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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 842 • October 31- November 13, 2013

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 842 • October 31- November 13, 2013

3

T

Government Secrecy Threatens America’s Rule of Law
he conclusion of John Whitehead’s August commentary “The NSA: The Abyss from Which There Is No Return” (RCReader. com/y/nsa1) deserves serious consideration: “Once you allow the government to start breaking the law, no matter how seemingly justifiable the reason, you relinquish the contract between you and the government that establishes that the government works for and obeys you – the citizen, the employer, the master. And once the government starts operating outside the law, answerable to no one but itself, there’s no way to rein it back in, short of revolution.” For the past six months, the more egregious mass-surveillance activities of the National Security Agency (NSA) have been disclosed to Americans, confirming our worst fears. Nearly every form of communication we engage in is being recorded and stored for purposes that are seriously unconstitutional, regardless of judicial oversight done in secret by a special court. And even though our leaders, both political and bureaucratic, assure us that its activities are legal, they are only speaking to administrative sanction. This means that the legality of what they are doing is not necessarily constitutional, nor apparently does it need to be when perpetuated under the guise of national security and/or keeping us safe from terrorists. Congress enacted the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978 (FISA), which included the establishment of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC) to provide judicial oversight of the government’s surveillance activities while keeping intact its secrets. However, critics argue that FISC is nothing more than a rubber stamp for unfettered access by intelligence agencies, including the NSA, CIA, FBI, and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence – especially considering that, since FISC’s creation, it is estimated that 98 percent of all warrants are granted. FISA requires that all surveillance have its genesis in foreign communications – in other words, initiating from outside the U.S. Despite this criterion, PRISM is just one of the NSA programs that collect all Americans’ metadata for storage and possible future examination. It was part of an array of evidence disclosed by former intelligence contractor Edward Snowden, shocking Americans over the enormity of scope this level of surveillance entails. (See RCReader.com/y/nsa2, RCReader. com/y/nsa3, and RCReader.com/y/nsa4.) Congressional hearings confirmed PRISM’s existence amidst assurances from NSA Director Keith Alexander and National Intelligence Director James Clapper that metadata was collected but not examined without warrants approved by FISC. Clapper originally testified under oath that no such surveillance was being conducted. However, Clapper was not prosecuted for lying to Congress after he admitted to the felony, stating that it was the least untruthful thing he could think to say at the time. Meanwhile, the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence – co-chaired by Dianne Feinstein (D-California) and Saxby Chambliss (R-Georgia) – is giving enthusiastic support for the NSA’s surveillance activities, regardless of the express violations of our constitutionally protected rights. FISC ostensibly provides a check on the NSA’s powers, but the process makes it practically toothless. A single FISC judge hears a one-sided argument – the government’s – in favor of a warrant, with no opposing argument against the warrant’s issuance. Unlike with warrants in criminal cases, no challenge is available to the warrant’s subject – in this case, people under surveillance. In addition, the “relevance” requirement for probable cause has been stretched so far as to defy the very meaning of the word, justifying the mass collection of every single communication of each American every second of every day as somehow “relevant” to foreign surveillance in ferreting out terrorists. Add to this the provision in the USA PATRIOT Act that permits the government to order the turning over of “any tangible things” to protect against terrorism, depending on how narrow or broad it is secretly interpreted by FISC. Finally, the use of a legal principle known as the “special needs clause” provides an exception to the Fourth Amendment requirement for a warrant for searches and seizures. It claims that minimal

WORDS FROM THE EDITOR

by Kathleen McCarthy km@rcreader.com

intrusion by government is justified in combating a larger public danger. This is broad enough to drive a truck through, and common sense alone can detect the potential for abuse in application. Add to this the absurdity of all FISC’s ruling being done in secret, with no public access to these opinions that are then precedent-setting – creating a body of secret law that U.S. citizens can have no knowledge of. It is an entirely unconstitutional, un-American process that is shrouded in secrecy under the increasingly dubious “classification” system for national security. All these policies fly in the face of the constitutionally guaranteed protections of due process against unlawful searches and seizures. These protections are at the core of our unalienable rights that the president, legislators, and the intelligence community’s employees take an oath to uphold. Feinstein is carrying the water for the NSA, promoting surveillance activities with no small measure of enthusiasm, claiming that if we had these spy programs prior to 9/11, we could have prevented the attacks. Apparently she did not get the memo that refutes that claim, with documented evidence that not only did we have such surveillance programs in place, but we had a great deal of relevant intelligence on at least three of the primary al-Qaeda operatives for years prior. The problem was not in the data collection, or

Continued On Page 12

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 842 • October 31- November 13, 2013

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 842 • October 31- November 13, 2013

5

ILLINOIS POLITICS

Can Chicago Mayor Get Something Done on Gun Control?

by Rich Miller CapitolFax.com

B

ack when Richard M. Daley was Chicago’s mayor, Hizzoner would hold a big, splashy press conference every year with cops and prosecutors and crime victims to unveil his new state gun-control legislation. The Chicago media poobahs would shout their huzzahs, the NRA would fume and raise tons of money from angry members, and then Daley would quietly go back to his job as mayor and nothing much would ever happen in Springfield. Rahm Emanuel is not Rich Daley. Mayor Emanuel’s Statehouse lobbyists are engaged in serious talks with the NRA and even the more strident Illinois State Rifle Association (something that Daley would never do, and vice versa) to try to work out a compromise on legislation to force convicted gun-possession violators to remain in prison for a lot longer than they already are. Emanuel himself is said to be actively involved by phone. It still remains to be seen whether Emanuel can succeed where Daley routinely failed. Some legislators said last week they believed the sides were closing in on a deal, but the NRA still had some objections. The basic disagreement is over first-time offenders. Emanuel initially wanted some first-time gun-possession offenders to do guaranteed prison time. The harsh reality is that too many people are getting light sentences for gun offenses, and then they’re coming out of prison to commit more gun crimes. The NRA, however, worries that otherwise innocent, law-abiding citizens who make a harmless mistake could wind up doing hard time. One of the compromises currently on the table would force state’s attorneys to initially charge some first-time offenders with a misdemeanor but allow prosecutors to go through a detailed “felony review” process that could result in more severe criminal charges. But the NRA frets that hard-line anti-gun Cook County State’s Attorney Anita Alvarez would abuse the process to lock too many of the wrong people behind bars. Indeed, word from inside the talks is that the NRA brought up an example of a man with an out-of-state gun permit who has been fighting off a Cook County felony weapons-possession charge for two years.

It still remains to be seen whether Rahm Emanuel can succeed where Richard M. Daley routinely failed.

The charges were reportedly dropped when the state’s attorney was put on the spot during negotiations. The NRA understandably worries that Alvarez – who said “I don’t believe that people should own guns” and “I would favor a law that no one could ever buy a gun” – will continue playing hardball with gun owners who don’t have criminal records. The NRA also finds itself in the somewhat unusual position of being allied with several AfricanAmerican lawmakers who oppose additional mandatory-minimum bills after seeing thousands of their constituents disproportionately locked up under current mandatory-minimum sentencing laws. But all of this is the way things work on just about everything else. It’s how things eventually get done. People on all sides with strong positions sit down and find a way to compromise. But up until last spring’s concealed-carry negotiations, which were forced on Springfield by a federal judge, that hadn’t really happened on gun-related issues. If they do come to some agreement, the next hurdle will be Governor Pat Quinn. The governor has historically been loathe to offend African-American voters, so he has maintained an unusually low profile on Emanuel’s mandatory-minimum proposals, not wanting to get caught in the middle. Quinn told the Illinois Radio Network that he wanted a ban on high-capacity gun magazines included in the sentencing-bill discussions. Such a provision would be a deal-killer for the NRA, and Quinn surely knows this. The danger here is Quinn trying to use a carefully crafted bill to grandstand on gun control, as he did this past summer with his splashy veto of the concealed-carry bill after refusing to participate in the negotiations. If Quinn uses his amendatory-veto powers to insert the magazine ban, he could quite probably tube the whole thing. Then again, if somebody is murdered by a repeat gun offender after Quinn vetoes the bill, the heat on the governor would be enormous, and a vindictive Emanuel would undoubtedly fan the flames. Quinn needs to tread carefully here. Rich Miller also publishes Capitol Fax (a daily political newsletter) and CapitolFax. com.

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 842 • October 31- November 13, 2013

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 842 • October 31- November 13, 2013

7

Hail to the Thieves

COVER STORY

by Jeff Ignatius jeff@rcreader.com

I

Sybarite5, November 10 at Augustana College
Kim arrangement of “Packt Like Sardines in a Crushd Tin Box.” “Radiohead has always been a band that we all love,” Whitney said. “We loved it [the first arrangement] so much that we decided to make a project out of it. ... And once we accumulated enough, we realized, ‘We’ve got to put an album together. We have to release this.’” But Sybarite5 is not a Radiohead cover band. Its repertoire ranges from Mozart to Samuel Barber’s “Adagio for Strings” to tango composer Ástor Piazzolla to Led Zeppelin’s “Stairway to Heaven” and “Heartbreaker.” Its 2010 EP Disturb the Silence featured Piotr Szewczyk’s “The Rebel” and Dan Visconti’s “Black Bend” – two commissions for Sybarite5 that remain staples of its live sets. The group’s Quad Cities performances might include a portion of another commission, Daniel Roumain’s Parks – about the famed civil-rights figure Rosa Parks. Metcalf said work is beginning on arrangements of Daft Punk and Aphex Twin, and Sybarite5 would also love to adapt Björk for string quintet: “Her stuff, like Radiohead’s, is so textural and full and symphonic in a lot of ways.” Because of the composition of the group – a traditional string quartet plus the double-bassist – there is no standard repertoire, and “we play what we love,” Whitney said. “We’ve commissioned so many things, had so many things arranged, just because the repertoire simply doesn’t exist.” “We are completely free to play whatever we want,” Metcalf said. “A lot of string quartets have the very daunting task of interpreting standard repertoire in a fresh, new way – of perfecting it to the level that they’re going to stand out from all the other people playing the same music all the time. ... We were right

t likely seems a minor thing, but most of the tracks on Sybarite5’s 2012 album Everything in Its Right Place clock in within a few seconds of the corresponding Radiohead versions. The string quintet – which will have three public performances as part of its Quad City Arts Visiting Artist residency from November 4 though 10 – is by no means the first classically trained ensemble to tackle the songs of Thom Yorke and company. But it’s certainly the most faithful, and the song lengths are actually telling. The eight arrangements by Paul Sanho Kim (on the 10-track album) are striking in matching each song nearly moment-formoment and part-bypart. This includes lush, thick, slow pieces such as “Everything in Its Right Place” and “Pyramid Song” but also explosive rockers such as “Paranoid Android” and “2+2=5.” Crucially, neither the arrangements nor the performances castrate the songs, retaining their dynamic range and energy without drums, electric guitars, or amplification. Kim has “created a new repertoire for effects on string instruments,” explained violinist Sarah Whitney in a phone interview last week. For example, players hit their strings with spoons or pens, she said, “all essentially to imitate the electronics on the recordings. So it’s become much more than just a string cover. It’s become a much more creative project. ... “It was fascinating to see how closely Paul could replicate every single sound. ... When you have everything written on paper and you’re playing every little effect in the song, you definitely have a much deeper understanding of the song. ... We really know every little second of that music.” “The most compelling thing about the [Radiohead] songs are the ... rich harmonies, and a lot of the songs are almost symphonic in nature,” added cellist Laura Metcalf in a separate phone

