Louisiana Deer Harvest 

2008‐09 
Mail survey‐  Each year, a 6% sample of licensed hunters between the ages of 16 and 59 receive a 
harvest survey by mail.  Participants return the survey and statistics are compiled.  Youth and senior 
hunters are not included in this survey, so estimates are best used for monitoring long term trends.  The 
mail survey index for hunters and harvest for the 2008/09 season is 162,600 and 158,200 respectively.   
The harvest by weapon type and sex is shown in Table 3.   While the hunter number index has been 
relatively stable the last few years, the harvest index was down 21% this year and is the lowest value 
since 1986 (Figure 2).  Two more major hurricanes, as well as the effects of Katrina are largely impacting 
the landscape, and are thought to have caused access and visibility issues across the state, but especially 
in the coastal zone.  Temporary flooding events caused some deer mortality in isolated areas during and 
after Ike.  Trees and forested habitats were affected well into central and even northern Louisiana 
during Hurricane Gustav.  Reduced visibility and accessibility due to storm debris impacted many 
hunters.  Anecdotal hunting reports were mixed this year, with some hunters (especially in the southern 
parts of the state) reporting reduced harvests, and some reporting normal or exceptional harvests.    In 
southern areas the mast crop was reduced by the storm, but many hunters still saw good acorn 
availability.  Heavy rainfall following the storms may have increased fawn mortality in some coastal, 
bottomland, Florida, and rice prairie parishes such as Lafourche, St. Landry, Tensas, Pointe Coupee, 
Concordia, East Carroll, Tangipahoa, St. Helena, Evangeline, and Jefferson Davis.   Lower than average 
lactation rates were observed on a few WMAs, and DMAP clubs, and there was one report of low fawn 
observations on other private land.  This may reduce recruitment into older age classes in affected areas 
and could result in reduced harvests of that age class (fewer 1.5 year olds next year). 
Human expansion and development also impact wildlife habitats and deer carrying capacity and we 
continue to see an increase in exurbia in some areas of Louisiana.  Forest management practices of the 
last decade have also impacted the landscape and reduced carrying capacities are being observed in 
some pine dominant parishes and regions.  Hog populations may be high enough in some areas of the 
state to affect deer numbers through direct competition for food resources.   And although there were 
no large scale hemorrhagic disease (EHD or BTV) outbreaks reported or identified, it is possible that 
some populations suffered mortality rates higher than perceived, and this may have impacted harvest at 
some local levels.   
Hunter attitudes and preferences may be changing.  Some hunters, even on WMAs, now are sometimes 
“passing” females and younger bucks in hopes of harvesting a trophy, or possibly because they simply 
do not have the time or desire to do the work of processing the animal.  This may be especially true of 
the growing number of senior hunters and the younger generation of busy, affluent, trophy‐type 
hunters.  Some hunters and managers may be becoming more comfortable with managing for lower 
numbers of deer that are more balanced with the habitat.   Biologists have seen no indication within the 
available data that statewide over‐harvest of female deer has occurred since implementing the new 3 
antlerless deer limit.  We are continuing to monitor and take public comment from concerned hunters 
where overharvest has been a concern at local levels.  

Table 3.  Distribution of deer harvest as recorded by the annual LDWF mail survey, 2008‐09. 

Weapon  
modern gun 
primitive 
bow 
cross bow 
null 
Totals 

Male 
71947.5 
7811.4 
5227.2 
705.6 
400.0 
86092 

Female
60552.5
6288.6
4672.8
694.4
0.0
72208

Total
132500
14100
9900
1400
400
158300  

%
83.7%
8.9%
6.3%
0.9%
0.3%

 
Figure 2.  LDWF hunter and harvest estimates from its annual mail harvest survey, 1970‐2008. 

 
 
Internet/phone reporting results‐ This year was the first mandatory year for tagging and reporting deer 
through the new system.   Results provide a count of male and female deer harvested by weapon type 
and parish on private and public lands.  Participation in the reporting program is believed to be less than 
100% and it may take a period of time for all hunters to learn the system and comply with the law.  It is 
important for hunters to report their deer, so that complete data is available for future deer 
management decisions.  There were 227,001 sets of deer tags issued in 2008‐09.  A summary of the 
reported harvest along with the WMA managed hunts and program totals are presented by parish in 
Appendix 1.  The top total harvest parishes are presented in Table 4.  The top harvest parishes by 
forested acres per deer are presented in Table 5.  The total harvest count from all 3 sources of data is 
116,571.  The harvest sex ratio of the 95,718 deer reported taken on non‐program private lands was 58 
% male and 42 % female. 
 
