Victoria’s Bushfires

February 2009

Lessons Learned
Disaster Preparedness  Rapid Response  Sustainable Recovery
Robyn Riddett
Managing Director   Anthemion Consultancies rgrd@bigpond.com

Secretary‐General  ICOMOS  ISC on Risk Preparedness Secretary‐General  ICOMOS Scientific Council

Victoria’s Bushfires
• WARNING! • This presentation  contains material which  may shock some  viewers. • Activate your personal  response plan now. • Stay and listen or leave  early!

Black Saturday – 7th February 2009
• The south‐east corner  of Australia is one of  the most fire‐prone  regions in the world • “One of the darkest  days in Australia’s  peacetime history” • “The fiercest fires the  emergency services  personnel have ever  seen” • “Unimaginable horror”

Fire Conditions
• 11 year drought, tinder  dry bush • Three days of over 40°C  in previous week • 46.7°C on the day • Hot, dry gale force  winds from the north • Less than 4% humidity • Fire index over 300 – usually under 100

Known Causes
• Lightning – 3 • Fallen power lines – 1 • Arson – at least 2,  more suspected • Sparks from a grinder  on a day of Total Fire  Ban ‐ 1

Damage Overview
• 183 fires in Victoria and  South Australia • Fire temperatures  estimated in excess of  3,000°C • 400,000 hectares burnt  • Fire front over 1,000km • 210 dead plus missing • Over 7,500 homeless

Damage Overview
• 1,500+ houses, schools,  businesses, public  buildings lost • Four towns destroyed • Some others lost over  1/3 of their population  – tight communities in  the bush • Attachment to the land

Damage Overview
• Millions of native  animals and birds dead • Species endangered • Extensive loss of stock – cattle, sheep,  bloodstock (racehorses) • Loss of pets – ponies,  dogs, cats, poultry etc.

Fire Behaviour
• Over 120 km per hour • Fire storm and ember  attack leapt 40 km • Fire raced across  treetops and left big  trees as burnt  matchsticks • Temperatures in excess  of 3,000° C

Fire Behaviour
• Dense smoke – visibility  less than 2 metres • Incredible roar like a jet  engine • Fire created its own  weather • Houses simply exploded  – air, heat, gas bottles

Eyewitness  Accounts
• “I heard the noise and had  20 seconds, I was in the  pool and didn’t think  Kinglake was under threat.” • “We were in the pool and  suddenly saw it coming.   We hid under a wet blanket  and called the neighbours  to come.  As they ran the  fire raced through and they  were incinerated in their  tracks.”

How Prepared Were We?

Adequacy of Personal Fire Plans
• Some people well‐ prepared • Poor or no personal  preparation – “I never  thought it would  happen” • Personal fire plans not  compulsory, not  prepared properly,  evaluated or rehearsed

Adequacy of Personal Fire Plans
• Many left it too late to  evacuate, panicked,  under‐estimated the  fire, not mentally  prepared • Compare with cyclone  preparedness plans

Adequacy of Emergency Response
• General warnings in  days before the fires • Everyone knows about  annual bushfires • No warnings on CFA,  DSE Websites or ABC  774 at the beginning • Types of warnings  changed as the events  unfolded

The Warnings 
STAY AND DEFEND OR  LEAVE EARLY  You must activate your  fire plan now.  If you evacuate you must  report to the Emergency  Relief Centre at  Whittlesea. •They must be specific ‐ the detail is critical!

The Warnings 
If you see smoke it is too  late to leave.   Residents in XX Street you  are being threatened by a  fire which is increasing in  size.  Communities in  Taggerty remain on alert.   Communities in Snobs  Creek you must remain  vigilant.  The road  between XX and XX is  closed.

The Warnings
• People claimed that they did not receive a warning  or what does early mean, the message changed
Residents of Healesville you must remain on alert as there may  not be enough time for a warning. If you see smoke get out now – don’t wait until you see flames. If you are seeing flames it is too late to leave and you must stay  and defend your property as best you can. Urgent Threat Message: For residents in the Beechworth area  the fire has significantly increased in size and is spotting  ahead.  The fire is increasing in size.

The Response
• ABC Radio 774 – official  emergency radio • Integrated response:  police,  • County Fire Authority – 5,000 voluntary  firefighters • Department of  Sustainability and  Environment, Parks Vic.

The Response
• Relief centres • Red Cross, Salvation  Army • Community support  and volunteers • Emergency  accommodation – private, community  centres, Army barracks  and tents

The Response
• Vicroads – road  closures, re‐ establishment of  personal ID ‐ driver’s  licences etc. • Loss of identification  and possessions • Department of Human  Services

The Response
• Centrelink – relief  payments, medical  treatment etc. • Banks, insurance claims • Telstra supplied free  mobile phones • Supply of generators,  food and water to those  who stayed

The Response
• Over A$2,000,000  raised in Red Cross  Bushfire Relief Appeal • Crime scene – areas  barricaded and  dangerous • Appointment of a Royal  Commission of Enquiry  and Task Force

The Response
• Contamination on site – asbestos, lead paint etc. • Looting • Locating the dead and  missing persons • Identification of the  bodies • Treating injured people  and animals

The Response
• Burnt power lines – power outages • Threat to Melbourne’s  water supply – rain and  ash • Another day of extreme  fire danger a week later  but it dissipated • People tired and  stressed

Adequacy of Emergency Response
• The professional  emergency response  plans are well‐ rehearsed and worked  exceedingly well • There was an evolving  response as issues  emerged.

Adequacy of Emergency Response
“No‐one in government  expected their  Ministries or  departments would  ever have to cope with  a fire of this  magnitude”.
Bruce Esplund, Victorian  Emergency Services  Commissioner

Everyone is shell‐shocked

Future Issues
• Human stories – shock,  guilt, anger, long‐term  recovery • BLAME – the Green  Debate • Lack of cleared  vegetation in bush  (burn‐offs) and around  houses in bush setting • Council regulations

Future Issues
• Rebuilding communities • Rebuilding houses in  bushfire‐prone areas • Changes to building  regulations • Recovery of the  landscape • Recovery of fauna

Lessons from Hurricane Katrina
• Make all the information regarding causes and  consequences known before rebuilding begins. • Involve communities early in the rebuilding process. • Establish realistic recovery timelines – not just for  anniversaries or political convenience.  It takes time  to build a community  in the first place and it takes  time to rebuild them after a disaster.

Lessons from Hurricane Katrina
• Separate disaster response from recovery and  rebuilding – this is not emergency services task. It  involves physical, psychological, social and economic  resurrection of communities and the state. • Future proof – don’t repeat the mistake.  Build safer  and smarter to withstand foreseeable hazards and  climate change.
Dr Edward J Blakeley, executive director, Recovery and  Development Administration, New Orleans

There is a long way to go!

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful