were dying. In search
of food in the garbage dumps, the
wild ducks would thrust their heads in
plastic, cone-shaped yogurt containers
and get stuck as the opening proves too
narrow for a clean exit. The ducks die,
ironically, of starvation.
What makes this picture more ironic
is that the frst two stories are fables that
are meant to teach. The last one is fact.
And inspite of it, most still don’t get it.
What surprises me is that despite this
television coverage and the danger the
yogurt containers pose to our wildlife,
nobody has called the attention of the
yogurt manufacturers. The same deadly
containers are still being used up to this
day. The moral of the story of our own
times eludes us. Now is the time to act.
Got any jar story to share? – AJ
A
local radio station
proclaims that their
music is “easy listen-
ing” which could be true from
a number of perspectives.
Music that is easy to listen to
might have little or no content
to engage the mind; perhaps
the sounds are soft, and with
very little change in tempo or
volume.
Many people report that when they
turn to God for answers, listening is not
easy: they strain to hear, but receive
“nothing.” But, another possibility in
listening to God can be found in a faith-
full decision to listen easily: by leaving
aside expectations of receiving answers
that are intellectually stimulating or of
dramatic intensity (similar to “volume”
and “tempo” in music). Choosing a
manner of easy listening to God might
at frst seem diffcult when we are
unfamiliar with the experience, but, un-
like the background music that has little
meaning, the responses we can receive
to our many and varied ways of relating
with God are exactly what we need to
satisfy our deepest needs and desires.
The attitude of trust that we apply to our
mode of listening makes possible a man-
ner of listening that is unstrained, yet is
powerfully effective.
We generally fnd it easy to listen
to those we love and to those whose
company we enjoy, whether the content
is light and with little for our minds but
plenty of satisfaction for our hearts, or
the subject matter is quite serious, and
elicits deep compassion from within us.
Whenever we are inclined to exercise
trust while we listen to someone, we
are almost sure to receive something
of value, even when we might hold a
different understanding or belief than
the person speaking to us. If we bring
trust with us to the times when we listen
to God, especially if we have previously
found companionship and love in that
relationship, easy listening is a natural
consequence.
Though communication with God can
seem to be primarily one-way, with us
having all the words, if we listen with a
peaceful spirit, or at least stop talking,
we are ready to receive the kinds of
responses that we need. And what we
need might sometimes include a few
words that speak directly to our hearts,
but more often turns out to be awareness
that we are loved, that we are fne as
we are, or that we are where we belong
Easy Listening
at this particular moment. We might
receive inspired thoughts that open our
minds to greater truth, but we more of-
ten fnd that rather than thoughts in our
minds, we notice stirrings in our hearts
- of peace, contentment, acceptance, joy,
longings, and desires.
Easy listening has a sometimes sur-
prising and even disconcerting aspect
when we remain quiet for a time and are
patient. Rather than a hoped-for “word”
from God, we might hear our own men-
tal chattering, and realize that some of
what is taking place in our minds is less
than useful, and that we need to care-
fully identify those that are inhibiting
our availability to spiritual experience.
Some are critical of our simple desire
to be in contact with God, others are
merely passing directionless thoughts
of no value. Rather than becoming
discouraged with such a discovery, we
can quietly choose to listen not to the
foreground noise in our minds, but to
the One who remains quietly in the
background of our hearts.
If easy listening to God is not yet a
familiar option, ask. And, after asking,
listen – with trusting ease.

Randy Roche, SJ
Center for Ignatian Spirituality
Loyola Marymount University
STE 900
(310) 258-8695
http://www.lmu.edu/cis
Page 10 October 18-24, 2013 Asian Journal - (619) 474-0588 Visit our website at http://www.asianjournalusa.com
(Continued on page 16)
Arts & Culture
SAN DIEGO, CA, 10/11/2013 - La
Jolla Music Society opens this Season’s
Discovery Series with 2013 Van Cliburn
International Piano Competition winner,
Vadym Kholodenko at the Auditorium
at TSRI on Sunday, November 3 at 3
pm. The frst musician in his family,
pianist Vadym Kholodenko enrolled at
Kiev’s Mykola Lysenko Special Music
School under Prof. Natalia Grydneva
and Prof. Borys Fedorov. From the
age of 13, he has made appearances in
the U.S., China, Hungary and Croatia.
In 2004 he was awarded the Russian
Youth National Prize “Triumph”, and in
2005 moved to Moscow to study at the
Moscow State Conservatory under the
tutelage of the Honoured Artist of the
USSR, Professor Vera Gornostaeva. His
La Jolla Music Society debut perfor-
mance will feature works by Rachmani-
noff and Mendelssohn.
La Jolla Music Society enhances the
concert-going experience by presenting
“Preludes” – pre-concert chats and per-
formances – prior to each performance.
San Diego Youth Symphony students
will perform at 2 pm.
Concert tickets are $5-$30 and are
available through the La Jolla Music
Society ticket offce, (858) 459-3728
and online at www.LJMS.org.
About the Artist – Vadym Kholodenko
Vadym Kholodenko was born in 1986
in Kiev, Ukraine. In 2011 he won First
Prize at the Schubert Piano Competition
(Dortmund, Germany) and in 2010 First
Prize at the Sendai Piano Competition
(Sendai, Japan), preceded by another
notable victory at the Maria Callas
Competition in Athens, Greece, where
he received the Grand Prix. The special
Maria Callas’ commemorative concert
at the Herod Atticus theatre marked his
debut with the “New Russia” orchestra,
led by the orchestra’s Chief Conduc-
tor, Yuri Bashmet. Mr. Kholodenko has
enjoyed an enriching collaboration with
Yuri Bashmet and the orchestra since.
Mr. Kholodenko has played in
recital and as soloist with orchestras
throughout Russia, U.S., Europe and
Asia, and has collaborated with many
distinguished conductors including
Vladimir Spivakov, Alexander Rudin
and Eugeny Bushkov. Since 2007 he
has worked with pianist Andrey Gugnin,
subsequently founding the duet iDuo,
La Jolla Music Society presents Vadym Kholodenko,
Piano Nov. 3 at the Auditorium at TSRI
touring throughout Europe and Russia,
and recording together. Mr. Kholodenko
has recorded CDs featuring works by
Schubert, Chopin, Rachmaninoff and
various contemporary composers.
About La Jolla Music Society
“We bring the world to San Diego” -
As one of Southern California’s leading
presenters of world-class performing
arts, La Jolla Music Society contributes
to San Diego’s cultural vitality year-
round through a rich variety of presen-
tations, including classical, jazz and
contemporary music, and dance. During
the 2013-14 Season, La Jolla Music
Society will present The Boston Pops,
Alisa Weilerstein & Inon Barnatan, The
Chamber Music Society of Lincoln
Center, Cedar Lake Contemporary Bal-
let, Yo-Yo Ma & Kathryn Stott, Mitsuko
Uchida, Jazz at Lincoln Center
Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis and
other high-quality artists both emerging
and world-renowned.
For more information, visit www.
LJMS.org, or call (858) 459-3728.
La Jolla Music Society’s 45th An-
niversary Season is supported by The
City of San Diego Commission for
Arts and Culture, the County of San
Diego Community Enhancement
Fund, the National Endowment
for the Arts, ResMed Foundation,
Sempra Energy, The Westgate Hotel,
Conrad Prebys and Debbie Turner,
Brenda Baker and Steve Baum, Joan
and Irwin Jacobs, The Frieman Family,
Rita and Richard Atkinson, Brian and
Silvija Devine, Sam B. Ersan, Kay and
John Hesselink, June and Dr. Bob Shill-
man, Jeanette Stevens, and an anony-
mous donor.
For more info, e-mail: KSakamoto@
LJMS.org
WHO: La Jolla Music Society pres-
ents Vadym Kholodenko, piano
WHEN: Sunday, November 3, 2013
at 3 pm
Prelude: San Diego Youth Symphony
students perform at 2 pm
WHERE: The Auditorium at TSRI
10640 John Jay Hopkins Drive, La
Jolla
TICKETS: Adult $30, Child
$5
Call (858) 459-3728
or order online at
www.LJMS.org
INFO: www.
LJMS.org
By Jeremaiah M. Opiniano , The
Philippine Connection | LIPA CITY,
10/23/2012 —Sr. Mary Celine of Jesus,
OCD knows by heart the Blessed
Virgin Mary cured her ovarian cancer,
and saved her from a harrowing road
accident in the United States —both of
which happening 29 years ago.
But the octogenarian nun was orally
mum over a supernatural event —the
alleged apparitions of Mary Mediatrix
of All Grace at a garden here— some
64 years ago. Though, Sr. Mary Celine
believed that had happened.
People can understand the Discalced
Carmelite nun’s disposition. For one,
she belongs to a congregation of clois-
tered nuns with vows of silence. For
another, she and her confreres had been
quiet about the alleged apparition for 40
years —until a local bishop lifted Mary
Mediatrix’s veneration in 1991 (that
which was reaffrmed by the existing
archbishop of Lipa just three years ago).
While this Marian nation is agog over
the canonization of Visayan proto-
martyr Pedro Calungsod, there’s
an ongoing re-investigation
of Mary Mediatrix of All
Grace’s apparition to
then Carmelite novice
Teresita Castillo by the
Episcopal Commis-
sion on Doctrine of the
Faith of the Catholic
Bishops’ Conference
of the Philippines
(CBCP). So almost
everyone, includ-
ing Lipa Archbishop
Ramon Arguelles, DD,
had to be tongue-tied.
