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JAR 66 CATEGORY B1

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MODULE 3A ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS WORKBOOK

Index
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ATOMIC STRUCTURE ................................................................. 1-1 STATIC ELECTRICITY ................................................................. 2-1 ELECTRICAL TERMINOLOGY .................................................... 3-1 PRODUCTION OF ELECTRICITY ................................................ 4-1 CELLS & BATTERIES.................................................................. 5-1 OHMS LAW .................................................................................. 6-1 ELECTRICAL MEASURING INSTRUMENTS .............................. 7-1 RESISTANCE & RESISTORS ...................................................... 8-1 RESISTORS IN DC CIRCUITS ..................................................... 9-1

10 THE WHEATSTONE BRIDGE...................................................... 10-1 11 ENERGY & POWER IN DC CIRCUITS ........................................ 11-1 12 CAPACITANCE & CAPACITORS ................................................ 12-1 13 CAPACITORS IN DC CIRCUITS .................................................. 13-1 14 MAGNETISM ................................................................................ 14-1 15 ELECTROMAGNETISM ............................................................... 15-1 16 INDUCTION & INDUCTORS ........................................................ 16-1 17 INDUCTORS IN DC CIRCUITS .................................................... 17-1

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JAR 66 CATEGORY B1

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MODULE 3A ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS WORKBOOK

INTENTIONALLY BLANK

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MODULE 3A ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS WORKBOOK

ATOMIC STRUCTURE

Answer the following questions in your own words. Q1. What is the difference between an element, a compound and a mixture ? Q2. Describe the structure of an atom. What is the significance of the charges on the fundamental particles ? Q3. What are ions and how are they formed ? Q4. What is the significance of the number of electrons in the valance shell ? Q5. Locate a table of elements that shows the distribution of electrons within the shells and determine how many electrons there are in the valence shell of the following material: Aluminium Silver Copper Gold Germanium Q6. Are there any elements that have more than 8 electrons in their outer shell ? (shell K,L,M,N,O,P or Q, not sub-shells) Q7. Each shell is limited as to the number of electrons it can hold. Is there any way of working out the maximum number of electrons that each shell can hold ?

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MODULE 3A ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS WORKBOOK

STATIC ELECTRICITY

Q1. What is static electricity ? Q2. Why must maintenance engineers consider static electricity when working on aircraft: i) ii) electronic equipment structures

Q3. What is the Triboelectric series ? Q4. What sort of potentials can be created by somebody walking across a carpet and does humidity have any effect on the value ? Q5. As two charged bodies are moved apart, the force of attraction or repulsion between them decreases by the square of the distance (i.e. if the distance between them is increased from 1cm to 2 cm, the force decreases by a factor of 4. If the distance is increased to 3cm, the force decreases by a factor of 9), why ?

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JAR 66 CATEGORY B1

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MODULE 3A ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS WORKBOOK

ELECTRICAL TERMINOLOGY

Q1. Define the following electrical terms in your own words: i) ii) iii) iv) v) vi) Potential Potential difference Electromotive Force Voltage Current Resistance

Q2. What is the difference between conventional current flow and electron flow ? Q3. The following potential differences were measured in a circuit: A is +4 volts with respect to (wrt) B B is +3 volts wrt C C is +2 volts wrt D D is +1 volts wrt to ground What is the potential difference of: i) ii) iii) iv) A wrt ground B wrt ground A wrt C B wrt D

Q4. The following potential differences were measured in a circuit: E is at the same potential as ground and 25 volts wrt D D is 15 volts wrt C C is 10 volts wrt B B is 30 volts wrt A i) ii) iii) iv) What are the potentials at B, C and D wrt ground. What is the potential difference of A wrt C. What is the potential difference of C wrt A. What is the potential difference of ground wrt B

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MODULE 3A ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS WORKBOOK

Q5. The Following potentials were measured in a circuit: E is at ground potential and A is +100 volts wrt ground D is +50 volts wrt E C is +15 volts wrt D A is +20 volts wrt B i) ii) iii) What are the potentials at B, C and D with respect to ground. What is the potential at C wrt B and D. What is the potential at B wrt E.

