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com
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Thursday • Oct. 31, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 64
WHO’S TO BLAME?
NATION PAGE 7
RED SOX WIN
WORLD SERIES
SPORTS PAGE 11
PLANING AHEAD
FOR FALL GARDEN
SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 17
NEW SECURITY ISSUES SURFACE FOR HEALTH WEBSITE
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
Astate administrative law judge
Wednesday proposed a $6.75 mil-
lion fine against PG&E for delay-
ing and mischaracterizing the cor-
rection of a significant error in its
pipeline record-keeping.
The error concerned Line 147, a
3.8-mile pipeline that runs
beneath Brittan Avenue in San
Carlos.
California Public Utilities
Commission Administrative Law
Judge Maribeth Bushey said in the
proposed decision that PG&E dis-
covered in October 2012 that the
pipeline contained arc welds
instead of being seamless, but did
not publicly file a correction with
the commission until July.
PG&E completed an internal
investigation in March. When the
utility finally did submit the July
filing, it called the error “errata,” a
word usually used for minor mis-
takes.
Bushey wrote, “The errors dis-
covered included pipeline incor-
rectly recorded as seamless, a fact
pattern distressingly similar to
San Bruno.
Ruling suggests San Carlos
pipe records ‘not credible’
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Kwame Harris’ defense attorney
told jurors yesterday the former
San Francisco 49er offensive tack-
le did in fact injure his ex-
boyfriend and break bones during
an argument at a Menlo Park
restaurant but that it was in self-
defense after the alleged victim
threw the first punch.
Harris, 31,
slapped Dimitri
Geier once as a
“natural reac-
tion” to a
“forcible punch
to his chest”
and later swung
twice, attorney
Alin Cintean
Ex-49er claims self-defense
in assault on ex-boyfriend
Judge urges
$6.75M fine
against PG&E
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Mateo police, with coopera-
tion from the San Mateo-Foster
City Elementary School District,
arrested an after school child-care
aide Friday, Oct. 25 on suspicion
of committing lewd acts on a child
under 14 and child annoyance,
according to a joint press release
by the police and district.
The aide, Eric Michael Renz, a
20-year-old Millbrae resident, was
booked into San Mateo County
Jail, but released on $100,000
bail, said District Attorney Steve
Wagstaffe.
The victim in the case is a girl in
Horrall Elementary School’s
Children’s Annex program,
according to district officials.
Police received a referral on Oct.
21 about the alleged incident,
which occurred on the late after-
noon of Oct. 18. A district
employee allegedly witnessed and
reported the incident, said Molly
Barton, the district’s assistant
superintendent for student servic-
es. The district, upon learning of
the incident, immediately
removed Renz from any contact
with children and provided infor-
mation to police to assist with the
investigation, according to the
release.
The investigation revealed that,
while sitting with the victim,
Renz allegedly kissed the girl and
touched her inappropriately,
according to police.
Interviews were conducted with
the victim and detectives estab-
lished probable cause for an arrest,
according to the release. There are
no suspicions of other incidents
involving the suspect at this time,
Police arrest after school child-care aide for lewd acts
Eric Michael Renz worked at Horrall Elementary in the San Mateo-Foster City Elementary School District
SAMANTHA WEIGEL/DAILY JOURNAL
Therapist Warren Dale started Tuesday’s meeting with the victims of the Oct. 17 Redwood City apartment fire
before they were told they would never be able to enter their units.
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Victims of the Terrace
Apartments fire were devastated to
hear they would never be allowed
back into their apartments this
week after waiting 11 days to find
out the status of their apartment
and belongings.
Former residents packed a meet-
ing at the Red Morton Community
Center Tuesday with American Red
Cross volunteers and Jeff
Badstubner of the property man-
agement company Sequoia Realty
Services. Frustration at the long
days and nights they’d spent wait-
ing to hear an update boiled over
while Warren Dale, a licensed ther-
apist with expertise in trauma
recovery, began talking about the
emotions some of the victims may
have been feeling. It was hard to
know the extent of their grief as
many did not yet know the degree
of their losses after being rushed
out of their homes during the fire,
Dale said.
But while some appreciated the
sentiment, others simply wanted
to know about the personal items
they were forced to leave behind
during the six-alarm fire Oct. 17.
Badstubner said the building was
uninhabitable and they would not
be able to enter their apartment
and personally gather their
belongings.
“To not be allowed back in is
devastating to me, said resident
Lisa Porter, “because I want to be
able to assess what actually hap-
pened.”
Porter, 47, had lived on the
fourth floor close to where the fire
started and was lucky to have
escaped. She is hearing impaired
and sleeps with a sleep apnea
Harsh reality for fire victims
Terrace Apartments residents told they won’t be allowed back in
Kwame Harris
See HARRIS, Page 19
See RENZ, Page 20
See FINE, Page 20
See VICTIMS, Page 20
Man charged with stealing
gold crowns from corpses
LANCASTER — A former funeral
home apprentice has been charged
with stealing gold crowns from the
teeth of corpses in the Antelope
Valley.
Authorities say 39-year-old Pete
Lara was charged Wednesday with
more than two dozen felony counts,
mostly burglary but also grand theft
and possession of methampheta-
mine.
He was arrested Monday and
remains jailed.
Authorities say Lara was an appren-
tice embalmer at Halley-Olsen-
Murphy Funeral Home in Lancaster
when he began taking the dental
crowns and other items last year.
Prosecutors contend that he disposed
of the gold at pawn shops and jewel-
ry exchanges.
He faces up to 19 years in prison if
convicted.
Baby born on
Orange County freeway
SANTAANA — It was a rush deliv-
ery on an Orange County freeway
Wednesday morning as a pregnant
woman gave birth in a car.
Authorities say the woman’s hus-
band was taking her to the hospital
but the baby wouldn’t wait. He pulled
onto the shoulder of State Route 22
in Santa Ana.
She delivered the child at around
12:30 a.m. The Orange County
Register says it’s the woman’s fourth
child and she was a day overdue.
Arriving paramedics cut the child’s
umbilical cord and took mother and
child to the hospital, where they’re
said to be doing fine.
There’s no word on whether it’s a
girl or a boy.
High school bans
body-shaking twerking
ALISO VIEJO — One Southern
California high school has added
twerking to its list of dances that are
banned for students.
The Orange County Register
reports Tuesday that administrators
at Aliso Niguel High School decided
the rump-busting dance is sexually
suggestive and should no longer be
allowed on campus or at dances.
Twerking now joins “freaking” and
“grinding” as prohibited dances at
the Orange County school. Those
who break the rules could be ineligi-
ble for future dances for the remainder
of the school year. Parents also will
be notified.
No other high schools in the
Capistrano Unified School District
say they have banned twerking.
Twerking has gained recent popu-
larity among teens thanks to pop
star Miley Cyrus, but the dance has
been around for a while.
Woman gets jail time
for framing volunteer
SANTAANA— ACalifornia woman
who planted drugs in the car of an ele-
mentary school volunteer has been
ordered to serve almost four months
in jail.
City News Service says Jill Easter
got a year’s sentence Wednesday after
pleading guilty to false imprison-
ment, but a judge stayed most of the
term and she’ll only serve 120 days.
She also must perform 100 hours of
community service.
Easter’s husband, Kent Easter, is
expected to face trial next week.
Prosecutors say the Irvine couple
planted prescription painkillers,
marijuana and a marijuana pipe in the
car of a parent volunteer at their
son’s school in 2011, then called
police.
Authorities say the Easters disliked
the volunteer because they felt the
woman hadn’t properly supervised
their son.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday • Oct. 31, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Rap performer
Vanilla Ice is 45.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1517
Martin Luther posted his 95 Theses
on the door of the Wittenberg Palace
church, marking the start of the
Protestant Reformation in Germany.
“I would venture to guess
that Anon, who wrote so many poems
without signing them, was often a woman.”
— Virginia Woolf, English author and critic (1882-1941)
Film director Peter
Jackson is 52.
Actress-singer
Willow Smith is 13.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Project manager Yvonne Nagel and fellow actors perform at Movie Park Germany in Bottrop.
Thursday: Sunny. Highs in the lower
60s. Northeast winds around 5
mph...Becoming north in the afternoon.
Thursday night: Clear. Lows in the
upper 40s. Northeast winds 5 to 10 mph.
Friday: Sunny. Highs in the 60s. East
winds around 5 mph in the
morning...Becoming light.
Friday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the upper 40s.
Northwest winds around 5 mph in the evening...Becoming
light.
Saturday: Sunny. Highs in the lower 60s.
Saturday night: Partly cloudy. Lows in the upper 40s.
Sunday: Mostly cloudy. Highs in the upper 50s.
Sunday night through Wednesday: Partly cloudy. Lows
in the upper 40s. Highs in the upper 50s to mid 60s.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1795, English poet John Keats was born in London.
I n 1864, Nevada became the 36th state.
I n 1887, Nationalist Chinese leader Chiang Kai-shek was
born in Zhejiang Province.
I n 1926, magician Harry Houdini died in Detroit of gan-
grene and peritonitis resulting from a ruptured appendix.
I n 1938, the day after his “War of the Worlds” broadcast
had panicked radio listeners, Orson Welles expressed “deep
regret” but also bewilderment that anyone had thought the
simulated Martian invasion was real.
I n 1941, the Navy destroyer USS Reuben James was torpe-
doed by a German U-boat off Iceland with the loss of some
100 lives, even though the United States had not yet entered
World War II. Work was completed on the Mount Rushmore
National Memorial in South Dakota, begun in 1927.
I n 1959, a former U.S. Marine showed up at the U.S.
Embassy in Moscow to declare he was renouncing his
American citizenship so he could live in the Soviet Union.
His name: Lee Harvey Oswald.
I n 1961, the body of Josef Stalin was removed from
Lenin’s Tomb as part of the Soviet Union’s “de-
Stalinization” drive.
I n 1968, President Lyndon B. Johnson ordered a halt to all
U.S. bombing of North Vietnam, saying he hoped for fruit-
ful peace negotiations.
I n 1984, Indian Prime Minister Indira Gandhi was assassi-
nated by two Sikh security guards.
I n 1992, Pope John Paul II formally proclaimed that the
Roman Catholic Church had erred in condemning the
astronomer Galileo for holding that the Earth was not the
center of the universe.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
CARGO DOUGH SORROW TURKEY
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The veterinarian with laryngitis was a —
“HOARSE” DOCTOR
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
DUBIL
PREYK
RUTIMA
PANSYP
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
J
u
m
b
le

p
u
z
z
le

m
a
g
a
z
in
e
s

a
v
a
ila
b
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a
t

p
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llp
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s
.
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” “ Answer
here:
Actress Lee Grant is 88. Former astronaut Michael Collins
is 83. Former CBS anchorman Dan Rather is 82. Folk singer
Tom Paxton is 76. Actor Ron Rifkin is 75. Actress Sally
Kirkland is 72. Actor David Ogden Stiers is 71. Actor Brian
Doyle-Murray is 68. Actor Stephen Rea is 67. Olympic gold
medal long-distance runner Frank Shorter is 66. Actress Deidre
Hall is 65. Talk show host Jane Pauley is 63. Actor Brian
Stokes Mitchell is 56. Rock musician Larry Mullen is 52.
Actor Dermot Mulroney is 50. Rock musician Mikkey Dee
(Motorhead) is 50. Rock singer-musician Johnny Marr is 50.
Actor Rob Schneider is 49.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Gorgeous
George, No. 8, in first place; Money Bags, No. 11,
in second place; and Gold Rush, No. 1, in third
place.The race time was clocked at 1:41.03.
5 2 3
20 33 50 53 54 7
Mega number
Oct. 29 Mega Millions
2 36 40 49 54 10
Powerball
Oct. 30 Powerball
6 11 16 21 33
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
0 0 9 0
Daily Four
6 5 2
Daily three evening
3 12 33 44 47 22
Mega number
Oct. 30 Super Lotto Plus
3
Thursday • Oct. 31, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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BELMONT
Theft. A person reached into a woman’s
purse and took her wallet on El Camino Real
before 11:32 a.m. Monday, Oct. 28.
Vandalism. A mailbox was damaged on
Coronet Boulevard before 11:29 a.m.
Monday, Oct. 28.
Accident. A vehicle hit a bicyclist and
there were minor injuries at the intersection
of Masonic Way and Old County Road before
9:21 a.m. Monday, Oct. 28.
Burglary. Aresidence was reported broken
into on El Camino Real before 8:24 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 27.
Suspi ci ous ci rcumst ance. A woman
reported her shih tzu was taken from her yard
on Coronet Boulevard before 8:54 a.m. on
Friday, Oct. 25.
SAN CARLOS
Grand theft. Grand theft was reported on
the 1500 block of Hull Drive before 9:41
a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 29.
Petty theft. Petty theft was reported on the
2100 block of Eaton Avenue before 9:36
a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 29.
Burglary. A burglary was reported on the
first block of Madrona Street before 11:36
a.m. Saturday, Oct. 26.
Recovered vehi cl e. Astolen vehicle was
located on the 1900 block of Carmelita
Drive before 10:03 a.m. on Friday, Oct. 18
Police reports
High, can you help me?
Aman reported that he was not feeling
well after smoking marijuana on F
Street in Belmont before 9:20 a.m. on
Friday, Oct. 25.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The former Daly City man accused of
helping a childhood friend kill a high
school acquaintance a dozen years ago and
leave the boy’s body in an apartment stor-
age unit used as a hangout took to the
stand yesterday to personally tell jurors he
only helped hide the bloody evidence.
Reynaldo Maldonado, now a 34-year-old
adult in a button-down shirt and close-
cropped haircut, testified Erick Romeo
Morales actually killed Quetzlcoatl Alba,
15, on May 21, 2001, at Westlake
Apartments before calling him to the
scene. Maldonado said the two were
friends and then lovers back in Guatemala
before each moving to the Bay Area and
that lingering affection propelled him to
cover up rather than reveal the truth to
police.
Eight days after the murder, Maldonado
called 911 because he “wanted to tell the
truth” but changed his mind once officers
responded to his pay phone call.
“Because I loved Erick very much and I
couldn’t do that,” Maldonado testified
through a Spanish-speaking interpreter.
Prosecutors contend Maldonado held
Alba down while Morales stabbed him
repeatedly in the neck, arms and torso.
Both men were eyed as suspects but each
left Daly City shortly after the murder.
Maldonado went first to New York and then
Florida. Daly City police found
Maldonado in Miami on
a tip from his friend,
Mario Cajina, who testi-
fied the defendant con-
fessed the killing and
showed him a key piece
of evidence in the trial
— a photo taken of
Morales standing over
Alba’s body.
On the stand yester-
day, Maldonado said he did tell Cajina
about Alba’s murder but never admitted
participating.
“I did tell him but not the way he said it,”
Maldonado said.
The defense argued in opening state-
ments that Cajina has a financial motiva-
tion and Maldonado testified that, while
he shared the story sometime after his
2001 arrival in Miami, his 2007 arrest
came two weeks after the man was kicked
out of their shared housing.
According to Maldonado, he was making
coffee at home alone on Miriam Street
where he lived with Morales’ family and
others when Morales called him on his
own cellphone. Morales allegedly asked
Maldonado to take a cab to the apartment
storage unit where Westmoor High School
students hung out and bring him a new
sweater. Once there, Maldonado said
Morales gave him a bloody sweatshirt,
cellphone and what would turn out to be a
knife bundled up. Maldonado told jurors he
took the items home to hide at Morales’
order and used a glove to
open the bloody pack-
age before burying all of
it in a can in the back-
yard at night.
An excavation of the
yard based on Cajina’s
tip would turn up the
items in 2007 when
Daly City police
reopened the case.
After Alba’s murder, Maldonado said
Morales left Daly City two to three days
later and he left three days after being
interviewed by detectives. He did not see
Morales again and told jurors, while he
was “a little” afraid of him, he was more
afraid of Morales’ father with whom he
still lived.
“He said to me I don’t know what you
know or what you saw but if anything hap-
pens to my son you’re going to pay for
it,” Maldonado said.
In 2009, two years after Maldonado’s
arrest, Morales was apprehended after an
East Coast traffic stop revealed his identi-
t y.
He and Maldonado are being tried sepa-
rately and both face life in prison without
the possibility of parole if convicted.
Both Maldonado and Morales remain in
custody without bail.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Murder defendant takes stand
Reynaldo
Maldonado
Erick Morales
4
Thursday • Oct. 31, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
5
Thursday • Oct. 31, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
Fer mere ìn|ermcIìen cc|| ó50·344·5200 º www.smdcì|yjeurnc|.cemJsenìershewccse
* While supplies last. Some restrictions apply. Events subject to change.
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Presented by Health Plan of San Mateo and The Daily Journal
Free Services include
º F|u Shots
for seniors age 65+ provided for no fee by
San Mateo County Pharmacists Association
º 8efreshments
º 0oor Pr|zes and 0|veaways
º 8|ood Pressure
º Ask the Pharmac|st
by San Mateo Pharmacists Assn.
º Hea|th Screen|ngs
by Peninsula Special Interest Lions Club
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º Free 0ocument Shredd|ng
for seniors age 62+ by Miracle Shred
and N08F
Senior
Showcase
Information Fair
Friday, November 15, 2013
9:00am to 1:00pm
Foster City Recreation Center
6050 Shell Blvd., Foster City
Free Admission, Everyone Welcome
Senior Resources and Services from
all of San Mateo County —over 40
exhibitors!
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ADMISSION
Vivian R. Vanoni
Vivian R. Vanoni, a 65-year resident of
Millbrae, died Monday Sept. 28, 2013, at
the age of 92.
She spent 20 years as a real estate broker
in Millbrae but found more fulfillment as a
wife, mother, grandmother and great-grand-
mother. She was preceded in death by her
husband Richard and survived by her three
daughters Trina Hobbs, Carole Cappa and
Elaine Hughes, her eight grandchildren and
11 great-grandchildren.
“She will be deeply missed by all.”
Afuneral liturgy will be celebrated 12:30
p.m. Saturday at the Chapel of the
Highlands, El Camino Real at 194
Millwood Drive in Millbrae.
Committal will follow at Woodlawn
Memorial Park in Colma. Family and
friends may visit on Saturday after noon
until 12:30 p.m.
Obituary
Two arrested fleeing
scene of residential burglary
A man and a 15-year-old boy are in cus-
tody after allegedly fleeing from the scene of
a residential burglary in
Belmont yesterday morn-
ing, according to police.
