ARTicle Press Book Launch Thursday 28th November, 4pm - 7pm

Lecture Theatre, School of Art, Margaret Street, B3 3BX
ARTicle Press is a Birmingham Institute of Art and Design (BIAD) platform, publishing research of international and national significance in the fields of visual art, curatorial practices, contemporary philosophy, art education, discourse and cultural theory. Our publications offer new perspectives on existing practices and debates and are aimed at both specialist audiences and the general public. We invite you to join us for the launch of our most recent titles, On the Verge of Photography: Imaging Beyond Representation Edited by Daniel Rubinstein, Johnny Golding & Andy Fisher Queertexturealities Edited by Henry Rogers Zētēsis Vol.1 No.1 ‘The Cruelty of The Classical Canon’ Executive Editor: Johnny Golding Zētēsis Vol.1 No.2 ‘Ana-Materialism Wet-Dry-Thick-Thin-Here-Now-Gone’ Executive Editor: Johnny Golding

Every ARTicle press publication is rigorously assessed through a peer-review process, ensuring the highest quality academic standard. Publications funded via public research funds are Open Access and print publications are available for purchase online with an initial five hundred-copy print run. ARTicle Press encourages innovative design that prioritizes the aims and concerns of each individual publication. Our extensive portfolio demonstrates the spectrum of our products including high-end, beautifully designed artist books, exhibition catalogues, collections of essays and documents of events and conferences. In addition to publications we now also offer limited edition artist prints and works available for purchase in collaboration with ARTicle Gallery. For more information visit www.articlepress.co.uk Follow us! @_ARTiclePress

On The Verge of Photography: Imaging Beyond Representation Edited by Daniel Rubinstein, Johnny Golding & Andy Fisher ISBN: 978-1-873352-02-1

On the Verge of Photography: Imaging Beyond Representation is a provocative and bold rethinking of photography in light of the digital transformation and its impact on fine art, culture and society. Addressing the centrality of the digital image to our contemporary life, the fourteen new essays in this collection challenge the traditional categories of photographic theory - that of representation evidence, documentation and the archive - and offer a fresh approach to its impact on aesthetics, contemporary philosophy and the political. Drawing on the networked human condition of embodiment, social media, and bio-politics, On the Verge of Photography offers an invaluable resource for students of visual culture, researchers in the field of digital imaging and artists working with new media.

Queertexturealities Edited by Henry Rogers ISBN: 978-1-873352-74-8

The authors in this publication have made significant contributions to the intersection between the fields of queer studies and art based practice in which the status of art is considered in an academic research context. What readers will encounter are a number of thoughtful responses to the curious notion that there may well be some correspondence between the activities, activations and activism of both queer and art. Something I will playfully inscribe as qUeErArT – a pictorial neologism, an almost calligram – a circumstance perhaps in which our ways of engaging with art lead us to the experiencing of ‘strange conundrums’. Conundrums that operate in different modes of communication, or so for the moment we may think. Cultural producers, such as Derek Jarman, Tobias Schneebaum and Frank O’Hara, are mobilised in the exploration of essence, identity construction and the aesthetic subject which leads to a conceptualisation of queer sorority and affective kinship in relationship to the work of Peter Hujar and Antony Hegarty of Antony and the Johnsons. This leads us on to the emotionally complex, highly codified and unsettling world of Ranier Werner Fassbinder’s film Querelle as a means of imagining a queer grammar. While the trajectory of the book is to explore some recent moves in queer studies that extend the work of queer beyond the realm of the sexualised identity the politics of Queer are rarely far from view. With a consideration of David Wojnarowicz’s, banned film, A Fire in My Belly, the politics of censorship and art as animal excess are eloquently discussed. In a philosophical move the conceptualisation of a queer parrhesia explores the importance of the carnal-knowledge practice of the body that Socrates so carefully neglects which takes us finally to the practice of un-writing, to those we turn to – for example – Roland Barthes and Sarah Ahmed – when love takes over and the words we love leave love itself unrequited.

Zētēsis Vol.1 No.1 ‘The Cruelty of The Classical Canon’ Executive Editor: Johnny Golding, Director, Centre for Fine Art Research (CFAR)

Zētēsis is an international, peer-reviewed journal concerned with the converging theoretical, creative and practical fields of fine art, philosophy, feminist & queer praxis, mediated ecologies and the wild sciences. It is a platform for debate, invention and whimsicality around the role of complexity and the irrational/imaginary in art and the sciences, physics and metaphysics, culture and its economies, skin and the pleasures of the flesh. Committed to research driven by curiosity, experimentation and risk, Zētēsis welcomes intra and trans-disciplinary connections across these fields. With this debut volume of Zētēsis, the artists, philosophers, designers, technicians and scientists involved with this project and committed to an ‘ol d fashioned’ kind of research – that which is generated by a curiosity and deep commitment to know (the whatever) – declare a new Daybreak. It is one that intends to take as a given, complexity and the irrational/imaginary in art and the sciences, physics and metaphysics, culture and its economies, skin and the pleasures of the flesh. It steps to the atonal rhythms of the mimetic patterns of camouflage and the flâneur. It aligns itself with the history of those who were (and remain) willing to ask and act upon this basic question: Supposing it could be otherwise, what would this otherwise look like, become, be, now?

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