Q6. What is the difference between an emf and a potential difference ? Q7. What factors affect resistance and how do they affect it ? Q8. What is conductance and conductivity ?

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MODULE 3A ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS WORKBOOK

PRODUCTION OF ELECTRICITY

Q1. Explain how a thermocouple produces electricity. Q2. What happens when a force is applied to a piece of quartz crystal ? Q3. Describe one aircraft related use of quartz crystals. Q4. Investigate the construction and operation of a common primary cell and write a brief report on your findings.

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MODULE 3A ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS WORKBOOK

CELLS & BATTERIES

Q1. What is the difference between primary and secondary cells? Q2. A 25 A-h at the 10 hour rate battery can supply what maximum current continuously and for how long ? Q3. A 35 A-h at the 1 hour rate battery can supply what maximum current and for how long ? Q4. If a 40 A-h at the 10 hour battery was discharged at 8 Amps how long would you expect it to be able to provide this current ? Q5. When carrying out a capacity test on a 20 A-h battery, it only achieved 80%, what is the actual battery capacity ? Q6. A battery was discharged at 10 Amps for 10 hours in order to test its capacity. What was the batterys rating ? Q7. If four 2 volt, 1 ampere-hour cells, each with an internal resistance of 2 ohms are connected in series to form a battery, what is the battery voltage, capacity and internal resistance ? Q8. How can a 4 volt, 6 A-h supply be obtained from six 2 volt, 2 A-h cells ? Q9. Two 12 volt, lead acid, aircraft batteries are connected in parallel to give a greater capacity. Draw a circuit diagram depicting the individual cells of these two interconnected batteries. Q10. What happens if a 4 volt battery is connected in parallel with a 2 volt battery? Q11. When 3 identical cells are connected in series across a filament, in which order do they discharge? Q12. In your own words, describe the construction of a typical lead acid aircraft battery. Q13. In your own words, describe the construction of a typical Nickel Cadmium battery aircraft battery. Q14. State some typical A-h ratings for lead acid and Ni-cad aircraft batteries. Q15. What is thermal runaway and what might cause it occur ?

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MODULE 3A ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS WORKBOOK

OHMS LAW

Q1. How are current, voltage and resistance related. Q2. Complete the table below. Voltage 12 volts 24 volts 200mA 240 volts 12 volts 001 Amps 6V 150A 200mV 500mV 200 volts 15 volts 3000 volts 10 Amps 200A 15 A 6k 2.7M 50mA 25k 12 Amps 2400 Ohms 6.8 k 20 68M Current 05 amps 720 Ohms 4K7 Resistance

Q3. If the voltage across a component is doubled what affect will it have on the current flowing through it ? Q4. If the value of a resistor in a circuit is doubled, but the current is kept constant at its original value, what affect will it have on the voltage across the resistor ?

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Q1. Q2. Q3. Q4. Q5. Q6. Q7. Q8. Q9.

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MODULE 3A ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS WORKBOOK

ELECTRICAL MEASURING INSTRUMENTS


What is the difference between an analog meter and a digital meter ? What is the purpose of the mirror on an analog instrument ? Explain why an ideal ammeter should have zero internal resistance. Explain why an ideal voltmeter should have infinite internal resistance. Find out what the internal resistance of one of the laboratory meters is on the voltage and current ranges. Should analog meters be laid down or stood up for an accurate reading ? Describe in detail how a voltage measurement should be made. Describe in detail how a current measurement should be made. Describe in detail how a resistance measurement should be made.

Q10. Two 10M resistors are connected in series across a 300 volt supply. If a meter, having an internal resistance of 10M on the appropriate range, is used to measure the voltage drop across the two resistors, what values will be indicated on the meter. Q11. Determine the internal resistance of the Electronic Workbench multi-meter when it is set to measure voltage. Explain how you obtained your answer. Q12. Explain how a meter measures resistance.