 

Table 4. Top 20 deer harvest parishes derived from the new reporting system , 2008‐09. 
Parish 
Union 
Bienville 
Claiborne 
Vernon 
Bossier 
Jackson 
Webster 
Iberville 
Natchitoches 
Tensas 

Harvest 
7915 
5387 
5171 
4311 
3930 
3689 
3652 
3398 
3384 
3376 

  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  

Parish 
Winn 
Morehouse 
Desoto 
Avoyelles 
W. Feliciana 
Sabine 
Lincoln 
Beauregard 
Rapides 
St. Landry 

Harvest 
3272 
3041 
3014 
2828 
2786 
2729 
2623 
2443 
2329 
2283 

 
Table 5. Top 20 harvest parishes by forested acreage derived from the new reporting system, 2008‐09  
Parish 
E. Carroll 
Tensas 
Madison 
W. Baton Rouge 
W. Feliciana 
Morehouse 
Union 
Richland 
Avoyelles 
Point Coupee 

Acres/deer
32 
34 
50 
55 
58 
59 
60 
66 
69 
72 

  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  

Parish 
St. Landry 
Iberville 
Webster 
Bienville 
Claiborne 
Jackson 
Lincoln 
Bossier 
Concordia 
Franklin 

Acres/deer 
73 
76 
79 
84 
84 
85 
90 
93 
93 
96 

 
Mail survey vs. reporting system harvest‐ The mail survey index of 158,200 is higher (36%) than the 
system reported harvest of 116,571.  Since the mail survey is a single mailing, there is the potential to 
bias the index high.  The mail survey index is best used to monitor trends over time and not as an 
absolute estimate.  The new reporting system count is likely low due to less than 100% participation.  
We anticipate greater compliance with the system in the future.  However, it is possible that, due to a 
number of reasons, the statewide harvest from the reporting system will continue to be lower than the 
mail survey index. 
Wildlife Management Areas‐ The Department manages over 1,000,000 acres with deer hunting 
opportunity.  Archery and either sex gun hunts are the primary methods for keeping deer numbers in 
balance with the habitat.  Youth and handicapped hunts also are available on many areas. Buck only 
seasons provide extended hunting opportunity and generally are held near or during rut.  Harvest rates 
are highly variable on the WMAs according to deer physiographic region, habitat conditions, and hunter 
efforts. In some years WMA harvest rates equal or surpass intensively managed DMAP properties.  On 

some WMAs, harvest rates are low due to habitat type, forest conditions, accessibility issues, or other 
management objectives.  In general, WMA deer herds are managed in a way that helps insure long term 
forest regeneration, diversity, sustainability, and high deer quality.  WMAs are not managed for 
maximum residual numbers, but rather maximum sustained harvest and recreational opportunity, which 
means deer herds at or below maximum biological carrying capacity.   
In 2008/09, managed deer hunts were held on over 900,000 acres of wildlife management areas where 
high rates of success were often observed.  The harvest was over 5,000 deer on the WMAs this year 
(Table 6).  Either‐sex hunts had an average hunter success rate of 11 efforts per deer, well below the 
long‐term average of 16 efforts per deer, but up slightly from the 9.3 efforts per deer observed last year 
(Figure  3).  The success rate was considered good considering the heavy rainfall that fell across most of 
the state during the either sex days following Thanksgiving.  Either sex day harvests are greatly 
influenced by weather and hunter turn out. Hunter success and harvest vary, sometimes substantially, 
from year to year.  Some Region 5 hunts were closed due to military training exercises.  The long term 
trend for WMA hunter success illustrates fewer efforts needed to harvest a deer. 
Many exceptional deer were harvested on the WMAs.  The top 10 WMA bucks of 2008‐09 are listed in 
Appendix 2. 
Table 6.  WMA harvest totals from managed deer hunts and/or self‐clearing permit data only, 2008‐09. 
WMA
Atchafalaya Delta
Alexander State Forest
Attakapas
Bayou Macon
Bayou Pierre
Ben's Creek
Big Lake
Bodcau *
Boeuf
Buckhorn
Camp Beauregard
Clear Creek
Dewey Wills
Fort Polk **
Grassy Lake
Jackson Bienville
Loggy Bayou
Maurepas Swamp
Ouachita
Pearl River
Peason Ridge**
Pomme de Terre
Red/Three Rivers
Russel Sage
Sabine
Sherburne