interview. “There are so many layers and so many textures, and so many really elegant sounds in the songs. There are things in the songs that are kind of rough and a little bit rock-and-roll, but if you really, really listen [to the original versions], there’s a lot of beauty there. I love hearing it on different instruments. ... It brings out different things within the music.” Kim’s arrangements and Sybarite5’s performances make Radiohead sound natural on string instruments, which disguises the enormity of the task – something the quintet learned firsthand when it tried to arrange “No Surprises” the day before a recording session. “We didn’t even really have a lot of time to set up expectations of how difficult it was going to be,” Metcalf said. “We just had to do it. ... It was not an easy process. It was the first time we ever attempted something like that. We managed not to kill each other, and we think we got a pretty good arrangement out of it.” The blog New York Music Daily made a compelling case that Sybarite5’s versions are “better than the originals. As much as the layers of electronic effects in Radiohead’s music can sound completely random, they’re meant to create a dissociative, disquieting effect. But they can be distracting. Sybarite5’s no-nonsense

arrangements for the most part steer clear of that side of Radiohead, putting the melodies front and center and reaffirming just how strong they are.” Started roughly a decade ago, Sybarite5 initially featured a rotating cast of musicians, performing annually on street corners at the Aspen Music Festival. A few years later, founder and double-bassist Louis Levitt decided to make the group a more serious endeavor with a stable lineup, and its current members have all been with the ensemble since at least 2009. Metcalf said she was drawn to Sybarite5 in part because she had “never played music that was not immediately categorizable as classical at a really high level and as an artistic statement. I was drawn to the fact that this group plays really every kind of music you could possibly think of ... .” Sybraite5 won the Concert Artists Guild Victor Elmaleh Competition in 2011, which carried with it a management contract. Next year the ensemble will present its inaugural Forward Festival, a “portable” event that the quintet hopes to bring to various communities after its first run in Sarasota, Florida. The concept, Whitney said, is to collaborate with other artists in the community in each city. But the biggest hook for Sybarite5 is its Radiohead project, which started with a

Continued On Page 16

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 842 • October 31- November 13, 2013

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Vol. 20 · No. 842

Back to Ground Zero

MUSIC

by Jeff Ignatius jeff@rcreader.com

Oct. 31 - Nov. 13, 2013
River Cities’ Reader
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I

Local H, November 8 at RIBCO
different. ... So in a way, Ryan knows these songs better than I do. ... It’s kind of cool to go back to ground zero. It kind of gives you a look into what you were thinking originally.” Another benefit, Lucas said, is the intensive rehearsal process, which is something that doesn’t happen when two people have been playing together for more than a decade. “I kind of feel like Photo by Wade Hawk the band had become sort of under-rehearsed anyway, so I don’t really mind rehearsing like this,” he said. And he said that the duo has been able to resurrect “songs that had fallen off the band’s radar for a while, and you don’t even know why.” Lucas wouldn’t name it, but he said that Local H has been practicing his favorite song off its 1995 Ham Fisted debut – a track the band had abandoned on its set lists. As for his voice, Lucas said that “it is getting better all the time. There are a lot of things I can do now that I certainly couldn’t do six months ago.” But it isn’t coming back as quickly as he’d like – almost certainly a function of disregarding medical advice to rest it. “I don’t think any of the doctors that I saw have any clue what I do every night, which is damaging enough,” he said. “If they knew, they’d probably want me to stop. ... [But] taking it easy isn’t the vocabulary when it comes to this band.” Local H will perform on Friday, November 8, at RIBCO (1815 Second Avenue, Rock Island; RIBCO.com). The show starts at 9 p.m. and also features Satellite Heart and the Post Mortems. Tickets are $12 in advance and $15 at the door. For more information on Local H, visit LocalH.com.

t would have been the perfect time for Scott Lucas to close the door on Local H. In February, he was mugged in Russia, an attack that left him with damage to his vocal chords – and they still aren’t fully healed. In August, Local H announced that drummer Brian St. Clair was amicably leaving the guitar/ drum duo after 14 years. On the plus side, the band was coming off Hallelujah! I’m a Bum, which one PopMatters.com author dubbed the “best rock album of 2012,” and which TinyMixTapes.com called a “watershed album ... . Not only is it the most intricately arranged and carefully structured of the band’s 20-plus-year history, but it is also their first to delve so deeply into the polluted waters of partisan politics. ... Musically, Hallelujah! is on par with the best entries in the H catalogue. Lucas has a knack for crafting heavy rock with strong, distinctive hooks.” As epitaphs go, a band could do much worse. But when I asked guitarist/vocalist Lucas last week about shelving his Chicago-area band given the events of 2013, he said he never seriously considered it. “This would be the second time in my life where I would sort of think that,” he said. But “at this point it’s kind of hard to separate myself from the band. When I’m dead, you won’t have to wonder what I thought and what was going through my mind. All you have to do is put on these records, and you’d know. ... This has never been a job for me. I honestly don’t know what else I would do. It is part of me, and it always has been.” A better opportunity to deep-six Local H, he said, would have been before St. Clair joined initially, following its three-

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album 1990s tenure on the Island label – which spawned the top-10 hit “Bound for the Floor.” “That would have been the smart time to try something else,” Lucas said. “Now it’s just too fucking late.” Local H’s November 8 show at RIBCO will be its first with new drummer Ryan Harding – and I do mean “new.” I asked Lucas whether Harding was a long-term replacement, and he sounded unprepared for the question. “Uhhhh ... yeah,” he said. “I guess you’re the first person I talked to about this, so I don’t really know exactly what to say about it. But yeah.” When asked about Harding’s strengths compared to St. Clair’s, Lucas suggested that their relationship is still a bit too fresh: “I don’t think we’re going to know that yet.” But he said the new start with Harding has given him the chance to revisit the band’s songs as they were originally recorded. “Having played with Brian so long, there’s a lot of things that I wasn’t aware of that we were doing ... ,” he said. “But it’s also interesting that you get into ruts with people. It’s a chance to break your own habits, as well. That’s really interesting to me. ... “You see that Ryan’s coming from the recording. And then you realize that what me and Brian might have been doing is coming from the way we’ve been playing it live, which sometimes is completely

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 842 • October 31- November 13, 2013

9

The Zydeco Smile

MUSIC

by Mike Schulz mike@rcreader.com

W

Terrance Simien Performs and Educates as Blues in the Schools’ Artist-in-Residence
ould you like to see a photo of perhaps the happiest child in the world? If so, I’ll direct you to the Web site of Grammy-winning zydeco musician Terrance Simien, the latest artist-inresidence for the Mississippi Valley Blues Society’s Blues in the Schools program. Land on the home page at TerranceSimien.com, click on the “Creole for Kidz” tab, and check out the picture of the little boy – he looks about three or four – photographed at one of Simien’s concerts. You’ll have no trouble knowing which kid I’m referring to: He’s wearing a red Spider-Man T-shirt, holding a gold-bead necklace, and boasting what might be the most infectiously joyful smile you’ve ever seen. “That’s the zydeco smile, man!” says Simien, with a laugh, when I reference the child’s photo during our recent phone interview. “You get that, man! You get that when you hear the music. You just start smiling, and people start dancing ... . That’s what that music does to you!” The Web-site photographs of Simien, meanwhile, find him sporting some serious zydeco smiles himself – which only makes sense, as the artist has an awful lot to smile about. Alongside his ensemble Terrance Simien & the Zydeco Experience, the Louisiana-based, 48-year-old musician has toured nearly 50 countries, and given more than 7,000 performances, during the band’s 32 years together. In 2008, the group’s Live! Worldwide album earned it the very first Grammy Award presented in the new category of Best Zydeco or Cajun Music Album – a category for which Simien and his wife and manager Cynthia had spent years petitioning. And when he’s not performing publicly, the piano, trumpet, and accordion player is generally busy educating youths about his music’s roots in his outreach program “Creole for Kidz & the History of Zydeco,” a multicultural arts program that has reached more than 500,000 students worldwide. In addition to performing three public concerts, Simien will be delivering a one-man version of his group’s presentation at 10 area schools during his November 4 through 8 area stay, and he calls the opportunity to educate young people about the blues-influenced Cajun dance music of zydeco “a passion that’s been evolving through the years. are, laid-back atmosphere of that whole scene. “You know,” Simien says with a laugh, “whenever I went out to hear the popular music, you had to be dressed a certain way, and you had to dance a certain way, and it wasn’t fun for me at all. You didn’t want to make a wrong move; otherwise the kids would be talking about you until you graduated. “But over there at the zydeco dance, it was not like that. Man, everybody was just letting go and enjoying the music. People were smiling. People were having fun. And you didn’t see any fights or anything like that, man. You were just out having a good time.” Simien’s early love for zydeco led to the gift of an accordion for his birthday (“I might’ve been 13 or 14”), which the young man taught himself to play. “It wasn’t that hard to learn,” he says. “I picked up on the style of John Delafose, who was a popular musician in the zydeco circuit where I grew up. I just learned all his songs, and then I started learning some Clifton Chenier, and I started writing some of my own songs, and the music just evolved from there.” From his youth, Simien says, “I always dreamed about having a band. And my vision, before I had the zydeco experience at dance halls, was to start a cover band.” Yet as he became more deeply entrenched in Creole music and its history during his teen years, Simien says he began to feel less a desire than a responsibility to help build awareness of zydeco and its origins. “One of my biggest motivations was seeing it and then saying, ‘Wow, so many people my age don’t even know about all this stuff. Don’t even know the history behind it.’ Because it’s a multiracial, multicultural collage of influences that came together in Louisiana that make this music, and make this culture. “I mean, my family alone was here since the mid-1700s. I’m part French, African, Spanish, Native American, and German, and all these cultures came together in Louisiana and started families, and fused together, and made this music. And that’s why so many people can automatically connect with it, because there’s something in there that’s in your DNA. It’s more than what they hear – they’re feeling something inside of them.” With a laugh, Simien adds, “I

“I mean, there’s nothing like playing for a group of kids,” he continues. “Just getting them into the music, and seeing their faces... . We’ll do these shows sometimes for two, three thousand kids at a time, and they’ll really be blown away. They’ll say ‘Wow! I’ve never seen anything like this before! Thank you!’”