On April 11, 1951, six
bishops collectively declared
this: the evidence of the 1948 appari-
tions of Mary Mediatrix at the Carmel
monastery at Brgy. Antipolo del Norte
“exclude any supernatural intervention
in the reported extraordinary happen-
ings.” This evidence includes those sur-
rounding the showering of petals, with
these rose petals reportedly curing sick
patients in later decades.
Castillo, from September 12 to 26,
1948, reportedly conversed with the
Blessed Mother at a vine inside the
monastery. Then on reported dates
from Sept. 28, 1948 to 1949, there were
episodes of the showering of rose petals.
The incident made headlines locally
and abroad, until Lipa suffered a public
backlash given the 1951 declaration.
But former Lipa Archbishop Mariano
Gaviola “reversed” the 1951 declaration
with a July 16, 1991 decree writing that
the image of Mary Mediatrix, hidden to
Hope prevails in Marian
apparitions probe
Sis. Teresita Castillo, Mother
Mary Cecilia of Jesus and Bishop
Afredo Maria Obviar in 1948
OUR LADY, MARY, MEDIATRIX OF
ALL GRACE in Lipa Carmel is venerated
again in 1991 after 40-year seclusion
Among the Virgin Mary’s prophecies to Castillo include the
current dominance of China, mentioned on Oct. 17, 1949 as a
“secret message”. “Pray hard for China’s dream to invade the
whole world. The Philippines is one of its favorites,” Castillo
quoted the Blessed Virgin as saying.
Miraculous petals from the shower of roses in Lipa
20 Marriage Tips
(Continued from page 4)
try to not be too stupid.
14) GIVE HER SPACE… The
woman is so good at giving and giving, and
sometimes she will need to be reminded
to take time to nurture herself. Sometimes
she will need to fy from your branches to
go and fnd what feeds her soul, and if you
give her that space she will come back with
new songs to sing…. (okay, getting a little
too poetic here, but you get the point. Tell
her to take time for herself, ESPECIALLY
after you have kids. She needs that space
to renew and get re-centered, and to fnd
herself after she gets lost in serving you,
the kids and the world.)
15) BE VULNERABLE… you
don’t have to have it all together. Be will-
ing to share your fears and feelings, and
quick to acknowledge your mistakes.
16) BE FULLY TRANSPARENT. If
you want to have trust you must be willing
to share EVERYTHING… Especially
those things you don’t want to share. It
takes courage to fully love, to fully open
your heart and let her in when you don’t
know i she will like what she fnds… Part
of that courage is allowing her to love you
completely, your darkness as well as your
light. DROP THE MASK… If you feel like
you need to wear a mask around her, and
show up perfect all the time, you will never
experience the full dimension of what love
can be.
17) NEVER STOP GROWING
TOGETHER… The stagnant pond breeds
malaria, the fowing stream is always fresh
and cool. Atrophy is the natural process
when you stop working a muscle, just as it
is if you stop working on your relationship.
Find common goals, dreams and visions to
work towards.
18) DON’T WORRY ABOUT
MONEY. Money is a game, fnd ways to
work together as a team to win it. It never
helps when teammates fght. Figure out
ways to leverage both persons strength to
win.
19) FORGIVE IMMEDIATELY
and focus on the future rather than carry-
ing weight from the past. Don’t let your
history hold you hostage. Holding onto
past mistakes that either you or she makes,
is like a heavy anchor to your marriage
and will hold you back. FORGIVENESS
IS FREEDOM. Cut the anchor loose and
always choose love.
(Continued on page 14)
Page 11 Asian Journal - (619) 474-0588 Visit our website at http://www.asianjournalusa.com October 18-24, 2013
Community
(Continued on page 16)
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SUND/Y, NOVEMPER 3, 2C¹3
We're aII in this toQether.
140 Films from 15 Countries in 10 days. The
Countdown is on!
Gala Screening, 2013 AFI Docs Film
Festival
Filmmaker scheduled to attend
Jose Antonio Vargas’ family didn’t
expect he’d be a success. They didn’t
expect that he`d fnd a network oI sup-
porters who’d believe in his promise.
They didn’t expect that talent, courage,
and hard work could allow him to tran-
scend his questionable background. In
other words, they did not fully anticipate
the power of the American dream.
Jose was brought to the U.S. at age 12.
He didn’t have papers, but his grand-
parents in California didn’t think it’d
be a problem because they fgured he`d
go into the service industry like they
did as immigrants from the Philippines.
But Jose learned English, made friends,
became a star student, edited the school
paper, acted in plays, went to college,
found a job with the Washington Post,
and won a Pulitzer Prize.
DOCUMENTED is not a documen-
tary about Jose Antonio Vargas’ achieve-
ments. It’s about, as he puts it, living
in a different kind of reality – that even
though he grew up on Anne of Green
Gables, Will Smith, and Salt-n-Pepa,
even though he pays taxes and pledges
allegiance to the stars and stripes, he
cannot share in the same liberties as
any other American, nor can he hug his
mother in the Philippines as any other
human being could.
The autobiographical DOCU-
MENTED is one of the year’s most
powerful documentaries not because
it’s a compelling rags-to-riches tale, but
because it’s the chronicle of a most un-
enviable process: Jose’s coming-out as
an undocumented American, his shaky
self-discovery as an activist and symbol,
Documented
and perhaps most crushingly, his learn-
ing how to be a son to a mother he
hasn’t seen since she let him go nearly
20 years ago.
As a documentarian, Jose Antonio
Vargas is a natural storyteller, nimbly
narrating his life story through snip-
pets from public appearances, archival
materials, and riveting footage with his
biological and non-biological families.
Through it all, the irony isn’t lost on him
that a most imperfect nation produced,
in many ways, a model American. What
gets lost in the discussion of immigra-
tion reform, and which DOCUMENT-
ED so emotionally discovers, is that the
perfecting – and careful re-examining –
of America is only possible with people
like his high school principal or his
newspaper colleague or his lola and lolo
who understood that compassion often
begins with a leap of faith. –Brian Hu
Jose Antonio Vargas, Ann Lupo / Asian American Panorama / USA / 2013 / documentary,
familv / 90 mins / English, Spanish, Tagalog with English subtitles / HD
T
oday is THE day! We
are so excited to an-
nounce our 14th San
Diego Asian Film Festival
line-up at various locations
throughout San Diego includ-
ing our home base Digiplex
Mission Valley at Hazard
Center.
We open SDAFF 2013 with one of
China's biggest hits of the year FIND-
ING MR. RIGHT at the Birch North
Park Theatre on Thursday, Nov. 7 at
6:30pm. It's the romantic comedy of a
sassy spoiled young woman from China
who takes Seattle -- and everyone in her
way -- by storm. Director Xue Xiaolu is
scheduled to attend.
Highlights oI the 10-day flm Iestival
include It's a Wong Fu Homecoming!
which showcases UCSD alumni & You-
Tube pioneers Wong Fu Productions,
Separated at Birth a spotlight panel
on two sets of identical twins adopted
around the world to only discover each
other with the help of new media, and
many oI Asia's hottest flms includ-
ing Hong Kong breakdancing hit THE
WAY WE DANCE, indie Japanese
breakthrough HOMESICK, Bollywood's
music and confetti-infused romance
YEH JAWAANI HAI DEEWANI, and
many, many more!
Audience Award, 2013 Udine Far
East Film Festival
Like a Mentos in your mouth, HOW
TO USE GUYS WITH SECRET TIPS
is easily the most refreshing, visually
effervescent, off-kilter romantic comedy
out of Korea this year. Make that from
anywhere. It’s a seesaw of mania and
comedy, bouncing around in a visual
wonderland flled with laugh-out-loud
humor and breakout star turns by Oh
Jung-Se and the perpetually interest-
ing Lee Si-Young, last seen together in
Couples.
The title’s glitchy retro grammar says
it all. A happy mix of B-movies from the
60s, Three Stooges antics, and female
how-to aesthetics, HOW TO USE
GUYS brings us Choi Bona, a surly
advertising assistant who glares through
fuIIy bangs and cinched hoodie as she
is continually overworked and dumped
on by her male peers. On one advertis-
ing shoot, Bona butts heads with Lee
Seung-jae, an eccentric pop star on the
verge of losing his celebrity luster. After
stumbling on a self-help VHS box-set
(VHS!), Bona unleashes Dr. Swarski, a
William Shatner-esque video genie who
inIects the flm with throwback gender
advice.
The real treat is Lee Si-Young whose
Bona is Unabomber meets Pikachu, un-
apologetic, charming, and a perfect par-
ry to Oh’s preening comedy. Startlingly,
HOW TO USE GUYS is the debut from
Lee Won-Suk, who doesn’t stray too far
from the rules of romantic comedy but
delivers with unforgettable mentholated
happy freshness. –Christina Ree
Lee Won-Suk / Asia Pop' / South Korea / 2013 / romantic
comedv / 116 mins / Korean with English subtitles / DCP /
West Coast Premiere
How To Use Guys With Secret Tips
We end SDAFF 2013 at the New Cen-
tral Library (downtown San Diego) on
Nov. 15 at 7:00pm with DOCUMENT-
ED, about Jose Antonio Vargas -- a
young charming Pulitzer Prize-winning
journalist who happens to be undocu-
mented. Brought to the U.S. from the
Philippines when he was a child, Vargas
didn't know he was undocumented until
he was rejected for a driver's license.