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MODULE 3A ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS WORKBOOK

RESISTANCE & RESISTORS

Q1. If the length of a conductor is doubled and its cross-sectional area halved, what affect will this have on its resistance ? Q2. If the length of a conductor is doubled and its cross sectional area doubled, what affect will it have on its resistance ? Q3. Do the following have positive or negative temperature co-efficient of resistance: i) ii) iii) iv) v) Battery electrolyte Thermistors Copper wire Aluminium wire Carbon

Q4. For what purpose would Eureka wire be used ? Q5. Use the colour codes to work out the values of the following resistors: i) ii) iii) iv) v) vi) vii) ix) x) Red Orange Yellow Gold Orange Orange Orange Red Violet Green Blue silver Green Green Black Gold Brown Brown Black Brown Red Green Gold Brown Grey Gold Blue Yellow White Yellow Red Orange Brown Yellow Red Red

viii) Green Blue Silver

Q6. Assuming you want to use resistors with a 10% tolerance, what are the closest preferred values for the following resistance values: i) ii) iii) iv) v) 13M Ohms 3.0K Ohms 4.9K Ohms 54K Ohms 14.5K Ohms Page 8-1

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JAR 66 CATEGORY B1

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MODULE 3A ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS WORKBOOK

Q7. For the preferred values selected in answer to Q6. Above. What are the maximum and minimum values one could expect to find ? Q8. What is the difference between a potentiometer and a rheostat ? Q9. A resistor is connected across a potentiometer and the slider is increased from minimum resistance to maximum (see diagram in notes p.8-7). What affect will this have on the voltage across the resistor and the current flowing through it ? Q10. A resistor is connected in series with a rheostat and the slider is moved from minimum to maximum resistance (see diagram in note p.8-7). What affect will this have on the voltage across the resistor and the current flowing through it ? Q11. When current flows through a resistor, what affect is it likely to have on its value of resistance ? Explain your answer. Q12. Explain how can a thermistor be used to stabilise the current flowing through a coil of wire that tends to get hot when used.

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JAR 66 CATEGORY B1

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MODULE 3A ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS WORKBOOK

RESISTORS IN DC CIRCUITS

Q1. Explain Kirchoffs second law. Q2. Using Ohms law and Kirchoffs second law, derive the formula for the total resistance of resistors connected in series. Q3. A 12k resistor is connected in series with a 24k resistor across an 18 volt supply. What is the circuit current and the voltage drop across each resistor ? Q4. Two 4.7k are connected in series across a 12 volt battery. What is the circuit current and the voltage drop across each resistor ? Q5. When a 1.2k resistor is connected in series with a 3.6k across a power supply, the current is 150mA. What are the voltage drops across the resistors ? Q6. If three resistors of equal value are connected in series across a power supply, what proportion of the supply voltage will be dropped across each resistor. Q7. Calculate the current flowing in the circuit of Figure 1. Q8. Calculate the voltage drop across each of the resistors in Figure 1. Figure 1 Q9. Calculate the voltage drops across each of the resistors in Figure 2. Q10. Calculate the current flowing in the circuit of Figure 2 Q11. Calculate the voltage at point B wrt point A in Figure 2. Q12. Assuming a ground is placed at point C in Figure 2, what will be the potential at point B wrt C ? Q13. Assuming a ground is placed at point B in Figure 2, what will be the potential at point B wrt C ? Figure 2

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MODULE 3A ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS WORKBOOK

Q14. Assuming two resistors R1 and R2 are connected in series across VSupply, complete the following table. VSupply 100V 12V 24V R1 1.2k 800 R2 2.8k 2400 300mA 190mA 36V 3K6 60 120V 1000V 300 1700 400 1000 5.2V 7K2 120 40 12M 300 24V 100V 56M 13k 1.6A 24mA 34V 3V 40V 8V 3.8V 16V 5.7V RTOT ISupply VR1 VR2

Q15. The off-load voltage of a power supply is 100 volts. When the supply is connected to a 200 resistor the terminal voltage falls to 90 volts. Calculate the internal resistance of the power supply. Q16. The off-load voltage of a power supply unit is 28 volts, the on-load voltage is 26 volts. If the load is 600, calculate the internal resistance of the power supply unit. Q17. The internal resistance of a 30 volt power supply is 60, calculate the terminal voltage when it is connected to a 240 load.