At approximately
10:05 a.m., a Belmont
police officer spotted a
white Acura TL sedan
commit a traffic viola-
tion on Ralston Ranch
Road at Christian Drive
and followed it onto east-
bound State Route 92 where he stopped it.
While on the traffic stop, a burglar alarm
call was received for a residence on Ralston
Ranch Road, according to police.
Officers responded to the alarm call and
found that the residence had been burglar-
ized. A subsequent investigation led to the
discovery of approximately $5,000 in jew-
elry from the burglary inside the Acura,
according to police.
The driver of the Acura, Antoine Lamar
Wells, 30, of Oakland, was arrested without
incident along with his passenger, a 15-
year-old male from East Palo Alto. Wells
was booked into the San Mateo County Jail
for burglary, possession of stolen property,
felon in possession of a stun gun and con-
spiracy. The juvenile, whose name is being
withheld due to his age, was booked into the
San Mateo Youth Services Center for burgla-
ry, possession of stolen property and con-
spiracy, according to police.
Belmont investigators are in contact with
other Bay Area law enforcement agencies to
see if these suspects are tied to any other
recent burglaries. Anyone with information
on this investigation is asked to call
Belmont police at 595-7400 or the Belmont
Police Crime Tip Line at 598-3000.
Halloween DUI
saturation effort underway
Halloween partyers are encouraged to
have a ghoulish holiday this week, but offi-
cials in San Mateo County will be on the
lookout for anyone who may drink too much
of the witch’s brew. ADUI saturation effort
is underway in San Mateo County this week
to deter and arrest potential alcohol- or drug-
impaired drivers on local roads, according
to Burlingame police Sgt. Jay Kiely.
Enforcement teams from San Carlos,
Menlo Park and Burlingame are saturating
county roads between the hours of 6 p.m.
and 2 a.m. The crackdown began Monday
and will end early Friday morning.
As part of the San Mateo County STEP, or
Saturation Traffic Enforcement Program, the
teams hope to keep the pressure on drivers
to use good judgment and stay safe, accord-
ing to Kiely.
“These DUI saturation patrols to be con-
ducted throughout our community will pro-
vide the exact education and enforcement
needed to correct the type of dangerous
behavior that puts everyone in out city at
risk, particularly on Halloween, when chil-
dren and families are out trick-or-treating,”
Burlingame Police Chief Ed Wood said in a
statement.
“This is a ‘zero-tolerance’ crackdown, so
drive sober or get pulled over,” he said.
Thirteen people have been killed in drunk-
en-driving crashes in San Mateo County
this year alone, according to Kiely.
Local briefs
Antoine Wells
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
In a spectacular display of inno-
vation, technology, bravery and a
$10 million budget, Pacific Gas
and Electric is using helicopters to
make repairs to the electrical lines
running parallel to the San Mateo-
Hayward Bridge.
Two workers were suspended
from helicopters and dropped
about 200 to 300 feet in the air to
access the electric tower in the
Bay closest to Foster City yester-
day. The project was initiated in
September and will run through
the end of the year.
“It’s a method we pioneered
called long-lining. It’s much more
efficient,” said PG&E spokesman
Jason King.
The technique allows PG&E to
work on more remote towers in the
Bay, valleys, woods and places
that aren’t as accessible by road,
King said. Yesterday, it made
repairs to the conductors that sup-
port the line and it will use the
same technique to string the new
lines, King said.
“It’s a proactive replacing of
equipment to add additional capac-
ity and reliability to our customers
in the Bay Area,” King said.
About a year and a half ago it
used long-lining to repair electric
towers further out from the bridge
and the current project is working
on the lines connecting the PG&E
substation in Hayward to the sub-
station in San Mateo, King said.
The helicopter took off from a
landing pad at the Hayward substa-
tion, King said. Two workers were
harnessed and carried equipment as
they hung from the helicopter dur-
ing flight. The first worker was
dropped off around 11 a.m. then a
second worker was flown in carry-
ing a ladder.
The current lines have been
there since the 1950s, King said.
The new electric wires are com-
posed of aluminum and a steel
core, don’t sag as much and can
carry more power than traditional
copper wires, King said. Because
these towers are located in the
Bay, they deteriorate from weather
conditions such as harsh wind and
salt. The new electric wires are
similar in diameter to the old
ones, but they’re higher capacity
and have better insulation, allow-
ing them to last longer, King said.
The project will run until the end
of the year and PG&E plans on
continuing to use the long-lining
technique because “using helicop-
ters is the most efficient, safe and
fastest way for us to do the job,”
King said. PG&E is proactively
preparing for the imminent popu-
lation growth in the Bay Area.
“Part of the purpose of this proj-
ect is beyond being able to meet
our goals of safety, reliability,
affordability and service,” King
said. “It’s to anticipate and serve
the future needs of our customers,
both residential and business, on
the Peninsula.”
samantha@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
PG&E replacing transmission lines over Bay
SAMANTHA WEIGEL/DAILY JOURNAL
PG&E workers were transported by helicopter to work on the power lines
at an electrical tower in Foster City yesterday.
Ed Dept. seeks
feedback on
ratings system
Kimberly Hefling
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The Education
Department on Wednesday asked for
the public’s help to develop a new
ratings system for America’s col-
leges and universities.
It announced a series of public
forums next month in California,
Virginia, Iowa and Louisiana, with
the goal of having a draft system
ready by next fall. By 2018, the
plan is to tie some financial aid to
schools based on performance
using the system.
The ratings system, sought by
President Barack Obama, is
designed to provide students with
more information about schools
and help rein in the rising cost of
college and make institutions of
higher learning more accountable
in areas such graduation rates.
Members of the higher education
community have questioned
whether it is the federal govern-
ment’s job to create such a system
and whether it would be fair. For
example, if graduates’ salaries are
factored in, they worry that a
school with lower-paid graduates in
fields such as social work or with a
high number of stay-at-home par-
ents could be unfairly judged.
Education Secretary Arne Duncan
told reporters on a conference call
that it’s too early to know exactly
what metrics will be used to develop
the system, but that it will be
thoughtfully done.
6
Thursday • Oct. 31, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/WORLD
Being
there
is why
I’mhere.
Cancer Awareness Day
created by eighth grader
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Eighth-grader Trevor Collet came up with the idea of Roy
Cloud Elementary School Cancer Awareness Day when he
asked a girl sitting next to him in class
why she was wearing a pink soccer jersey.
The associated student body president
found out it was National Breast Cancer
Awareness Month.
“Later that day, I was in leadership
class,” Collet wrote in an email. “We were
thinking of spirit days and the connection
came to me immediately. Then other peo-
ple started to elaborate on the idea and it
exploded into all the things we have
planned now.”
Collet’s leadership class will be coordinating classroom
activities this Friday, Nov. 1 and asking all pupils, staff and
teachers to wear pink. The Redwood City school will have local
hairstylists from San Carlos’ Salon Gossip and Burlingame’s
Mondi provide free haircuts to all students and staff willing to
donate 10 inches or more of their hair. Hair will be donated
through Wigs for Kids and Pantene Beautiful Lengths.
Catherine Gaston, activities director at the school, said
most students she has worked with would have chosen to have
a Crazy Hair Day or something along those lines, but the
class this year is quite special. They’ve focused more on
building community and respect.
“Most of us have been touched by cancer,” Gaston said in a
press release. “Both of my parents are cancer survivors so
this is personal for me too. The stories are inspirational; and
yes, I will be cutting my hair too!”
The day will be amazing because of so many things, espe-
cially the girls cutting their hair for cancer, Collet wrote.
“I think it is a great way to help people in need and to boost
their self-confidence,” he wrote.
A tribute wall will be set up where family or friends who
have been affected by cancer will be honored. Elementary
teachers will be provided with supplementary lessons to
increase cancer awareness. Nurse practitioner Kathy Smith of
the Stanford Cancer Center will visit science classes.
Principal Dana Hardester is very excited for the day.
“The students have been working really hard on this, and it
is great to see all the community members that have gotten
involved,” Hardester said in a press release. “This is such a
positive event. I love that this was a student’s idea and the
class just ran with it. It is great to see young people working
to make a difference!”
What other events will come from the student council?
Collet’s leadership class that has many events in mind, he
said. “We are having a canned food drive in November and a
coat drive in December set up by our Vice President Amy
Gifford,” Collet wrote. “Also, our commissioner of commu-
nity services is looking for places that we can volunteer in
our community.”
Trevor Collet
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A former masseur at the Peninsula
Jewish Community Center was sen-
tenced to nine months in jail and
ordered to register as a sex offender for
touching a female client inappropri-
ately and forcing her to perform a sex-
ual act.
Victor James Petush, 27, pleaded no
contest to felony sexual battery for no
more than a year in jail. On
Wednesday, he was also placed on three
years of supervised probation and
ordered to undergo counseling. He
must also pay the victim $1,090.
Petush was
employed by the
Foster City-based
PJCC’s service part-
ner, Club One, and
is no longer work-
ing there, according
to the center.
On Feb. 10, a
woman who had
received many mas-
sages previously at the center but not
from him, reported Petush began the
session with several remarks about her
great body and, during the massage,
touched her inappropriately, assaulted
her with his hand and made her mastur-
bate him before she could leave.
The woman contacted police who
arrested Petush. Petush reportedly
claimed all contact with the woman
was consensual.
Prosecutors say Petush has commit-
ted similar offenses on other people
but that those fell outside the statute of
limitations.
Petush has been free from custody on
a $100,000 bail bond. If convicted by
a jury of all his original charges, he
faced up to eight years in prison.
Masseur jailed for groping, assaulting client
By Ciaran Giles
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MADRID — The head of Spain’s intel-
ligence services will give a closed-door
briefing to a parliamentary committee
about allegations that Spain was a target
for surveillance by the U.S. National
Security Agency, the prime minister
said Wednesday. He did not announce a
date for the session.
Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy spoke
a day after NSA director Gen. Keith
Alexander told a U.S. House
Intelligence panel that millions of tele-
phone records of European citizens were
swept up as part of a NATO program to
protect the alliance. Alexander said,
however, the U.S. didn’t collect the
European records alone.
Up to now, Spain has insisted it is
unaware of any U.S. spying.
Speaking in parliament, Rajoy didn’t
refer to Alexander’s comments, but said
Spain was taking the allegations of U.S.
spying seriously. He said such activity, if
confirmed, is “inappropriate and unac-
ceptable between partners.”
Rajoy said National Intelligence
Center chief Felix Sanz Roldan would
address the issue in a closed-door ses-
sion of parliament’s official secrets
commission.
Opposition lawmakers urged Rajoy to
press the U.S. for explanations and to
clarify if Spain had helped the NSAand
whether he had any part in it.
Meanwhile, a German delegation met
with American officials at the White
House as part of Berlin’s efforts to probe
allegations that Chancellor Angela
Merkel’s cellphone was monitored by
U.S. intelligence.
Head of Spain’s intelligence service
to address Parliament on spying
Victor Petush
REUTERS
Spain’s Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy
reacts as he attends a weekly cabinet
control session at Parliament in Madrid .
NATION/WORLD 7
Thursday • Oct. 31, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
REUTERS
Barack Obama speaks about the Affordable Care Act at Faneuil Hall in Boston, Mass.
U.N.:U.S.says it doesn’t,
and won’t, spy on U.N.
By Peter James Spielmann
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
UNITED NATIONS — The United Nations said Wednesday
it has received assurances from the U.S. government that
U.N. communications networks “are not and will not be
monitored” by American intelligence agencies. But chief
U.N. spokesman Martin Nesirky would not comment on
whether the world body had been monitored in the past, as
reported recently by the German magazine Der Spiegel.
Nesirky said the United Nations had been in contact with
Washington about the reports that surfaced two months ago
and has received a U.S. guarantee of no current or future
eavesdropping.
“Back in August when these reports first surfaced, we said
we would be in touch with the relevant authorities,” he said.
“And I can tell you that we were indeed in touch with the
U.S. authorities. I understand that the U.S. authorities have
given assurance that the United Nations communications
are not and will not be monitored.”
Nesirky would not elaborate on whether spying had taken
place and declined to answer related questions. For empha-
sis, he held up a piece of paper that said: “No comment.”
AU.S. official told the Associated Press that “The United
States is not conducting electronic surveillance targeting
the United Nations headquarters in New York.” The official,
who was not authorized to be named, spoke on condition of
anonymity.
It was not clear whether foreign U.N. missions in New
York could be monitored by U.S. intelligence agencies.
Former U.S. Ambassador John Bolton, who held the post
at the United Nations from 2005-2006, would not comment
on “what may or may not have gone on in the past” because
he’s no longer in government.
“That said, it seems to me that the United Nations and
everybody walking through the U.N. building are perfectly
legitimate intelligence targets, and I think any decision by
any president to say we are not going to eavesdrop on U.N.
headquarters is a mistake,” he told the AP.
“There’s nothing in the U.S. Constitution that says you
may not eavesdrop on the U.N.,” Bolton said. “Silence and
a deeply emphasized ‘No comment’ is how you should deal
with all these intelligence questions.”
Der Spiegel reported that documents it obtained from U.S.
leaker Edward Snowden show the National Security Agency
secretly monitored the U.N.’s internal video conferencing
system by decrypting it last year.
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
and Laurie Kellman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — President Barack
Obama claimed “full responsibility”
Wednesday for fixing his administra-
tion’s much-maligned health insurance
website as a new concern surfaced: a
government memo pointing to securi-
ty worries, laid out just days before the
launch.
On Capitol Hill, Health and Human
Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius
apologized to frustrated people trying
to sign up, declaring that she is
accountable for the failures but also
defending the historic health care over-
haul. The website sign-up problems
will be fixed by Nov. 30, she said, and
the gaining of health insurance will
make a positive difference in the lives
of millions of Americans.
Obama underscored the administra-
tion’s unhappiness with the problems
so far: “There’s no excuse for it,” he
said during a Boston speech to promote
his signature domes-
tic policy achieve-
ment. “And I take
full responsibility
for making sure it
gets fixed ASAP. ”
The website
HealthCare.gov was
still experiencing
outages as Sebelius
faced a new range of
questions at the
House Energy and Commerce
Committee about a security memo from
her department. It revealed that the
troubled website was granted a tempo-
rary security certificate on Sept. 27,
just four days before it went live on
Oct. 1.
The memo, obtained by the
Associated Press, said incomplete test-
ing created uncertainties that posed a
potentially high security risk for the
website. It called for a six-month “mit-
igation” program, including ongoing
monitoring and testing.
Security issues raise major new con-
cerns on top of the long list of techni-
cal problems the administration is
grappling with.
“You accepted a risk on behalf of
every user ... that put their personal
financial information at risk,” Rep.
Mike Rogers, R-Mich., told Sebelius,
citing the memo. “Amazon would never
do this. ProFlowers would never do
this. Kayak would never do this. This
is completely an unacceptable level of
security. ”
Sebelius countered that the system is
secure, even though the site’s certifi-
cate, known in government parlance as
an “authority to operate,” is of a tem-
porary nature. A permanent certificate
will be issued only when all security
issues are addressed, she stressed.
Spokeswoman Joanne Peters added
separately: “When consumers fill out
their online ... applications, they can
trust that the information they’re pro-
viding is protected by stringent securi-
ty standards and that the technology
underlying the application process has
been tested and is secure. Security test-
ing happens on an ongoing basis
using industry best practices.”
New security issues surface
for health insurance website
Kathleen
Sebelius
NATION/WORLD 8
Thursday • Oct. 31, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
PIGSKIN
Pick ‘em Contest
We are not responsible for late, damaged, illegible or lost entries. Multiple entries are accepted. One prize per household. All applicable Federal, State & Local taxes associ-
ated with the receipt or use of any prize are the sole responsibility of the winner. The prizes are awarded “as is” and without warranty of any kind, express or implied. The
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whatsoever for injuries, damages, or losses to persons and property which may be sustained in connection with the receipt, ownership, or use of the prize.
THE DAILY JOURNAL
Redwood General Tire Pros
and Original Nick’s Pizzeria & Pub
PRESENT THE NINTH ANNUAL
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Week Nine
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TIEBREAKER: Chicago @ Green Bay__________
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What is the deadline?
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Send entry form to: 800 S. Claremont Street, #210, San Mateo, CA 94402. You may enter as many
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By Stephen Ohlemacher
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Social Security benefit s
will rise 1.5 percent in January, giving mil-
lions of retired and disabled workers an aver-
age raise of $19 a month to keep up with the
cost of living.
The increase is among the smallest since
automatic adjustments were adopted in
1975, and reflects the fact that consumer
prices haven’t gone up much in the past
year.
The annual cost-of-living adjustment, or
COLA, is based on a government measure of
inflation that was released Wednesday.
“Yea. Whoop-de-do,” said Lance Colvin, a
retired office worker in Kirkland, Wash.
“That’s my opinion.”
Automatic COLAs were adopted in 1975
so that benefits for people on fixed incomes
would keep pace with rising prices. Some
advocates for older Americans, however,
complain that the COLA sometimes falls
short, especially for people with high med-
ical costs.
Social Security benefits
to go up by 1.5 percent
By Lara Jakes
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Nearly two years after
pushing out the U.S. military, Iraq is asking
for more American weapons, training and
manpower to help fight a bloody resurgence of
al-Qaida that has unleashed a level of violence
comparable to the darkest days of the nation’s
civil war.
The request will be discussed during a White
House meeting Friday between Iraqi Prime
Minister Nouri al-Maliki and President Barack
Obama in what Baghdad hopes will be a fresh
start in a complicated relationship that has
been marked by victories and frustrations for
each side.
“We know we have major challenges of our
own capabilities being up to the standard.
They currently are not,” Lukman Faily, the
Iraqi ambassador to the U.S., said in an inter-
view with the Associated Press. “We need to
gear up, to deal with that threat more serious-
l y. We need support and we need help.”
He added: “We have said to the Americans
we’d be more than happy to discuss all the
options short of boots on the ground.”
“Boots on the ground” means military
forces. The U.S. withdrew all but a few hundred
of its troops from Iraq in December 2011 after
Baghdad refused to renew a security agreement
to extend legal immunity for Americans forces
that would have let more stay.
At the time, the withdrawal was hailed as a
victory for the Obama administration, which
campaigned on ending the Iraq war and had lit-
tle appetite for pushing Baghdad into a new
security agreement. But within months, vio-
lence began creeping up in the capital and
across the country as Sunni Muslim insurgents
lashed out at Shiites, angered by a widespread
belief that Sunnis have been sidelined by the
Shiite-led government, and with no U.S.
troops to keep them in check.