Something in Your DNA

Simien’s fascination with zydeco began when he himself was a child in rural Louisiana. “That was the music that we heard growing up,” he says. “I first heard it at our church in St. Landry Parish, in the little church community we grew up in called Mallet. In our church hall, we used to have fundraisers, and one of them was a zydeco dance, and I remember really loving the music from as early as three years old.” Yet while Simien had been playing the piano and started on the trumpet at age 10, he admits that for most of his youth, “I wasn’t listening to zydeco. We didn’t have any zydeco records at my house when I was a kid, and like all the other kids, I kind of got into the popular music on the radio, you know. “But when I was a teenager, I started going with my dad to these zydeco dances. And I remember going to this place called Slim’s Y-Ki-Ki in Opelousas, which was a famous zydeco dance hall – it’s still there – that was built back in the ’40s. I went with him and saw there were a few teenagers there with their parents, like me. And we started dancing, just having a good time, and I really fell in love with the kind of come-as-you-

Continued On Page 16

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 842 • October 31- November 13, 2013

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

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Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 842 • October 31- November 13, 2013

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Over the Hill, Under the Gun
BAD GRANDPA
This might surprise a grand total of none of you, but Bad Grandpa – which also goes by the more telling title Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa – isn’t much of a movie. The first Jackass release to feature an actual narrative, and actual characters, in place of the usual parades of comically vile, violent challenges and stunts (though there are a few of those, too), director Jeff Tremaine’s road-trip slapstick is mostly shapeless and certainly obvious, and nowhere near as hilarious as you want it to be. Yet it’s also a continually interesting and, in the end, rather sweet sociological experiment reminiscent of Borat, but a Borat without the mean-spiritedness. If Sacha Baron Cohen’s outing, with its Candid Camera-style employment of “real people” clearly not in on the joke, reveled in displaying how crass and ignorant Americans could be, Tremaine’s suggests just how tolerant and polite we can be – and given the circumstances presented here, that’s apparently mighty tolerant and polite indeed. To quickly dispense with the plot, because it really isn’t important, Bad Grandpa finds Johnny Knoxville (hidden under impressive prosthetics) playing his familiar Jackass character Irving Zisman, a randy, recently widowed 86-year-old with serious penchants for booze, women, dirty jokes, and letting his (please-let-it-be-prosthetic) junk dangle in places it absolutely shouldn’t. Early in the film, his drug-addict daughter arrives with her eight-year-old son Billy (Jackson Nicoll), and – as she’s entering, or maybe fleeing, rehab – orders the elderly man to care for the child. That won’t do for Irving. So instead, he pops the kid climactic goof on in a car, and Little Miss Sunshine, the pair (or which the beaming rather the trio, Nicoll performs in as the corpse drag, might be the of Irving’s one time the movie late wife is passes judgment on tagging along) its “supporting cast” embarks on a of regular folk, but cross-country considering those trek to North being judged are Johnny Knoxville and Jackson Nicoll in Bad Grandpa Carolina, obnoxious pageant where Billy is moms and their to be dropped off with his weed-smoking lout unbearably precocious spawn, they kind of of a father. deserve it.) You get zero points for correctly guessing And then there are the reactions of that our initially wary traveling companions those regular folk – judging by the facial will bond, with Irving eventually melting at blurring, about 90 percent of whom signed the thought of giving up Billy, and the boy release forms – who greet Irving’s and Billy’s learning to appreciate, and mimic, grandpa’s colossally inappropriate shenanigans with abhorrent behavior. You lose points if you frequent horror, yes, but also abundant guessed that their antics would match the kindness, and almost inhuman patience. My (low) highs of previous Jackasses; barring favorite extras were probably the sweetthose in a handful of sequences – particularly tempered UPS ladies who seemed to give a literally explosive one set in the corner actual thought to, at Irving’s request, shipping booth of a small-town diner – the gross-outs Billy to North Carolina in a box. But they’d and public faux pas in Bad Grandpa are more have competition in the moving-company mild-chuckle-funny than belly-laugh-funny. employees who helped Irving stash his wife But I had a fine time anyway. Knoxville, who in the trunk, and the woman who nearly had never once drops character (the end-credit a heart attack witnessing an adjustable-bed outtakes don’t count), is typically fearless, fiasco, and the strip-club patrons who didn’t and he develops an excellent rapport with flee when Irving danced with his scrotum Nicoll, whose unflappable deadpan is a hanging below his kneecaps; if we learn thing of true comic beauty. Tremaine’s entire anything here, it’s that there appear to be no film would fall completely apart if this limits some will go to spare the feelings of gifted youth weren’t so stunningly adept at the elderly and the pre-pubescent. Watching keeping a straight face, and Nicoll is even this moderately enjoyable yet fascinating more endearing – as he’s finally allowed to film, I was reminded of the famed Anne smile – when Billy begins sharing grandpa’s Frank quote: “In spite of everything, I still love for juvenile pranks. (Bad Grandpa’s believe people are good at heart.” It may not be typical Jackass, but if Bad Grandpa can evoke the spirit of Anne Frank, for Pete’s sake, it’s gotta be doing something subversive.

Movie Reviews

by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com

THE COUNSELOR
Ridley Scott’s The Counselor, with its original script by No Country for Old Men author Cormac McCarthy, is a sundrenched, exceedingly nasty thriller about drug dealings gone awry in and around Mexico, and it feels a little self-conscious – all artfully composed tableaux and conversational portent and poetically (and amusingly) crackpot dialogue that dances around the movie’s narrative without ever, exactly, explaining what that narrative is. Yet it’s a visually stunning piece of work that keeps you in a state of giddily expectant dread with every scene – initially unclear though its storyline is, the movie should prove terrifically rewarding on repeat viewings – and heaven knows there are worse ways to spend two hours than by staring at the beautiful, and beautifully intense, faces of The Counselor’s Michael Fassbender, Penélope Cruz, Cameron Diaz (truly terrifying), Javier Bardem, and Brad Pitt. More than half of whom meet fantastically grisly deaths here. Now that’s entertainment. For reviews of Carrie, Escape Plan, The Fifth Estate, and other current releases, visit RiverCitiesReader.com. Follow Mike on Twitter at Twitter.com/ MikeSchulzNow.

Listen to Mike every Friday at 9am on ROCK 104-9 FM with Dave & Darren

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What ’s Happenin ’ ’ What ’s Happenin
Music
Church of Misery
Rock Island Brewing Company Saturday, November 2, 9 p.m.
So, confident in that knowledge, I hereby present the lyrics to the Church of Misery song “Boston Strangler (Albert De Salvo)” in their entirety. My publisher said he’d only consider blacking out words and phrases that might be deemed really offensive. Please let me inside Open your door I’m here to XXXXXXXXXXX. Show me your smiling And hear me your crying XXXXXX fall from my grace XXXXXXX – XXXXXXX I lost my mind In a trance, XXXXXX XXXXXXXXXX for XXXXXXX XXXXXXXXXXXX on you, XXXX XXXXXXXXXXXXXX, and it’s so good I’m caught XXXXXXXXXXXXX For my distorted youth Take that, censorship! Church of Misery performs locally with opening sets by Against the Grain and Bloody Hammers (you were expecting Fragrant Daffodils?), and more information on the night is available by calling (309)793-4060 or visiting RIBCO.com.

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 842 • October 31- November 13, 2013

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Theatre
A Christmas Story: The Musical
Circa ’21 Dinner Playhouse Wednesday, November 6, through Sunday, January 5

T

even its dissemination to the appropriate agencies. There were volumes of intelligence pouring in on potential attacks on American soil, including flying airplanes into buildings. Feinstein admitted during a recent Senate hearing that then-CIA Director George Tenet issued her committee dire warnings of an impending attack months before 9/11. The only conclusion is that there was a failure of senior levels of government to act effectively on actionable intelligence, as reported in the 9/11 Commission Report, among others. The support for these massive surveillance programs by both the Senate and House intelligence-oversight committees is unseemly in the face of so much evidence that debunks the programs’ efficacy, including the systematic unraveling of Feinstein’s claims that this surveillance thwarted no fewer than 54 terrorist attacks. In the final analysis, the only domestic activity actually

Government Secrecy Threatens America’s Rule of Law
prosecuted based on collected metadata was that of a New York cabbie found guilty of sending $8,500 to a tribe in Somalia that was designated as a terrorist organization. (See RCReader. com/y/911.) It makes a lot more sense when viewed through the lens of massive corruption that characterizes Feinstein’s service. As co-chair of the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, whose job it is to oversee the intelligence services, she emphatically gives a pass on all counts of overreach. Perhaps Feinstein is an unapologetic cheerleader for government spying because, as a member of the military-construction appropriations subcommittee from 1997 through 2005, she cleared hundreds of millions of dollars in funding for projects that were awarded to companies – Tutor Perini Corporation and

WORDS FROM THE EDITOR

Continued from Page 3

? You thought I was going to end with one of my typical, smart-alecky jokes? In a piece about Helen Keller?!? Well, of all the ... ! What’s enin’ pages for you for two whole weeks!

he Japanese touring band Church of Misery will take the stage at the Rock Island Brewing Company on November 2, and along with their significant fan base, the artists have spent years wowing music critics, with AllMusic.com calling the group “the undisputed (and unchallenged) kings of Japanese stoner/ doom,” and TheObelisk.net describing its musicians as “among the best in the world at what they do.” Still, to be honest, I was a little nervous about asking to write a What’s Happenin’ on this particular booking, considering that Church of Misery’s thrash-metal and psychedelic rockers – musicians who’ve been blowing away crowds worldwide since the release of 2001’s CD debut Master of Brutality – are best-known for songs about mass murderers and serial killers, with titles on the band’s discography including “Killfornia (Ed Kemper),” “Road to Ruin (Charles Whitman),” and “Room 213 (Jeffrey Dahmer).” But then it dawned on me: We’re the Reader, damn it! We’re not going to kowtow to potentially squeamish sensibilities and the threat of reprisal for articles of perhaps questionable morality!

“H

o, ho, ho!!! And what do you want for Christmas, little boy?”

“I want tickets to the Circa ’21 Dinner Playhouse’s new production of A Christmas Story: The Musical that was based on the classic holiday comedy from 1983 and that opened on Broadway in 2012 and got nominated for three Tony Awards including Best

Musical and that’s now m debut in a presentation Parise from Circa ’21’s S and has a cast that inclu Gage McCalester and M and Andrea Moore and and his daughter Kriann bunch of other people a fantastic singing and rea dance numbers and all t dialogue we remember f that’s running between N

Theatre
C

Playcrafters Barn Theatre Friday, November 8, through Sunday, November 17
urtainUp.com called it “an inspiration.” The New York Times deemed it “profoundly moving.” Time magazine described it as “unforgettable theater.” And from November 8 through 17, the “it” being referenced will find a home at the Playcrafters Barn Theatre with the Moline venue’s The Miracle Worker, author William Gibson’s telling of the early education of author/activist Helen Keller. Having lost her sight and hearing as the result of a childhood illness,

The Miracle Worker

Keller went on to become the first blind and deaf individual to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree, achieved fame (and some notoriety) as an outspoken campaigner for women’s suffrage and labor rights, and, in a 1999 Gallup poll, was named one of the most widely admired people of the 20th Century. Gibson’s play, meanwhile, explores the origins of Keller’s impassioned, fiercely determined temperament, and shows how it was both shaped and harnessed by schoolteacher Annie Sullivan, the practical-minded, tireless educator who taught the young, nearly uncontrollable Keller how to communicate.

Directed by Rae Mary, Playcrafters’ Miracle Worker features Laila Haley as Keller, Cayte McClanathan as Sullivan (both pictured), and a supporting cast of local talents that includes Bill Peiffer, Mollie Schmelzer, Tyler Henning, Leigh VanWinkle, and Al Whitmore. But while you’ll certainly learn a lot from Playcrafters’ presentation – and will likely have a sensationally entertaining, deeply emotional time doing so – there’s no harm in learning more! Try your hand at the Helen Keller head-scratchers to the right. Performances of The Miracle Worker take place Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 3 p.m., and more information and tickets are available by calling (309)762-0330 or visiting Playcrafters.com.

URS Corporation – with ties to her husband, Richard Blum. From 2001 to 2005, Perini earned $759 million and URS earned $792 million in military-construction and environmental projects. Originally a builder of casinos, Perini converted to military-construction projects, increasing federalcontract revenues from $7 million in 2000 to $444 million in 2004, according to an extensive exposé. (See RCReader.com/y/feinstein. Read more about Feinstein’s other conflicts of interest at RCReader. com/y/blum1, RCReader.com/y/blum2, and PeterByrne.info.) Feinstein had (and still has) unprecedented access to data that should have forced her to recuse herself in all manner of legislative actions where these clear conflicts of interest existed, but she refused. Astonishingly, because she was also member of the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Ethics, her accountability was

(and still is) nonexistent. This is just one story of toxic corruption in government that has gone unindicted. Feinstein has been in office for more than 30 years, with no end in sight thanks to excessive partisanship among voters regardless of past bad acts. Democrats and Republicans will almost always vote for their party’s candidate regardless of previous behavior, rather than casting a vote for the opposing party’s candidate with a clean record. Feinstein’s bad acts leave her ripe for compromise. Logic suggests that intelligence agencies have proverbial dossiers on all politicians, bureaucrats, and private and public industry leaders for this very reason – to force compliance or face exposure. Granted, Feinstein’s history is well-documented, but if the distribution of her conflicts of interest has not reached critical mass, their resurrection could potentially threaten her

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 842 • October 31- November 13, 2013

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by Mike Schulz mike@rcreader.com

making its area by director Tony Smokey Joe’s Café udes Ben Klocke and Marc Ciemiewicz Tom Walljasper na and a whole and is filled with ally entertaining that hilarious from the movie and November 6 and

January 5 and that’s going to be a whole lot of fun for the whole family and I promise I’ll be really really good if you get it for me Santa and oh I also want an official Red Ryder carbine-action 200-shot rangemodel air rifle!” “You’ll shoot your eye out, kid.” For more information on, and tickets to, A Christmas Story: The Musical, call (309)786-7733 extension 2 or visit Circa21.com.

Music
A

International Chamber Soloists
Galvin Fine Arts Center Friday, November 8, 7:30 p.m.

1) On what day was Helen Keller born? A) March 3, 1874 B) June 27, 1880 C) September 13, 1893 2) What was Keller’s middle name? A) Adams B) Bennett C) Reardon 3) From which institution did Keller graduate? A) Bryn Mawr College B) Radcliffe College C) Yale University 4) What was the date of Keller’s death? A) April 5, 1951 B) May 11, 1963 C) June 1, 1968 5) True or false: When Keller made public speeches, she spoke out loud to her audiences.

very special guest is set to amaze audiences at St. Ambrose University’s Galvin Fine Arts Center, and when I first learned that the Toronto Star called this individual “a superbly equipped player with a rocksteady bow arm and ultra-confident technique,” my initial thought was: Awesome! Katniss Everdeen! And then I remembered that the guest in question was actually Dmitri Berlinsky, the lead violinist and front man for the acclaimed musicians of International Chamber Soloists. And then I remembered that Katniss Everdeen is fictional. Sometimes I’m a bit slow on the uptake. Performing on the Galvin stage on November 8, International Chamber Soloists is an assemblage of gifted touring artists led by Berlinsky, and its ensemble of award-winning string players practically constitutes a living, breathing tour of the globe. Beyond the Russia-born violinist, the

group showcases young performers from Australia, Belarus, Korea, New Zealand, Poland, Romania, Taiwan, Uzbekistan, and the United States, and has also thrilled concert-goers in dozens of additional countries, having recently completed tours throughout Europe and South America. Lauded for their dynamic interpretive skills and their collective ability to make classical works by Mozart, Prokofiev, Beethoven, and other greats sound newly vital and fresh, the talents of International Chamber Soloists are sure to exhilarate the Galvin crowd with the sort of musical panache witnessed by American audiences spanning from San Jose’s National Theater to New York’s Carnegie Hall. Meanwhile, Berlinsky will likely be a show all his own, considering that the New York Times wrote of one his performances: “His tone was rounded and velvety, and he phrased in a way that brought out the music’s fire.” So with the booking of Berlinsky, Galvin is essentially catching fire. Just like Katniss Everdeen! Fine. I’m slow on the uptake and have seen too many Hunger Games trailers. For more information on, and tickets to, November 8’s International Chamber Soloists concert, call (563)333-6251 or visit SAU.edu/galvin.

What Else Is Happenin’
Friday, November 1 – Whitey Morgan & the 78’s. Michigan-based honky-tonk/country musicians in concert, with an opening set by Fifth of Country. Rock Island Brewing Company (1815 Second Avenue, Rock Island). 9 p.m. $10-12. For information, call (309)793-4060 or visit RIBCO.com. For a 2011 interview with Whitey Morgan, visit RCReader.com/y/whitey. Friday, November 1 – Cowboy Junkies. Canadian alternative-country/ blues/folk rockers in a concert cosponsored by the Englert Theatre. First United Methodist Church (214 East Jefferson Street, Iowa City). 8 p.m. $25-38. For tickets and information, call (319)688-2653 or visit Englert.org. For a 2008 interview with the band’s Alan Anton, visit RCReader.com/y/junkies. Saturday, November 2 – Cowboy Indian Bear. Kansas-based independent rockers in concert, featuring an opening set by The Bubble Baths. Rozz-Tox (2108 Third Avenue, Rock Island). 9 p.m. $5. For information, call (309)200-0978 or visit RozzTox.com. Wednesday, November 6, through Friday, November 8 – Terrance Simien. Concerts with the Blues in the Schools educator/musician, presented by the Mississippi Valley Blues Society.

MUSIC

Answers: 1 – B, 2 – A, 3 – B, 4 – C, 5 – True. Thank you for playing. Wha wrong with you?!? Shame on you for thinking that! No more What’s Hap re-election. Modern government surveillance is J. Edgar Hoover on steroids, considering the amount of information collected and available for ... whatever. It is no longer extreme to consider that such revolting practices could be employed, especially because all our conversations, communications, and digital activities are stored. Personal data could be easily manipulated for nefarious purposes that benefit those with access. The thing most lacking today is Americans’ imaginations. People often respond to government spying by saying, “Why should I care? I’m not doing anything wrong.” We should all reply: “Yet!” The average U.S. citizen breaks at least three laws every day, according to a Wall Street Journal review of Harvey Silverglate’s book Three Felonies a Day (RCReader.com/y/felonies). This is a reasonable estimate considering the massive number of

Continued On Page 14 by Kathleen McCarthy km@rcreader.com

laws added to the books every year. It would be impossible for any of us to know every law, and if the government were intent enough, it could find violations that apply to you and prosecute you using your specific history conveniently stored and made available in secret without your even knowing until the hammer fell. This week, Congress is introducing legislation, the USA Freedom Act, to more intensively govern the NSA’s activities. It is important to familiarize yourself with this legislation beyond the news bites given by the corporate media. A draft version of the bill reveals the key provisions including (1) addressing Section 215 and ending bulk collection of Americans’ communication records; (2) reforming FISC; (3) increasing transparency; and (4) addressing National Security Letters issued by the FBI requiring recipients to turn over private data without notification.

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 842 • October 31- November 13, 2013

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Continued From Page 13

What Else Is Happenin’
Wednesday: Center for Active Seniors (1035 West Kimberly Road, Davenport), 11:30 a.m. Thursday: RME Community Stage (131 West Second Street, Davenport), 7 p.m. Friday: The Muddy Waters (1708 State Street, Bettendorf), 9 p.m. Free admission. For information, call (563)322-5837 or visit MVBS.org. Friday, November 8 – Local H. Alternative rock duo in concert, with opening sets by The Post Mortems and Satellite Heart. Rock Island Brewing Company (1815 Second Avenue, Rock Island). 9 p.m. $12-15. For information, call (309)793-4060 or visit RIBCO.com. Friday, November 8 – Wycliffe Gordon. Jazz trombonist performs a concert in Hancher Auditorium’s Visiting Artists series. The Mill (120 East Burlington Street, Iowa City). 7 and 9:30 p.m. $10-20. For tickets and information, call (319)335-1160 or visit http://www.Hancher.UIowa.edu. Saturday, November 9 – Jessica Hernandez & the Deltas. Concert with the Detroit-based jazz, blues, and soul musicians, preceded by a SPECTRA poetry reading at 8 p.m. Rozz-Tox (2108 Third Avenue, Rock Island). 10 p.m. $5 suggested donation. For information, call (309)2000978 or visit RozzTox.com. For an August interview with Hernandez, visit RCReader. com/y/hernandez. Sunday, November 10 – Sybarite5. String quintet performing as Quad City Arts Visiting Artists, in an event held in partnership with the Quad City Symphony Orchestra. Augustana College’s Wallenberg Hall (3520 Seventh Avenue, Rock Island). 3 p.m. $10-25. For tickets and information, call (309)793-1213 or visit QuadCityArts.com. Tuesday, November 12 – Natalie MacMaster & Donnell Leahy: Masters of the Fiddle. Rave-ups, ballads, and step dancing in a concert in Hancher Auditorium’s Visiting Artists series. Englert Theatre (221 East Washington Street, Iowa City). 7:30 p.m. $10-35. For tickets and information, call (319)335-1160 or visit http://www.Hancher.UIowa.edu. Tuesday, November 12 – The Alejandro Ziegler Tango Orchestra. Concert featuring the touring musicians from Buenos Aires. Coralville Center for the Performing Arts (1301 Fifth Street, Coralville). 6:30 p.m. $12-23. For tickets and information, call (319)248-9370 or visit CoralvilleArts.org. Wednesday, November 13 – Jake Shimabukuro. Jazz, blues, rock, bluegrass, classical, and folk music with the touring ukulele player. Englert Theatre (221 East Washington Street, Iowa City). 8 p.m. $30-33. For tickets and information, call (319)688-2653 or visit Englert.org. Friday, November 1, through Sunday, November 17 – Last Call: The Songs of Stephen Sondheim. Musical revue of songs by the Pulitzer Prize-winning composer, created by Tyson Danner and Mike Schulz. QC Theatre Workshop (1730 Wilkes Avenue, Davenport). Fridays and Saturdays 7:30 p.m., Sundays 3 p.m. “Pay what it’s worth” ticket pricing. For tickets and information, call (563)650-2396 or visit QCTheatreWorkshop.org. Sunday, November 3 – Ghost Brothers of Darkland County. Supernatural musical presented in radio-drama format, featuring a book by Stephen King and score by John Mellencamp. Adler Theatre (136 East Third Street, Davenport). 7 p.m. $39.50-69.50. For tickets, call (800)745-3000 or visit AdlerTheatre.com. For an interview with star Bruce Greenwood and director Susan V. Booth, visit RCReader.com/y/darkland. Monday, November 4 – Theodore Roosevelt. One-man reflection on the president’s triumphs and failures, featuring actor Terry Lynch. Eldridge Public Library (200 North Sixth Avenue, Eldridge). 6:30 p.m. Free admission. For information, call (563)285-4794 or visit ScottCountyLibrary. org. Thursday, November 7, through Sundays, November 17 – I Take This Man. Romantic comedy by Jack Sharkey, directed by Dana Skiles. Richmond Hill Barn Theatre (600 Robinson Drive, Geneseo). ThursdaysSaturdays 7:30 p.m., Sundays 3 p.m. $8-10. For tickets and information, call (309)9442244 or visit RHPlayers.com. Friday, November 8, through Sunday, November 10 – Berlin to Broadway with Kurt Weill. A journey through the noted musician’s career, directed by Bill Theisen and conducted by William LaRue Jones. Englert Theatre (221 East Washington Street, Iowa City). Friday and Saturday 8 p.m., Sunday 2 p.m. $5-20. For tickets and information, call (319)688-2653 or visit Englert.org. Friday, November 8 – Murder at Skuttlebutt Sound. A new pirate-adventure murder mystery with the It’s a Mystery! troupe, written by Scott Naumann. Skellington Manor Banquet & Event Center (420 18th Street, Rock Island). 6:30 p.m. $35 for dinner and show. For tickets and information, call (363)344-9187 or visit SkellingtonManor.com. Expo Center (2621 Fourth Avenue, Rock Island). Friday 5-9 p.m., Saturday10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sunday: 11 a.m.-4 p.m. $7 weekend pass. For information, call (712)324-9964 or visit AntiqueSpectacular.com. Friday, November 1 – Cirque Mechanics: Birdhouse Factory. Stage spectacular in which factory workers are acrobats and machines are circus props. Orpheum Theatre (57 South Kellogg Street, Galesburg). 7:30 p.m. $25-40. For tickets and information, call (309)342-2299 or visit TheOrpheum.org. Friday, November 8 – QC United’s Third-Annual Food & Wine Experience. Event featuring international wines, samplings from three area chefs, and live music with electric violinist Jerald Daemyon. River Music Experience (131 West Second Street, Davenport). 6 p.m. $50-65/person, $90-130/couple. For tickets and information, call (563)326-1333 or visit RiverMusicExperience.org. Friday, November 8 – Rock ’n’ Roll Bingo. Music-trivia fundraiser held in support of the John R. Kiley Memorial Scholarship, with host Cody Tucker of radio station B100FM. Knights of Columbus Hall (1111 West 35th Street, Davenport). 7 p.m. $10 at the door. For information, visit RockNRollBingoQC.com. Sunday, November 10 – Unity Fest International. A celebration of community diversity featuring food tastings, cultural performances, ethnic demonstrations and crafts, and more. Putnam Museum (1717 West 12th Street, Davenport). Noon-5 p.m. Free admission. For information, call (5630)349-1870 or visit QCUnited.org. Tuesday, November 12 – Theresa Caputo. Interactive readings and personal stories with the star of TLC’s Long Island Medium. Adler Theatre (136 East Third Street, Davenport). 7:30 p.m. $41.75-100. For tickets, call (800)745-3000 or visit AdlerTheatre.com.