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MODULE 3A ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS WORKBOOK

10 THE WHEATSTONE BRIDGE


Refer to Figure 1 to answer the following questions

Q1. If R1=R2=R3=R4 and E=24 volts: A. Calculate the current flowing through R1 and R2. B. Calculate the potential difference between points A and B. C. If E was decreased to 20 volts, what affect would it have on the potential difference between points A and B ? Q2. If R1= 200, R2= 600, R3= 1k and E=16 volts: A. What value must R4 be to balance the bridge. B. What will be the current flowing in R2. C. What will be the potential at A. Figure 1

Q3. If R1= 2k2, R2= 32k, R4= 80k and E=21 volts: A. What value of R3 will balance the bridge. B. If R3 has a value of 4k4, what will be the potential difference between points A and B. C. If R3 has a value of 1k1, what will be the potential difference between points A and B. Q4. On connecting the Wheatstone Bridge circuit shown, the meter indicated full scale deflection. Discuss possible fault conditions that would exhibit these symptoms. Q5. On connecting the Wheatstone Bridge circuit shown, the meter needle abutted against the zero end-stop. Discuss possible fault conditions that would exhibit these symptoms.

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MODULE 3A ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS WORKBOOK

11 ENERGY & POWER IN DC CIRCUITS


Q1. How much work is done if 3 coulombs of charge is moved through a potential of 20 volts. (60 Joules) Q2. How much work is done when 10 amps flows through a potential of 6 volts for 2 minutes. (7200 Joules) Q3. How much energy is used when 3 amps flows through a potential of 5 volts for 10 minutes. (9 kJoules) Q4. The voltage across a 3k2 resistor in an electrical circuit is 6 volts. How much energy is used in pushing the current through this resistor for 1 minute. (0675 Joules) Q5. 6 amps flows through a 12 volt filament in a circuit. Calculate the: A. work done by the circuit if the filament is on for 2 hours. B. energy used by the filament in 2 hours. C. rate at which work is being done by the filament. Q6. Assuming the circuit comprises a single resistor connected across a voltage source, complete the following table. Voltage (v) 10 Volts 24 Volts 2 Amps 24 Volts 200 28 Volts 120 Volts 3k6 40mAmps 300 Watts Resistance () 600 1200 Watts 400 Joules 320 Joules Current (I) Power (W) Work Done in 10 mins (J)

Q7. If a 2.5kW kettle is left switched on for 10 minutes, how much energy is used in kWhs. Q8. If 1kWh costs 7 pence, how much will it cost to keep a 100 Watt light on for 6 hours per day for 7 days. Q9. What is the maximum voltage and current that can be applied to a 300 resistor with a 20 Watt power rating. Q10. What is the maximum voltage and current that can be applied to a 4k7 resistor with a 30 Watt power rating.

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MODULE 3A ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS WORKBOOK

Q11. A 28 volt power supply with an internal resistance of 100 is connected to a 100 load. Calculate the: A. circuit current. B. power dissipated in the load. C. power supply terminal voltage when connected to the load. Q12. A light bulb, rated at 100 Watts, is connected across a 240 volt supply. Calculate the circuit current and the resistance of the filament when the light is on. Q13. A light bulb, rated at 100 Watts is connected across a 28 volt supply. Calculate the circuit current and the resistance of the filament when the light is on. Q14. How much power will be dissipated by a 3k6 resistor with 6 amps of current flowing in it.