More than 5,000 Iraqis have been killed in
attacks since April, and suicide bombers
launched 38 strikes in the last month alone.
Al-Maliki is expected to ask Obama for
new assistance to bolster its military and
fight al-Qaida. Faily said that could include
everything from speeding up the delivery of
U.S. aircraft, missiles, interceptors and
other weapons, to improving national
intelligence systems.
Iraq seeking new U.S. aid after pushing out troops
REUTERS
Iraqi soldiers arrest suspected militants during a raid and weapons search operation in North
Babil province.
OPINION 9
Thursday • Oct. 31, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
No on Measure P
Editor,
The Daily Journal article regarding South
San Francisco (“Solar panel plan creates rift”
in the Oct. 21 issue of the Daily Journal)
clearly shows that taxpayers up and down the
Peninsula are not happy with their tax dollars
going to pay for solar power.
Why are we asking taxpayers to come up
with $18 million for solar energy when so
many of our school facilities are in desperate
need of repairs? That $18 million could go a
long way making much needed updates at our
schools. Senate Bill 73, passed this summer,
is taking funds from Proposition 39 and
handing out more than $460 million per year
for five years to K-12 schools for energy
projects including solar.
Why would we ask taxpayers to pay out of
their pockets for solar before we know exact-
ly how much money is coming to the San
Mateo-Foster City Elementary School
District from Proposition 39? This bond is
asking the taxpayer to make the capital
investment, yet the taxpayer won’t see any
of the return on this investment. The savings
goes only to the district. This is not how I
want to see my tax dollars spent. I will be
voting no on Measure Pand I urge you to do
the same.
Rob Bennett
San Mateo
Support Measure P
Editor,
Like monster waves that challenge
Mavericks’ surfers, our San Mateo-Foster
City schools face daunting challenges. By
voting “yes” on Measure P, we can address
these challenges. As a San Mateo County
Board of Education trustee, I have a broad edu-
cation perspective; and as a San Mateo prop-
erty owner, I expect fiscal accountability.
Bottom line: I’m supporting Measure P
because I believe our community will rise if
we successfully manage the waves of change
that sweep toward our schools. The district is
seeing surging student enrollment growth.
Independent demographers forecast 600 to
700 additional students by 2018 — that is
the equivalent of two elementary schools.
Measure P addresses this growth by reopen-
ing Knolls Elementary School and rebuilding
Bowditch to relieve overcrowding. If we
don’t add classroom space, class sizes will
increase and rooms dedicated to science,
music and art will be converted to regular
classrooms.
All California schools are adopting new,
rigorous academic standards and computer-
based assessments beginning in spring
2014. Measure P provides classroom tech-
nology for computer-based instruction to
prepare students for the 21st century work-
place.
Our schools have grappled with wave after
wave of state funding cuts and funding needs
to be augmented. This is not an issue of fiscal
mismanagement. Auditors have raised no
concerns about past spending, and Measure P
would actually save $1 million annually
through energy efficiency projects to assist
with funding shortfalls. Good school dis-
tricts plan ahead to avoid problems later. The
oncoming waves of change don’t have to
engulf us. Let’s come together: Vote “yes” on
P.
Rod Hsiao
San Mateo
The letter writer is a member of the San
Mateo County Board of Education.
Use tax dollars wisely and equitably
Editor,
The No on P campaign has been accused of
being divisive, pitting Foster City against
San Mateo. Is voicing the “other side” to a
bond measure not allowed? What happened to
the democratic process?
Did you know that the Yes on P campaign
backing includes bond underwriters, archi-
tects, lawyers and others, many of whom
contributed thousands of dollars and live out-
side of San Mateo and Foster City. With these
outside parties, Yes on P has amassed
$100,000. The No campaign is run by par-
ents, who are using old-fashioned community
involvement with minimal funds (approxi-
mately $3,500).
The Los Angeles Times noted on Aug. 6,
2013, that in Los Angeles County, the treas-
urer-tax collector adopted a policy that bond
underwriters cannot donate to school bond
campaigns if they want to be eligible to sell
county bonds. The Los Angeles Times notes
that “county treasurers across California and
many investment banks have become con-
cerned that campaign donations can create an
uneven playing field for bond business at the
expense of taxpayers.” Our school district
and county would be smart to adopt such a
policy on bond campaign donations.
Outside parties have spoken with their
money this election. Exercise your democrat-
ic right and vote Nov. 5. The district should
first adequately explain how and when they
will spend the remaining $70 million from
2008’s Measure L, which has not yet hit our
property tax bills. Vote no on P. Send a mes-
sage to use our tax dollars wisely and equi-
tably amongst all students.
Christine Stiles
San Mateo
Vote yes on Measure P
Editor,
By supporting our local schools, we sup-
port students in all of the communities they
serve. As residents and former mayors of San
Mateo, we urge a yes vote on Measure P t o
benefit all San Mateo-Foster City School
District students.
Our excellent schools attract families to
our community, causing school overcrowd-
ing. Great schools make our neighborhoods
desirable, protecting property values. Yet,
overcrowded schools cannot promote contin-
ued success.
Local student enrollment has increased dra-
matically. In the next five years, hundreds of
additional classroom seats will be needed.
Measure P increases school capacity, allevi-
ating overcrowding.
California adopted new, rigorous academic
standards, but provided limited funding for
the technology necessary to implement
them. Local students begin taking new com-
puterized exams in spring 2014. That’s why
our schools require Measure P now. It pro-
vides an even playing field so that all stu-
dents, regardless of their socio-economic
background, have access to technology.
Measure P’s energy efficiency upgrades
save our schools almost $1 million annually
to protect academics and retain teachers, pay-
ing back the investment we make today. It
includes fiscal safeguards like independent
citizen oversight, annual audits and a prohi-
bition against funds for administrators’
salaries. All funds go to our schools and can-
not be taken by the state.
State Sen. Leland Yee, Assemblyman Kevin
Mullin, Supervisor Dave Pine, the San Mateo
Democratic Party, San Mateo Labor Council,
San Mateo-Foster City School District, PTA
Council, local business leaders and many
others support Measure P because it is critical
for our schools now. On Tuesday, Nov. 5,
vote yes.
Jerry Hill and Carole Groom
San Mateo
Jerry Hill is member of the California
Senate and Carole Groom is a member of the
San Mateo County Board of Supervisors.
Unacceptable discrepancy
Editor,
Nearly 25 years ago, I started my teaching
and coaching career at Borel Middle School
and Bowditch Middle School, as well as
being the sports coordinator for all middle
schools in San Mateo-Foster City
Elementary School District.
In these roles, I have spent hours in all of
our three San Mateo middle schools (Borel,
Abbott, Bayside S.T.E.M) gymnasiums as
well as several other middle school gymnasi-
ums throughout San Mateo County. The dis-
parity between the San Mateo middle school
gymnasiums and every other gymnasium is
vast and shocking. These gyms are unsafe,
archaic (50+ years old) and minuscule. The
children play on linoleum over concrete
floors, while the sidelines and baselines are
fraught with dangers in the form of a stage,
walls and benches that creep within inches of
the sideline. PE classes are crammed into
them with the slim hope of getting enough
physical activity to prevent the laundry list
of obesity-related diseases that await them in
their very near future. If gymnasiums are not
important nor a priority to our community or
our students, why was a new and modern
gymnasium built at Brewer Island Elementary
School in Foster City? Why is a new gymna-
sium included in the Bowditch Middle School
(Foster City) plan?
The SM-FCSD cannot be expected to match
the gymnasiums in other schools districts,
but it can control the incredible discrepancy
within its own district. If this bond were to
pass, Foster City would have two new, mod-
ern gymnasiums and the San Mateo middles
schools would have none. Unacceptable.
Steve Sell
San Mateo
What a scream
S
o you’ve made it to Halloween with-
out actually knuckling down a cos-
tume?
Never fear! Idea time is here! There’s no
need to join the boring masses in dressing
up as Miley Cyrus and gyrating on a foam
finger or paying hom-
age to “Duck Dynasty”
and getting mistaken
for some grungy guy
who wandered into the
wrong party. Same goes
with Honey Boo Boo;
one might just mistake
you for one of the
assorted “real house-
wives.”
There’s always a body
suit covered in boxes of
breakfast goods and plastic knives — cereal
killer. Or, keeping the suit and covering it
with either fuzzy baby chickens or Barbie
dolls — chick magnet. But let’s think out-
side the box a little further.
Ano-brainer could be a simple orange
jumpsuit. Call yourself a character from
Netflix show “Orange Is the New Black,” just
not the character Crazy Eyes. Sorry, Julianne
Hough, blackface doesn’t cut it in the realm
of the politically correct. Of course, if you
really want people to think you’re racist,
adopt a southern drawl and come bearing
fried food. Howdy, Paula Deen!
Back to the jail clothes, they also let you
be any number of pseudo-celebrities who
saw themselves in legal hot water this year.
Add a wig, a bong-turned-vase and some
lighter fluid and bam! You’re actress Amanda
Bynes.
If you really don’t want to attend whatever
festivities are in the works tonight, call in
your regrets and blame it all on a govern-
ment shutdown. You’re Congress. Or BART
workers.
If you have to go but want a good excuse
to leave, show up in a sailor suit and make a
point of bailing out before everybody else.
How else will you be Costa Concordia cruise
ship Captain Francesco Schettino? Or, don
some cleats and a shabby dark beard. Start
yelling at the host about how you were never
offered an invitation. Let them figure out you
are former Giants pitcher Brian Wilson as
they escort you to the door.
Fondness for the wild kingdom? Forgo the
animal ears and leotard unless you’re a guy.
In that case, wear the ensemble with glee and
tell fellow revelers you’re dressed as a girl’s
favorite Halloween costume. But for either
sex, stick a shark mask over your head, grab
a chain saw and spin in circles. Sharknado!
Ahorse head and a DNAtesting kit is all
you need to be European beef, or rather what
has been masquerading as beef.
Or, go head to toe as some sort of bug and
carry a Nokia in a nod to German Chancellor
Angela Merkel’s phone.
Looking for a cheap option? Nab lots of
paint sample cards in hues just shy of black
and attach them to dark clothing. Add in a
crop for good measure but don’t be surprised
if others don’t immediately recognize you as
“Fifty Shades of Grey.” It’s not like every-
body reads that pulp.
How about a hot dog costume? Send lewd
self-portraits signed “Carlos Danger” to fel-
low trick-or-treaters. Bonus couple points
for a long-suffering wife (a “Stand by your
man” logo shirt) or sexting partner (use
one’s imagination).
Another group costume — you, shirtless
and tattooed, being carried all night by sev-
eral burly men. Voila! Justin Bieber. Great
idea for the person playing the pop star too
cool to climb the Great Wall of China.
Probably less exciting for those playing his
hired help.
When all else fails, walk around clutching
a sample ballot and candidate roster,
bemoaning the outcome of the election and
admitting you never participate. With
Election Day around the corner, is there any-
thing more scary than the idea of voter apa-
thy?
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat”
runs every Tuesday and Thursday. She can be
reached by email: michelle@smdailyjour-
nal.com or by phone (650) 344-5200 ext.
102. What do you think of this column?
Send a letter to the editor: letters@smdai-
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election-related topics through Monday, Nov. 4. Letters on
election-related topics will not be accepted after 5 p.m. Friday,
Nov. 1. Because of space limitations, not all election-related
letters will be printed.
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who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
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BUSINESS 10
Thursday • Oct. 31, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 15,618.76 -61.59 10-Yr Bond 2.527 +0.02
Nasdaq 3,930.62 -21.72 Oil (per barrel) 96.66
S&P 500 1,763.31 -8.64 Gold 1,343.20
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Wednesday on the
New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
General Motors Co., up $1.17 to $37.23
Investors looked past the automaker’s one-time expenses during a strong
third quarter in which revenue rose 4 percent.
Yelp Inc., down $1.78 to $67.05
Losses widened for the online review site and it announced that it would
sell 3.7 million new shares.
Aflac Inc., down $1.98 to $65.02
The insurer was slammed by the falling value of the yen in Japan,where
the company does a substantial part of its business.
Range Resources Corp., up $2.76 to $77.40
The independent energy company beat Wall Street expectations for the
third quarter as it grew more efficient and costs fell.
LinkedIn Corp., down $23.03 to $224.11
The professional networking service boosted its user base and increased
revenue, but turning a profit is still problematic.
Nasdaq
Take-Two Interactive Software Inc., down 81 cents to $17.14
Record-breaking sales of the latest installment of “Grand Theft Auto”
game, drove the game maker’s profits sharply higher.
Buffalo Wild Wings Inc., up $11.71 to $141.22
A growing base of restaurants,falling costs and a strong outlook grabbed
the attention of a lot of investors.
Questcor Pharmaceuticals Inc., down $9.72 to $60.01
The drugmaker revealed that federal regulators have joined an ongoing
investigation of the company.
Big movers
By Ken Sweet
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The stock market
retreated from all-time highs
Wednesday after the Federal Reserve
said the U.S. economy still needed
help from its stimulus program.
In its latest policy statement, the
nation’s central bank said it will con-
tinue buying $85 billion in bonds
every month and keep its benchmark
short-term interest rate near zero. The
bond purchases are designed to keep
borrowing costs low to encourage hir-
ing and investment.
The Fed said it would “await more
evidence” that the economy was
improving before starting to pull back
its stimulus program.
The Fed’s announcement was mostly
expected by investors. Since the Fed’s
last meeting in September, the econo-
my suffered a blow because of the 16-
day partial shutdown of the U.S. gov-
ernment and the near-breach of the
nation’s borrowing limit.
As a result, investors thought it
would be highly unlikely the Fed
would make any changes to its stimu-
lus program until was more evidence
that the U.S. could grow without the
central bank’s help.
The soonest the Fed could revisit its
bond-buying program will be at its
mid-December meeting. However, Ben
Bernanke’s term as Fed chairman ends
in February and his successor, Janet
Yellen, has yet to be confirmed by the
Senate. It is seen as unlikely Bernanke
would take on such a large project like
pulling back on the bond-buying pro-
gram when he only has months left in
the position.
“We’re looking at March of next
year at the earliest” before the Fed will
start to pull back, said Dean Junkans,
chief investment officer for Wells
Fargo Private Bank.
On Wednesday, the Dow Jones indus-
trial average lost 61.59 points, or 0.4
percent, to 15,618.76. The Standard &
Poor’s 500 index fell 8.64 points, or
0.5 percent, to 1,763.31. The Dow and
S&P 500 closed at record highs
Tuesday.
The Nasdaq composite fell 21.72
points, or 0.6 percent, to 3,930.62.
Bond prices also fell after the Fed’s
announcement. The yield on the
benchmark U.S. 10-year Treasury note
rose to 2.54 percent from 2.50 percent
the day before.
Stocks of home construction compa-
nies fell after the Fed said in its policy
statement that “the recovery in the
housing sector slowed somewhat in
recent months.” Last month, the Fed
said housing “has been strengthen-
ing.”
KB Home fell 47 cents, or 3 percent,
to $17.49. Luxury homebuilder Tol l
Brothers fell 56 cents, or 2 percent, to
$33.56 and PulteGroup fell 21 cents,
or 1 percent, to $18.00.
Despite the decline Wednesday,
October has been a big month for the
stock market. With just two days of
trading left, the S&P 500 is up 4.9 per-
cent, putting the index on track for its
best month since July.
Investors also had another dose of
quarterly earnings to work through.
General Motors rose $1.17, or 3 per-
cent, to $37.23. After taking out one-
time effects, the nation’s largest
automaker earned $1.7 billion, or 96
cents per share, beat analysts’ expecta-
tions of 94 cents per share.
Western Union plunged $2.39, or 12
percent, to $16.85. The money trans-
fer company said late Wednesday that
it may not see any profit growth in
2014 due to increasing regulation and
compliance costs.
Facebook soared in after-hours trad-
ing after the company reported higher
income than analysts were expecting.
Facebook rose $5.87, or 12 percent,
to $54.88. The social media network
said it earned an adjusted profit of 25
cents per share for the third quarter, six
cents better than what analysts were
expecting. Revenue jumped 60 percent
to $2.02 billion.
Feds say U.S. needs support, stocks fall
By Bree Fowler
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Apple CEO Tim Cook
believes Santa’s sleigh will be loaded
with iPads this Christmas, but a vari-
ety of competing tablets are sure to be
along for the ride, too.
Apple’s iPad Air, a thinner, lighter
and faster-running version of its previ-
ous large tablet computers, goes on
sale Friday with a starting price of
$499. The company also unveiled an
updated version of its iPad Mini
recently. It goes on sale sometime in
November.
Apple is expecting strong sales of
both models —so much so that Cook
told analysts during the company’s
most recent earnings conference call
that “this is going to be an iPad
Christmas” as he predicted year-over-
year growth.
But this year the iPad faces its
stiffest holiday season competition
since its 2010 introduction. While
Apple still holds the largest chunk of
the growing tablet market, the iPad
has been losing market share to quali-
ty —and often cheaper— alternatives
that run Google’s Android operating
system.
According to data released by market
research firm IDC on Wednesday, iPads
accounted for about 30 percent of the
tablets shipped during the July-
September quarter, down from about 40
percent in the same period a year ago.
Tom Mainelli, IDC’s research direc-
tor for tablets, noted that Apple faced
tough year-ago comparisons because it
released a new iPad during the second
quarter of 2012, which caused its sales
to spike in both the second and third
quarters of that year.
Meanwhile, Samsung Electronics,
Apple’s closest rival, saw its market
share jump to 20 percent from 12 per-
cent a year ago. Smaller tablet makers
such as Asus, Lenovo and Acer also saw
big increases, though their shares of
the market remained in the single dig-
i t s.
The overall number of tablets
shipped in the July-September period
jumped 37 percent from a year ago,
driven by a surge in Android tablet
shipments. At the same time, iPad
shipments rose less than 1 percent.
Mainelli said that despite the com-
petition he expects Apple to post a
year-over-year increase in iPad sales
for the fourth-quarter, predicting that
the slimmed down nature of the iPad
Air will be a big draw for consumers
who complained in the past about the
iPad’s weight. If Apple does lose mar-
ket share during the holiday season,
Mainelli said, the amount will be tiny
and of little consequence to the compa-
ny’s bottom line.
“We’re all guilty of this, of looking
at Apple’s market share and saying:
‘Are they in trouble?”’ Mainelli said.
“But the reality is they’re going to
have a real good fourth-quarter, they’re
going to have great average selling
prices compared to their competitors
and that’s going to be great for their
profits and great for the Street too.”