Bucks
96
20
92
30
4
72
87
110
123
64
77
212
197
150
171
185
97
118
32
47
40
29
255
34
31
159

Does
68
17
74
40
4
41
28
112
82
41
96
127
142
33
116
193
56
86
23
22
3
34
121
21
36
115

Total harvest
154
37
166
70
8
113
115
222
205
105
173
339
339
183
287
378
153
204
55
69
43
63
376
55
67
274

Acres
135,000
5,500
26,300
6,919
6,940
13,856
19,231
32,471
50,971
11,262
12,500
54,269
55,000
88,216
13,297
32,000
4,300
67,713
9,641
35,031
33,010
7,064
69,061
16,835
7,554
44,000

Acres/deer
876
149
158
99
867
123
167
146
249
107
72
160
162
482
46
85
28
332
175
508
767
112
184
306
113
161

Sicily Island
Spring Bayou
Thistlewaite
Tunica Hills
Union
West Bay

8
45
78
63
162
144
3032

8
16
62
29
135
83
2064

16
61
140
92
297
227
5086

7,524
12,078
11,000
5,783
11,270
62,115
967,711

470
198
79
63
38
274
190

*= self clearing data only
**=partial season only 

 
Figure 3. LDWF Wildlife Management Area deer hunter success rates, 1960‐2008. 

 

Appendix 1.  Deer harvest by parish as recored through the LDWF tagging system, 2009.

People per Acres1

Forested

Forested 2

System WMA

DMAP

LADT

Total

Acre per

Forested acre

1
harvest3 harvest4 harvest harvest harvest deer harv. per deer harv.5
Sq Mi
Land area land
acres
Parish
Acadia
90
419379
0.24
100532
164
0
4
4
172
2438
na
Allen
489280
0.70
33
343916
1092
124
33
126
1375
356
250
Ascension
262
186560
0.48
88660
299
18
68
0
385
485
230
Assumption
216768
0.52
69
112409
485
0
88
58
631
344
178
Avoyelles
532736
0.37
50
196104
2042
229
515
42
2828
188
69
Beauregard
28
742464
0.80
592461
1816
0
62
565
2443
304
243
Bienville
518810
0.87
19
451470
4159
67
185
976
5387
96
84
Bossier
117
537152
0.68
365219
3460
88
0
382
3930
137
93
Caddo
564480
0.56
286
313620
1838
0
0
82
1920
294
163
Calcasieu
685504
0.39
171
270336
541
0
0
81
622
1102
435
Caldwell
20
338816
0.76
256017
1823
195
179
53
2250
151
114
Cameron
840320
0.00
8
0
209
0
2
31
242
3472
na
Catahoula
16
450368
0.41
183159
1092
10
51
198
1351
333
136
Claiborne
483008
0.90
22
435693
4499
0
103
569
5171
93
84
Concordia
445376
0.38
29
170753
1032
229
239
332
1832
243
93
DeSoto
29
561408
0.78
437109
2854
0
84
76
3014
186
145
E. Baton Rouge
291456
0.41
907
120883
538
0
304
5
847
344
143
E. Carroll
22
269696
0.13
34026
526
70
429
37
1062
254
32
E. Feliciana
290176
0.70
47
204297
1579
0
454
37
2070
140
99
Evangeline
425152
0.49
53
209704
1099
0
58
50
1207
352
174
Franklin
34
399104
0.27
108819
766
0
278
89
1133
352
96
Grant
412864
0.84
29
346030
1462
120
13
53
1648
251
210
Iberia
127
368064
0.28
101286
604
0
51
32
687
536
na
Iberville
395904
0.65
54
257875
2122
154
975
147
3398
117
76
Jackson
364608
0.86
27
314611
3342
67
29
251
3689
99
85
Jeff. Davis
48
417472
0.14
58574
240
0
37
12
289
1445
na
Jefferson
196160
0.11
1484
21181
168
0
0
0
168
1168
na
La Salle
23
399232
0.86
341475
1452
231
47
0
1730
231
197
Lafayette
172672
0.13
706
22492
12
0
0
0
12
14389
na
Lafourche
83
694208
0.15
104618
610
0
362
1
973
713
na
Lincoln
90
301696
0.78
234787
2546
0
0
77
2623
115
90
Livingston
414720
0.76
142
316643
1365
0
31
0
1396
297
227
Madison
22
399424
0.26
105549
1456
0
307
356
2119
188
50
Morehouse
508352
0.36
39
180565
2606
0
269
166
3041
167
59
Natchitoches
31
803520
0.70
559577
3334
0
31
19
3384
237
165
Orleans
2684
115558
0.00
0
28
0
0
0
28
4127
na
Ouachita
390739
0.64
241
249628
1921
110
127
36
2194
178
114
Plaquemines
32
540544
0.03
13902
162
0
4
18
184
2938
na
Point Coupee
356672
0.40
41
141702
1337
0
327
294
1958
182
72
Rapides
96
846400
0.66
562213
1957
23
48
301
2329
363
241
Red River
25
249152
0.55
137864
822
0
13
124
959
260
144
Richland
357440
0.23
38
80838
984
0
78
160
1222
293
66
Sabine
27
553792
0.80
445625
2607
30
31
61
2729
203
163
St. Bernard
297600
0.11
145
31374
41
0
18
0
59
5044
na
St. Charles
169
181504
0.22
39884
125
0
15
44
184
986
217
St. Helena
0.79
26 262,000
206615
1139
0
47
0
1186
221
174
St. James
157504
0.47
86
73254
387
68
145
0
600
263
122
St. John
197
140096
0.46
64132
329
68
20
0
417
336
154
St. Landry
594368
0.28
94
167290
1857
120
174
132
2283
260
73
St. Martin
66
473536
0.63
296426
1455
0
169
304
1928
246
154
St. Mary
392192
0.33
87
131208
1505
151
188
45
1889
208
na
St. Tammany
546688
0.63
224
346369
754
5
88
0
847
645
409
Tangipahoa
505728
0.60
127
305468
991
0
41
48
1080
468
283
Tensas
11
385600
0.30
113863
1758
132
879
607
3376
114
34
Terrebonne
803136
0.16
83
129697
715
0
1
119
835
962
na
Union
561664
0.85
26
478170
6698
297
296
624
7915
71
60
Vermilion
46
751232
0.10
77283
263
0
13
13
289
2599
na
Vernon
850176
0.90
40
767517
4095
175
39
2
4311
197
178
W. Baton Rouge
113
122368
0.48
58788
472
0
578
16
1066
115
55
W. Carroll
230016
0.19
34
44517
219
0
0
9
228
1009
195
W. Feliciana
259840
0.63
37
162679
2105
74
540
67
2786
93
58
Washington
66
428544
0.70
301547
1685
22
24
5
1736
247
174
Webster
380928
0.75
70
286922
3222
0
0
430
3652
104
79
Winn
18
608320
0.90
546508
2853
0
158
261
3272
186
167
Totals
27764669
0.51 14221733
95718
2877
9349
8627 116571
238
122