THEATRE

COMEDY

VISUAL ART

Saturday, November 2, and Sunday, November 3 – Fall Mississippi River Valley Art Drive. Seventh-annual, self-guided tour featuring more than 400 works by artists residing within 100 miles of the Mississippi River. For information, visit MRVAD.com.

Friday, November 1, through Sunday, November 3 – Fall Antique Spectacular. Annual event featuring 70 exhibitors offering fine antiques and collectibles for sale. QCCA

EVENTS

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 842 • October 31- November 13, 2013

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 842 • October 31- November 13, 2013 Continued From Page 7

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com by Jeff Ignatius jeff@rcreader.com

COVER STORY

Hail to the Thieves
away able to find our voice through the repertoire that we played, and construct our own personal style and canon of repertoire ... just by choosing very, very carefully the works that we were going to play and the works that we were going to commission.” Metcalf added that the quintet format means greater variety for her – “I’m not confined to the bass line all the time” – and that Kim is particularly adept at making arrangements that are compelling for both the players and the audience. He’s good at “keeping the arrangement interesting. They’re not repetitive.” The five instruments, Metcalf said, are essential to reproducing Radiohead. The double bass, she said, “opens up a huge range of possibilities in terms of range and timbre of the songs that we can get. And also percussive effects and sounds we create using only our instrument.” Levitt, for example, can hit his bass. “It’s not like a bass drum, but it really gets that depth and that effect,” Metcalf said. Meanwhile, the cello can hold down the song’s low end. If the group were a string quartet, she added, the arrangement could include only one of those elements: “I think that since ... we have that added instrument ... [and] that added range, we’re able to capture a lot of the different sounds that are in the songs.” And while Sybarite5’s versions of Radiohead aren’t radical deconstructions, she said, the group is adventurous in trying to reproduce the breadth and depth of the songs. “We’re not exactly experimental in a way that you would think of experimental, but we definitely want to explore every possibility of sound that can be created by our instruments,” she said. “I think that the sounds make sense for us. They’re not ‘other’ for us.” Metcalf stressed that Radiohead is not meant as a novelty. “It’s very easy to cover rock tunes on string instruments, and very hard to do it well,” she said. “It’s easy to distill a rock tune into its most simple parts – the bass line, the percussion, the voice, the guitar parts. But to make it really interesting and something that we feel comfortable presenting on a concert stage is much, much more difficult.” As for Led Zeppelin, she said that it’s a great way to connect with younger students, few of whom have ever rocked out on classical instruments. (Much of Sybrarite5’s residency will be spent in area schools.) But Metcalf admitted that she had no affinity for Led Zeppelin before joining Sybrarite5: “It’s not of my time, let’s say. But neither is Mozart.” Sybarite5 will close its Quad City Arts

residency with a full-length public concert on Sunday, November 10, at Augustana College’s Wallenberg Hall (3520 Seventh Avenue, Rock Island). Tickets to the 3 p.m. performance are $25 for adults and $10 for students and can be obtained by calling (563)322-0931 or visiting QCSymphony. com. Other public performances are scheduled for 11 a.m. on Thursday, November 7, at Black Hawk College (Room 115, Building 4, 6600 34th Avenue, Moline) and 3 p.m. on Friday, November 8, at the Deere-Wiman House (817 11th Avenue, Moline). For more information on Quad City Arts’ Visiting Artist series, visit QuadCityArts. com For more information on Sybrarite5, visit Sybarite5.org.

The Zydeco Smile
think it’s their blood talking to ’em, you know what I’m saying? “So I came to realize, hey, this isn’t just Louisiana history. This is American history, man. And if we don’t all step up, this is gonna be a thing of the past. Because there really wasn’t anybody making any effort in the Creole community to educate about this, you know?”

MUSIC

Continued from Page 9

by Mike Schulz mike@rcreader.com
“And now, you have tons and tons of teenage zydeco bands coming out of the Creole communities down here in south Louisiana, and also around southeast Texas, and even in California. There are a bunch of teenage bands around there in the San Francisco Bay area and in Los Angeles – a lot of Creoles settled there back in the early 1900s, looking for better jobs and stuff, and brought the culture with them, you know?” With the renamed Terrance Simien & the Zydeco Experience’s higher-profile engagements including a breakthrough set at the 1984 World’s Fair in Louisiana, an appearance in the 1987 Dennis Quaid thriller The Big Easy, and a concert at Australia’s Sydney Festival that was attended by 100,000 music fans, the band made music history when, in 2008, it won the first Grammy in a category fought for by Simien and his wife for seven years prior. “We just felt, ‘Hey, you have styles of music like Hawaiian music, and Native American music, and folk music, and all of these styles of American music that deserve to be recognized, and ours isn’t there.’ So we started a little campaign, and began petitioning the Grammys’ board of trustees to establish a new category. “A lot of the process involved educating the community about zydeco and networking and then uniting the community ... . We worked really hard at it for seven years. And finally, on our fourth petition, after a letter of recommendation to establish the category was brought forth to the trustees, they voted for the category almost unanimously.” But as proud as Simien is of that accomplishment, he says that the 2001 creation of his “Creole for Kidz & the History of Zydeco” program will always remain a professional and personal highlight. “I always wanted to reach the kids and connect them with this music,” he says, “because as a kid growing up with this music, you know, I was connected to it, and it was a real positive experience for me. You know, growing up dancing and having a good time, and not feeling any pressure from bullying or anything like that ... . It was an atmosphere that was just so joyful and laid-back, and I think all kids should experience that.” And, the artist says, that sense of joy is certainly evident when the youths he performs for learn that the music of Terrance Simien & the Zydeco Experience is prominently featured in 2009’s New Orleans-set Disney film The Princess & the Frog. “In our programs, I’ll always ask the kids, ‘How many of you guys have seen The Princess & the Frog?’ And I’d say 95 percent of the audience’s hands go up, and they’ll go up all excited. ‘Oooo! Yeah!’ And I’ll say, ‘Well, guess what, guys? We have a song in that movie.’ And then I’ll start singing ‘Goin’ down the bayou, goin’ down the bayou ... ,’ and I’ll see these little girls putting their hands over their mouths, you know, all surprised, like, ‘Oh, that song! I know that song!’ And then we’ll get ’em to sing the song with us, and then all of a sudden, that’s it. They’re connecting with the music. “So thank you, Disney!” says Simien, laughing. “Because kids from now until forever are gonna be watching that classic and connecting to the music.” Terrance Simien will perform three public concerts during his Blues in the Schools residency: at the Center for Active Seniors (1035 West Kimberly Road, Davenport) at 11:30 a.m. on November 6; at the Redstone Room (129 Main Street, Davenport) at 7 p.m. on November 7; and at The Muddy Waters (1708 State Street, Bettendorf) at 9 p.m. on November 8. For more information on Simien’s area residency, call the Mississippi Valley Blues Society at (563)322-5837 or visit MVBS.org. For more information on the artist himself, visit TerranceSimien.com.

While still in his teens, the artist formed the zydeco band Terrance Simien & the Mallet Playboys in 1981, and he admits that, initially, it was difficult finding fellow teen musicians for the ensemble. “Guys would say, ‘Aw, man, I can’t play that zydeco stuff! That’s for old people!’ But those same guys, you know, are zydeco musicians today. They all live for that stuff now.” What Simien says was less difficult, perhaps somewhat surprisingly, was his band’s ability to book sets at local venues. “It was such a novelty around home, you know – a teenage zydeco band – that people would book us because we were young doing it. It was like, ‘Let’s book these kids!’ So it was actually easier to get bookings then. Even though,” he adds with a laugh, “some of the older zydeco guys were getting pissed off because we were getting their gigs.