Cook in his comments Monday
emphasized that his company isn’t
just focused on how many iPads it sells
in comparison to its rivals, saying
that Apple also looks at things like
customer loyalty and usage rates.
IPads face toughest holiday season yet
By Larry Neumaister
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Two financial firms
sued Twitter on Wednesday, saying it
supported their own world tour to sell
its shares last year, only to disallow
the sales in a ruse aimed at boosting
the company’s valuation above $10
billion for an initial public offering.
Precedo Capital Group Inc., based in
Scottsdale, Ariz., and Continental
Advisors, based in Luxembourg ,
sought $124 million in damages,
including $100 million in punitive
damages, for misrepresentations that
it said were “wanton and egregious.”
Expected to go public before
Thanksgiving, Twitter’s plan to sell
70 million shares will be the biggest
technology IPO since Facebook went
public last year. In a regulatory filing
last week, Twitter set a price range of
$17 to $20 per share for its offering.
At the $20 share price, Twitter would
be valued at about $12.5 billion.
The two financial companies said
they took the roadshow through sever-
al countries and three continents in
September 2012, lining up institu-
tional funds, asset managers and high
net worth individuals to buy $278 mil-
lion in Twitter shares.
The lawsuit accused San Francisco-
based Twitter of seeking an artificial
market to ensure at least a $19-per-
share price, injuring the public
because the initial offering price for
its shares will not be based on price-
to-earnings ratio and balance sheet
valuations.
“The public will now be purchasing
shares at an inflated price, based upon
Twitter’s pre-IPO fraudulent misrepre-
sentations,” the lawsuit said.
In a statement, Twitter Inc. said:
“We’ve never had a relationship with
these plaintiffs. Their claim is com-
pletely without merit.”
The lawsuit said the financial firms
took to the road looking for investors
after a Twitter shareholder, GSV Asset
Management Inc., claimed in March
2012 that it had negotiated a deal with
Twitter to sell $50 million to $278
million worth of Twitter stock owned
by employees, contractors and other
stockholders. GSV Asset was not
named as a defendant in the lawsuit.
In the 18-day international road-
show, 47 presentations were made in
eight countries by GSV Asset and
Continental Advisors while Precedo
Capital made presentations to
investors and 10 broker dealers in New
York, Chicago, Florida, Virginia and
Pennsylvania, the lawsuit said. It said
GSVAsset provided information at the
roadshows including non-public infor-
mation that came from Twitter.
After obtaining more than $50 mil-
lion in commitments at $19 per share,
Twitter blocked the sale nine days after
the roadshow ended, causing the plain-
tiffs to lose millions of dollars in com-
missions, fees and expenses, besides
damage to their reputations, the law-
suit said.
Twitter accused of ruse to pump up share price
Facebook 3Q results fly past expectations
NEWYORK — Facebook’s latest quarterly results showed
continued strength in mobile advertising, which spurred a
60 percent revenue increase in the July-September quarter.
The numbers beat Wall Street’s expectations for the sec-
ond consecutive quarter, but after an initial after-hours trad-
ing spike, Facebook’s stock took a downturn during the
company’s conference call with analysts.
Investors may have been spooked by a remark by
Facebook finance chief David Ebersman, who said the com-
pany saw a decrease in daily use among younger teenagers,
an important but fickle demographic.
After soaring as much as 18 percent to $57.98 after the
quarterly results came out, shares of Menlo Park, Calif.-
based Facebook slid to $48.44 in extended trading during
the company’s conference call. The stock had closed
Wednesday’s regular trading day down 39 cents at $49.01.
The stock’s fluctuations overshadowed a stellar quarter.
The world’s largest social network said Wednesday that it
earned $425 million, or 17 cents per share, in the third quar-
ter. That’s up from a loss of $59 million, or 2 cents per
share, in the same period a year ago.
Visa 4Q profit down
28 percent on large tax provision
Visa Inc.’s fourth-quarter net income fell 28 percent as it
set aside money for taxes, and it said it’s making its plans
based on a slow recovery of the U.S. economy.
The world’s largest processor of debit and credit card pay-
ments said payments on its system rose 13 percent to $1.1
trillion for the quarter. Visa’s results are closely watched
because they can be a window into the buying habits and
financial health of consumers.
Growth in the number of U.S. transactions slowed from
August into September, showing constrained consumer
spending, Chief Financial Officer Byron Pollitt said on a
conference call. The company is assuming “a tepid recov-
ery in U.S. economic growth,” he said.
Visa’s observations dovetail with economic reports that
showed employers adding fewer jobs in September than in
August.
“We do expect one day to benefit from stronger economic
growth, we just don’t know when yet,” CEO Charlie Scharf
said.
Panasonic, Tesla sign deal to expand cell supply
PALO ALTO — Electric car maker Tesla Motors has signed
a deal with Japan’s Panasonic Corp. to expand its supply of
battery cells.
Under the pact announced early Wednesday, Panasonic
will supply nearly 2 billion cells over the next four years.
The automotive grade lithium-ion battery cells will power
the Model S sedan as well as the Model X SUV, which is
scheduled to go into production by the end of 2014, Tesla
said.
The agreement amends a 2011 contract between
Panasonic and Tesla that promised enough cells for 80,000
vehicles — or approximately 560,000 cells — through
2015.
Business briefs
<< Sharks fall to Kings in OT, page 13
• Raiders starting to get healthy, page 13
Thursday, Oct. 31, 2013
WHAT A WAY TO START: WARRIORS WHIP UP ON LAKERS IN SEASON OPENER >> PAGE 13
Knights, Scots
advance to CCS
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Despite playing on a severely sprained ankle, Hillsdale’s Mariko Iinuma
gutted out a 6-2,6-3 win with partner Kathy Li at No.1 doubles to help the
Knights advance to the CCS tournament with a 5-2 victory over Aragon.
Celebrate like it’s 1918
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
With its first chance to earn a
berth into the Central Coast
Section girls’ tennis team tourna-
ment since 2006, Hillsdale cap-
tain Mariko Iinuma was deter-
mined to do everything in her
power to make it happen.
So despite seriously spraining
her left ankle during a United
States Tennis Association tourna-
ment over the weekend, Iinuma,
normally the Knights’ No. 3 sin-
gles player, joined Kathy Li in the
No. 1 doubles spot against Aragon
Wednesday afternoon.
Iinuma, a junior, kept alive her
unbeaten streak in Peninsula
Athletic League play, as she and Li
secured a 6-2, 6-3 win over
Aragon’s Magali De Sauvage and
Melissa Ma to clinch the team
match as the Knights went on to
beat Aragon 5-2 and qualify for the
CCS team tournament.
“I really wanted to play to help
the team win,” Iinuma said. “I was
really looking forward to going to
CCS as a team. The best part of
high school tennis is going (to
the playoffs) as a team.”
Despite being told by her doctor
not to play, Iinuma put a splint on
the injured joint and limped around
the court. She thanked Li for help-
ing her pick up the slack as Iinuma
could barely move around the
court.
“[Li] really helped me a lot,”
Iinuma said. “I was at the corner of
whether I should play or not.
[Playing] might affect me in the
long run.
“[The ankle is] really swollen,
with internal bleeding and stuff.”
Having played each other in the
regular-season finale Tuesday,
Aragon coach Linda Brown said
she tried to switch up her doubles
team to better take advantage of
Iinuma’s injury — which she said
was the only bonus of playing the
same team twice in as many days.
Brown took her No. 4 singles
player, Melissa Ma, and moved
her to No. 1 doubles with de
Sauvage, hoping to pick up a win
there.
“Melissa Ma is a very good dou-
bles person,” Brown said.
“[Hillsdale is] so solid at singles
you have to do something in dou-
bles.”
The Knights’ domination at sin-
gles was stunted a bit as they were
without their regular No. 3 and No.
4 singles players. But what
E
arlier this week, I looked
at the local playoff races
for most of the sports —
except football. Mainly because
football can use an entire column
to itself to delve into league title
and Central Coast Section possi-
bilities.
Well, the
time to break
down the
football races
is now.
Entering
Week 8, it
might be eas-
ier to deter-
mine which
teams are out
of the various
races in the
Peninsula
Athletic
League, as opposed to who still
has a shot. But I’ll give you a
rundown of each of the three divi-
sions in the PAL, as well as
Serra’s prospects in the West
Catholic Athletic League —
which somehow was omitted in a
recent survey of the toughest
leagues in California.
But I digress.
Bay Division
As for the race for the division
title, four of the six teams are
Boston wins third title in 10 years,
but first time clinching at home
since winning it all 95 years ago
Inside
football
See LOUNGE, Page 16
By Ronald Blum
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOSTON — There hasn’t been a
party like this in New England for
nearly a century.
Turmoil to triumph. Worst to
first.
David Ortiz and the Boston Red
Sox, baseball’s bearded wonders,
capped their remarkable turn-
around by beating the St. Louis
Cardinals 6-1 in Game 6 on
Wednesday night to win their third
World Series championship in 10
seasons.
Shane Victorino, symbolic of
these resilient Sox, returned from
a stiff back and got Boston rolling
with a three-run double off the
Green Monster against rookie sen-
sation Michael Wacha.
John Lackey became the first
pitcher to start and win a Series
clincher for two different teams,
allowing one run over 6 2-3
innings 11 years after his Game 7
victory as an Angels rookie in
2002.
With fans roaring on every pitch
and cameras flashing, Koji Uehara
struck out Matt Carpenter for the
final out. The Japanese pitcher
jumped into the arms of catcher
David Ross while Red Sox players
rushed from the dugout and bullpen
as the Boston theme “Dirty Water”
played on the public-address sys-
tem.
“I say I work inside a museum,
but this is the loudest the muse-
um’s been in a long time,” out-
fielder Jonny Gomes said.
And the Red Sox didn’t have to
fly the trophy home. For the first
time since Babe Ruth’s team back
in 1918, Boston won the title at
Fenway Park. The 101-year-old
ballpark, oldest in the majors, was
packed with 38,447 singing,
shouting fans anticipating a cele-
bration 95 years in the making.
There wasn’t the cowboy-up
comeback charm of “The Idiots”
from 2004, who swept St. Louis to
end an 86-year title drought. There
wasn’t that cool efficiency of the
2007 team that swept Colorado.
This time, they were Boston
GREG M. COOPER/USA TODAY SPORTS
The BostonRed Sox celebrate their 6-1 win over St. Louis to clinch their third World Series title in 10 years as the
Cardinals’ Matt Carpenter walks back to the dugout.
See TENNIS, Page 16
See BOSTON, Page 14
12
Thursday • Oct. 31, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS 13
Thursday • Oct. 31, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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by
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Klay Thompson scored a
career-high 38 points in a spectacular shooting
performance, and the Golden State Warriors
whipped the Los Angeles Lakers 125-94 in
their much-anticipated season opener
Wednesday night.
Thompson finished 15 of 19 from the floor,
including 5 of 7 from 3-point range, to lead the
Warriors to the runaway win. Golden State led
by 19 at the half, 33 at the end of the third quar-
ter and 35 early in the fourth.
David Lee added 25 points, eight rebounds
and five assists, and Stephen Curry had 10
points and six assists as the Warriors trounced a
rebuilding Lakers team playing without Kobe
Bryant and Steve Nash.
Jodie Meeks scored 14 points and Pau Gasol
had 12 points and seven rebounds for an over-
matched Lakers team playing on back-to-back
nights. Los Angeles beat the Clippers on
Tuesday night in their season opener.
After a lackluster preseason, the Warriors
finally showed why so
many believe they can con-
tend for the Western
Conference title this sea-
son.
Thompson swished
shots. New addition Andre
Iguodala distributed the
ball. Big man Andrew
Bogut protected the paint.
Lee piled up putback
points. Curry got in the mix, too, though he
wasn’t needed to be anywhere close to the made-
for-TVstar he was while leading Golden State to
the second round of the playoffs last season.
On one play in the third quarter, Iguodala stole
the ball, whirled a behind-the-back pass on a
fast break to Lee, who touched it back to
Iguodala for a layup that brought the announced
sellout crowd of 19,596 roaring to its feet.
Iguodala finished with seven points, four
rebounds and four assists.
Far fewer Lakers fans than usual showed up at
Oracle Arena. And the ones who did were easily
drowned out by the home fans expecting big
things in the basketball-united Bay Area.
Not much is expected of the Lakers, who sur-
prised some with their season-opening win
over the Clippers. Los Angeles lost Dwight
Howard and Metta World Peace in the offseason,
Bryant hasn’t returned to practice since tearing
his left Achilles tendon against the Warriors late
last season and Nash was given the night off to
rest with the Lakers playing on back-to-back
nights.
Aday later than expected, the losses finally
showed.
The Warriors outshot the Lakers 53.5 to 39.3
percent, outrebounded them 48 to 39 and looked
far more talented and together than their neigh-
bors to the south.
And for a change, Golden State also had the
brightest star.
Thompson scored 16 points and made all four
of his 3-pointers to help the Warriors take a 26-
16 lead after the first quarter. He had 27 points at
halftime in front of his dad, former NBAplayer
Mychal Thompson, who watched while work-
ing the Lakers’ radio broadcast.
Thompson, who also had three rebounds and
one assist, left to a standing ovation with 13.3
seconds remaining in the third quarter and the
Warriors up 96-62. His previous career high was
34 points in the Game 2 win at San Antonio in
the second round of the playoffs last season.
NOTES: Lakers coach Mike D’Antoni said
the tentative plan is to rest Nash for one game
in back-to-back sets to keep the 39-year-old
point guard fresh. ... Mark Jackson said his one
regret as Golden State’s coach is not calling a
timeout when Bryant tore his Achilles tendon
last season. He said he didn’t realize Bryant was
that hurt until later. The Lakers intentionally
fouled the Warriors to let Bryant come off the
floor after he made two free throws. Jackson said
he apologized to Bryant between exhibition
games in China this preseason. “Typical Kobe.
He said, ‘Thank you. Appreciate it.’ But he said
he’s coming after us next time he sees us,”
Jackson said. ... Warriors SF Harrison Barnes
sat out with left foot inflammation, as expected,
but was in uniform. Jackson said Barnes will sit
out again Thursday night at the Clippers.
Warriors annihilate Lakers in season opener
Warriors 125, Lakers 94
Klay Thompson
SPORTS 14
Thursday • Oct. 31, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Strong — playing for a city shaken by the
marathon bombings in April.
After late-season slumps in 2010 and
2011, the embarrassing revelations of a
chicken-and-beer clubhouse culture that
contributed to the ouster of manager Terry
Francona, and the daily tumult of Bobby
Valentine’s one-year flop, these Red Sox
grew on fans.
Just like the long whiskers on the play-
ers’ faces, starting with Gomes’ scruffy
spring training beard.
“As soon as we went to Fort Myers, the
movie’s already been written,” Gomes said.
“All we had to do was press play, and this is
what happened.”
Ortiz, the only player remaining from the
2004 champs, was the MVP after a Ruthian
World Series. He batted .688 (11 for 16)
with two homers, six RBIs and eight walks
— including four in the finale — for a .760
on-base percentage in 25 plate appearances.
Even slumping Stephen Drew delivered a
big hit in Game 6, sending Wacha’s first
pitch of the fourth into the right-center
bullpen.
By the time the inning was over, RBI sin-
gles by Mike Napoli and Victorino had made
it 6-0, and the Red Sox were on their way.
And now, all over New England, from
Connecticut’s Housatonic River up to the
Aroostook in Maine, Boston’s eighth
championship can be remembered for the
beard-yanking bonding.
The win capped an emotional season for
the Red Sox, one heavy with the memory of
the events that unfolded on Patriots Day,
when three people were killed and more than
260 wounded in bombing attacks at the
Boston Marathon. The Red Sox wore
“Boston Strong” logos on their left sleeves
and erected a large emblem on the Green
Monster as a constant reminder.
A“B Strong” logo was mowed into center-
field grass at Fenway.
“All those that were affected in the tragedy
— Boston Strong!” Victorino said.
Red, white and blue fireworks fired over
the ballpark as Commissioner Bud Selig
presented the World Series trophy to Red
Sox owners John Henry, Tom Werner and
Larry Lucchino, leaving a smoky haze over
the field.
“It was an awesome atmosphere here
tonight,” Lackey said.
Continued from page 11
BOSTON
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Anze Kopitar scored on a
power play 2:32 into overtime after setting up
Justin Williams’ tying power play goal with
7:39 left in the third period, and the Los Angeles
Kings rallied from behind three times
Wednesday night to beat the San Jose Sharks 4-
3.
Drew Doughty and Jarret Stoll also had goals
and Jonathan Quick stopped 17 shots in the first
meeting of the season between the Pacific
Division rivals, helping the Kings win for the
eighth time in 11 games.
Marc-Edouard Vlasic, Joe Pavelski and Logan
Couture scored for the Sharks, who finished the
first month of the season 10-1-2 and set a fran-
chise record for wins in October. Antti Niemi
made 19 saves in the finale of a 3-2 road trip.
Williams got the equalizer on a pass from
Kopitar, beating Niemi high to the glove side
after the Sharks were assessed their second
bench minors of the game for having too many
men on the ice.
Kopitar got the game-winner on a one-timer
from the slot on a pass from Doughty, after
Sharks defenseman Justin Braun was sent off for
hooking Jeff Carter as he carried the puck to the
net.
A costly turnover by Kings defenseman
Willie Mitchell led to the seventh goal of the
season by Couture, putting the Sharks ahead 3-
2 during at 18:04 of the second. Kyle Clifford
was off for goaltender interference when Jason
Demers intercepted Mitchell’s attempted clear-
ing pass from behind the net, and Couture fin-
ished off a perfectly executed tic-tac-toe play
with Demers and Patrick Marleau.
Pavelski gave the Sharks a 2-1 lead at 11:27
of the first, getting a cross-ice pass from Tommy
Wingels and beating Quick to the glove side
from short range for his fifth goal after Carter
overskated the puck about 10 feet inside the
Kings’ blueline.
The Kings tied it at 3:15 of the second when
Slava Voynov got the puck from Dustin Brown
just inside the blueline and took a slap shot
along the ice that Stoll redirected past Niemi’s
stick. It was the second goal in two games for
Stoll, following a 12-game dry spell that was
the longest season-opening drought of his
career.
Kings topple Sharks in overtime
By Michael Wagaman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA — Oakland linebacker Miles
Burris practiced for the first time since undergo-
ing knee surgery in January, and second-round
pick Menelik Watson joined him on the field
after missing nearly a month.
Slowly but surely, the line in the Raiders’
training room is thinning out.
The timing is right, too.
Coach Dennis Allen’s team is in the midst of
a five-week stretch playing against opponents
with sub-.500 records. The Raiders have won
two of their last three and can get back to a
break-even point by beating Philadelphia on
Sunday.
“I thought both of those guys looked fairly
decent out there at practice,” Allen said
Wednesday. “We’ll continue to evaluate them as
the week goes on but that was good to see, to
have those guys back out there. Those guys can
help us.”
The Raiders have had a long list of injured
players almost since the season began, most of
them offensive linemen. The outlook is a bit
more promising now.
Getting Watson, the 42nd overall pick in the
draft, back to practice gives Oakland some
much-needed depth up front. Starting right
tackle Tony Pashos and backup center/left
guard Andre Gurode both sat out last week’s win
over the Pittsburgh Steelers while hurt.
Even left tackle Jared Veldheer, out since
early in training camp, received encouraging
news regarding his triceps injury.
Veldheer flew to Los Angeles earlier this week
to meet with his doctor and was told his recov-
ery is right on track.
“Everything’s going good,” said Veldheer,
who had started 42 consecutive games for the
Raiders before getting hurt during a training
camp practice. “It’s on track with everything.
It’s getting close, that’s the exciting part.”
Burris started 15 games as a rookie in 2012
but had been on the physically unable to per-
form list before getting cleared to practice this
week.
The Raiders now have three weeks to decide
whether to add Burris to the 53-man roster.
They have an exemption on the 2012 fourth-
round draft pick until then.
“(We’re) getting an opportunity to get him
out here and actually go through some football
activity and see where he’s at movement-wise,
see where he’s at conditioning-wise,” Allen
said. “That will be a big factor as to when and if
we decide to bring him up to the active roster.”
Burris set a franchise rookie record with 138
tackles last season while playing weakside
linebacker. Now he’s taking reps at all three
linebacker positions and will also get work on
special teams before the team makes its deci-
sion.
Raiders starting to get healthy
Kings 4, Sharks 3
SPORTS 15
Thursday • Oct. 31, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 4 4 0 .500 230 186
Philadelphia 3 5 0 .375 176 211
Washington 2 5 0 .286 173 229
N.Y. Giants 2 6 0 .250 141 223
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 6 1 0 .857 196 120
Carolina 4 3 0 .571 170 96
Atlanta 2 5 0 .286 166 184
Tampa Bay 0 7 0 .000 100 163
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Green Bay 5 2 0 .714 212 158
Detroit 5 3 0 .625 217 197
Chicago 4 3 0 .571 213 206
Minnesota 1 6 0 .143 163 225
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 7 1 0 .875 205 125
San Francisco 6 2 0 .750 218 145
Arizona 4 4 0 .500 160 174
St. Louis 3 5 0 .375 165 198
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 6 2 0 .750 179 144
N.Y. Jets 4 4 0 .500 143 211
Miami 3 4 0 .429 152 167
Buffalo 3 5 0 .375 176 213
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 5 2 0 .714 187 131
Tennessee 3 4 0 .429 145 146
Houston 2 5 0 .286 122 194
Jacksonville 0 8 0 .000 86 264
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 6 2 0 .750 197 144
Baltimore 3 4 0 .429 150 148
Cleveland 3 5 0 .375 148 179
Pittsburgh 2 5 0 .286 125 153
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Kansas City 8 0 0 1.000 192 98
Denver 7 1 0 .875 343 218
San Diego 4 3 0 .571 168 144
Oakland 3 4 0 .429 126 150
Thursday’sGame
Cincinnati at Miami, 5:25 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 3
Minnesota at Dallas, 10 a.m.
Tennessee at St. Louis, 10 a.m.
Atlanta at Carolina, 10 a.m.
New Orleans at N.Y. Jets, 10 a.m.
Kansas City at Buffalo, 10 a.m.
San Diego at Washington, 10 a.m.
Philadelphia at Oakland, 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Seattle, 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Cleveland, 1:25 p.m.
Pittsburgh at New England, 1:25 p.m.
NFL GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Toronto 14 10 4 0 20 48 32
Tampa Bay 12 8 4 0 16 40 33
Montreal 13 8 5 0 16 37 23
Detroit 13 7 4 2 16 29 34
Boston 11 7 4 0 14 32 20
Ottawa 12 4 6 2 10 35 38
Florida 12 3 7 2 8 26 42
Buffalo 14 2 11 1 5 23 41
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 13 9 4 0 18 41 31
Carolina 12 4 5 3 11 26 36
N.Y. Islanders 12 4 5 3 11 37 39
Columbus 11 5 6 0 10 31 29
Washington 12 5 7 0 10 34 38
New Jersey 12 3 5 4 10 26 37
N.Y. Rangers 11 4 7 0 8 18 37
Philadelphia 11 3 8 0 6 20 30
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Colorado 11 10 1 0 20 35 16
Chicago 13 8 2 3 19 45 38
St. Louis 10 7 1 2 16 38 25
Minnesota 13 6 4 3 15 30 31
Nashville 12 6 5 1 13 23 32
Winnipeg 14 5 7 2 12 34 40
Dallas 12 5 6 1 11 31 36
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 13 10 1 2 22 51 24
Anaheim 13 10 3 0 20 42 33
Vancouver 15 9 5 1 19 42 41
Phoenix 13 8 3 2 18 43 40
Los Angeles 14 9 5 0 18 40 36
Calgary 12 5 5 2 12 36 43
Edmonton 14 3 9 2 8 36 54
NOTE:Two points for a win,one point for overtime
loss.
Wednesday’sGames
Pittsburgh 3, Boston 2
Toronto 4, Calgary 2
Detroit 2,Vancouver 1
Los Angeles 4, San Jose 3, OT
Thursday’sGames
Anaheim at Boston, 4 p.m.
Buffalo at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m.
Nashville at Phoenix, 7 p.m.
Friday’sGames
Washington at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Columbus at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Carolina, 4 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Florida, 4:30 p.m.
Montreal at Minnesota, 5p.m.
NHL GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Toronto 1 0 1.000 —
New York 1 0 1.000 —
Philadelphia 1 0 1.000 —
Brooklyn 0 1 .000 1
Boston 0 1 .000 1
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Miami 1 1 .500 —
Atlanta 0 1 .000 1/2
Charlotte 0 1 .000 1/2
Washington 0 1 .000 1/2
Orlando 0 2 .000 1
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Indiana 2 0 1.000 —
Cleveland 1 0 1.000 1/2
Detroit 1 0 1.000 1/2
Chicago 0 1 .000 1 1/2
Milwaukee 0 1 .000 1 1/2
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 1 0 1.000 —
Dallas 1 0 1.000 —
Houston 1 0 1.000 —
New Orleans 0 1 .000 1
Memphis 0 1 .000 1
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Minnesota 1 0 1.000 —
Oklahoma City 1 0 1.000 —
Denver 0 1 .000 1
Portland 0 1 .000 1
Utah 0 1 .000 1
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Golden State 1 0 1.000 —
Phoenix 1 0 1.000 —
Sacramento 1 0 1.000 —
L.A. Lakers 1 1 .500 1/2
L.A. Clippers 0 1 .000 1
Wednesday’sGames
Philadelphia 114, Miami 110
Cleveland 98, Brooklyn 94
Toronto 93, Boston 87
Detroit 113,Washington 102
New York 90, Milwaukee 83
Minnesota 120, Orlando 115, OT
Houston 96, Charlotte 83
Indiana 95, New Orleans 90
Dallas 118, Atlanta 109
San Antonio 101, Memphis 94
Oklahoma City 101, Utah 98
Phoenix 104, Portland 91
Sacramento 90, Denver 88
Golden State 125, L.A. Lakers 94
Thursday’sGames
New York at Chicago, 5 p.m.
NBA GLANCE
vs. Seattle
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/8
vs.Carolina
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/10
@Saints
1:25p.m.
FOX
11/17
@Redskins
5:40p.m.
ESPN
11/25
vs.Rams
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/1
vs.Titans
1:05p.m.
CBS
11/24
vs.Philly
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/3
@Giants
10a.m.
CBS
11/10
@Houston
10a.m.
CBS
11/17
vs.Phoenix
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/2
@Montreal
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/26
@Ottawa
2p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/27
@L.A. Kings
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/30
vs.Canucks
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/7
vs. Buffalo
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/5
@Tampa
10a.m.
FOX
12/15
@Dallas
1:30p.m.
CBS
11/28
@Jets
10a.m.
CBS
12/8
@Winnipeg
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/10
at 76ers
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/4
vs.Lakers
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/30
@LAC
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/31
vs.Kings
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/2
at Spurs
5:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/8
at Minnes.
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/6
@Memphis
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/9
THURSDAY
Girls’ tennis
PAL team tournament final, TBD, 3:30 p.m.; Notre
Dame-Belmont at St.Francis,2:45 p.m.;Castillleja at
MenloSchool,SacredHeart Prepat Crystal Springs,
3:30 p.m.
Volleyball
Hillsdale at Burlingame, Menlo-Atherton at Carl-
mont, Woodside at San Mateo, Aragon at South
City,Mills at Half Moon Bay,Jefferson at El Camino,
Westmoor at Terra Nova, Capuchino at Sequoia,
5:45 p.m.
Boys’ water polo
Capuchino at Mills, 3 p.m.; Terra Nova vs. Priory at
Menlo School,Hillsdale at Half Moon Bay,4:15 p.m.
Girls’ water polo
Hillsdale at Half Moon Bay, Terra Nova at Menlo
School,3 p.m.; San Mateo vs.Mercy-Burlingame at
Mills, 4:15 p.m.
Volleyball
Notre Dame-Belmont at St. Ignatius, 6:30 p.m.
FRIDAY
Football
Sequoia at Sacred Heart Prep, Woodside at San
Mateo, 2:45 p.m.; Menlo School at South City,
Menlo-Atherton at Terra Nova, Capuchino at
Burlingame,Aragon at Half Moon Bay,Jefferson at
Mills, El Camino at Hillsdale, Carlmont at King’s
Academy, 7 p.m.; Serra at St. Francis, 7:30 p.m.
WHAT’S ON TAP
NBA
BOSTONCELTICS—Suspended F Jared Sullinger
for the Celtics’ season-opening game against
Toronto on Wednesday night.
CHICAGOBULLS—Exercised the fourth-year op-
tion for G/F Jimmy Butler and third-year option for
G Marquis Teague.
DENVER NUGGETS —Exercised the fourth-year
contract option on F Kenneth Faried and third-year
option on G Evan Fournier.
PHILADELPHIA 76ERS — G Allen Iverson an-
nounced his retirement.
NFL
BALTIMORERAVENS—Released S Michael Huff
and DE Marcus Spears.Signed Ss Omar Brown and
Brynden Trawick from the practice squad and WR
Kamar Aiken and QB Nick Stephens to the practice
squad.
BUFFALOBILLS —Signed DT Stefan Charles off
Tennessee’s practice squad.Named Michael Lyons
director of analytics.
CINCINNATI BENGALS—Placed S Taylor Mays on
injured reserve.
HOUSTONTEXANS —Signed S Steven Terrell to
the practice squad.
KANSASCITYCHIEFS—Released TE Kevin Brock.
Signed OL Rokevious Watkins from the practice
squad and TE Dominique Jones to the practice
squad.
OAKLANDRAIDERS —Re-signed DL Brian San-
ford.
SANFRANCISCO49ERS —Released WR Marlon
Moore.
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — Placed WR Sidney Rice
on injured reserve. Signed WR Ricardo Lockette
from the practice squad and WR Josh Lenz to the
practice squad.
TRANSACTIONS
16
Thursday • Oct. 31, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
still in the mix but, when you get right down
to it, that number is really three and by the
end of this weekend, it will probably be only
two.
First off, let’s get this out of the way:
Sequoia and South City have no chance of
winning the Bay Division crown and of
those two, only the Cherokees have an out-
side shot at qualifying for CCS. Both teams
are 0-3 in league play and the Cherokees
would need to run the table to have at chance
at an at-large berth to CCS.
As for those in the running for the league
title, right now, Terra Nova and Sacred Heart
Prep appear to be the cream of the crop. Terra
Nova is 3-0 in Bay Division play and 7-0
overall, while SHP is 2-0 and 7-0.
The Gators appear to have the easier route
to 3-0 than the Tigers do going to 4-0. SHP
takes on Sequoia, while the Tigers face an
always-tough Menlo-Atherton squad this
weekend.
I’m predicting both SHP and Terra Nova
win to set up the winner-take-all matchup
next week in Atherton.
As for the division’s four automatic CCS
berths, Terra Nova, Sacred Heart Prep,
Menlo-Atherton and Menlo School appear to
have those all but locked up.
Ocean Division
The league title appears to be Burlingame’s
to lose. The Panthers (2-0 PALOcean, 7-0
overall) are proving their non-league success
was no fluke as they have continued their
dominant ways in Ocean Division play
against a better caliber of opponent than
they faced earlier in the year.
Burlingame still has a couple “trap” games
on the schedule — Woodside in two weeks
and San Mateo to close the season. The way
Burlingame is playing, its final three games
should be mere speed bumps on its way to its
first league title in 11 years and an undefeated
regular season.
As for those still in the running for a CCS
at-large berth, Aragon appears to have the
best chance, as long as the Dons win out. At
2-1 in league play and 5-2 overall, the Dons
appeared to have already gone through the
toughest portion of their Ocean Division
schedule, having already played Burlingame
and Woodside. Aragon still has one major
bump in the road in San Mateo, and the
Bearcats may be the only other team with an
outside shot at a CCS berth. It’s a long shot,
however, as the Bearcats play the three
toughest teams in the division to close out
the regular season — including Aragon and
Burlingame back to back.
Woodside has shown a lot of improvement
since entering Ocean Division play, but
needed to go undefeated in league to earn a
CCS berth after going 0-4 in non-league
play, with its rivalry game against M-At o
close out the season.
Cap and Half Moon Bay will have to
regroup next year, possibly in the Lake
Division.
Lake Division
After El Camino lost to Mills in the Lake
Division opener three weeks ago, Colts
coach Mark Turner told his team that over the
last several years, the Lake champion has had
one loss.
Turns out he was prophetic as the Colts get
another shot to stay in the race for the Lake
Division crown with a must-win game
against undefeated Hillsdale.
The Knights are the only team in the divi-
sion that controls their own fate as the only
one unbeaten in the division. Wins over El
Camino Friday could all but clinch the crown,
depending on how King’s Academy does
against Carlmont.
AHillsdale win and King’s Academy loss
would sew up the Lake Division title, and the
automatic CCS berth that goes along with it,
for Hillsdale.
AHillsdale loss and King’s Academy win,
however, and suddenly the race for the Lake
title is wide open.
West Catholic Athletic League
It’s not often Serra and Hillsdale football
would be mentioned in the same breath —
until today. That’s because, much like
Hillsdale, Serra holds the fate of a potential
WCALtitle in its hands.
The Padres are currently tied with Mitty
atop the WCALstandings with perfect 4-0
marks, but a lot can change between now and
the end of the regular season, and unlike a lot
of other teams in a lot of other leagues, Serra
(or Mitty for that matter) do not have the lux-
ury of overlooking anybody.
Alot of people thought the Padres’ win
over Bellarmine was the end-all, be-all for
Serra. But that couldn’t be further from the
truth. Serra faces nemesis St. Francis Friday
night in Mountain View, and you know the
Lancers would like nothing better than to
derail the Padres from their title track.
The Padres then finish the regular season
against Riordan and Mitty. The finale against
the Monarchs could be for the league title.
History has dictated the Padres have at least
one close call per regular season and that
may have come last week in a 31-24 win over
St. Ignatius. But there are still three more
land mines the Padres must maneuver around.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
Hillsdale lost in singles, it made up
for in doubles. In addition to
Iinuma’s win at No. 1 doubles, No. 4
singles player Irene Palisoc teamed
with Anne Okada at No. 2 doubles
and won 6-2, 6-3.
Hannah Bodin and Mai Bahn gave
the Knights a rare doubles sweep as
they won 6-1, 4-6, 6-3 at No. 3 dou-
bles.
As usual, Hillsdale had an easy
time at No. 1 and No. 2 singles,
where Cindy Liu and Natalie
Spievack, respectively, each won in
straight sets. Liu cruised to a 6-2, 6-
1 win, while Spievack won her
match 6-2, 6-2.
Aragon’s two wins came from
Aislinn Oka at No. 3 singles, 6-0,
6-0, and Sagrika Jawadi at No. 4 sin-
gles, 6-3, 6-3.
Jawadi was making her first
appearance in a singles match after
spending the season as part of the
No. 2 doubles team for the Dons.
Despite playing the same team
twice in two days, Hillsdale coach
Jackie Nachtigall said she wasn’t
too concerned.
“I wasn’t nervous much today,”
Nachtigall said. “I have confidence
in my players.”
Carlmont 7, Mills 0
Joining Hillsdale in the CCS tour-
nament are the Scots, who cruised to
a win over the Vikings in the PAL’s
other CCS qualifying match.
Both Carlmont and Hillsdale fin-
ished as co-champions of the PAL
Bay Division, so both had to win
matches Wednesday to advance to
the section tournament.
Carlmont coach Amina Halsey
said she was missing a pair of
starters Wednesday, but it didn’t
affect the Scots in the sweep of the
Ocean Division champs.
“This is the third year in a row
[we’ve] qualified for CCS (as a
team),” Halsey said. “But this is the
first time the team has ever won a
PAL Bay Division title. That’s kind
of big for them.”
Halsey said her biggest concern
going into Wednesday’s match was
to make sure her team did not embar-
rass the Vikings — who were once a
Bay Division power playing in the
Ocean Division for the first time
this season.
“At no point do we want to make
another team feel bad,” Halsey said.
“So I reminded them before the
match, ‘You are expected to win, but
you are also expected to be polite.’ I
was pleased to see the girls do that.
“I think the girls had a good time
with that. It was nice to have a
relaxed match and have fun. It was-
n’t a huge, competitive match where
everyone was really worried.”
Continued from page 11
TENNIS
Boys’ water polo
By virtue of its 10-2 win over
Carlmont Wednesday afternoon, the
Menlo School boys’ water polo team
regained the Peninsula Athletic
League Bay Division title it lost last
year to Menlo-Atherton.