1= http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/22000.html
2= USDA, Forest Inventory mapmaker, 2007
3= all lands through May 1, 2009
4= managed hunts only (SCD should have been reported by internet or phone)
5= coastal marsh and some prairie parishes exlcuded from this index. Some agriculture parishes may be biased high.

 

 
 

 

 

Appendix 2. 

 
Top WMA Bucks
Calculated for all clubs
All Districts
2008-09 Season
July 09, 2009
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Club Name

Deer#

Rating

Age

Loggy Bayou Wma
Jackson-Bienville
Union Wma
Grassy Lake Wma
Clear Creek WMA
Grassy Lake Wma
Loggy Bayou Wma
Red River/3 Rivers Wma
Thistlethwaite WMA
Ouachita Wma

29
3
281
95
69
148
72
162
105
47

294.00
230.81
210.28
209.20
205.16
204.90
197.00
195.06
192.26
192.12

4
3
5
3
4
4
3
4
4
3

Parish

Bossier
Bienville
Union
Avoyelles
Vernon
Avoyelles
Bossier
Concordia
St. Landry
Ouachita

Data for Top Bucks:
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Weight Live
248
240
190
219
175
203
223
225
205
190

Weight Dressed
193
187
148
171
137
158
174
176
160
148

Points
10
8
10
11
11
11
10
10
8
11

Base Left
8.00
6.00
5.13
5.25
4.75
5.00
6.00
4.75
4.88
4.75

Base Right
8.00
5.50
4.88
5.50
4.75
4.88
5.00
5.75
4.63
4.25

Length Left
20.50
21.00
23.14
22.50
23.50
22.00
20.00
19.50
22.25
22.75

Length Right
18.50
20.50
23.63
19.75
24.25
22.50
19.50
20.00
23.25
24.25

Spread
16.00
18.00
16.63
15.75
17.00
17.00
14.25
15.50
16.00
16.75

Index rating formula : ((length + spread) * base) + points