Directed by Vargas in his Ieature flm
debut, DOCUMENTED reveals his
background, career, and the mother
in the Philippines he hasn't seen in 20
years. Jose Antonio Vargas is scheduled
to attend.
To buy tickets and view all flms, pan-
els, and parties at SDAFF 2013 visit
www.pac-arts.org/SDAFF!
If you are as excited as we are, make
sure you tell us on our social media @
PacArtsMovement and Facebook.com/
SDAsianFilm.
Camera d`Or, 2013 Cannes Film
Festival
Ofpcial Selection, 2ô13 1oronto
International Film Festival
Ofpcial Selection, 2ô13 Busan Inter-
national Film Festival
The story could take place in many
countries, but ILO ILO is fundamentally
Singapore. The ethnic-Chinese Lim
family hires Teresa, a maid from the
Philippines, to take care of their son
Jiale, who is prone to disobedience. Like
ILO ILO
Anthony Chen / Discoveries
/ Singapore / 2013 / coming-
of-age, drama, family / 99
mins / English, Hokkien,
Mandarin, Tagalog with
English subtitles / DCP /
West Coast Premiere
CANCER CAN’T. I CAN.
People who can in San Diego.
Sisters. Survivors. You.
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breast cancer treatments, services and support for uninsured women and their families. Internationally, Komen is the
largest funder of breast cancer research in the world.
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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2013
We’re all in this together.
Page 12 October 18-24, 2013 Asian Journal - (619) 474-0588 Visit our website at http://www.asianjournalusa.com
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H MART
Page 14 October 18-24, 2013 Asian Journal - (619) 474-0588 Visit our website at http://www.asianjournalusa.com
Trends
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Jeane Napoles
(Continued from page 1)
(Continued from page 2)
UPCC
My links
(Continued from page 6)
(Continued from page 10)
20 marriage tips
revolutionized choir performance not
only in the country, but in the world.
The Choral tradition of representing the
country in foreign stages still lives four
decades later, and in their 21st Interna-
tional tour, they will be performing what
will be a frst in the UPCC history: A
Winter Tour.
“S’Aliw Himig:” Isang Lakbay
Taglamig 2013
For this year’s international tour,
the concert theme is “S’Aliw Himig:”
Isang Lakbay Taglamig 2013 (“Melodi-
ous Melange”” A Winter Tour 2013).
S’Aliw is a conjunction of two Taga-
log words “Saliw” (harmony, musical
accompaniment, medley, potpourri,
melange) and “Aliw” (delight, good
cheer, joyousness, liveliness) combined
with “Himig” (tune, melody, rhythm of
music, note, tone). “Lakbay Taglamig”
simply means a winter tour, journey or
travel.
S’Aliw Himig: Isang Lakbay Ta-
glamig begins on December 12, 2013
until January 15, 2014 and will cover
the West Coast from the State of Wash-
ington down to the main cities of Cali-
fornia in the United States of America.
UPCC will perform a varied repertoire
of Classics, Spirituals, Christmas
melodies, Broadway and Filipino music,
and not without their signature vibrant
choreography.
Under the leadership of Music Direc-
tor Professor Janet Sabas-Aracama,
the UP Concert Chorus embarks on
this journey with the hope to showcase
Filipino talent on a foreign stage, uphold
peace and be a cultural envoy in a time
of distress, and provide respite to our
kababayans who will be spending the
holidays in a foreign land, away from
their family. Through music, the UP
Concert Chorus brings their audiences
closer to home this Christmas.
About the Conductor
As a soloist with the Philippine
Philharmonic Orchestra (PPO), MPO
and Las Piñas Bamboo Festival, Prof.
Janet “Jai” Sabas-Aracama has sung
with such international conductors as
Piero Gamba, Ruggero Barbieri, Julian
Quirit and Oscar Yatco. On the concert
platform, she has performed in Han-
del’s Messiah, Stravinsky’s Les Noces,
Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9, Verdi’s
Stabat Mater and Requiem, Rutter’s
Gloria, Rossini’s Petite Messe Solen-
nelle, Mahler’s Symphony No. 8, Bach’s
St John’s Passion, Bach’s Magnifcat,
Bruckner’s Te Deum and Dvorák’s
Stabat Mater amongst others.
Opera and Broadway credits include
the roles of Katisha in Gilbert and
Sullivan’s The Mikado, Bloody Mary
in Rodgers and Hammerstein’s South
Pacifc, Suzuki in Puccini’s Madama
Butterfy, Mother in Jeffrey Ching’s
Rendezvous in Venice as well as
major roles in Gershwin’s Candide and
Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin amongst
others. She is a versatile singer, not only
in singing opera, art songs and Broad-
way but crossing over to contemporary
gospel, soul, jazz and Original Pilipino
Music.
Prof. Aracama earned her Bachelor’s
and Master’s degree in Music at the
University of the Philippines College of
Music in choral conducting, voice and
ethnomusicology. Her mentors were
Dean Rey T. Paguio for conducting,
Josie Bailen, Fides Asensio and Elmo
Makil for Voice. She is now a permanent
faculty member of the University of the
Philippines and currently is the Chair-
person of the Conducting Department.
On November 26, 1999, she was
elected and appointed by the University
to be the Artistic Director and Conduc-
tor of the renowned UP Concert Chorus,
flling the shoes of the late Dean Rey T.
Paguio.
With great determination and mu-
sicianship, she has led UPCC to win
numerous festival awards. Under her
leadership, UPCC has also been on
a number of international tours. She
is also a vocal and choral trainer and
facilitator of music workshops in the
Philippines and regularly serves as an
adjudicator in choral competitions. She
has acted as vocal instructor/coach in
numerous musical productions, includ-
ing Repertory Philippines’ productions
of “Into the Woods” and “Fiddler on the
Roof”, New Voice Company’s “Chess”
and more.
Washington State Concert Schedule
The frst stop of the UPCC Winter
Tour is in Washington State. The
Association of Filipino Engineers in
Washington (AFEW) headed by Jun
Aesquivel, The Beta Sigma Fraternity
headed by Dr. Nick Panlasique, Filipino
American Community of South Puget
Sound headed by Angel Vano, president,
with Rufno Ignacio, past president, as
coordinator, and the Crossover Christian
Church, headed by Pastor Greg Do-
mingo, are the sponsoring groups. The
concert schedule follows:
December 13, 2013 – Olympia,
Washington
December 14 & 15, 2013 – Seattle,
Washington
Jeane Napoles, whose mother is cur-
rently being investigated over one of the
country's biggest corruption scandals,
earned widespread derision for her
social media posts featuring fashy cars
and a swanky condominium in the US.
"We read the newspapers. We follow
the Internet. That is where we heard
about her," said Bureau of Internal Rev-
enue chief Kim Henares.
Government investigators allege Ms
Napoles' mother Janet, a businesswom-
an, helped members of the Philippine
parliament embezzle 10 billion pesos
($230 million) in government funds.
Three opposition senators as well as
former president Gloria Arroyo, who is
in jail for election fraud and graft, are
among those swept up in the investiga-
tion and could face criminal charges for
misuse of funds.
A photograph posted on social media
sites by Jeane Lim-Napoles, the daugh-
ter of Manila businesswoman, Janet
Lim-Napoles, show an extravagance that
has attracted the eye of the tax man.
The corruption scandal prompted
thousands to march in the streets in mas-
sive rallies against graft.
Prior to the scandal, 23-year-old
Jeane Napoles regularly took to Tumblr,
Instagram and YouTube to document her
high-fying lifestyle.
But after Filipino newspapers in June
broke the news about her mother's
alleged links to corruption, her posts
drew anger in the impoverished country
where many believe a few families are
enriching themselves unfairly.
Ms Napoles deactivated her social me-
dia accounts but her photos and videos
had already become viral.
Ms Henares said the tax evasion
complaint against Ms Napoles was not
linked to the corruption allegations
against her mother.
The bureau cited a Los Angeles
condominium that the daughter alleg-
edly acquired for 54.73 million pesos
in 2011, and a Philippine property she
bought in 2012.
A student studying fashion design, the
young woman had not fled any income
tax returns, itself evidence of tax eva-
sion, according to Ms Henares.
"We have always said there is nothing
wrong with being rich as long you pay
the right taxes," the offcial added.
Janet Napoles, her mother, was
detained in August for allegedly detain-
ing an aide who later blew the whistle
on her alleged role in embezzling state
funds.
Ms Henares denied any political mo-
tive in prosecuting the daughter and said
she was merely enforcing tax laws.
"Whether it is her fault or her mother's
fault, someone will go to jail," said Ms
Henares.
December 18 to 20, 2013 – Vancou-
ver, Washington
Details about the concert venue, time,
and ticket prices will be announced
later. Those who are interested to be
a sponsor, host family, or advertiser,
please contact the concert coordinators:
Jun Aesquivel at (206) 948-2145; Dr.
Nick Panlasigue at (253) 350-7038, Ru-
fno Ignacio at ((360) 238-8943, Vivian
Tadeo at (360) 574-6275 or Dr. Romy
Protacio, concert organizer, at (206)
755-8717.