As usual, Menlo (9-0 PALBay, 19-
3 overall) used a team effort to over-
whelm a PALopponent. Seven differ-
ent players scored for the Knights,
who were paced by Chris Xi’s three
goals. Nick Bisconti finished with a
pair of goals. Nikhil Bhatia, Andreas
Katsis, Weston Avery, Ryan
Hammarskjold and Eric Luxenberg
each had a goal apiece in the victory.
Menlo goaltender John Wilson had
another strong effort between the
pipes, finishing with 12 saves.
The win locks up yet another
Central Coast Section berth for
Menlo. Menlo-Atherton, in second
place, also punched its ticket to the
Division I tournament. With one
match left, there are three teams still
vying for the PAL’s third automatic
berth: Burlingame, Carlmont and
Sequoia.
Sacred Heart Prep wrapped up an
undefeated West Catholic Athletic
League season with a 19-11 win over
St. Ignatius.
The Gators (6-0 WCAL, 20-3 over-
all) exploded for six goals in the first
period and after leading 9-5 at half-
time, erupted for seven goals in the
third quarter.
Nelson Perla-Ward had a monster
game for SHP, scoring a team-high
seven goals. Michael Swart was right
behind him with six, followed by
Harrison Enright’s three tallies. Chris
Hinichs, Jackson Enright, William
Conner each scored one.
Gators’ goaltender Philippe Marco
finished with 14 saves.
Local sports roundup
SUBURBAN LIVING 17
Thursday • Oct. 31, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Vegetables that add to an autumn garden’s vibrancy include Chinese cabbage and spinach.
By Lee Reich
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
How green is your vegetable garden?
Just because summer’s long gone and frost
is in the air doesn’t mean your garden has to
be a scene of tawny colors, limp leaves and
withered stems.
My garden remains very green, and the
first step was staying ahead of the weeds.
Especially after midsummer, we gardeners
tend to ease up on weed control, and it’s then
that heat-loving annuals like lamb’s-quar-
ters, purslane and pigweed start to take hold.
For me, cooler weather brought quackgrass
and creeping Charlie stealthily trying to —
well, creep — in at the garden’s edges.
Regular weeding forays through summer and
early fall took but a few minutes — much
less than the effort that firmly established
weeds would have required.
But lack of weeds alone doth not a garden
make, and it was season-long, carefully
chosen plantings that provided the lush
greenery itself.
AUTUMN SALADS
BEGIN WITH SPRING SOWINGS
I started planting for the present way back
in early spring. I sowed kale seeds then
which started yielding tasty leaves in early
summer and will continue to do so for weeks
to come. Brussels sprouts — for those who
like them — would also be sown in early
spring for a harvest that begins about now.
If you had stopped by my garden in late
spring, you would have caught me sowing
broccoli and cabbage seeds. It was odd to be
planting these vegetables just as they were
ready for harvest from early spring sow-
ings. Yes, an early spring sowing of broc-
coli can keep up steam right into fall, but
sometimes such plants peter out by midsum-
mer. So I also start some fresh new plants
for fall harvest.
Come early summer, I planted seeds of
endive and escarole, a bed of which now
stands out in the vegetable garden like a
Some vegetables come into their own in autumn
See GARDEN, Page 19
18
Thursday • Oct. 31, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SUBURBAN LIVING
E V E RY T HI NG MARKE D DOWN!
We Don’t Meet
Our Competition,
We Create It!
601 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Hours: Mon.- Sat. 10am to 7pm
Sun. Noon to 6pm
Phone: 650.588.0388
Fax: 650.588.0488
Grand
Opening Sale
By Kellen Henry
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — There’s no shortage of buzz
about beekeeping these days.
From environmentalists worried about dis-
appearing colonies to foodies seeking local-
ly sourced liquid gold, lots of new beekeepers
are itching to roll down their sleeves.
With cities like New York lifting beekeep-
ing bans, and with a wealth of new books,
online videos and meet-up groups, learning
the basics is easier than ever.
But as a hobbyist beekeeper myself, who
once moved a hive full of bees from
Washington, D.C., to New York during a
career change, I can also tell you that the
sweet rewards of homemade honey don’t
come without some sticky practical chal-
lenges.
One of those, of course, is facing the bees
themselves.
“You can learn 99 percent of beekeeping on
YouTube, but you need to know that when
you’re actually there and you’re digging into
a box filled with 50,000 stinging insects,
that you’re good with that,” said Chase
Emmons, managing partner and apiary direc-
tor at Brooklyn Grange, a rooftop farm in
New York that offers some hands-on training
at its hives.
Whether you’re creating a small business
or just planning to enjoy your own honey,
here are some realistic pointers on the
money, space and neighborly grace required
of a beekeeper.
LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION
Where you keep your bees is an important
part of how to keep them. A sunny, out-of-
the-way spot with good drainage is best.
Scope out a location that won’t trip up unsus-
pecting neighbors, curious pets or repair-
men.
Your hive should also be convenient for
frequent inspections. Remember you’ll be
carrying equipment and removing heavy
boxes of honey at harvest time. If you have
to scale a rickety roof ladder to see your bees,
you might be tempted to neglect your duties.
Make sure your landlord is on board and
beekeeping is legal in your city. Then take
some time to sell the idea to your neighbors.
Emmons recommends coming armed with a
few jars of honey to sweeten the deal.
“The last thing you need is unhappy neigh-
bors,” he said. “You can catch more flies with
honey.”
NOT JUST A WALK IN THE PARK
The good news is you don’t have to hire a
bee sitter when you leave town on vacation.
Once the hive is up and running, the bees are
quite self-sufficient in their daily needs. But
preventing pests and swarms, as well as
extracting honey, will require some time and
even some hard, physical work over the
course of the year.
A deep hive chamber full of honey can
weigh as much as 90 pounds, and actively
managing your hive will require lifting and
maneuvering those bulky boxes. You’ll also
be suiting up in heavy clothing and working
in the hot sun.
As a new beekeeper, you should make time
to attend a class or meet-up group on top of
your bee yard work. You might even meet a
potential partner to help you shoulder the
load.
HONEY MONEY
Before you take gold out of your hive,
you’ll have to put some in. It might cost you
around $400 to get set with wooden hive
equipment, tools and the bees themselves,
though much of your equipment can be used
for several years before being replaced.
Shop around before ordering, and appraise
deluxe, all-in-one kits carefully. They may be
easier than buying equipment a la carte but
they often include supplies you don’t really
need.
To bee? Hobbyist hives require time, money
SUBURBAN LIVING 19
Thursday • Oct. 31, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
frothing sea of greenery.
Through summer I continued planting,
selecting vegetables that would enjoy
crisp, fall weather, then sowing their seeds
according to the number of days they take to
mature. So turnips and winter radishes went
in in early August, then small radishes a
couple of weeks later.
Sometime during those weeks I also found
space to sow parsley, rutabagas, and
autumn’s most tender and lush green,
mbche.
Other vegetables that contribute to an
autumn garden’s vibrancy include Chinese
cabbage and spinach. All these vegetables
are green, lush through much of autumn and
tasty.
ALL GREENERY IS NOT FOR EATING
My last planting of the season, around
the middle of September, was just for lush-
ness, not for eating. That planting was of
cover crops, which are grown solely for the
good of the soil. The cover crop I chose was
a mix of oats and field peas. I sowed them in
any beds that were cleared of summer crops
— beans or corn, for example — and were
not slated to receive any of the aforemen-
tioned fall vegetables.
Now, at about 8 inches high and still
growing, the oats and peas will keep rain
from washing away soil or leaching out
nutrients, shade out any weeds trying to get
a foothold, and enrich the ground with valu-
able organic matter. After frigid weather
kills these plants in January or February,
their rotting roots will leave behind chan-
nels for water and air. Best of all, a dense
stand of cover crops, like the rest of the
greenery, simply looks prettier than bare
soil and decrepit plants.
Continued from page 17
GARDEN
said during opening statements.
“Kwame was defending himself,” Cintean
said.
Prosecutor Brian Donnellan didn’t shy
away from conceding Geier punched twice
— one a glancing blow and another that
connected — but said Harris’ response was
five blows to the face. He asked jurors
weighing the charges of felony domestic
violence and assault with force to consider
who escalated the altercation from verbal to
physical and if Harris’ response to aggres-
sion was proportional.
Police reports list Harris as 6 feet 7 inch-
es and 240 pounds while Geier is 6 feet 1
inch and 220 pounds.
Donnellan also told jurors to think about
the sequence of events on Aug. 21, 2012,
that began with dinner at Su Hong To Go and
ended with Harris arrested and Geier requir-
ing a metal plate to repair broken cheek and
orbital bones.
The two men met roughly five years before
the fight when Harris hired Geier who was
working as an escort, Donnellan said. The
arrangement turned into a romantic relation-
ship and the men even lived together for
about six months in Harris’ Napa home
before later parting. They remained friends
and Geier stayed with Harris when he was
here on business. Donnellan said Geier had a
“game” in which he would borrow Harris’
underwear but had not done so Aug. 21.
That night, prior to Harris taking Geier to
San Jose International Airport, the men
dined at a two-person table at Su Hong.
Geier poured soy sauce into a container
which angered Harris who questioned his
lack of table manners, Donnellan said.
Harris suggested Geier find his own way to
the airport and, as the two men went to his
car to remove luggage, Donnellan said
Harris accused Geier of wearing his under-
wear and started “pantsing” him.
On the third try, Geier said he grabbed
Harris’ hand which led to the punches,
Donnellan said.
Cintean disagreed with Geier’s account of
having his pants tugged at five times, say-
ing Harris only “pulled up the back of his
shirt.”
After releasing Geier, Harris left but the
injured and shocked man remained about a
half hour before calling a cab and en route
deciding to seek hospital care.
Harris was arrested early the next morning
and, shortly after, Geier filed a civil lawsuit
which was dismissed in February. Donnellan
told jurors they’ll hear from a domestic vio-
lence expert about victim reactions that
may seem counterintuitive such as filing and
dropping a lawsuit or being noncooperative
with the prosecution. Both are “not unsur-
prising,” he said.
Geier refuses to testify but Donnellan will
let jurors hear his testimony from a prelimi-
nary hearing. Cintean indicated his client
plans to testify.
“You will hear from Kwame,” Cintean
said. “You’ll hear what happened.”
Harris is free on $75,000 bail.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
HARRIS
By Kim Cook
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
When silica, soda and lime meet high
heat, a beautiful alchemy occurs. The result
— a taffy-like substance otherwise known
as glass — has inspired creative minds for
centuries.
Artists and craftsmen today often com-
bine old-school techniques with new tech-
nology to create one-of-a-kind works of arts
for the home.
Internationally known sculptor Dale
Chihuly, based in Tacoma, Wash., has drawn
crowds to a variety of public spaces with his
outdoor “glass garden” installations of
imaginative, other-worldly creations.
(www.chihuly.com) You can find some of his
smaller pieces — glass baskets, wall art and
table sculptures — at www.artnet.com .
In her Detroit studio, Nina Cambron fuses
opaque, translucent and iridescent glass into
wall panels resembling totems. The endur-
ing quality of glass as an artistic medium is
what drew her to it, she says.
“It’s just so rich, smooth, shiny and per-
manent,” she says. “Unlike painting or
drawing, you can’t erase and rework an area.
After it’s fired, you’re done.”
(www.ninacambron.com)
Gale Scott, a glass artist based in
Worcester, Mass., uses a technique called
“electroforming” that involves blowing
glass into copper forms. The hot, soft glass
meets the rigid metal and billows into ethe-
real shapes. (www.galescott.com)
New Yorker Peter Byrum displayed his
paintings on glass at May’s International
Contemporary Furniture Fair in Manhattan.
Using acrylics, he paints natural elements
like leaf fronds and coral on layered sheets
of tempered glass, sometimes half a dozen
or more. The effect is three-dimensional, an
organic, ephemeral diorama. (www.peter-
bynum.com)
Thor and Jennifer Bueno of Spruce Pine,
N.C., are inspired by nature, and form hot
glass into shapes evoking water-washed
rocks or molecular structures.
“Walking along a river, light bounces
across the water’s surface,” says Jennifer
Bueno.
Each sculpture is made by blowing and
shaping molten glass into “pebbles.” The
colors come from adding glass shards or
powders. The piece is then baked to hard-
ness, sandblasted and given a protective
luster; the result looks remarkably like a
rock scoured by the action of a swift current
over time.
In another series, the pebble shapes are
made out of the mirrored material known as
mercury glass.
“In its liquid state, glass glows with
intense heat and moves slowly, as if self-
propelled,” notes Bueno. “Mercury glass
has the appearance of liquid metal, undulat-
ing and three-dimensional.”
The finished glass resembles electrons,
particles, even sound waves. (www.bueno-
glass.com)
At Wayfair.com, you’ll find photographs
printed on the back of glass panels from
Platin Art. Bamboo stems, flowers, and
black and white city skylines seem to float,
making for arresting wall art, particularly
for large expanses of wall space. (www.way-
fair.com)
At LaylaGrayce.com, the Worlds Away
Marina Ice Glass collection of furniture has
a Hollywood Regency vibe, cool and ele-
gant. Nightstands, chests and other pieces
are clad in a milky, translucent glass.
(www.laylagrayce.com)
If you’re interested in acquiring art glass,
ArtfulHome.com has an extensive collec-
tion from North American artists at a range
of prices. (www.artfulhome.com )
If stained glass intrigues you, there are
tutorials on YouTube. DelphiGlass.com
offers stained-glass supplies, kits and tips
for beginners. (www.delphiglass.com)
Right at Home: A glass act
DATEBOOK 20
Thursday • Oct. 31, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THURSDAY, OCT. 31
Interweave Knitting Lab. Mariott
San Mateo, 1770 S. Amphlett Blvd.,
San Mateo. Interweave Knitting Lab
is an exciting, four-day event that
explores everything knitting. Free.
For more information go to
www.interweaveknittinglab.com.
Bay Area Free Small Business
Forum. 8 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. South
San Francisco Conference Center,
255 S. Airport Blvd., South San
Francisco. Small business owners are
invited to learn how to elevate their
online presence. This event is free,
but requires advanced registration at
smallbusinessforum.web.com.
Banjo and Guitar Serenade. 1:15
p.m. Peninsula Temple Beth El Senior
Friendship Club, 1700 Alameda de las
Pulgas, San Mateo. Randy Lee talks
about metaphor in song and music
and performs ‘Danny Boy,’ ‘The Girl
From Ipanema’ and many other note-
worthy songs. $1. For more informa-
tion call 378-2717.
FRIDAY, NOV.1
Portola Art Gallery exhibit. 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Allied Arts Guild, 75 Arbor
Road, Menlo Park. The Portola Art
Gallery presents Jan Prisco’s ‘Local
Color: New Painting of the San
Francisco and Monterey Peninsulas’
and ‘Fall Splendor.’ This exhibit will
run Monday to Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5
p.m., through Nov. 30.
Garden Study Club. 1 p.m. San
Mateo Garden Center, 605 Parkside
Way, San Mateo. There will be a crafty
project, tea and cookies. $5. For more
information call 365-6191.
‘Prints Matter’ and ‘Flowers and
Water.’ 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Pacific Art
League of Palo Alto. 227 Forest Ave.,
Palo Alto. ‘Prints Matter,’ a regional
competition and juried exhibition of
38 prints by 25 California artists, will
be featured in the main gallery. Free.
For more information email gallery-
manager@pacificartleague.org.
Project Read’s 21st Annual Trivia
Challenge Fundraiser. 5:30 p.m. to 9
p.m. South San Francisco Conference
Center, 255 S. Airport Blvd., South San
Francisco. Enjoy an evening of fine
dining and fun trivia competition.
$30 donation fee. For more informa-
tion and to RSVP call 829-3871.
John Blues Boyd and Friends. 6
p.m. to 9 p.m. Marvin Gardens Pub-n-
Grill, 1160 Old County Road, Belmont.
Mississippi Bluesman John Blues
Boyd brings the Blues to Belmont. He
and his Band open with a Show Set.
Further sets include Session Jams
with guest musicians.
First Friday. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. The
Shop, 309 Seventh Ave., San Mateo.
There will be several artists and a
community art project. For more
information contact theshop@fly-
wheelpress.com.
Making Dreams Come True: The
Time is Now. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sequoia
High School (multi-purpose room),
1201 Brewster Ave., Redwood City.
This is a community event benefit-
ting immigrant youth. There will be a
dinner and raffle. All proceeds from
the event will be used for Sequoia
High School Dream Club
Scholarships. Tickets are available at
the door: $10 for adults, $5 for stu-
dents and parents. Free for children
under 10. For more information
email Jane Slater at jslater@seq.org.
Ah Sam Florist Holiday Open
House. 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. 2645 El
Camino Real. A celebration of the fall
and winter seasons. Discover
enchanting decor. Gorgeous
tablescapes. Artisan gifts. Free. For
more information email
lori@ahsam.com.
BHS Musical — Curtains. 7 p.m.
Burlingame High School Auditorium,
1 Mangini Way, Burlingame. $15 gen-
eral admission, $10 for students, sen-
iors and children. For more informa-
tion call 558-2854.
Jimmy Bosch live at Club Fox.
Doors open at 8 p.m. Show starts at
10:30 p.m. Club Fox, 2209 Broadway,
Redwood City.Tickets are $25 (for the
first 100 people) and $30.
Hillbarn Theater presents ‘Lettice
and Lovage.’ 8 p.m. Hillbarn Theater,
1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City.
Tickets start at $23 and can be pur-
chased at www.HillbarnTheater.org
or by emailing boxoffice@hill-
barntheater.org.
Pacifica Spindrift Players presents
‘Social Security,’ a comedy by
Andrew Bergman. 8 p.m. Muriel
Watkin Gallery, 1050 Crespi Drive,
Pacifica. Tickets are $25 for adults
and $20 for seniors and students but
will be half-priced during opening
week. Runs through Nov. 24. For tick-
ets call the reservation line at 359-
8002.
Dragon Productions presents ‘Rich
and Famous,’ a play by John
Guare, directed by Meredith
Hagedorn. 8 p.m. The Dragon
Theater, 2120 Broadway, Redwood
City. A surreal comedy with music
that is part vaudeville, part absurd
and an entirely funny romp through
the perils of being a successful artist.
Tickets range from $25 to $35 and
can be purchased at www.drag-
onproductions.net. Runs through
Nov. 3.
SATURDAY, NOV. 2
San Mateo History Museum
Docent Training Program. 7:45 a.m
to 5 p.m. San Mateo County History
Museum, 2200 Broadway, Redwood
City. Lunch provided. Free. For more
information call 299-0104 ext. 231 or
email education@histyory shocwcas.