Goin’ Down the Bayou

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 842 • October 31- November 13, 2013

17

PHOTOGRAPHY

Featured Images from the Quad Cities Photography Club

E

(Editor’s note: The River Cities’ Reader each month will feature an image or images from the Quad Cities Photography Club.) ach summer the Quad Cities Photography Club issues a summer challenge. Each person is randomly given a topic to use to create a photo. The challenge photos are then shown and discussed at the September club meeting. It’s always interesting to see how the topics are interpreted. Dan Holtz had the topic “Old Architecture.” He stated, “The wellpreserved Victorian heritage of my hometown of Geneseo, Illinois, provided many good opportunities to capture this theme. I made this photo of an old bank-building façade, because the date of 1912 is clearly inscribed along with the ornate stone work and interesting lines and colors of the architectural design. The photo was made facing the corner of the building to capture the key elements of the façade and to provide something of a three-dimensional feeling. As is the case with many area communities, the retail businesses have replaced and modernized

much of the old architecture on the ground level, but if one looks up, the façades are often well-preserved.” He shot this photo using a Nikon D90 with a Nikon 18-200-millimeter lens at about 60 millimeters, f/8, and 1/1000 of a second. He submitted his photo directly as it was taken in the camera. The topic for Dick Koos was “Pair.” He thought about this and discussed it with his wife. They decided that a pair of pears would be a nice twist. It also gave him a chance to do tabletop photography for

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the first time. He asked several club members for suggestions on how to do this, then set up a table in front of a window that had light filtered through a curtain. The pears were set on a piece of black poster board, and he added a white board on the right side to reflect on the right pear, reducing the shadow there. The shot was taken with a Nikon D7000 with an 18-70-millimeter lens at 70 millimeters on a tripod. It was shot in RAW at f/6.7 and 1/6 of a second. Dick made some minor adjustments to the exposure using Apple’s Aperture software, and he removed some blemishes. He added, “They did taste as good as they look.” The Quad Cities Photography Club welcomes visitors and new members. The club sponsors numerous activities encompassing many types and aspects of photography. It holds digital and print competitions most months. At its meetings, members discuss the images, help each other to improve, and socialize. The club also holds special learning workshops and small groups that meet on specific photography topics, and occasionally offers interesting shooting opportunities. The club meets at 6:30 p.m. the first Thursday

of the month September through June at the Butterworth Center, 1105 Eighth Street in Moline. For more information on the club, visit QCPhotoClub.com.

October 17 Crossword Answers

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18

Ask

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 842 • October 31- November 13, 2013

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

the

I’ve tried to be open-minded, but I’ve decided that men are givers and women are takers. I study at my local coffeehouse. I am interested in this woman who comes in and I often unplug my computer and offer to let her use the outlet. Two weeks ago, I decided to make my interest clearer by buying her coffee. She said, “Oh! Thanks!” Then she put her nose back in her books. The next time she came in, I offered her my large table because she had tons of books. She blushed as girls do, asking, “Are you sure?” I said, “Of course!” I then worked at a small, cramped table next to her. She made no effort to talk, except when she asked me to watch her computer while she went to the restroom. Finally, I decided to be really clear and asked if she’d like to grab a bite sometime. She smiled and said she’d just see me here, but thanks. Yeah, she’ll see me there and expect me to give her my big table. I’m sick of this take, take, take. A woman needs to tell a man right away if she’s not interested and not let him sit there like an idiot, planning to make her life easier. – Irate I guess when you ask a woman whether she’d like to use the power outlet, she should just come right out and say, “I would, but I don’t find you very attractive.” Why go after what you want when you can dance around it, do it favors, and hope it figures out that you’ve made a secret agreement with it in your head? There are girls who would respond in a way you’d consider honorable – who would not only show appreciation when you provide them with complimentary food and beverages but even follow you home. Unfortunately, they’re the sort of girls who catch a Frisbee in their teeth. Like the sign spinner on the corner in the Statue of Liberty suit, you think you need to lure women with a special offer, except instead of “Cash for gold!” it’s “Snake your drain for a date!” You’re apparently convinced that no woman would want you for you. This probably isn’t entirely off-base, since the “you” you currently are is a guy who thinks instilling a sense of obligation in a woman for favors rendered is your best hope of having sex

Mouse Ado About Nothing

Advice Goddess

again before you forget where the parts go. Stop grumbling that women are conniving takers, and work on accepting yourself, flaws and all. Once your selfrespect is no longer trailer-hitched to whether women want you, you can be direct – just talk to a woman, let her see who you are, and ask her out. She may turn you down, but if you feel okay about yourself, you’ll see her rejection as your cue – simply to find the next girl to hit on, not to storm out behind the coffeehouse, shake your fist at the sky, and yell, “Hey, weren’t the meek supposed to inherit the earth? Where’s mine?!”

BY AMY ALKON

A friend of a year has a pattern of raving about people she meets and then completely cooling on them. Last week, she met a man online. On their first date, he took her shopping, buying her a gold ring and a key ring he had engraved with both their names and “Thinking of you always.” She describes him as perfect, brilliant, et cetera, and said she loves him and would marry him. I said things like “Take some time to get to know him,” but I don’t think she really heard me. – Concerned A first date like theirs raises some questions for the second date, such as, “Who should pay the invoice for the sideby-side burial plots?” Be prepared to wear out your face trying to talk sense into your friend. The problem is “confirmation bias” – our tendency to seek information that supports what we already believe and toss information that does not. In other words, your time would be better spent painting a wall and speaking meaningful thoughts to the paint as it dries. Another productive use of your time would be adding up how much of it you’re spending worrying about this woman’s problems. It isn’t mercenary or ugly to expect a friendship to be mutual and to influence you in positive ways. If how she lives is dragging you down, you may want to give her a little less prominence in your life. Then, when you do see her, you can just admire her ring and share in her happiness at reaching that milestone golden anniversary – celebrating 50 joyous minutes of knowing a man.

Wait Problems

171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (AdviceGoddess.com)
©2013, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved.

Got A Problem? Ask Amy Alkon.

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 842 • October 31- November 13, 2013

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY
ARIES (March 21-April 19): Once when I was hiking through Maui’s rain forest, I spied a majestic purple honohono flower sprouting from a rotting log. As I bent down close, I inhaled the merged aromas of moldering wood and sweet floral fragrance. Let’s make this scene your metaphor of the week, Aries. Here’s why: A part of your life that is in the throes of decay can serve as host for a magnificent bloom. What has been lost to you may become the source of fertility. Halloween costume suggestion: a garbage man or cleaning maid wearing a crown of roses. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): What don’t you like? Get clear about that. What don’t you want to do? Make definitive decisions. What kind of person do you not want to become and what life do you never want to live? Resolve those questions with as much certainty as possible. Write it all down, preferably in the form of a contract with yourself. Sign the contract. This document will be your sacred promise, a declaration of the boundaries you won’t cross and the activities you won’t waste your time on and the desires that aren’t worthy of you. It will feed your freedom to know exactly what you like and what you want to accomplish and who you want to become. Halloween costume suggestion: the opposite of who you really are. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Are you up for an experiment? Not just on Halloween, but for a week afterward, be scarier than your fears. If an anxious thought pops into your mind, bare your teeth and growl, “Get out of here or I will rip you to shreds!” If a demon visits you in a nightly dream, chase after it with a torch and sword, screaming “Begone, foul spirit, or I will burn your mangy ass!” Don’t tolerate bullying in any form, whether it comes from a critical little voice in your head or from supposedly nice people who are trying to guilttrip you. “I am a brave conqueror who cannot be intimidated!” is what you could say, or “I am a monster of love and goodness who will defeat all threats to my integrity!” CANCER (June 21-July 22): Are you ready to be amazed? Now would be an excellent time to shed your soul’s infantile illusions ... to play wildly with the greatest mystery you know ... to accept gifts that enhance your freedom and refuse gifts that don’t ... to seek out a supernatural encounter that heals your chronic sadness ... to consort and converse with sexy magical spirits from the future ... to make love with the lights on and cry when you come. Halloween costume suggestion: the archetypal lover. LEO (July 23-August 22): Some people in your vicinity are smoldering and fuming. The air is heavy with emotional ferment. Conspiracy theories are ripening and rotting at the same time. Hidden agendas are seeping into conversations, and gossip is swirling

by Rob Brezsny
You were not yet in the clear, but you seemed to be en route to total emancipation. I think this dream is an apt metaphorical depiction of your actual life right now. Could you somehow use it in designing your Halloween costume? CAPRICORN (December 22-January 19): I invite you to try the following exercise. Imagine the most powerful role you could realistically attain in the future. This is a position or niche or job that will authorize you to wield your influence to the max. It will give you the clout to shape the environments you share with other people. It will allow you to freely express your important ideas and have them be treated seriously. Let your imagination run a little wild as you visualize the possibilities. Incorporate your visions into your Halloween costume. AQUARIUS (January 20-February 18): In the course of earning a living, I have worked four different jobs as a janitor and six as a dishwasher. On the brighter side, I have performed as a songwriter and lead singer for six rock bands and currently write a syndicated astrology column. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you Aquarians are primed to cultivate a relationship with your work life that is more like my latter choices than the former. The next eight months will be a favorable time to ensure that you’ll be doing your own personal equivalent of rock singer or astrology columnist well into the future. Halloween costume suggestion: your dream job. PISCES (February 19-March 20): Author Robert Louis Stevenson loved the work of poet Walt Whitman, recommending it with the same enthusiasm as he did Shakespeare’s. Stevenson also regarded Whitman as an unruly force of nature, and in one famous passage, called him “a large shaggy dog, just unchained, scouring the beaches of the world and baying at the moon.” Your assignment is to do your best imitation of a primal creature like Whitman. In fact, consider being him for Halloween. Maybe you could memorize passages from Whitman’s Leaves of Grass and recite them at random moments. Here’s one: “I too am not a bit tamed, I too am untranslatable, / I sound my barbaric YAWP over the roofs of the world.” Homework: Meditate on death not as the end of physical life, but as a metaphor for shedding what’s outworn. In that light, what’s the best death you’ve experienced? Visit FreeWillAstrology.com.

like ghostly dust devils. Yet in the midst of this mayhem, an eerie calm possesses you. As everyone else struggles, you’re poised and full of grace. To what do we owe this stability? I suspect it has to do with the fact that life is showing you how to feel at home in the world no matter what’s happening around you. Keep making yourself receptive to these teachings. Halloween costume suggestion: King or Queen of Relaxation. VIRGO (August 23-September 22): Unification should be a key theme for you in the coming weeks. Anything you do that promotes splicing and blending and harmonizing will get extra help, sometimes from mysterious forces working behind the scenes. The more you work to find common ground between opposing sides, the stronger you’ll feel and the better you’ll look. If you can manage to mend schisms and heal wounds, unexpected luck will flow into your life. To encourage these developments, consider these Halloween disguises: a roll of tape, a stick of Krazy Glue, a wound that’s healing, a bridge. LIBRA (September 23-October 22): What do you think you’d be like if you were among the 1 percent wealthiest people on Earth? Would you demand that your government raise your taxes so you could contribute more to our collective well-being? Would you live simply and cheaply so you’d have more money to donate to charities and other worthy causes? This Halloween season, I suggest you play around with fantasies like that – maybe even masquerade as an incredibly rich philanthropist who doles out cash and gifts everywhere you go. At the very least, imagine what it would be like if you had everything you needed and felt so grateful you shared your abundance freely. SCORPIO (October 23-November 21): What if you had the power to enchant and even bewitch people with your charisma? Would you wield your allure without mercy? Would you feel wicked delight in their attraction to you, even if you didn’t plan to give them what they want? I suspect these questions aren’t entirely rhetorical right now. You may have more mojo at your disposal than you realize. Speaking for your conscience, I will ask you not to desecrate your privilege. If you must manipulate people, do it for their benefit as well as yours. Use your raw magic responsibly. Halloween costume suggestion: a mesmerizing guru; an irresistible diva; a stage magician. SAGITTARIUS (November 22-December 21): I had a dream that you were in the film O Brother, Where Art Thou? You were like the character played by George Clooney after he escaped from a prison chain gang. Can you picture it? You were wearing a striped jailbird suit, and a ball and chain were still cuffed around your ankle. But you were sort of free, too. You were on the lam, making your way from adventure to adventure as you eluded those who would throw you back in the slammer.