After its stint at the Washington State,
the UPCC will proceed to California
(Los Angeles, San Francisco, Union
City, and San Francisco).
20) ALWAYS CHOOSE LOVE. AL-
WAYS CHOOSE LOVE. ALWAYS CHOOSE
LOVE. In the end, this is the only advice you
need. If this is the guiding principle through
which all your choices is governed, there is
nothing that will threaten the happiness of your
marriage. Love will always endure.
In the end MARRIAGE isn’t about Happily
ever after. It’s about work. And a commitment
to grow together and a willingness to continu-
ally invest in creating something that can endure
eternity. Through that work, the happiness will
come.
Marriage is life, and it will bring ups and
downs. Embracing all of the cycles and learning
to learn from and love each experience will
bring the strength and perspective to keep build-
ing, one brick at a time.
These are lessons I learned the hard way.
These are lessons I learned too late.
But these are lessons I am learning and com-
mitted in carrying forward. Truth is, I LOVED
being married, and in time, I will get married
again, and when I do, I will build it with a
foundation that will endure any storm and any
amount of time.
If you are reading this and fnd wisdom in my
pain, share it those those young husbands whose
hearts are still full of hope, and with those
couples you may know who may have forgotten
how to love. One of those men may be like I
was, and in these hard earned lessons perhaps
something will awaken in him and he will learn
to be the man his lady has been waiting for.
The woman that told him ‘I do’, and trusted
her life with him, has been waiting for this man
to step up.
If you are reading this and your marriage isn’t
what you want it to be, take 100% responsibil-
ity for YOUR PART in marriage, regardless of
where your spouse is at, and commit to applying
these lessons while there is time.
MEN- THIS IS YOUR CHARGE : Commit
to being an EPIC LOVER. There is no greater
challenge, and no greater prize. Your woman
deserves that from you.
Be the type of husband your wife can’t help
but brag about.-- Link: http://www.viralnova.
com/20-marriage-tips/
States. The Washington Post published
our experience after an interview.
In the early 1980s Ferdinand Marcos
had a U.S. State visit. Working with The
Washington Post we exposed two things
on Marcos after extensive research. First,
was Marcos’ excessive spending during the
visit. David Valderrama worked with me
in providing data to Donnie Radcliff of The
Washington Post. The paper published it
during the visit. The exposure helped propel
Valderrama to become the frst Filipino
elected State offcial in mainland USA. A
top hotel executive who was introduced to us
by the late Ninoy Aquino also helped us in
obtaining accurate fgures.
Second, was the exposure of Marcos’ Fake
Medals. Aresearch team led by then Colo-
nel Boni Gillego provided leads and testimo-
nies of living Marcos’ commanding offcers
belying Marcos’ claims of heroism to John
Sharkey of The Washington Post. Ninoy
Aquino and I signed as witnesses to the
affdavits of the guerilla commanders. The
latter’s article was also published during the
State visit.
In the early 1990s, The Washington Post
Company was granted pioneer status to oper-
ate a wireless technology called Personal
Communications Systems (PCS). In the
same period, I was able to negotiate a joint
venture deal between SysCom of Silicon
Valley, California and RCPI (Radio Com-
munications of the Philippine Islands). The
latter was the largest telegraph company in
the country while the former had a patented
technology to transfer digitally telegrams,
messages or mails several times faster than
what RCPI was using then.
Through my sister-in-law, Ria Manglapus
who was with The Washington Post arranged
for me to meet with the Vice-President of the
Post company. I proposed that the company
join us in the Philippines to introduce its
PCS wireless technology and operate a cel-
lular phone business. I offered the universal
telecom franchise of RCPI. Despite its
initial interest, the Post decided not to do it.
In May 1999, JMS (James Martin Sys-
tems) Worldwide, Inc., an IT company and
a wireless communications consulting frm
hired me as a Project Manager. JMS, which
was named after James Martin, the grandfa-
ther of information technology, was partly
owned by The Washington Post. When I
successfully landed a big contract on Y2K
Contingency Planning in the Philippines,
I was named Country Manager. While we
were there, we developed the Emergency
Communications Network (ECN) and
proposed the concept of a Philippine Rural
Interconnection Development Enterprise
(PRIDE) - a national broadband network. I
also called it the Rural “Electronifcation”
Program.
JEFF BEZOS Links
After the EDSARevolution, the digital
revolution was concurrently moving at an
exponential pace. I wanted to take advan-
tage of both revolutions by establishing
operations in the Philippines. I did not only
introduce the new digital messaging and
wireless voice technologies but digital sales
and marketing concepts that proved success-
ful by other companies later on.
First, I set-up a company called Divisoria-
Market.com. The idea was to make acces-
sible and available locally, nationally, and to
the world products sold at Divisoria market
at bargain prices. Then, I negotiated a joint
venture with the Alemar’s Bookstore to sell
their books and other products online. The
venture included the sourcing of all our sup-
plies from a trader in Divisoria.
This sounds like the business model of Jeff
Bezos’ Amazon.com, right? I went further. I
went into electronic publishing. I procured
the license to manufacture and exclusively
distribute in the Philippines. Franklin’s
eBookMan. This is a device that combined
the features of electronic organizer, eBook
reader, MP3 player, Audio Book player,
Voice recorder and others depending on the
apps.
Given the eBook technologies we created
eBooks and eLibraries for sale online and
offine.. We called them “library in your
pocket” and the law libraries as “law on
the go”. We jokingly told law students or
lawyers, “you can now take the law in your
own hands.”
Later on, Amazon.com bought Franklin’s
eBook technology and the eBookMan be-
came Kindle. The rest is history! Jeff Be-
zos is now a multi-billionaire spending 1%
of his wealth to buy The Washington Post.
On my part, unfortunate and unavoid-
able circumstances prevented a successful
outcome for my business model. But as my
father would say, “no such things as failure,
only suspended success.”
What would be the direction of The Wash-
ington Post? Bezos’ letter to the employees
should give an indication. He says, “The
values of The Post do not need changing.
The paper’s duty will remain to its readers
and not to the private interests of owners.”
When a dissatisfed customer of the
paper wrote to Bezos, “Thank god you’re
getting involved, you understand customer
services,” the latter immediately responded,
“Thank you for your input. Keep your ideas
coming.”
We might see more space allotted to Let-
ters to the Editor in both offine and online
versions or an increase of Bloggers in the
online edition – not unlike the comments,
ratings and reviews in Amazon.com.
Page 15 Asian Journal - (619) 474-0588 Visit our website at http://www.asianjournalusa.com October 18-24, 2013
Health and Wellness
Follow @asianjournal
on Twitter
ROOM
FOR RENT
Quiet Neighborhood
in National City. No
smoking. No drugs.
619.746.3416
CDC.gov -- Learn the risks and con-
sequences of food poisoning in the fun
new web series, Recipes for Disaster – a
fctional cooking show where the host,
Maria, unintentionally makes common
food safety mistakes when preparing her
dishes.
Recent high-profle outbreaks keep
food safety fresh in our minds. Food-
borne illness, sometimes called food
poisoning, is a common, costly—yet
preventable—public health problem.
Each year, about 1 in 6 Americans (or
48 million people) gets sick, 128,000 are
hospitalized, and 3,000 die of foodborne
diseases. Forgetting about food safety is
a recipe for disaster.
The Food Safe Families Campaign
Toolkit gives you free access to public
service ads and tips. It introduces Maria
and her passion for cooking—though
not always with best practices in mind.
Watch the Recipes for Disaster video
and learn the right steps as Maria does
everything wrong. See all of the ads
here http://www.foodsafety.gov/keep/
basics/ads/index.html
Not Just Consumers
It is important to know that food
safety does not solely rest with consum-
ers. Contamination with harmful bacte-
ria like E. coli, Listeria, and Salmonella
commonly occurs earlier along the farm
to table chain.
Common Foodborne Illnesses and
Symptoms
The most common foodborne illnesses
are norovirus, Salmonella, Clostridium
perfringens, and Campylobacter.
Symptoms of food poisoning can be
as commonplace as diarrhea or as life-
threatening as organ failure.
These illnesses can even cause long-
term health problems or death. When
young children, pregnant women, older
adults, and people with weak immune
systems eat contaminated food, they
have a greater chance of becoming
severely sick with problems like miscar-
riage or kidney failure.
See your doctor or healthcare provider
if you have:
Diarrhea, along with a high fever
(temperature over 101.5°F, measured
orally);
blood in the stools, prolonged vomit-
ing that prevents you from keeping
liquids down;
signs of dehydration, including a
decrease in urination;
dry mouth and throat, and feeling
dizzy when standing up, or if you have
had diarrhea for more than 3 days
No Laughing Matter: Know the
Risks and Rules
Everyone is at risk for food poisoning.
To reduce your risk, be savvy about how
germs can be found in contaminated
food and sometimes make you sick.
Here are 4 simple steps to food safety:
CLEAN
Wash your hands and surfaces often.
Germs can survive in many places
around your kitchen, including your
hands, utensils, and cutting boards.
Rinse fresh fruits and vegetables
under running water and follow the rules
of food safetyand Watch the CLEAN
video!
SEPARATE
Don't cross-contaminate. Even after
you’ve cleaned your hands and surfaces
thoroughly, raw meat, poultry, seafood,
and eggs can still spread germs to ready-
to-eat foods—unless you keep them
separate.