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MODULE 3A ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS WORKBOOK

12 CAPACITANCE & CAPACITORS


Q1. A simple parallel plate capacitor has plates with an area of 10cm2, a distance of 001mm between the plates and a dielectric material between the plates with a relative permittivity of 40: A. Calculate the capacitance of the capacitor. B. What would have to be done to the distance between the plates to double the capacitance of the capacitor. C. What would have to be done to the cross sectional area of the plates to half the capacitance of the capacitor. D. If the dielectric is replaced by a material with twice the relative permittivity, what affect will it have on the capacitance of the capacitor. Q2. Calculate the capacitance of a simple parallel plate capacitor which has plates of cross sectional area of 100cm2, a distance of 0015mm between the plates and a dielectric material between the plates with an absolute permittivity of 8x10-9 Fm-9. Q3. Calculate the capacitance of a simple parallel plate capacitor which has plates of cross sectional area of 200cm2, a distance of 0025mm between the plates and a dielectric material between the plates with a relative permittivity of 300. Q4. A simple parallel plate capacitor has plates with an area of 150cm2, a distance of 002mm between the plates and a dielectric material between the plates with a relative permittivity of 350. Calculate the: A. Capacitance of the capacitor. B. Charge on the capacitor if it is fully charged on a 28 volt supply. C. Energy stored in the capacitor when it is fully charged. Q5. A multi-plate capacitor has 9 plates each with a cross sectional area of 4cm2. The distance between the plates is 015mm and the dielectric material between the plates has a relative permittivity of 50. Calculate the: A. Capacitance of the capacitor. (944nF) B. Charge on the capacitor if it is fully charged on a 28 volt supply. C. Energy stored in the capacitor when it is fully charged to 28 volts. Q6. A multi-plate capacitor has 3 plates each with a cross sectional area of 500cm2. The distance between the plates is 10mm and the dielectric material between the plates has a relative permittivity of 4. Calculate the: A. Capacitance of the capacitor. (354nF) B. Charge on the capacitor if it is fully charged on a 28 volt supply. C. Energy stored in the capacitor when it is fully charged to 28 volts.

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MODULE 3A ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS WORKBOOK

13 CAPACITORS IN DC CIRCUITS
Q1. A simple parallel plate capacitor has plates with an area of 12cm2, a distance of 001mm between the plates and a dielectric material between the plates with a relative permittivity of 40: A. Calculate the capacitance of the capacitor. B. Calculate the electrical energy stored in the capacitor if it is connected across a 28 volt supply. C. Calculate the charge on the capacitor if the potential is across it is increased to 100 volts. Q2. Complete the following table. Total Capacitance

Capacitor 1 100F 200F 100F 470F 47F 30F 200F 200F 30F 200F

Capacitor 2 200F 100F 300F 470F 100F 470F 47F 100F

Capacitor 3 none none 200F none none 100F 150F 200F 100F 400F

Connection Series Parallel Series

235F 32F Parallel Series Series Parallel Series 177F 100F

Q3. A 400F capacitor is connected in series with a 200F capacitor across a 120 volts supply. Assuming the capacitors are fully charged, calculate the: A. Voltage across each capacitor. B. Energy stored in each capacitor. Q4. A 47F capacitor is connected in series with a 100F capacitor across a 28 volts supply. Assuming the capacitors are fully charged, calculate the: A. Charge on each capacitor B. Voltage across each capacitor. C. Energy stored in each capacitor. D. Total charge on both capacitors.

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MODULE 3A ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS WORKBOOK

Q5. C1=100F, C2=200F and VSUPPLY = 60 volts. Assuming the capacitors are connected in series across the power supply, calculate the voltage drop across each capacitor (C1 40 volts, C2 20 volts) Q6. C1=100F, C2=200F, C3=400 and VSUPPLY = 120 volts. Assuming the capacitors are connected in series across the power supply, calculate the: A. Total capacitance. B. Voltage drop across each capacitor. (V1 - 6857 volts, V2 3428 volts, V3 - 1714 volts) C. Charge on each capacitor. D. Energy stored in each capacitor. Q7. C1=120F, C2=170F, C3=90F and VSUPPLY = 100 volts. Assuming the capacitors are connected in series across the power supply, calculate the: A. Total capacitance. B. Voltage drop across each capacitor. (V1 - 329 volts, V2 2323 volts, V3 - 4387 volts) C. Charge on each capacitor. D. Energy stored in each capacitor. Q8. C1=10F, C2=100F, C3=170F and VSUPPLY = 100 volts. Assuming the capacitors are connected in series across the power supply, calculate the: A. Total capacitance. B. Voltage drop across each capacitor. (V1 - 8629 volts, V2 863 volts, V3 - 508 volts) C. Charge on each capacitor. D. Energy stored in each capacitor.