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WHO GOES THERE · October 31, 2013

October 17 Answers: Page 17

ACROSS 1. Wine-press residue 5. Overwhelm 10. “I dunno” gesture 15. Ship’s berth 19. Moonfish 20. Spud 21. Needle 22. English poet 23. Ship of 1492 24. Win by _ _ 25. Japanese noodle dish 26. Radical 27. Start of a quip by Erma Bombeck: 3 wds. 31. Chapeauxa 32. What the doctor ordered 33. Estuary 34. Storage structures 36. Kilmer title 38. Earful of criticism 43. Pursue 44. Sweeping 45. Asian megacity 46. Balloon basket 47. Word akin to “psst” 48. Fairy tale figure 49. Tops 50. Extinct creature 51. Dividing 52. Skeletal part 53. Length of tartan 54. Region of ancient Anatolia 55. Low-oxygen malady 57. Satellites 58. Band of warriors 59. Part 2 of quip: 3 wds. 62. In conclusion 66. Cancel 67. Comic opera by Gilbert and Sullivan 72. The Gem State 73. Pickling solution 74. Blister 75. Times 76. Ave atque _ 77. Icy orbiter 78. Empty-headed 79. Romance in verse

80. Kind of ideal 81. Fable’s point 82. Cryptologist’s specialty 83. Lamella 84. Guard 86. Affixed 87. Group of big cats 88. CIA forerunner 89. Castle feature 90. Anuran 91. End of the quip: 5 wds. 100. Bindle stiff 101. NFL players 102. Unvarnished 103. Exigency 105. Came down 106. Spring 107. Senescence 108. Modeling material 109. Beyond: Prefix 110. Switch of a kind 111. Toad features 112. “Jane _” DOWN 1. Dieu et _ droit 2. Place in Samoa 3. Sounded 4. Flappers’ dance 5. Bleachers 6. Tarot suit 7. Unseen particle 8. Middle: Prefix 9. Soak before washing, e.g. 10. Underline 11. Core 12. Ski jump 13. Part of GUI 14. Unstinting 15. Drapes anagram 16. Crackpot 17. Apple media device 18. Kennel occupants 28. _ -memoire 29. Attention 30. Cash register 34. Like sequins and spangles 35. _ la vista 36. Through the skin 37. Sub _

38. Like some workers 39. Like some schools 40. Image: Prefix 41. Bottom 42. Old English coin 43. Smart 44. Contradict 45. Little 48. Thick and spreading 49. “Home _” 50. Homer’s exclamation 53. _ comitatus 54. Tribe of Oklahoma 56. Christiania, at present 57. Spelled 58. A cheese 60. Bay window 61. Coward and Neill 62. Concern of biographers 63. Something trite 64. Parlor 65. Definite article 68. Dereliction 69. Trample 70. Speed 71. Italian noble family 73. Dullard 74. Remain 77. Of a diplomat’s office 78. Left-hander 81. Kind of Japanese soup 82. Sept 83. Figurehead’s place 85. Auto giant 86. Loosey- _ 87. Tines 89. Brainiacs’ club 90. Stone that sparks 91. Ka-boom! 92. Hollow 93. News item, for short 94. Yorkshire river 95. Make turbid 96. Stonewort 97. Place of refuge 98. Snakelike 99. _ beer 104. Stain

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 842 • October 31- November 13, 2013

21

2013/10/31 (Thu)

ABC Karaoke - The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA American Dust - The Multiple Cat White Zephyr - Idpyramid - Chrash -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL C.J. the DJ -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL Double Dz Karaoke - Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bettendorf, IA Jam Sessions with John O’Meara & Friends - The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Karaoke Night -Crabby’s Bar & Grill, 826 W. 1st Ave. Coal Valley, IL Live Lunch w/ Keith Soko (noon) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Mayflies -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Open Mic & Karaoke Night -Pepperjack’s, 1225 E. Kimberly Rd. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night - Uptown Bill’s Coffee House, 730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA Open Mic Night w/ Karl -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night w/ Rob Dahms -Rustic Ridge Golf Course Grille & Pub, 1151 East Iowa St. Eldridge, IA Reggae Night w/ Two Peace -Rookies, 2818 N. Brady St. Davenport, IA Unlimited Gravity - Late Night Radio -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA 2013/11/01 (Fri)

THURSDAY

31

“Blue Man Group” Halloween jamtronica featuring OB.D.P. & The Lelack BOOm BOOm! -Brady Street Pub, 217 Brady St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St. Davenport, IA

FRIDAY

1

ABC Karaoke - Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Big Joe’s DJ & Karaoke Show -V.F.W. Post 9128, 2814 State Street Bettendorf, IA Brian Cutean (noon) -RME (River Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Chuck Muprhy -Eagle Ridge Resort & Spa, 444 Eagle Ridge Dr Galena, IL Cowboy Junkies -First United Methodist Church - Iowa City, 214 E Jefferson St Iowa City, IA Cross Creek Karaoke -Stickman’s, 1510 N. Harrison St. Davenport, IA Dan Tanklefsky -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Halloween Deja Vu Rendezvous featuring Have Your Cake -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA Human Aftertaste - Item 9 & the Mad Hatters - AWTHNTKTS -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Jazz After Five w/ Adam Schroeder Trio (5pm) - Dick Prall & Freedy Johnston (9pm) - The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Karaoke King -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Sneaky Pete’s, 207 Cody Rd. N. LeClaire, IA Kooby’s Karaoke -Funky Desi, 1409 5th Ave. Moline, IL Live Lunch w/ QTNstrumentals (noon) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Mercury Brothers - The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Night People (6:30pm) - ABC Karaoke (11pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Passion -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA People Brothers Band - Uniphonics - whysowhite - Bad Intentions - Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA

Jake Shimabukuro @ Englert Theatre – November 13
Project X - Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL Southern Thunder Karaoke and DJ -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL The Old 57’s -The Lucky Frog Bar and Grill, 313 N Salina St McCausland, IA Whitey Morgan & the 78’s - Fifth of Country -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL William Martin - Hunter Station - Crater - Mutts -Bier Stube Moline, 417 15th St Moline, IL Chuck Muprhy -Eagle Ridge Resort & Spa, 444 Eagle Ridge Dr Galena, IL Church of Misery - Bloody Hammers Against the Grain -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL Cody Road -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL Cosmic -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Cowboy Indian Bear - The Bubble Baths -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Dave Chastain Trio -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA DJ K -Funky Desi, 1409 5th Ave. Moline, IL Florida Georgia Line - Colt Ford - Tyler Farr -U.S. Cellular Center, 370 1st Ave NE Cedar Rapids, IA Greg & Susan Dirks -Uptown Bill’s Coffee House, 730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA Hi-Fi - The Dew Drop Inn, 602 5th St Durant, IA Item 9 & the Mad Hatters - Zeta June Cream of Gypsies Experience - The Mustache -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA

Joe Tingle -Barrel House Moline, 1321 5th Ave. Moline, IL Josh Duffee & His Orchestra -Rhythm City Casino, 101 W. River Dr. Davenport, IA Karaoke King -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Headquarters Bar & Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL Living with Lions - HeavyWeight Straight Up - Outsiders -Bier Stube Moline, 417 15th St Moline, IL Night People - Ducky’s Lagoon, 13515 78th Ave Andalusia, IL Nitrix - Silvis Eagles Club, 911 Mansur Ave. Silvis, IL North of 40 -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bettendorf, IA Passion -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA RME Guitar Circle (2pm) - River Prairie Minstrels (6pm) - RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Rory Block -CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA Russ Reyman Request Piano Bar (7pm) - Phoenix, 111 West 2nd St. Davenport, IA Sixth Element -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA 2013/11/03 (Sun)

Midnite Riders (5pm) - East Moline American Legion, 829 16th Avenue East Moline, IL Nuke Cult - Dirty Work - The Statistix Speaks Like Silence -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Open Mic Afternoon (3pm) - Mama Compton’s, 1725 2nd Ave Rock Island, IL Soul Karaoke -Top Shelf Lounge, 1327 13th Ave East Moline, IL Sunday Funday Karaoke (3pm) -Frick’s Tap, 1402 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Sunday Jazz Brunch (10:30am & 12:30pm) -Bix Bistro, 200 E. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Troy Harris, Pianist (10am) -The Lodge Hotel, 900 Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA 2013/11/04 (Mon)

MONDAY

4

30 2013/11/02 (Sat)

SATURDAY

2

SUNDAY

3

ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Musical Morning (7am) -Brewed Awakenings, 221 Brady St. Davenport, IA Open Mic at the Paddlewheel hosted by Silly C & Slack Man -Paddlewheel Sports Bar & Grill, 221 15th St Bettendorf, IA Open Mic w/ J. Knight -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA 2013/11/05 (Tue)

ABC Karaoke - Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Brian Cutean - Chris Dunn -First Lutheran Church of Rock Island Parish House, 1600 20th St Rock Island, IL Caroline Smith Album Release Show Max Jury - Sleepy Kitty -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA

A Memory Down - Indocile -Hook’s Pub, 318 N. 4th St. Clinton, IA ABC Karaoke - The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Barry Boyce (1pm) -Walcott Coliseum, 116 E Bryant St Walcott, IA Cross Creek Karaoke -Bootleggers Sports Bar, 2228 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -The Torchlight Lounge, 1800 18th Ave East Moline, IL Larry Davison & Chris Avey -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA

TUESDAY

5

ABC Karaoke - Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA ABC Karaoke - The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Acoustic Music (4:30pm) - RME (River Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA

Continued On Page 22

22

Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Open Mic Night -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night -Mama Compton’s, 1725 2nd Ave Rock Island, IL Open Mic Night w/ Dave Ellis -Bleyart’s Tap, 2210 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA RME Open Mic & Jam- The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA Terrance Simien (11:30am) -CASI (Center for Active Seniors), 1035 W. Kimberly Road Davenport, IA The Chris & Wes Show - Mound Street Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA The Old 57’s (6pm) - Karaoke King (9:30pm) - The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA 2013/11/07 (Thu) Southern Thunder Karaoke and DJ -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Sybarite5 (3pm) -Deere-Wiman Carriage House, 817 11th Ave. Moline, IL The Manny Lopez Big Band (6pm) -The Circa ‘21 Speakeasy, 1818 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL The Story So Far - Stick to Your Guns Such Gold - Rotting Out - Souvenirs (5:30pm) -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Wycliffe Gordon (7 & 9:30pm) -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 842 • October 31- November 13, 2013