COOK
Cook to the right temperature . While
many people think they can tell when
food is "done" simply by checking its
color and texture, there’s no way to be
sure it’s safe without following a few
important but simple steps. Use a food
thermometer to ensure that foods are
cooked to a safe internal temperature:
145°F for whole meats (allowing the
meat to rest for 3 minutes before carving
or consuming), 160°F for ground meats,
and 165°F for all poultry.
CHILL
Keep your refrigerator below 40°F
and refrigerate foods properly. Germs
can grow in many foods within 2 hours
unless you refrigerate them. (During the
summer heat, cut that time down to 1
hour.)
For more information on preventing
food poisoning, check your steps at
FoodSafety.gov.
Recipes for
Disaster: Keep
safe from food
poisoning
WOONSOCKET, R.I., Aug. 15, 2013
-- A new survey from CVS/pharmacy
released today found that less than
half of those surveyed (46%) were more
likely to get a fu shot this year follow-
ing last season's late fu outbreak. But
many more - 59% - said they consider it
a social responsibility to get the fu shot
every year in order to keep their com-
munity healthy and minimize the spread
of the infuenza virus.
All CVS/pharmacy and most
MinuteClinic locations are offering fu
vaccinations this week and all locations
will have vaccine in stock by the end of
August. The Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention (CDC) recommend that
everyone who is at least 6 months old
get a fu shot as soon the vaccine is
available.
"It is important for people to get the
fu shot annually because it is the most
effective way to prevent the spread of
infuenza to others and your immunity
from the virus declines over time," said
Papatya Tankut, RPh, Vice President of
Pharmacy Affairs, CVSCaremark.
"The results of our consumer survey
demonstrate the heightened awareness
among Americans to get vaccinated, and
CVS/pharmacy and MinuteClinic are
two of the most convenient places to get
a fu shot."
Convenience is a major driver in a
consumer's decision about where to re-
ceive a fu shot. Nearly half (47%) of the
respondents agree that it is inconvenient
to make an appointment for a fu shot.
This season, more than 7,500 CVS/
pharmacy stores and 650 MinuteClinic
sites inside select CVS locations will be
providing fu shots every day, including
evenings and weekends, no appointment
needed.
The survey also indicated that 80% of
respondents who have ever received a
fu shot would recommend the high-
dose fu vaccine to a friend or family
member over the age of 65, knowing
that it increases the immune system's
response for added protection against
the fu virus.
For customers 65 or older, CVS/
pharmacy and MinuteClinic offer the
Fluzone High-Dose vaccine. The high
dose vaccine contains four times the
antigens as the seasonal fu vaccine in
order to provide better protection for
this age group, who are at greater risk of
developing severe illness from the fu.
Additional key fndings from the
survey include:
• More than 60% agree that they feel
more susceptible to the fu virus when
traveling.
• Nearly two in fve respondents agree
that they are more likely to get a fu shot
when fu outbreaks are reported in the
news.
• More than half of those who have
ever received a fu shot did so because
they believe it keeps them healthy and
safe.
Health insurance plans, including
Medicare Part B, typically cover the
CVS/Pharmacy Consumer Survey Finds Less
Than Half of Americans Are More Likely to Get
Vaccinated
full cost of a fu shot. CVS/pharmacy
and MinuteClinic can directly bill many
national and regional health plans that
cover all or part of the cost of a fu shot.
In addition to fu shots, CVS pharma-
cists and MinuteClinic nurse practi-
tioners and physician assistants are
available to provide a number of other
vaccinations, including pneumonia and
whooping cough, among others. Visit
vaccines.cvs.com for more informa-
tion on the vaccines offered. Certain
immunizations have age and location
restrictions.
Customers will receive a 20% off
CVS/pharmacy Shopping Pass when
they get a fu shot at CVS or Minute-
Clinic. The Shopping Pass can be used
with CVS/pharmacy's ExtraCare card to
save 20% off non-pharmacy purchases
up to $100.*
Survey Methodology
This United States survey was
conducted online by Harris Interactive
on behalf of CVS/pharmacy from June
18-20, 2013 among 2,084 adults, ages
18 and older.
This survey is not based on a probabil-
ity sample; therefore no assessment of
theoretical sampling error can be made.
About CVS/pharmacy
CVS/pharmacy, the retail division of
CVS Caremark Corporation (NYSE:
CVS), is America's leading retail phar-
macy with more than 7,500 CVS/phar-
macy and Longs Drug stores in the U.S.
CVS/pharmacy is reinventing pharmacy
to help people on their path to better
health by providing the most accessible
and personalized expertise, both in its
stores and online at CVS.com. General-
information about CVS/pharmacy and
CVS Caremark is available athttp://info.
cvscaremark.com/.
About MinuteClinic
MinuteClinic is a division of CVS
Caremark Corporation (NYSE: CVS),
the largest pharmacy health care pro-
vider in the United States. MinuteClinic
launched the frst retail medical clinics
in the United States in 2000 and is the
largest provider of retail clinics with
more than 650 locations in 25 states and
the District of Columbia. By creating a
health care delivery model that responds
to patient demand, MinuteClinic makes
access to high-quality medical treatment
easier for more Americans. Nationally,
the company has provided care through
more than 16 million patient visits, with
a 95% customer satisfaction rating.
MinuteClinic is the only retail health
care provider to receive three con-
secutive accreditations from The Joint
Commission, the national evaluation
and certifying agency for nearly 15,000
health care organizations and programs
in the United States. For more informa-
tion, visit www.MinuteClinic.com.
*Normal ExtraCare purchase restric-
tions apply for 20% Off Shopping Pass.
ExtraCare card is not required in the
state of HI. Offer is not valid in the
states of AR, NJ and NY. Shopping Pass
is not available at MinuteClinic in the
states of MA, NJ and NY. Flu shots are
available when immunizing pharmacist,
MinuteClinic nurse practitioner or
physician assistant is on duty, while
supplies last.
Five Facts About Goal Setting
TeensHealth.org
As we grow up, we get better at
knowing what we are feeling and why.
This skill is called emotional awareness.
Understanding our emotions can help
us relate to other people, know what we
want, and make choices. Even emotions
we consider "negative" (like anger or
sadness) can give us insight into our-
selves and others.
Emotional awareness comes more
easily to some people than others. The
good news is, it's a skill that anyone can
practice. Here are a few ways to become
more in touch with your emotions:
Notice and name your emotions. Start
by just noticing different emotions as
you feel them. Name them to yourself.
For example, you might say, "I feel
proud" when a class presentation goes
well, "I feel disappointed" at not doing
well on a test, or "I feel friendly" when
sitting with a group at lunch.
Track one emotion. Pick a familiar
emotion — like joy — and track it
throughout the day. Notice how often
you feel it and when. Whenever that
emotion shows up, you can simply make
a mental note to yourself or jot it down
in a journal. Notice where you are, who
you're with, and what you're doing when
that emotion is present. Note whether
the emotion is mild, medium, or strong
and if it has different intensities at dif-
ferent times.
Build your emotional vocabulary.
How many emotions can you name? Try
going through the alphabet and thinking
of one emotion for each letter.
Think of related emotions that vary
in intensity. For example, you might be
irritated, annoyed, mad, angry, irate, or
fuming. See how many of these "emo-
tion families" you can come up with.
Keep a feelings journal. Take a few
minutes each day to write about how
you feel and why. Journaling about your
experiences and feelings builds emo-
tional awareness. You also can express
an emotion creatively. Make art, write
poetry, or compose music that captures a
specifc emotion you're feeling.
There's lots more you can try, of
course. For example, you can try identi-
fying the emotions an artist is trying to
convey as you read poetry or listen to
music, then recognize how you feel in
response.
The more you're aware of your emo-
tions, the more they'll help you to know
yourself and understand the people
around you.
Reviewed by: D'Arcy Lyness, PhD
Date reviewed: November 2012
5 Ways to Be More Aware of
Your Emotions
TeensHealth.org -- These practical tips
on goal setting can help make it easier to
set and reach goals:
Specifc, realistic goals work best.
When it comes to making a change, the
people who succeed are those who set
realistic, specifc goals. "I'm going to
recycle all my plastic bottles, soda cans,
and magazines" is a much more doable
goal than "I'm going to do more for the
environment." And that makes it easier
to stick with.
It takes time for a change to become
an established habit. It will probably
take a couple of months before any
changes — like getting up half an hour
early to exercise — become a routine
part of your life. That's because your
brain needs time to get used to the idea
that this new thing you're doing is part
of your regular routine.
Repeating a goal makes it stick.
Say your goal out loud each morning
to remind yourself of what you want
and what you're working for. (Writing
it down works too.) Every time you
remind yourself of your goal, you're
training your brain to make it happen.
Pleasing other people doesn't work.
The key to making any change is to fnd
the desire within yourself — you have
to do it because you want it, not because
a girlfriend, boyfriend, coach, parent,
or someone else wants you to. It will be
harder to stay on track and motivated if
you're doing something out of obligation
to another person.
Roadblocks don't mean failure. Slip-
ups are actually part of the learning
process as you retrain your brain into a
new way of thinking. It may take a few
tries to reach a goal. But that's OK —
it's normal to mess up or give up a few
times when trying to make a change.
So remember that everyone slips up
and don't beat yourself up about it. Just
remind yourself to get back on track.