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MODULE 3A ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS WORKBOOK

Refer to Figure 1 to answer the following questions

Q7. A 100F capacitor is connected in series with a 900 resistor across a 20 volt power supply. Calculate the circuit time constant. B. Calculate how long will it take for the circuit current to fall to zero when the switch is moved to position A. C. Calculate the voltage across the resistor after 1 time constant.
A.

Figure 1
D. Calculate the maximum circuit current.

Calculate the energy stored in the electric field when the capacitor is fully charged. F. Sketch a graph to show the circuit current and the voltage across the capacitor with respect to time when the switch is moved to position A.
E.

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MODULE 3A ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS WORKBOOK

14 MAGNETISM
Q1. Describe the domain theory of magnetism. Q2. Explain how lines of flux can be demonstrated to a group of students. Q3. Describe the Earths magnetic field and explain the terms dip and variation. Q4. Describe one use for a hard iron material and one use for a soft iron material. Explain how the materials magnetic properties are exploited. Q5. Explain how components can be shielded from magnetic fields. Q6. Explain why might it be necessary to shield components from magnetic fields.

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MODULE 3A ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS WORKBOOK

15 ELECTROMAGNETISM
Q1. Describe the field around two adjacent current carrying conductors if the currents are flowing in opposite direction. Q2. Explain how the right hand gripping rule and corkscrew rule can be used to determine the magnetic north end of a coil Q3. A coil of 200 turns is wound uniformly in the form of a toroid with an air core. The mean circumference is 60cm and the uniform cross-sectional are is 5cm2. If the current flowing in the coil is 4 amps, calculate the: i) ii) iii) Magnetising force Flux density Total flux (1333 At/m) (1.68 mT) (084 Wb)

Q4. The airgap in a certain magnetic circuit is 01cm long and has a crosssectional area of 30 cm2. If 600 At are available to produce flux, calculate the flux density in the airgap. (0755T) Q5. An iron ring has a mean diameter of 50 cm and a cross-sectional area of 10cm2. 500 turns of wire are uniformly wound on the ring and a flux of 125mWb is produced by a current of 2 amps. Calculate the relative permeability of the iron. (1560) Q6. An airgap in a magnetic circuit is 012cm long and has a cross-sectional area of 25cm2. Calculate the reluctance of the airgap, the number of ampere-turns to send a flux of 800Wb across the gap and the magnetising force H in the gap. (382000 At/Wb, 306 At, 255000 At/m) Q7. A coil of 300 turns is wound on an iron ring having a mean circumference of 40cm and a cross-sectional area of 5cm2. The coil has a resistance of 8 and is connected to a 20V d.c. supply. Taking r = 900, calculate: i) ii) iii) iv) v) mmf magnetising force total flux Flux density Reluctance of the ring (750 At) (1875 At/m) (106 mWb) (212 T) (707000 At/Wb)

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MODULE 3A ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS WORKBOOK

Q8. An iron ring of mean circumference 50cm has an airgap of 01cm and is wound with a coil of 120 turns, If the relative permeability for the iron is 350 when a current of 25 amps flows in the coil, calculate the flux density. (254mT) Q9. A steel ring has a mean diameter of 20cm and a cross-sectional area of 1.5cm2 broken by a parallel sided airgap of length 05cm. Taking r = 500, calculate the current necessary in 3000 turns of wire wound on the ring to produce a flux density of 05 Tesla in the airgap and the total flux in the steel ring. ( ) Q10. A steel ring having a mean diameter of 35cm and a cross-sectional area of 24cm2 is broken by a parallel sided airgap of length 12cm. Short pole pieces of negligible reluctance extend the effective cross-sectional area of the airgap to 12cm2. Taking r = 700 and neglecting leakage, determine the current necessary in 300 turns of wire wound on the ring to produce a flux density in the airgap of 025 Tesla. (13.17 Amps) Q11. A steel ring having a mean diameter of 25cm and a cross-sectional area of 12cm2 is broken by a parallel sided airgap of length 16cm. Short pole pieces of negligible reluctance extend the effective cross-sectional area of the airgap to 10cm2. Taking r = 600 and neglecting leakage, determine the current necessary in 3000 turns of wire wound on the ring to produce a flux density in the airgap of 05 Tesla. ( Amps)