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -Jake O’s Grille, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL Grayskul Zenith Tour: Graves33 AWTHNTKTS - Maxilla Blue -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Howlin' Brothers -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Karaoke Night -The Torchlight Lounge, 1800 18th Ave East Moline, IL Lil’ Rev -Bettendorf Public Library, 2950 Learning Campus Bettendorf, IA Open Jam w/ the Harris Collection - Brady Street Pub, 217 Brady St. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night - Cool Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL Open Mic w/ Jordan Danielsen - 11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA 2013/11/06 (Wed)

Continued From Page 21

THURSDAY

7

Cowboy Indian Bear @ Rozz-Tox – November 2
Soap -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL Terrance Simien -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA UI Jazz Combo (6pm) - UI Jazz Guitar Ensemble (7:30pm) -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Up the Chain -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL 2013/11/08 (Fri) Cross Creek Karaoke -Stickman’s, 1510 N. Harrison St. Davenport, IA International Chamber Soloists -Galvin Fine Arts Center, 2101 Gaines St. Davenport, IA Jimmy Nick & Don’t Tell Mama w/ Terrance Simien - The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA John McCutcheon - CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA Karaoke King -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Keep off the Grass -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Kooby’s Karaoke -Funky Desi, 1409 5th Ave. Moline, IL Local H - The Post Mortems - Satellite Heart - RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL Night Light -Pepperjack’s, 1225 E. Kimberly Rd. Davenport, IA Russ Reyman Trio (5:30pm) - Jason Carl & the Whole Damn Band (9pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA

2013/11/09 (Sat)

SATURDAY

9

WEDNESDAY

6

Acoustic Jam Night w/ Steve McFate - McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) - Lee’s Lanes, 925 S. Oakwood Ave. Geneseo, IL Jam Session w/ Ben Soltau -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Jason Carl & Friends -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Joe Pug - Sera Cahoone -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Karaoke Night w/ Chuck Murphy -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL Karaoke Night w/ Fat Dawgs Productions -QC Family Entertainment Center, 4401 44th Ave. Moline, IL Keller Karaoke -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Live Lunch w/ Chris Dunn (noon) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA

ABC Karaoke - The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Double Dz Karaoke - Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bettendorf, IA Jam Sessions with John O’Meara & Friends - The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Karaoke Night -Crabby’s Bar & Grill, 826 W. 1st Ave. Coal Valley, IL Mixology -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Open Mic & Karaoke Night -Pepperjack’s, 1225 E. Kimberly Rd. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night - Uptown Bill’s Coffee House, 730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA Open Mic Night w/ Karl -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night w/ Rob Dahms -Rustic Ridge Golf Course Grille & Pub, 1151 East Iowa St. Eldridge, IA Quick and Easy Boys - Little LegendRobby Schiller -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Reggae Night w/ Two Peace -Rookies, 2818 N. Brady St. Davenport, IA

FRIDAY

00 8

2 Buck Chuck -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke - Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Bettendorf Park Band’s Pre-Veteran’s Day Concert - Herber t Goettsch Community Center, 2204 Grant St. Bettendorf, IA Big Joe’s DJ & Karaoke Show -V.F.W. Post 9128, 2814 State Street Bettendorf, IA Cheap Thrill - Naughty Naughty -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL Chuck Muprhy -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL

1st Impression -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL ABC Karaoke - Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Brighton Ma - Simpleton and Cityfolk - Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Caught in the Act -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Chuck Muprhy -Big Shots, 419 15th St. Moline, IL Cosmic -Daiquiri Factory, 1809 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL DJ K -Funky Desi, 1409 5th Ave. Moline, IL Dress Up & Dance: Woodstock Rock featuring the Beaker Brothers Band - The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA Harmony Holler - Uptown Bill’s Coffee House, 730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA Jaiguru - Jason Carl Band - Elements in the Atmosphere - RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL Jessica Hernandez & the Deltas -RozzTox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Joe Tingle -Barrel House Moline, 1321 5th Ave. Moline, IL

Karaoke King -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Headquarters Bar & Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL Michal Menert - KeepLove -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Mommy’s Little Monster - Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bettendorf, IA Past Masters -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Russ Reyman Request Piano Bar (7pm) - Phoenix, 111 West 2nd St. Davenport, IA Terry Quiett Band -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA The Acoustic Project -Dunn Bros. Coffee, 787 Middle Rd. Bettendorf, IA The Portland Cello Project -CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA 2013/11/10 (Sun)

SUNDAY

10

ABC Karaoke - The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Cross Creek Karaoke -Bootleggers Sports Bar, 2228 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA Jason Carl Unplugged (6pm) -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Karaoke Night -The Torchlight Lounge, 1800 18th Ave East Moline, IL Midnite Riders (5pm) - East Moline American Legion, 829 16th Avenue East Moline, IL Open Mic Afternoon (3pm) - Mama Compton’s, 1725 2nd Ave Rock Island, IL Soul Karaoke -Top Shelf Lounge, 1327 13th Ave East Moline, IL Sunday Funday Karaoke (3pm) -Frick’s Tap, 1402 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Sunday Jazz Brunch (10:30am & 12:30pm) -Bix Bistro, 200 E. 3rd St. Davenport, IA

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Open Mic Night - Cool Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL Open Mic w/ Jordan Danielsen - 11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA The Alejandro Ziegler Tango Orchestra (6:30pm) - Coralville Center for the Performing Arts, 1301 5th St. Coralville, IA 2013/11/13 (Wed)

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 842 • October 31- November 13, 2013

23

Sybarite5 (3pm) - Wallenberg Hall, Augustana College, 3520 7th Ave. Rock Island, IL Troy Harris, Pianist (10am) -The Lodge Hotel, 900 Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA 2013/11/11 (Mon)

MONDAY

11

ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Musical Morning (7am) -Brewed Awakenings, 221 Brady St. Davenport, IA Open Mic at the Paddlewheel hosted by Silly C & Slack Man -Paddlewheel Sports Bar & Grill, 221 15th St Bettendorf, IA Open Mic w/ J. Knight -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Parker Millsap w/ Abby Brown -CSPS/ Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA 2013/11/12 (Tue)

WEDNESDAY

13

TUESDAY

12

ABC Karaoke - Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Dom Flemons -CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -Jake O’s Grille, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL Karaoke Night -The Torchlight Lounge, 1800 18th Ave East Moline, IL Natalie MacMaster & Donnell Leahy: Masters of the Fiddle -Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA Nobunny - Good Habits -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Open Jam w/ the Harris Collection - Brady Street Pub, 217 Brady St. Davenport, IA

Acoustic Jam Night w/ Steve McFate - McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL Burlington Street Bluegrass Band -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Deadstring Brothers -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) - Lee’s Lanes, 925 S. Oakwood Ave. Geneseo, IL Jake Shimabukuro -Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA Jam Session w/ Ben Soltau -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Jason Carl & Friends -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night w/ Chuck Murphy -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL Karaoke Night w/ Fat Dawgs Productions -QC Family Entertainment Center, 4401 44th Ave. Moline, IL Keller Karaoke -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Open Mic Night -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night -Mama Compton’s, 1725 2nd Ave Rock Island, IL Open Mic Night w/ Dave Ellis -Bleyart’s Tap, 2210 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA The Chris & Wes Show - Mound Street Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA The Hitman (6:30pm) - Karaoke King (9:30pm) - The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA

Whitey Morgan & the 78’s @ RIBCO – November 1
2013/11/14 (Thu) ABC Karaoke - The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Chuck Muprhy - RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL Double Dz Karaoke - Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bettendorf, IA Jam Sessions with John O’Meara & Friends - The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Karaoke Night -Crabby’s Bar & Grill, 826 W. 1st Ave. Coal Valley, IL Lorie Line: Born in Bethlehem -Coralville Center for the Performing Arts, 1301 5th St. Coralville, IA Matthew Curry & the Fury - The Winter Blues All-Stars -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA Open Mic & Karaoke Night -Pepperjack’s, 1225 E. Kimberly Rd. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night - Uptown Bill’s Coffee House, 730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA Open Mic Night w/ Karl -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA

THURSDAY

14

Open Mic Night w/ Rob Dahms -Rustic Ridge Golf Course Grille & Pub, 1151 East Iowa St. Eldridge, IA Patio -Blackhawk Bowl & Martini Lounge, 200 E. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Reggae Night w/ Two Peace -Rookies, 2818 N. Brady St. Davenport, IA This Must Be the Band -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA UI Jazz Combo (6pm) - JRE (7:30pm) - The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA 2013/11/15 (Fri)

FRIDAY

15

10 Of Soul -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke - Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Big Joe’s DJ & Karaoke Show -V.F.W. Post 9128, 2814 State Street Bettendorf, IA

Blues & Boogie Woogie Piano Stomp -Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA Cross Creek Karaoke -Stickman’s, 1510 N. Harrison St. Davenport, IA Daphne Willis - Hood Smoke - The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA Doug Brundies & the Big Acoustic Show -Barrel House Moline, 1321 5th Ave. Moline, IL Holly’s Buddies (5:30pm) - North of 40 (8pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Jazz Dinner at the River City Radio Hour (5:30pm) -Moline Commercial Club, 513b 16th St Moline, IL Jimkata - The Candymakers -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Joanne Shaw Taylor -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Karaoke King -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Kevin Presbrey -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Kooby’s Karaoke -Funky Desi, 1409 5th Ave. Moline, IL Night People Trio -Headquarters Bar & Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL Southern Thunder Karaoke and DJ -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL The Acoustic Project -Bleyart’s Tap, 2210 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA The Robert Cray Band - Riverside Casino Event Center, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA This Must Be the Band -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL Tim Kasher - Laura Stevenson -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA William Ross Perry (6:30pm) - Sena Ehrhardt (9:30pm) -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA

2013/11/16 (Sat)

SATURDAY

16

ABC Karaoke - Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Bluestem Trio - Uptown Bill’s Coffee House, 730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA Bob Dorr - Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Caught in the Act -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Chris & Wes Show -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA David Zollo & the Body Electric -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA DJ K -Funky Desi, 1409 5th Ave. Moline, IL Flash Point -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL James Blake -Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA Joe Tingle -Barrel House Moline, 1321 5th Ave. Moline, IL Karaoke King -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Headquarters Bar & Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL Larry Bo Boyd (6pm) -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL Nitrix -Hawkeye Tap Sports Bar N Grill, 4646 Cheyenne Ave. Davenport, IA Opiate: The Tool Experience -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Propaganda -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bettendorf, IA Russ Reyman Request Piano Bar (7pm) - Phoenix, 111 West 2nd St. Davenport, IA Tailfins -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA The Brat Pack - RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL The Lovedogs -The Lucky Frog Bar and Grill, 313 N Salina St McCausland, IA The Main Squeeze - Musketeer Gripweed -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA

24

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 842 • October 31- November 13, 2013

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

All

ROUTES. All LOCATIONS. All YOU NEED.

Download the free My QC Metro mobile app!
With our new mobile app, you’ll get all the up to-the-minute Metro info you need – routes, destinations, real-time arrival information – directly from your Apple or Android mobile device! It’s easy, convenient and free. Go green on your screen!

gogreenmetro.com

Download today in the Apple and Android marketplaces.

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