Page 16 October 18-24, 2013 Asian Journal - (619) 474-0588 Visit our website at http://www.asianjournalusa.com
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*Juris Doctor law degree, University of San Diego (1985),
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Comparative Law (USD), Oxford, England (1984);
Bachelor Degree, University of Southern California (1983);
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*Born in the Philippines (Cavite)
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Food for Thought
Read previous articles by visiting our website at www.asian-
journalusa.com
“The souls that say this chaplet will be embraced by My mercy during their lifetime and
especially at the hour of their death (754).” -- Words of Jesus in the Diary of St. Faustina
CHAPLET OF THE DIVINE MERCY
Using the rosary beads, recite one Our Father, one
Hail Mary, and one I Believe in God.
On the Our Father beads say this prayer, which
was given by Our Lord to St. Faustina (1905-1938).
Eternal Father, I oer You the Body and Blood, Soul
and Divinity of Your dearly beloved Son, Our Lord
Jesus Christ, in atonement for our sins and those of
the whole world.
On the Hail Mary beads say:
For the sake of His sorrowful Passion, have mercy
on us and on the whole world.
In conclusion say three times:
Holy God, Holy Mighty One, Holy Immortal One,
have mercy on us and on the whole world.
The Hour of Great Mercy
At three o’clock, implore My mercy,
especially for sinners; and, if only for a brief
moment, immerse yourself in My Passion,
particularly in My abandonment at the
moment of agony.This is the hour of great
mercy. In this hour, I will refuse nothing
to the soul that makes a request of Me in
virtue of My Passion (Diary, 1320). -- Divine
Mercy in My Soul: Diary of Saint Faustina
Kowalska
You expired, O Jesus, but the
source of life gushed forth for souls
and an ocean of mercy opened up
for the whole world.
O Fount of Life, unfathomable
Divine Mercy, envelop the whole
world and empty Yourself out upon
us. O Blood and Water, which
gushed forth from the Heart of
Jesus as a fount of mercy for us, I
trust in You. Amen.
Read about the Divine Mercy Chaplet + Divine Mercy Sunday + Hour of Great Mercy + Divine Mercy Novena + Diary of St. Faustina “Divine Mercy in My Soul”
Reflection
Direction for
Our Times
ILO ILO
(Continued from page 11)
(Continued from page 10)
Hope prevails
Father & Son
(Continued from page 1)
Laughing Matter
Read previous articles by visiting our website at www.asian-
journalusa.com
October 7, 2004,
Volume Ten
Jesus
M
y little apostles must
put aside tasks that
do not further My
Will. At this time, I am ask-
ing each one of you to bring
the Good News to souls. This
is your heavenly instruction.
I ask that you do this through
your duty, frst of all, because
it is in living the holy and
sacred life, following Me in
your daily duty, that I can
bring you to holiness.
This example of faithfulness will say
far more to others than if you neglected
your duty. So that is your frst priority
and you may rest in the fact that this
comes from Me. The second priority,
then, must be the spread of these words.
I want My words to move through your
world steadily. I do not want a frantic
haste, but neither do I want unneces-
sary delay. If you ask Me to show you
your role in this mission, I will show
you. You must say “yes” to Me. I speak
to your hearts, little apostles.You know
Me because you follow Me. Now is the
time to let nothing distract you from the
path to heaven. On that path you will
fnd that I am asking you to bring this
mission to fruition. This is the time for
which you have been prepared. Many
join the cause. Welcome them. Move
forward with the greatest humility be-
cause you have each been chosen to do
your little part. With your beautiful and
total “yes” I intend to save many souls.
Do not be distracted. If you fnd you
have been called, answer Me with love
and you will fnd yourself immersed in
heavenly grace.
www.directionforourtimes.com
the public eye for 40 years, be exposed
and venerated. Arguelles’ Nov. 12, 2009
decree reaffrmed Gaviola’s ruling,
while calling the reported apparition
“the most celebrated event recorded of
this local Church (of Lipa)”.

Apparitions
In the Catholic Church’s history, Marian
apparitions are harder to prove, as fraud and
deception are dangers, says lay Mariologist
and lawyer Marwil Llasos. In the Philip-
pines, for example, the 1989 apparition of
the Blessed Mother in Agoo, La Union unto
a guava tree had been ruled as constant de
non supernaturalitate (“nothing supernatu-
ral here,” thus not worthy of belief) by a
theological commission led by the late San
Fernando, La Union Bishop Salvador Lazo.
Of the over-500 Marian apparitions report-
ed, only about 14 of them, including those
in Lourdes (France) and Fatima (Portugal),
have been approved by Church authorities.
The ongoing test is the Blessed Mother’s
alleged apparition at Medjugorje in the for-
mer Yugoslavia (the place is found in today’s
Bosnia and Herzegovina) in 1981, itself
a delicate and unique case. An investigat-
ing team of the Vatican’s Congregation for
the Doctrine of the Faith, led by Cardinal
Camillo Ruini, will reportedly announce the
verdict later this year.
At the same time, it was only in May
this year that the Catholic Church’s basis
of evaluating apparitions, the 1978 “Norms
Regarding the Manner of Proceeding in the
Discernment of Presumed Apparitions or
Revelations” (written in Latin), was trans-
lated into fve languages. However, the 1978
norms do not apply to the 1948 reported
apparitions of Lipa.
Local dioceses were given powers by the
1978 norms to approve reported apparitions.
Llasos said the Church had to be “very
careful” in evaluating apparitions because
these can be “diabolical illusions” —or,
the devil can be responsible for these. “The
devil can transform himself into an ‘angel of
light,” Llasos told The Filipino Connection.
Mandated to investigate by the CBCP
were bishops Gabriel Reyes, Vicente Reyes
(Manila), Cesar Guerrero (San Fernando,
Pampanga), Mariano Madriaga (Lingayen,
Pangasinan), Juan Sison (Nuvea Segovia)
and then Apostolic Administrator of Lipa and
eventual Manila Cardinal Rufno Santos, all
of whom signed the 1951 verdict. But given
Gaviola’s 1991 reversal and Arguelles’ reaf-
frmation of Gaviola’s decree, CBCP-ECDF
is re-investigating the apparition in deference
to the 1951 committee.
After releasing their decrees, both Gaviola
and Arguelles formed archdiocesan com-
missions and tasked these to gather more
pieces of evidence and testimonials on the
Marian apparitions. Llasos notes, however,
of the Philippines’ limited number of experts
on Mariology and spiritual theology who
can help assess the reported apparitions like
Lipa’s.
Affirmations
While there’s an ongoing investigation,
Llasos said people are “free to believe” the
Marian apparitions in Lipa or not.
But after Llasos’ own meetings with
Castillo, his visits to Lipa, and his amass-
ing of secondary materials about Lipa, the
member of the four-year-old Dominican
secular group Company of St. Dominic
thinks the Marian apparition is “true” and
“supernatural.”
For one, Llasos says the apparitions “made
true prophecy”. Among the Virgin Mary’s
prophecies to Castillo include the current
dominance of China, mentioned on Oct. 17,
1949 as a “secret message”. “Pray hard for
China’s dream to invade the whole world.
Walking with Grandma
Four Catholic mothers
Four old Catholic women sit and
brag about their sons. The frst Catholic
woman tells her friends, "My son is
a priest. When he walks into a room,
everyone calls him 'Father'."
The second Catholic woman chirps,
"My son is a bishop. Whenever he
walks into a room, people call him 'Your
Grace'."
The third Catholic mother says, "My
son is a cardinal. Whenever he walks
into a room, he's called 'Your Emi-
nence'."
The fourth Catholic woman says, "My
incredibly handsome son is 6' 2 with
broad, square shoulders, good manners
and impeccable style. Whenever he
walks into a room, women say, 'Oh my
God!'"
I like walking with Gramdma, Her
steps are short like mine,
She doesn’t say “now hurry up”
She always takes her time.
I like to walk with Grandma,
Her eyes see things
like mine do,
We pebbles bright,
a funny cloud,
Half hidden drops of dew.
Most people have to hurry up,
They do not stop to see.
I’m glad that God made Grandma
unrushed and young like me!
and I would take turns doing
the driving and we did this
every day until we became
very good at it and we knew
every policeman in our town.
We were able to get away
as minors driving without a
license and no insurance. At
eleven years old I considered
myself an expert driver.
My close friends were Ernesto Mar-
tin, Celedonio Collado who was one of
our groomsman, my cousin, Eddie, Rico
Ramirez, the same guy who visited us in
Hawaii on their way to the Philippines
from Rhode Island, Demetrio Belmes, Boy
Ramirez, Mandong Cruz, Cesar Roque and
many more. Our gang built a swimming hole
in the Tulyahan River by clearing a lot of
debris. My uncle gave us an old steel cable
and we tied one end on the trunk of a big
Tsampoy tree and on the other end we fash-
ioned a wooden handle made from a guava
branch. We would swing on the cable and as
we were on the deep part, we would do all
kinds of acrobatic moves before we would
let go of the cable. This was so much fun
for us. We called this place “Pasong Choy”
for no reason and we did a lot of Tarzan ma-
neuvers using this cable that gave us about
a 15 feet drop to about 10 feet deep water.