California Classical Chinese Dance
Competition. 9 a.m. Skyline College
Theater, 3300 College Drive, San
Bruno. Help foster cultural exchange
and promote the beauty and good-
ness of Chinese dance. Tickets are
$10 and can be purchased by calling
(415) 431-3161. Registration details
can be found at www.feitian-califor-
nia.org/chinese-dance-competition.
San Carlos Grand Library
Reopening Celebration. 10 a.m.
San Carlos Library, 610 Elm St., San
Carlos. The ribbon-cutting ceremony
begins at 10 a.m. There will be live
music and activities for all ages.
Activities include story time, craft
programs, library tours, the Tricycle
Music Festival with Corner Laughers,
and live jazz from the Carlmont Jazz
Band.
Rosener House Open House. 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. 500 Arbor Road, Menlo
Park. Come experience our adult day
program in action! Rosener House
offers care for adults with chal-
lenges, including Alzheimer’s, mild
cognitive impairment, dementia,
Parkinson’s or post-stroke. Free. For
more information call 322-0126.
Free Fridays at San Mateo County
History Museum. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
San Mateo County History Museum,
2200 Broadway, Redwood City. There
will be events throughout the day
and a tour at 2 p.m. For more infor-
mation call 299-0104 or go to
www.historysmc.org.
Ah Sam Florist Holiday Open
House. Noon to 5 p.m. 2645 S. El
Camino Real. A celebration of the fall
and winter seasons. Discover
enchanting decor. Gorgeous
tablescapes. Artisan gifts. Free. For
more information email
lori@ahsam.com.
Tricycle Music Fest presents: The
Corner Laughers. 1 p.m. San Carlos
Library, 610 Elm St., San Carlos. Free
family music event to promote liter-
acy. Free. For more information go to
www.smcl.org.
Holiday Champagne Reception
and Fundraiser. 1 p.m to 4 p.m.
Plymire Schwartz House, 80
Chestnut Ave., South San Francisco.
$15 donation at the door includes a
tour of the House, a complimentary
beverage and an array of sweet
treats. A non-refundable advance
donation of $10 can be mailed (by
Oct. 26) to Plymire House. For more
information call 296-4012 or email
events@plymirehouse.org.
Art — When East meets West. 2
p.m. to 4 p.m. NanHai Art, 510
Broadway, Millbrae, Suite 301.
NanHai Art is presenting a free sem-
inar series on art exchange between
the east and west on the following
Saturdays: Nov. 2, Nov. 9 and Nov. 16.
Free. For more information and to
RSVP visit
www.nanhaiart.com/news. For ques-
tions, call 259-2100 or email
art@nanhai.com.
David Hockney Docent Lecture. 2
p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. his docent
lecture explores the major art work
of David Hockney on display at de
Young Museum from Oct. 26, 2013,
to Jan. 20, 2014. Free. For more infor-
mation email conrad@smcl.org.
Día de los Muertos. 2 p.m. San
Mateo Public Library, 55 W. Third
Ave., San Mateo. Presented by the
Latino Cultural Advisory Committee.
For ages 4 and up. Free. For more
information call 522-7838.
BHS Musical — Curtains. 7 p.m.
Burlingame High School
Auditorium, 1 Mangini Way,
Burlingame. $15 general admission,
$10 for students, seniors and chil-
dren. For more information call 558-
2854.
Dakila with special guest Raul
Rekow plus Lumbre. 8 p.m. Club
Fox, 2209 Broadway, Redwood City.
$15. For more information call (877)
435-9849 or visit
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
Hillbarn Theater presents ‘Lettice
and Lovage.’ 8 p.m. Hillbarn Theater,
1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City.
Tickets start at $23 and can be pur-
chased at www.HillbarnTheater.org
or by emailing boxoffice@hill-
barntheater.org.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
mask; luckily she was awoken by her
smoke detector that flashed a very
bright light when set off, Porter said.
She was able to escape by crawling
through a hole a firefighter had kicked
in the dividing wall between apartment
balconies, she added.
The opened windows and broken
doors had many residents concerned
about theft and whether their salvage-
able items had remained in the build-
ing. Gates and fences were erected
around the property and security guards
were on site 24 hours a day, Badstubner
said.
A third-party environmental con-
sulting company had evaluated the
building and would be retrieving,
cleaning and returning some of the
belongings, Badstubner said. The
building was constructed in the 1950s
and there are concerns about asbestos,
lead paint, smoke, water and mold
damage, Badstubner said. Most of their
possessions, including clothing, mat-
tresses, larger furniture, televisions
and kitchenware would not be salvage-
able.
“Due to health and safety concerns,
those items cannot be removed,”
Badstubner said.
Terrace Apartments residents were
told two to three people at a time would
be scheduled within a 30- to 45-minute
window when they could return to the
property with a list and be given back
some of their belongings. The majori-
ty of them will return on Thursday or
Friday.
Only about 10 percent of the resi-
dents had renters insurance,
Badstubner said. Those with renters
insurance may have their own environ-
mental moving company enter the
apartment for them at their provider’s
cost. Many residents questioned why
they couldn’t just hire their own
movers. The contaminants exposed by
the fire require a professional cleaning
and moving company, Badstubner
said.
Badstubner assured the residents that
he would remain at the meeting,
answer as many questions as he could
and didn’t mind if they “got in his
face” as they were going through
something traumatic. But niceties
weren’t what the residents needed and
many chose to leave once they
received schedules.
Karen Porter, Lisa Porter’s mother,
is a director of legal affairs for a soft-
ware company and told residents to
carefully read any waivers they are pre-
sented with and that signing one is not
a requirement to receiving their items
back.
The Red Cross has received a lot of
clothing, but they are now looking for
mattresses, furniture and storage, said
Marilyn Johnson, job director for the
American Red Cross’ service efforts in
the crisis.
For many residents, the loss of their
belongings is just the beginning on a
long road to recovery. Between the
Oct. 17 Terrace Apartments and the
July 7 Hallmark House Apartments
fires, about 144 affordable housing
apartments were lost in Redwood City,
Johnson said. There are still people
from 20 units who remain displaced
from the Hallmark fire, Johnson said.
Finding an apartment in the same
price range nearby is extremely diffi-
cult, said third floor resident Jim, who
preferred to not give his last name.
The best place he has been able to find
since the fire is $600 more than what
he paid at Terrace, Jim said. Although
he was somewhat relieved to have
found a new home, the stark increase
in his expenses will force him to cut
back on saving for retirement or
toward a down payment on a home,
Jim said.
The Redwood City Fire Department
has set up a donation account for the
victims of the Terrace Apartments fire.
Cash or checks can be written to “The
Woodside Road Victims Relief Fund”
and sent to the Redwood City Fire
Station 9 at 755 Marshall St.,
Redwood City, 94063. Donations can
also be directly deposited to the
Create a Smile Foundation account at
the San Mateo Credit Union.
The Red Cross hotline is (650) 259-
1765. The Red Cross is looking for
furnishing donations such as mat-
tresses or couches, storage facilities
and affordable housing opportunities
for the victims.
Non-monetary donations can be
made to St. Vincent de Paul (650) 366-
6367.
samantha@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
VICTIMS
but the department is still actively
investigating the suspect, said
Detective Sgt. Ryan Monaghan.
Renz, who has worked at the
Children’s Annex for about a month
and is employed by the district, has
been placed on administrative leave,
Barton said. He hasn’t been with the
district long, Barton added.
At this point, the district alerted par-
ents yesterday about the incident via
email, text and hard copy to families
that have children at Horrall, said
Barton. The district also sent out letter
to all parents with children in after-
school programs. The district has
passed on the news to other site prin-
cipals, so they can choose if they want
to give out the information to parents
as well.
The district is also scheduling meet-
ings for parents who have children at
the annex, Barton said.
“He (Renz) has no access to come on
campus,” Barton said. “We’re super
pleased we have processes in place and
that they worked.”
Anyone with information regarding
this case, or who believes that another
case may exist with the suspect, may
contact the San Mateo police’s inves-
tigations department at 522-7650.
Renz’s arraignment is scheduled for
Dec. 5, said Wagstaffe.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
RENZ
“It is not credible that PG&E’s engi-
neers and executives did not recognize
the provocative nature of these facts
in light of the intense public interest
in natural gas pipeline safety, ”
Bushey wrote.
She wrote that “submitting informa-
tion of on-going recordkeeping errors
in a routine-appearing document could
be seen as an attempt to mislead the
Commission and the public on the
significance of the new information.”
The proposal will go before the
commission on Dec. 5 or later for a
decision. PG&E and other parties will
have an opportunity to comment on
the proposed fine until late
November.
Brittany Chord, a PG&E spokes-
woman, told the Associated Press the
company is reviewing the decision.
Continued from page 1
FINE
COMICS/GAMES
10-31-13
WEDNESDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Late-summer sign
6 Keep subscribing
11 Boredom
12 Nikon gear
13 Battery posts
14 Like corduroy
15 Marathon units
16 Burrowing animal
17 Lots and lots
19 Political campaign
23 Hole maker
26 Host — Trebek
28 “2001” computer
29 Slow movers
31 Knowing looks
33 Screen dot
34 Break loose
35 Summer in Cannes
36 Rover’s reward
39 Work by Keats
40 Actress Delany
42 Astronaut Slayton
44 Coalition
46 Walks the floor
51 Dulcimer’s kin
54 Write hurriedly
55 Shallot kin
56 Ice game
57 Blatant
58 Bygone anesthetic
DOWN
1 “I came,” to Caesar
2 Object of worship
3 Take the bus
4 Suppose
5 Mantra chants
6 Banister
7 Grill remnant
8 Beak of a bird
9 Prior to
10 Bankroll
11 Scot’s cap
12 Russell of “Gladiator”
16 “Mad Max” Gibson
18 Refrain syllables
20 Winning
21 — diem
22 If not
23 Ekberg of films
24 Pasty
25 Commit perjury
27 Big tees
29 Got a ticket
30 Attorney’s deg.
32 Kind of system
34 Mouse alert
37 Bad smells
38 Toshiba competitor
41 Detest
43 Disney site
45 Helped a borrower
47 St. Louis landmark
48 Birthday dessert
49 Pitcher
50 Underhanded
51 Chaotic place
52 Mdse.
53 Come out even
54 That lady
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Put more muscle and
elbow grease behind any job you’re asked to do. By
taking on more responsibility, you will encourage
others to look to you for answers. Take control of
your life.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Don’t give in
too easily today. Do what you can to help others,
but keep personal information a secret. Sharing a
good time is one thing, but divulging your feelings
is something else.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Take pride in what
you do, and you will be given the opportunity to take
on more responsibility. It’s a good day to attend to
business, sign deals or firm up on an agreement.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Expect to
receive plenty of suggestions from well-meaning
individuals, but when it comes down to making a
decision, you will be best served by taking a chance
and doing things your way.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — You’ve got what it
takes to get what you want. Don’t wait for someone
else to step in and take over. Broaden your plans and
expect to raise your standard of living.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — You’ll thrive on change.
Share your emotions and don’t be afraid to stand up
to anyone acting pushy. Someone from a different
background will spark your interest.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Discuss your plans and
get started on them. The more energy you put behind
whatever you do, the more interest you will gather. A
partnership will increase your chance to excel.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Work relentlessly and
put your signature on whatever you do if you want to
receive star treatment. Compliments will encourage
you to make an important move.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — He who hesitates is
lost. Don’t let an emotional situation ruin your plans or
your fun. Getting involved in an event, activity or social
gathering will be to your benefit.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Someone is likely to face off
against you. You will have to make an instant decision
followed by a fast move if you want to maintain what
you’ve worked so hard to achieve.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Bend a little, and you will
get whatever you want. Conversations will help you
gain respect and the support you need to achieve your
goals. Good fortune will come from helping others.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Don’t second-guess
yourself. If you don’t understand, ask. Once you have
a clear picture regarding what you are supposed to do,
you will be able to add your own touch.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Thursday • Oct. 31, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
28
Thursday • Oct. 31, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
C oi ns º Dent al º J ewe l r y º S i l ver º Wat ches º Di amonds
1211 80t||0¶zM0 âä0 º 650-34I-I00I
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
º 0eaI With £xperts º 0uick 8ervice
º 0nequaI 0ustomer 0are
www.8est8ated6oId8uyers.com
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRY BURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 11/30/13
WEBUY
$50
OFF
Established 1979
ROLEX SERVICE
OR RE PAIR
22
Thurday • Oct. 31, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
Employment Services
110 Employment
PROCESS SERVER, FT/PT, Car &
Insurance. Deliver legal papers,
(650)697-9431
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
Established Independent
Small Business is expanding.
Now Accepting Applicatons For:
• Bookkeepers
• Administrative Assistants
• IT Technician
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
• PAID INTERNSHIPS
FOR TAX PROFESSIONALS
Apply in Person Monday - November
4, 2013, 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
1501 El Camino Real Suite I
Belmont CA 94002
For more information,
call (650)595-5604 Ext 12
110 Employment
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Two positions available:
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Presser
Are you…..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have….Good English skills, a
desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
Immediate openings for customer
service/seamstress and presser
positions.
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: (650)342-6978
DISHWASHER WANTED
New San Carlos Restaurant
Email: Max@johnstonsaltbox.com
Call (512)653-1836
DRY CLEANERS / Laundry, part time,
30+ hours a week. Counter, wash, dry
fold help. Apply LaunderLand, 995 El Ca-
mino, Menlo Park.
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES +
SALES MGR- (jewelry exp req)
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RESTAURANT -
Cook for American breakfast . Full time
or Part time, for Pantry Restaurant. Apply
1855 S. Delaware St., San Mateo.
(650)345-4544
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
TAXI & LIMO DRIVER, Wanted, full
time, paid weekly, between $500 and
$700 cash, (650)766-9878
180 Businesses For Sale
SELLING SALON in downtown San Ma-
teo. Please call (510)962-1569 or
(650)347-9490
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 523423
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Ryan Francis Rovai-Pickett
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Ryan Francis Rovai-Pickett
filed a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Ryan Francis Rovai-Pick-
ett
Proposed name: Ryan Francis Pickett
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December 3,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/22/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/22/2013
(Published, 10/24/13, 10/31/2013,
11/07/2013, 11/14/2013)
CASE# CIV 524322
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Christie Ann Ariate
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Christie Ann Ariate filed a peti-
tion with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Christie Ann Ariate
Proposed name: Christie Ariate Parsons
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December 4,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/18/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/10/2013
(Published, 10/24/13, 10/31/2013,
11/07/2013, 11/14/2013)
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 524611
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Nicola Lea Stalnaker
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Nicola Lea Stalnaker filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Nicola Lea Stalnaker
Proposed name: Nicola Lea Hunt
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December 4,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/11/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/10/2013
(Published, 10/17/13, 10/24/2013,
10/31/2013, 11/07/2013)
CASE# CIV 524636
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Olga Sergeyev
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Olga Sergeyev filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Olga Sergeyev
Proposed name: Olga Mescherskaya
Miller
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December
11, 2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J,
at 400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/23/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/18/2013
(Published, 10/31/13, 11/07/2013,
11/14/2013, 11/21/2013)
23 Thurday • Oct. 31, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV524378
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Roni Sheffer-Hogan
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Roni Sheffer-Hogan filed a pe-
tition with this court for a decree chang-
ing name as follows:
Present name: Roni Sheffer-Hogan
Proposed name: Roniya Sheffer-Hogan
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December 3,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/15/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/10/2013
(Published, 10/17/13, 10/24/2013,
10/31/2013, 11/07/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257779
The following person is doing business
as: Castellanos Trucking, 1781 Shore-
view Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Sandra Castellanos, same address. The
business is conducted by a Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Sandra Castellanos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/10/13, 10/17/13, 10/24/13, 10/31/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257574
The following person is doing business
as: At Bay Appliance Repair, 1224 Mont-
gomery Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
1224 Montgomery, LLC, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Limited Liability
Company. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Yevgeny Elin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/10/13, 10/17/13, 10/24/13, 10/31/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257897
The following person is doing business
as: Abante Event Planning and Consult-
ing, 401 Rollins Rd., BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Mariano Cruz, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Mariano Cruz /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/02/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/10/13, 10/17/13, 10/24/13, 10/31/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257911
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Burlingame Eye Associates, 2)
Burlingame Eye Clinic, 1750 El Camino
Real, Ste. 103, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Robert R. Elliston, M.D., 2606
Martinez Dr., Burlingame, CA 94010.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Robert R. Elliston /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/10/13, 10/17/13, 10/24/13, 10/31/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257836
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Feprep.com, 2) Feprep, 3) PPI, 4)
The Power to Pass, 1250 Fifth Ave.,
BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Profession
Publications, Inc., CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Patty Steinhardt /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/10/13, 10/17/13, 10/24/13, 10/31/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258072
The following person is doing business
as: Peppermax, 533 Keoncrest Dr.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Fabiola Levati-Woo and Johnson Woo,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a Limited Liability Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Fabiola Levati-Woo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/17/13, 10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258093
The following person is doing business
as: Shamrock Day Spa, 267 Baldwin
Ave, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Hou
Qin Liu, 448 Woodcock Ct, Milpitas CA
95035 and Xiaoying Zhang, 425 Aca-
lanes Dr, #13, Sunnyvale CA 94086. The
business is conducted by a General Part-
nership. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Hou Qin Liu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/16/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/17/13, 10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257957
The following person is doing business
as: Bijou Jewels, 444 Westlake Center
DALY CITY, CA 94015 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Kyunglim
Choe, 101 Crescent Way, 2216, San
Francisco, CA 94015. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 10/01/2013.
/s/ Kyunglim Choe /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/17/13, 10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258008
The following person is doing business
as: Elements Massage, 39 E. 4th Ave.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Sunnyvale
Massage, LLC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 10/01/2013.
/s/ Lisa Meteyer /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/17/13, 10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258088
The following person is doing business
as: Reed Investments, 2916 Delores
Way, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Patricia Reed and Thomas B. Reed Jr.,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a Co-Partners. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 10/01/1979.
/s/ Patricia M. Reed /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/16/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/17/13, 10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257982
The following person is doing business
as: Prestige Wines and Liquors, 1300
Burlingame Ave., BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Tottenham Wines & Spirits,
Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
06/07/2006.
/s/ Avtar Johal /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/17/13, 10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257948
The following person is doing business
as: Seven Day Creation, 355 Gellert
Blvd., Ste 200, DALY CITY, CA 94015 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Jeromy Hogue, and Bethany Hogue 12
Ida Dr. South San Francisco, CA 94080 .