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MODULE 3A ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS WORKBOOK

16 INDUCTION & INDUCTORS


Q1. The current flowing in a 200 mH inductor is changing at a rate of 10 amps per second, calculate the back emf in the coil. Q2. Two inductors of 100mH each are connected in series aiding. What is the total inductance if the coupling factor is: A. Zero B. 0707 C. one Q2. A 100mH inductor is connected in series aiding with a 300mH inductor. What is the total inductance if the coupling factor is: A. 025 B. 05 C. 095 Q3. If two similar inductors (coils) are lying at 90 degrees to each other, what value of coupling factor would you expect ? Q4. A 100mH inductor is connected in parallel with a 60mH inductor and positioned so that no mutual coupling exists between them. Calculate the total inductance. Q5. Two 200mH inductors are connected in parallel and positioned so that no mutual coupling exists between them. Calculate the total inductance.

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MODULE 3A ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS WORKBOOK

17 INDUCTORS IN DC CIRCUITS
Q1. A 100mH inductor is connected in series with a 500 resistor across a 20 volt power supply. D. Calculate the circuit time constant. E. Calculate how long will it take for the circuit current to reach its maximum value. F. Calculate the voltage across the resistor after 1 time constant. G. Calculate the maximum value to which the current will rise. H. Show that at the instant the switch is closed, the back-emf produced by the inductor is equal to the supply voltage. I. Calculate the energy stored in the magnetic field when the current has reached its maximum value. Q2. With reference to Figure 1. A 60mH inductor is connected in series with a 900 resistor, across a 12 volt power supply. A. Sketch a graph to show the circuit current with respect to time when the switched is moved to position A. Figure 2 Sketch a graph to show the voltage across the inductor with respect to time when the switched is moved to position A. C. Sketch a graph to show the voltage across the inductor when the switch is moved directly from position A to position B. D. Sketch a graph to show the circuit current when the switch is moved directly from position A to position B.
B.

(although only a sketches are required, graphs should be accurate at points where calculations can be made) Q3. A 10mH inductor is connected in series with a 36k resistor across a 14 volt power supply, calculate the: A. circuit time constant. B. maximum circuit current. C. circuit current after 1 time constant. D. voltage across the inductor after 1 time constant. E. energy stored in the magnetic field when the current has reached its maximum value. Issue 1 - 20 March 2001 Page 17-1

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MODULE 3A ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS WORKBOOK

Q4. A 15mH inductor is connected in series with a 470 resistor across a 12 volt power supply, calculate the: A. circuit time constant. B. circuit current after 1 time constant. C. voltage across the resistor after 1 time constant. D. energy stored in the magnetic field when the current has reached its maximum value. Q5. When an inductor of unknown value was connected across a 12 volt power supply, the current settled at 300mA after 200mS. Calculate the: A. resistance of the inductor. B. circuit time constant. C. voltage across the inductor after 1 time constant. Q6. If an ideal capacitor was fully charged on a power supply and then connected across an ideal inductor. Explain what would happen. (an ideal capacitor has no inductance or resistance and an ideal inductor has no capacitance or resistance) Q7. A real capacitor is fully charged on a power supply and then connected across an actual inductor. Explain what happens. Q8. Explain how a coil, connected into 24 volt d.c. circuit, could produce a back emf of 2000 volts.

Issue 1 - 20 March 2001

Page 17-2