During the rainy season the Tulyahan River
would be so swollen that water would almost
reach the bridge by our place. This was the
perfect time for us to construct a raft made
from banana trunks which was plentiful as
the wind would knock down many banana
trees. We would then gather some trunks and
connect them together with kakawate sticks
and then tie them with a rope. This would
be strong enough to hold the banana trunks
together and act as a raft enough for about
four people to ride the current of the swollen
river. We would start from the bridge which
was at Tabing Ilog, Novaliches and end up
at Pasong Choy, close to Kaybiga, about
10 miles downstream. This is also the same
river where I learned how to swim because
I fell in and I learned because of fear. I also
taught my brother, Mario, how to swim
(Continued on page 17)
The Philippines is one of its favorites,” Cas-
tillo quoted the Blessed Virgin as saying.
The other “prophecy” is that the Philip-
pines’ future saints will come from Lipa,
to include two of Lipa’s former bishops,
auxiliary bishop Alfredo Obviar and the
resident bishop Alfredo Versoza (see the
headline story ‘Obviar lobbyists think he’ll
be a saint soon‘).
Llasos also believes the reported appari-
tions promoted true devotion to the Blessed
Mother, as well as the praying of the Holy
Rosary. This is why, he adds, the National
Pilgrimage to Lipa for World Peace and
Sanctifcation of the Clergy is held every
Sept. 12 in Lipa City.
And if apparitions lead to “spiritual fruits”
such as conversion, or naming parishes on
behalf of Mary Mediatrix of All Grace (like
those in Digos City, Davao del Sur and Kida-
pawan, North Cotabato), or congregating for
prayer like the annual Sept. 12 festivities,
Mary’s spiritual mediation is “evident,”
Llasos contends.
“It is the Blessed Virgin Mary visiting her
children,” Llasos said, “telling us ‘I am your
Mother.’”
Awaiting
Arguelles, in an interview published in
Spirit Daily (an online Catholic news aggre-
gator), said while the Holy See “approved”
the 1951 declaration with a statement on
Sept. 28, 2010, his Nov. 12, 2009 decree
“does not, in any way, confict with the fnal
statement of the Holy See”. What also seems
to be excluded of any supernatural interven-
tion, to Arguelles’ reading of the 1951
verdict, are the evidence and testimonies.
“But no one can be stopped nor be faulted
if he feels otherwise,” Arguelles told Spirit
Daily, bearing mixed feelings after meeting
two offcials of the Vatican’s Congregation
for the Doctrine of the Faith and knowing
of the Holy See’s affrmation of the 1951
verdict.
“What we do (and what happens) now…
and in the near future is what matters more.”
The devotees then await the CBCP’s
verdict, with Manila Archbishop Luis
Antonio Tagle, DD chairing the ECDF and
spearheading the investigation, to be done
under the “strictest” provisions of canon law.
But Llasos thinks those who believed the
apparitions “will be vindicated” because that
“comes from God”.
But there’s solace daily at the monastery
in Lipa. The statue is encased in a glass
and a pocket of people quietly pray there
inside the main church. At a veranda inside
the monastery, one can view the vine and a
white replica of the statue.
Sr. Mary Celine was even tongue-tied in
giving her name orally. “Find my name on
page 51,” the nun said, pointing to a book
she freely gave. But in that book of testimo-
nials on the rose petals she gave away, Mary
Celine didn’t mince her words.
“All though the years, the Blessed Mother
has made her presence very tangible and
alive in this monastery.”
Given the ongoing investigations and
authorities refuse to speak (for fear of sub
judice), The Filipino Connection relied on
written accounts and online materials of the
reported apparitions, and an interview to
produce this story.
many Filipino women, Teresa has moved
abroad to take care of others in order to send
money home to take care of her own son.
Her presence though puts a strain on the Lim
family. Jiale in particular doesn’t make the
transition easily, and takes it out on Teresa.
But as they feel each other out with equal
parts caution and belligerence, his hate turns
into a surprising affection.
ILO ILO is a semi-autobiographical flm
by 29-year-old director Anthony Chen in his
feature debut. The flm won him the best frst
flm award at Cannes this year, though he’s
no stranger to the festival, having previ-
ously presented his acclaimed shorts at the
prestigious event. ILO ILO has been claimed
with much pride by Singapore: it’s the frst
local feature to win an award at Cannes and
is the nation’s submission to next year’s
Oscars. That said, it’s a flm that expands
the Singaporean narrative beyond the three
ethnicities that typically get acknowledged
in the country, and gives that narrative legs,
touching audiences in festivals all over the
world. –Rizzhel Javier
Page 17 Asian Journal - (619) 474-0588 Visit our website at http://www.asianjournalusa.com October 18-24, 2013
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13 dead
APARTMENTS FOR RENT
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Published every Friday.
ages 5and upat 11am, featuring “not too
spooky”interactive tales told by profes-
sional storyteller Harlynne Geisler.
Afterwards, children can gather outside
the museum with artist Elizabeth Wash-
burn for mask-making activities that
can serve as the start of a Halloween
costume.Admission and art materials
are freefor all ages. No reservations
required.
UNA International Gift Shop: Kids
can pick up a Trick-or-Treat for UNI-
CEF box to take along with them as they
go trick-or-treating this Halloween. The
money they collect will be sent to UNI-
CEF to help children around the world
who need clean water, food, school
supplies, etc.
Booths along the Prado:
Fiesta del Reyes/Old Town State
Historic Park:Play the Magnifying
Guessing Game and have optical illu-
sions twist your mind! Learn about the
new menu at the Cosmopolitan Hotel
and Restaurant, where kids eat free!
Girl Scouts of America:A “Gizmos &
Gears” activity teaches boys and girls
how to create their own tracks of gears
and how they work. A magnet activ-
ity allows kids to arrange magnets in
geometric shapes while learning about
their properties.
House of Pacifc Relations Inter-
national Cottages: Families can learn
about the organization and the national
cultures it represents, programs for
youth, and year-round events. A number
of cottages will be open on Family
Day from noon to 4pm so families can
explore different cultures.
Marston House:Mask-making and
coloring. Receive a vintage, c. 1900-
style treat bag full of various goodies,
including coupons and candy (while
supplies last).
The Old Globe: Learn about this
year’s performance of How the Grinch
Stole Christmas! and enter for a chance
to win a Family 4-Pack to the show.
RH Fleet Science Center:Park visitors
are invited to make slime!
San Diego Civic Youth Ballet: Crafts,
ballet dancers, and information on
upcoming programs, including The
Nutcracker.
SDG&E: Sign up to receive free
water-savings kits that include a low-
fow shower head, kitchen sink aerator,
and two bathroom sink aerators. Craft
activities for kids.
San Diego History Center: “Wicked
Brewing: What’s Stirring in our Hal-
loween Cauldron?”
Take a turn at stirring the trivia pot
and see what history surfaces. From San
Diego’s sodaworks to craft beers, there’s
nearly a brew for everyone’s palette in
our city’s past.
San Diego Model Railroad Museum:
Halloween-themed activities. Kids 12
and under can pick up a ticket for free
admission (with a paid adult) to Haunted
Train Town inside the museum.
San Diego Natural History Museum:
Get ready for Real Pirates (dropping an-
chor at theNAT February 8) by picking
up some pirate’s booty and participating
in buoyancy experiments. Also check
out some mammoth teeth to get a sneak
peek at the Mammoths and Mastodons
exhibition, which closes November 11.
San Diego Zoo:Pins, decals, maga-
zines, and Halloween candy will be
handed out to everyone. Zoo animals at
the booth.
using the same method. These were exciting
time for us and even today Fred or Rico and
I would reminisce about our adventures in
the river.
During this time my dad graduated
from law school but he was not able to
take the Philippine bar as he retained his
U.S. citizenship. He just devoted his time
in several business ventures like poultry
farming, tilapia raising, a poultry supply
store and juke boxes. I was the one who
attended maintenance training for our juke
boxes and so that was my duties. I was going
to school in evening and in the day time I
would take care of our juke boxes which
included minor repairs, replacing the records
and dealing with the business owners and
actually counting the money for dividing
and giving the proft to my mom. We placed
three juke boxes into the three cafes in our
town and they were all trying to compete
with each other for customers. We did very
well because this was very new to our town
and many young suitors would play the
appropriate record hoping that their loved
one would hear the music. I was then court-
ing Rosemarie Susano, the daughter of the
owner of Novaliches Market. Once we went
to a movie in Manila and on our way home
when we boarded the bus, her mother was
also on board the same bus. She became very
angry and was raising her voice so I decided
to get off and I waited for the next one. I was
worried because I overheard her say she was
going to tell my father. She was a teacher in
the elementary school where my father was
the PTApresident. It even crossed my mind
that I may be forced to marry Rosemarie. I
did not hear anything from my father and I
continued seeing her.
Before long we were able to buy the two
lots adjacent to ours. One lot is where we
started our poultry farm. In the other lot he
built a small commercial building and one of
our cousins started a barber shop. Today that
lot has a bank building but it does not belong
to us anymore. Then my dad leased one rice
paddy from a Mr. Pedro Valenzuela, a friend
of his, which he converted into a fshpond.
The government had a program and was
just starting to introduce the tilapia fsh to
the country. They provided free seedlings to
anyone that has a pond and we were the frst
one to have a tilapia pond in Novaliches.