The business is conducted by a Married
Couple. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Bethany Hogue /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13, 11/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258077
The following person is doing business
as: Be Prepared First Aid, 723 Cuesta
Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Marita
Nickison, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Marita Nickison /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13, 11/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258057
The following person is doing business
as: Parthenon Properties, 540 Elm St.,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070, is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: 540 Elm
Associates, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Compa-
ny. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ John Gerontides /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13, 11/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258148
The following person is doing business
as: Pacific Residential Realty, 118 Ascot
Ct., Apt. F, MORAGA, CA 94556 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Keith Miller, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Keith Miller /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13, 11/14/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258189
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Sunny Ridges Joint Venture,
185 Ridgeway Rd., Hillsborough, CA
94101 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Naomi Sobocinski, same ad-
dress and Robert Balopole, 1650 Borel
Pl., Ste. 224, San Mateo CA 94402. The
business is conducted by a Joint Ven-
ture. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Naomi Sobocinski /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13, 11/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258203
The following person is doing business
as: 8 Sushi, 2470 Skyline Blvd., PACIF-
ICA, CA 94044 is hereby registered by
the following owner: My Ocean 8 Incor-
poration, CA. The business is conducted
by a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Tracy Mok /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/23/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/07/13, 11/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257935
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Rumi, 1179 Laurel St., SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered
by the following owners: Andrew Joseph
Gambardella and Sharon Lee Gambra-
della, 2747 Hallmark Dr. Belmont, CA
94002. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Andrew Gambardellal /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/31/13, 11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258302
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Superior Landscaping Service,
3945 Branson Dr., SAN MATEO, CA
94403 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Sergio Martinez, and Laura
A. Martinez, 3945 Branson Dr., San Ma-
teo, CA 94403. The business is conduct-
ed by a Married Couple. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Sergio Martinez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/31/13, 11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258298
The following person is doing business
as: Drewsco Consulting & Marketing,
988 San Felipe Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA
94066 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Andrew G. Daly, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Andrew G. Daly /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/31/13, 11/07/13, 11/14/13, 11/21/13).
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: Oct. 15, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
Amour Amour Cafe
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
305 E. 4th Ave.
SAN MATEO, CA 94401-4008
Type of license applied for:
41 - On-Sale Beer and Wine - Eating
Places
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
October 24, 31, November 7, 2013
203 Public Notices
CHILD FIND NOTICE
The San Mateo County SELPA is
seeking children and young adults
from birth to age 21 who may need
special education services, including
highly mobile (such as migrant or
homeless) children with disabilities
and children who are suspected of
having a disability and are in need of
special education. If you believe
your child may have any of these
special needs, please contact your
local school district or the SELPA Of-
fice at (650) 802-5464.
AVISO PARA ENCONTRAR NINOS
SELPA del Condado de San Mateo
está buscando niños y jóvenes (de 0
a 21 años de edad) quienes puedan
necesitar servicios de educación es-
pecial, incluyendo altamente móviles
(como niños migrantes o desampara-
dos) con discapacidades y niños que
se sospeche tengan una discapaci-
dad y tienen necesidad de servicios
de educación especial, por favor con-
tacte a su distrito escolar local o la
Oficina de SELPA al (650) 802-5464.
210 Lost & Found
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
ART PAPER, various size sheets, 10
sheets, $20. (650)591-6596
ART: 5 charcoal nude figures, unframed,
14” x 18”, by Andrea Medina, 1980s.
$40. 650-345-3277
RUB DOWN TYPE (Lettraset), hundreds
to choose from. 10 sheets for $10.
(650)591-6596
296 Appliances
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both (650)520-3425
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both (650)520-3425
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
296 Appliances
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
OSTER MEAT slicer, mint, used once,
light weight, easy to use, great for holi-
day $25. (650)578-9208
PRESSURE COOKER Miromatic 4qt
needs gasket 415 333-8540 Daly City
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
298 Collectibles
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1953 CHEVY Bel Air Convertible model.
Sun Star 1:18 scale.Blue. Original box.
$20 cash. (650)654-9252
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
2003 AMERICAN Eagle silver proof dol-
lar. Original velvet box and COA. $70
Cash. (650)654-9252
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK HAMILL autographed Star Wars
Luke figure, unopened rarity. 1995 pack-
age. $75 San Carlos, 650-255-8716.
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
SILVER PIECE dollar circulated $30 firm
415 333-8540 Daly City
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
24
Thurday • Oct. 31, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
298 Collectibles
STAR WARS 9/1996 Tusken Raider ac-
tion figure, in original unopened package.
$5.00, Steve, SC, 650-255-8716
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90., (650)766-
3024
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 SOLD!
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
BARBIE BLUE CONVERTIBLE plus ac-
ccessories, excellent shape, $45., SOLD!
LARGE ALL Metal Tonka dump truck.
as new, $25, SOLD!
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
STAR WARS R2-D2 action figure. Un-
opened, original 1995 package. $10.
Steve, San Carlos, 650-255-8716.
STAR WARS, Battle Droid figures, four
variations. Unopened 1999 packages.
$60 OBO. Steve, 650-255-8716.
TONKA DUMP Truck with tipping bed,
very sturdy Only $10 SOLD!
TONKA METAL Excavator independent
bucket and arm, $25 SOLD!
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
APPLE Harmon Kardon speakers, sub-
woofer, one side rattles. In San Carlos,
$40, 650-255-8716.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SANYO C30 Portable BOOM BOX,
AM/FM STEREO, Dolby Metal Tape
player/recorder, 2/3 speakers boxes, $50
650-430-6046
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SLIDE PROJECTOR Air Equipped Su-
per 66 A and screen $30 for all
(650)345-3840
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
3 DRAWER PLATFORM BED Real
wood (light pine, Varathane finish). Twin
size. $50 (650)637-1907
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
304 Furniture
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
AUTUMN TABLE Centerpiece unop-
ened, 16 x 6, long oval shape, copper
color $10.00 (650)578-9208
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLONDE Wood, 6 drawers,
31” Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45.
(650)592-2648
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINA CABINET, 53” x “78” wooden
with glass. Good shape. $120 obo.
(650)438-0517
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
CURIO CABINET 55" by 21" by 12"
Glass sides, door & shelves $95 OBO
(650)368-6271
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 drawer 61" wide, 31" high,
& 18" deep $50., (650)592-2648
DRESSER - all wood, excellent condition
$50 obo (650)589-8348
DRESSERlarge, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
HEADBOARD, QUEEN-SIZE,HALF-
MOON shape,decorated with small
stones,very heavy. Free to take away!
(650-342-6192)
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 medal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white
pen and paper holder. Brand new, in
box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
PRIDE MECHANICAL Lift Chair, Infinite
postion. Excellent condition, owner’s
manual included. $400 cash only,
(650)544-6169
QUEEN SIZE Hide a Bed, Like new
$275, (650)245-5118
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99., (650)592-2648
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
304 Furniture
TEAK BASE and glass cover cheese
holder. Great for holidays. $18.
(650)341-6402
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV CABINET, brown wood, 3 shelves, 2
doors, brass hardware, 34 3/8wx20
1/2dx28 3/8h good condition. $35
(650)347-5104
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057.
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
BRADFORD COLLECTOR Plates THAI
(Asian) - $35 (650)348-6955
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
ICE CREAM MAKER - Westbend 4 qt.
old fashion ice cream maker, brand new,
still in box, $30., (650)726-1037
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO (650)345-5502
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
OSTER BREAD maker (new) $45.,
(650)520-3425
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40. for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
6-8 MISC. TOOLS - used, nail tray with
nails, $15., (650)322-2814
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman, 10”, 4 long
x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 10" mitre saw with 100 tooth
carbon blade $60 SOLD!
PROFESSIONAL MORTAR BOX Like
New $25 (650)368-0748
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
309 Office Equipment
FILING CABINET, 4-drawer, letter $25
(650)341-8342
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20.00 (650)871-7200
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS - (50) for $50., SOLD!
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, anti-oxident proper-
ties, new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WALKER, Foldable with
wheels. $15 (650)756-7878
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN - (7) Olde Brooklyn
lanterns, battery operated, safe, new in
box, $100. for all, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BABY BJORN Little Potty Ideal 4
travel/early training,(650)595-3933
BLUE/WHITE DUCK shaped ceramic
teapot, hand painted, made in China.
$18. (650)341-6402
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BREVILLE JUICE Maker multi speed
(Williams Somoma) never used $90
(650)994-4783
BRIEFCASE 100% black leather
excellent condition $75 (650)888-0129
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
DOLLS: NEW, girl and boy in pilgrim
costume, adorable, soft fabric, beautifully
made. $30. 650-345-3277
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. SOLD!
GOLD COLORED ONE 3-pce. Martex
towel set(bath, hand, face),. Asking $15.
Call (650)574-3229
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HOT SANDWICH maker elec, perfect,
$9.95 (650)595-3933
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks. 9 months
worth, $60., (650)343-4461
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
KITCHEN POTS 3 stainless steel, 21/2
gal., 4 gal., 5 gal. $10 all. (650)574-3229
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $7., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
310 Misc. For Sale
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOW RIDER magazines 80 late 1999 all
for $80 (650)873-4030
LUGGAGE, BLACK Samsonite with roll-
ers, 3 compartments, condition clean,
never used. makeshift handle, $40
(650)347-5104
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12”Lx
5”W , $12. both, SOLD!
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, SOLD!
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO (650)593-8880
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
ONE 3-PCE. clay colored Martex towel
set (bath, hand, face), . Asking $15. Call
(650)574-3229
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
33" wide x 20 inches deep. 64.5 " high.
$70.00 (650)871-7200
PATIO ARMILLARY vintage iron 18" rd,
$60 obo email green4t @ yahoo.com
PET CARRIER Excellent Condition Very
Clean Size small "Petaire" Brand
$50.00 (650)871-7200
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SCARY DVD movies, (7) in cases, Zom-
bies, Date Movie, Labyrinth, in original
boxes. $10/all. (650)578-9208
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, SOLD!
TRIVIAL PURSUIT - Master Game/Ge-
nus Edition. Has all cards. Mint condi-
tion. Asking $10. (650)574-3229
USB VEHICLE charger any mini USB
device $20 (650)595-3933
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEST AFRICAN hand carved tribal
masks - $25 (650)348-6955
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WIN SIZE quilt Nautica brand New in pkg
Yellow/White/Black Trim “San Marino"
pattern $ 40 Firm (650)871-7200
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
XMAS DECORATIONS: 6 unique, hand
painted, jointed new toy soldiers, holding
musical instrument. $34. 650-345-3277
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap $75.
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
UKULELE STILL in box unused, no
brand $35 (650)348-6428
312 Pets & Animals
2 BEAUTIFUL canaries for sale. good
singers, $50 each Call evenings,
(650)592-6867
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
ALPINESTAR MOTORCYCLE JEANS
Twin Stitched. Internal Knee Protection.
Tags Attached. Mens Sz 34 Grey/Blue
Denim $50.00 (650)357-7484
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56” square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
INDIAN SARI $50 (650)515-2605
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
SILK SCARF, Versace, South Beach
pattern 100% silk, 24.5”x34.5” made in
Italy, $75. $(650)591-6596
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored, green lapel &
hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMAN;S LEVI'S Jacket Pristine cond.,
faded Only $29 (650)595-3933
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
25 Thurday • Oct. 31, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Works by future
doctors
7 One of two N.T.
books
10 Mellowed,
perhaps
14 24/7 Rollerball
maker
15 Address for a PFC
16 Traffic controller
17 African adventure
18 Buttinskies
20 1954 Luis Buñuel
film
22 Eur.’s ocean
23 Diva quality
24 Smallish cells
25 “__ Love”: Natalie
Cole hit
26 Lamarr of
Hollywood
28 Harrison
colleague
30 Sluglike “Star
Wars” alien
31 Map corner item,
maybe
33 Cross-referencing
words
35 1974 Lina
Wertmüller film
38 Rat Pack leader
40 Pizza order
44 Start for sphere
45 Moved, as a
trireme
48 Aussie flock
49 Benchmark: Abbr.
50 “For shame!”
51 Portuguese royal
53 PGA money
winner, e.g.
54 1963 Peter Brook
film
58 Unwanted import
from the East?
59 Words that may
precede
weeping?
61 Word with blue or
bean
62 Neurologist’s test,
briefly
63 Temper
64 Covers the gray,
say
65 Tokyo, long ago
66 They raise
dough
DOWN
1 Festoons with
certain tissue, for
short
2 Give courage to
3 Swathes
4 Attempt
5 Spine-tingling
6 Baby carriers
7 Hunter’s garb, for
short
8 Clearing
9 A.L. Rookie of the
Year after
Tommie Agee
10 Rights protection
gp.
11 Has a date
12 On the way
13 With 44-Down,
setting for 20-,
35- and 54-
Across
19 TV’s Oz and
Gupta
21 Barstool topper
22 Yellowfin tuna
27 Like no-nonsense
questions
29 “When You Wish
Upon __”
30 Big name in
games
32 Bygone Delta
rival
34 “Illmatic” rapper
36 Cajun crawfish
dish
37 Went on and on
38 In a manner of
speaking
39 Ready to go
forward
41 Blocks
42 Attack with
profanity
43 That, in Tabasco
44 See 13-Down
46 Before, to a bard
47 Offset, as costs
50 It may be gross
52 “The L Word”
producer Chaiken
55 Woody Allen’s
“Radio __”
56 Science fiction
prize
57 Collector’s suffix
60 D.C. United’s org.
By Gerry Wildenberg
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
10/31/13
10/31/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
316 Clothes
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
70 SPREADER cleats, 1” x 8” for 8”
foundations. $25. (650)345-3840
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $30.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
USED LUMBER pieces 5 2x4's, 2 2x6's,
3 plywood sheets ALL $30.00
650-341-8342
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
BICYCLE MAGNA -Great Divide Excel-
lent Condition Like New SSF Area
SOLD!
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. (650)341-1861
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
CAMPER DOLLY, excellent condition.
Used only once. $150. (650)366-6371
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
318 Sports Equipment
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler$20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
STATIONARY BIKE, Volt, Clean, $15
(650)344-6565
STATIONERY BIKE, $20. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057.
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
322 Garage Sales
GENUINE
ESTATE SALE/
MOVING SALE
Tons of good stuff!
Clothes, furniture,
pool table,
Lifetimes of goods
Saturday
November 2nd
ONLY
148 Costa Rica Ave
x St. Howard Ave
Burlingame
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Rugs
THROW RUG, 8’ x 11’, black and gold.w/
fring, beautiful,clean. $50. SOLD!
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
NIKON FG 35mm SLR all black body.
Vivitar 550FD flash. Original owner. $99.
Cash (650)654-9252
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens. 28mm-210mm. Fil-
ter and lens cap. Original owner. $99.
Cash. (650)654-9252
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
470 Rooms
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$3,000, Call Glen @ SOLD!
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
TOYOTA ‘00 CAMRY LE, 4 dr, auto,
clean title, smogged. 129K miles, $3,800.
(650)342-6342
VW ‘01 BEETLE, Turbo Sport, 97K
miles, auto, $5,800. (650)342-6342
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
BOX OF auto parts. Miscellaneous
items. $50.00 OBO. (650) 995-0012.
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
26
Thurday • Oct. 31, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Asphalt/Paving
NORTHWEST
ASPHALT REPAIR
Driveways, Parking Lots
Asphalt/Concrete
Repair • Installation
Free Estimate
(650)213-2648
Lic. #935122
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Mantels • Chair Rails •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Carpets
COLEMAN'S
CARPET SERVICE
Green, Soap free,
Detergent Free Carpet Cleaning!
Dry in a few hours! $99.00!
2 Room minimum!
Call Gisele (510)590-7427
Contractors
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
• General Errands • Event Help
New Client Promotion
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Cleaning
Concrete
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
Construction
SPI CONSTRUCTION INC
• Remodels • New Additions
• Kitchens • Bathrooms
For all your construction needs
(650)208-8855
Lic. #812356
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
REDWOOD FENCES
AND DECKS
• Chain Link
• Ornamental Iron
Quality work at reasonable rates
(650)703-0344
License #289279
VICTOR’S FENCES
and House Painting
•Interior •Exterior
Power Wash
•Driveways •Sidewalk •Houses
Free Estimates
(650)583-1270
or (650)808-5833
Lic. # 106767
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
• Gutters and downspouts,
• Rain gutter repair,
• Rain gutter protection (screen),
• Handyman Services
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
by Greenstarr
Chris’s Hauling
Licensed Bonded and Insured
Since 1985 License # 752250
www.yardboss.net
º Yard c|ean up - att|c,
basement
º Junk meta| remova|
|nc|ud|ng cars, trucks and
motorcyc|es
º 0emo||t|on
º 0oncrete remova|
º Fxcavat|on
º Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
&
Tom 650.355.3500
Chris 415.999.1223
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Landscaping
Landscaping
by Greenstarr
º 0omp|ete |andscape
ma|ntenance and remova|
º Fu|| tree care |nc|ud|ng
hazard eva|uat|on,
tr|mm|ng, shap|ng,
remova| and stump
gr|nd|ng
º 8eta|n|ng wa||s
º 0rnamenta| concrete
º Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
Tom 650. 355. 3500
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
27 Thurday • Oct. 31, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Plumbing Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Washing
EXTERIOR
CLEANING
SERVICES
- window washing
- gutter cleaning
- pressure washing
- wood restoration
- solar panel cleaning
(650)216-9922
services@careful-clean.com
Bonded - Insured
Windows
ASSOCIATED WINDOW
CLEANING
Services include:
Gutter Cleaning, Air duct
Cleaning, Pressure Washing,
Window Cleaning and more.
10% off any one service.
Free estimates call
(650)583-0420
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
• BANKRUPTCY •
Huge credit card debit?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650-363-2600
This law firm is a debt relife agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
Food
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
Health & Medical
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
PAIN & STRESS RELIEF
$29 UP
Weight loss, Migraine, Stroke,
Fatigue, Insomnia, PMS, HBP,
Cough, Allergies, Asthma,
Gastrointestinal, Diabetes
(650)580-8697
Acupuncture, Acupressure Herbs
1846 El Camino Real, Burlingame
Accept Car & work injury, PPO
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Massage Therapy
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL Group, Inc
8008264333
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises * Land vacations * Family
vacations
Personalized & Experienced Travel
Service
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939

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