Dad even had a small concrete pond in the
side of our house where we also had tilapia
for our home consumption. It was so cool
to cast your pole and the fshes would bite
it instantly. Most of the time we would have
burning ambers for instant fsh barbeque.
Father & Son USN
(Continued from page 16)
reporters.
"If this comes to pass, it could be a disas-
trous event for the developing world, and
that in turn will greatly hurt the developed
economies as well. I urge US policymakers
to avert this potential crisis," he added.
"Latest signs of recovery among devel-
oped economies, encouraging as they are,
remain uneven, and the growth of some
emerging economies is slowing. Addressing
increased volatility and achieving strong,
balanced, and sustainable global growth,
will continue to require appropriate policy
responses and reforms in countries of all in-
come levels," noted a Saturday communique
from the committee.
World Bank
(Continued from page 1)
less night as the typhoon roared through
the town of Capas, 90 kilometers (55
miles) north of Manila, shortly before
midnight.
"The wind was very strong and there was a
whistling sound. After a while we heard torn
roofng sheets clattering across the yard," she
told AFP.
As Santi dumped rain inland, a wall of
mud fell on a police barracks near the town
of Magalang, killing an offcer awaiting
deployment to rescue typhoon victims, the
disaster council's spokesman Rey Balido told
a news conference.
Elsewhere in central Luzon, an elderly
woman and four minors were crushed to
death when trees crashed onto two houses
and a vehicle, while the wall of a school col-
lapsed and crushed an old man to death.
Two children and an elderly person
drowned in a fooded village, while the body
of a fsherman who had gone to sleep in his
boat on shore the previous night was recov-
ered at sea, Balido added.
Another man was electrocuted by a loose
power line while yet another died of a heart
attack in an incident that disaster offcials
also blamed on Santi.
Three other fshermen who put to sea
before the typhoon have also failed to return,
Balido said.
He said nearly 6,000 people moved into
government-run shelters amid warnings their
communities could be hit by fooding and
landslides from the typhoon.
Alocal news station aired footage of
earth-colored foodwaters climbing above
river defences and swamping farmland in
San Miguel, where three of the victims had
drowned.
Soldiers, police, and local government
workers used military trucks to rescue resi-
dents in fooded communities in San Miguel
and Minalin towns, the regional civil defence
offce there said.
"The wind picked up very quickly, very
dramatically. We had the wind coming right
off the ocean for four hours," said one wit-
ness on the east coast.
Even as the weather improved, foodwa-
ters continued to rise in low-lying areas as
rain from the nearby Sierra Madre mountains
swept downstream through swollen rivers.
In the town of San Ildefonso, 60 kilome-
ters from Manila, police pulled a woman on
a motorbike and a farmer to safety after they
were nearly swept away while separately
crossing a street that had turned into a raging
river.
Farmer Frankie Gracia, 30, told AFP he
had been forced to butcher one of his pigs
after it fell ill from exposure to the rain, and
he had wanted to take some of the pork to his
relatives across the street.
"I needed to reach the other side soon,
otherwise the meat would spoil," he said.
Balido said 8,414 houses were damaged,
while the central Luzon civil defence offce
said the typhoon blacked out 37 towns and
cities, populated by 2.1 million people.
Road and utility crews were out clearing
roads and restoring power, but it could take
up to two days before electricity is restored
and major highways are reopened to traffc,
Nigel Lontoc, a disaster offcial for the
region, told AFP by telephone.
The Philippines is hit by some 20 ty-
phoons each year.
Santi is expected to be close to Vietnam's
northeast coast by Tuesday, the Hong Kong
Observatory said. — Agence France-Presse
Thanksgiving Novena
to St. Jude
O Holy St Jude! Apostle and Martyr,
great in virtue and rich in miracles,
near kinsman of Jesus Christ, faith-
ful intercessor of all who invoke
your special patronage in time of
need, to you I have recourse from the
depth of my heart, and humbly beg
to whom God has given such great
power to come to my assistance.
Help me in my present and urgent
petition. In return I promise to make
your name known and cause you to
be invoked. St. Jude pray for us and
all who invoke thy aid. Amen. (Say
three Our Father's, 3 Hail Mary’s,
and Glorias.) Publication must be
promised. This novena nas never
been known to fail. I have had my re-
quest granted. Publication promised.
- Charito Tatad
Read the Asian Journal
DIGITAL EDITION
at scribd.com/asianjournal
Page 18 October 18-24, 2013 Asian Journal - (619) 474-0588 Visit our website at http://www.asianjournalusa.com
(Continued on page 17)
Children 12 and under will be treated
to free admission at many of the Park's
museums at the 5th annual Balboa Park
Halloween Family Day on Saturday,
October 26.. Participating museums and
cultural attractions will present a spook-
tacular array of hands-on activities,
crafts, costume parades, tours, storytell-
ing, and other free goodies from 11:00
a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Adults also receive
discounted admission when they pick
up a Stay-for-the-Day Pass, a one-day
excursion pass allowing one adult ad-
mission to fve park museums for a low
price of $43.
Among the highlights of this year’s
park-wide Halloween Family Day is a
doggie costume parade and contest in
the Spanish Village Art Center, spooky
storytelling and mask-making at the
Timken Museum of Art, a host of activi-
ties centered on the Model Railroad Mu-
seum’s Haunted Train Town, a creepy
nocturnal Critter Cave at the Natural
History Museum, and a variety of free
activity and prize-drawing booths on the
Prado. Please see below for a complete
listing of all the activities scheduled for
the October 26 Family Day.
Special Family Day Activities and
Offers
Balboa Park Visitors Center: Free gift
to kids in costume who are accompanied
Mingei International Museum: Chil-
dren 12 and under free with paid adult.
Museum of Photographic Arts: Special
Halloween sunprint craft for all ages,
using photographic paper, Halloween-
themed cut-outs, and the light of the sun
to create spooky designs.
Reuben H. Fleet Science Center:
Toddlers 5 and younger can get crafty
in Kid City with Pasta Skeletons and
Pumpkin Guts, and kids of all ages can
unleash their inner mad scientists and
invent FrankenToys in the Tinkering
Studio. Kids 12 and under free with paid
adult for gallery admission only.
San Diego Air & Space Museum:
Make ghost rotors (paper helicopters
with a Halloween twist) in the educa-
tion center at 11:30, 12:30, and 1:30
and launch them into the sky! At 2:30,
see what happens when two pumpkins
are dropped from the roof — one with
a parachute and one without. Enjoy the
kid-friendly 3D/4D movie theater and
Kid’s Aviation Action Hangar all day
(simulators not included). Discounted
admission price of $5 to see the Ripley’s
Believe It or Not special exhibition.
San Diego Automotive Museum:Ghost
car coloring sheets help kids discover
their inner (scary) car designer in the
Children’s Art Gallery.
San Diego Model Railroad Museum:
Explore the Haunted Train Town featur-
ing fve spooky train stations! Passen-
gers on the Haunted Express can go on
a Halloween scavenger hunt, listen to
a Ghost Train story, make a Boo Train,
and collect prizes.
San Diego Museum of Art:A special
Search & Find activity will award prizes
for costumes and activity completion.
San Diego Natural History
Museum:Grab a fashlight and visit the
Critter Cave to learn about bats and
other nocturnal creatures, then join in
a costume parade led by Ms. Frizzle at
2:00pm following her 1:00pm perfor-
mance. Also, hands-on activities to cre-
ate a batty craft to take home. 3D flms
are included with free admission for
kids 12 and under with paid adult.
San Diego Museum of Man: Learn
about Dia de los Muertos (the Day
of the Dead), make a calavera mask,
and learn about sugar skulls. Stop by
the Bone Yard to meet Mr. Bones and
discover how skeletons are put together,
and then take a spooky tour of the mu-
seum’s mummy collection.
San Diego Youth Symphony: Free
open orchestra rehearsals (classical
melodies) on the second foor of the
Casa del Prado building, rooms 207 &
205, from 8:45am to 5:15pm.
San Diego Zoo: Free admission to
all children through 11 years of age,
regardless of adult ticket purchase. Part
of “Kids Free Month” (October) promo-
tion.
Spanish Village: Dog Costume Pa-
rade/Contest at 1:30pm in the Spanish
Village courtyard. Sign up begins at
1:00pm. Dog treats for the winners, and
frst place receives a $25 Spanish Vil-
lage Gift Certifcate. Free art activities,
including trick-or-treat bag decorating,
trick-or-treating at 37 studios, entertain-
ment, art, and food booths.
Timken Museum of Art:Art Tales &
Mini Mastersstorytelling for children
5th Annual Balboa Park Halloween Family Day on October 26 offers park-wide fun for kids 12 and under
by an adult (while supplies last). Enter a
drawing to win:
Passports to Balboa Park
Old Town Trolley/Seal Tour tickets
Win a CD and 2 free tickets to a San
Diego Youth Symphony and Conserva-
tor concert at CA Center for the Arts or
Copley Symphony Hall
San Diego Junior Theatre tickets to an
upcoming show
Japanese Friendship Garden: Hallow-
een-themed crafts andTaste of Japan
Food Fest!featuring cuisine from differ-
ent Japanese food vendors. Families can
picnic in the newly opened portion of
the garden expansion.
Marie Hitchcock Puppet Theatre: Free
puppet-making activity for children
accompanied by an adult at 11:45am
before the 1pm show; show ticket not
required.

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