DRINKING IT ALL IN

In Search of True Tequila • Drinking with LCD Soundsystem’s Nancy Whang
Istanbul’s First and Last Craft Cocktail Bar • The (Totally Unofficial) Lego
Bartender Collection • Made of Moonshine • Sherry Cobbler
PUNCHDRINK.COM

WELCOME

CONTENTS

In Search of True Tequila

L

ess than a year ago, PUNCH was
merely a lengthy list of contributors
and a belief a publication dedicated
to exploring drinks culture through narrative
journalism could thrive on the web.
Like so many who’ve made drinks their life
in one way or another, I didn’t seek a career
in wine because I liked the way it tasted.
Instead, I fell in love with it because it wasn’t
just another way to catch a buzz, but a window into the history, geology and climate of
a region, and a way to discover the sense of
“place” that is spiritually and psychologically
ingrained over centuries. Wine, like spirits and
or the ambitions of an entire era. In America,
our invention of the cocktail may not have the
sanction of ages that Europe’s history with
wine has, but guess what: Our early penchant
for mixing wines and spirits, tossing them in
a glass and turning it into entertainment—it’s
uniquely ours. Grumpy onlookers might call it
adulteration; I’d call it the very spirit of rein-

vention and experimentation that has come to
What PUNCH grew into is a platform
for understanding these connections and,

Story: WYATT PEABODY | Photos: PEDEN + MUNK

2

Drinking with LCD Soundsystem’s
Nancy Whang
Story: LESLIE PARISEAU | Photo: RUVAN WIJESOORIYA

everything from the production of illegal
moonshine and how it shaped the identity
of an entire corner of Kentucky to one guy’s
quest to immortalize famous bartenders as
weight are important to us, but so are weird
hobbies and dive bar escapades.
Ahead is a very small snapshot of PUNCH,
followed by a list of some of the writers and
photographers who took this from a few
scribbles on a napkin to a real-life magazine.
PUNCH is as much theirs—and yours—as it
friends and family who lent advice, good looks,
wine, cocktail shaking skills and emotional
support. You know who you are.

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Istanbul’s First and Last
Craft Cocktail Bar
Story: KATIE PARLA | Photo: INNES WELBOURNE

10

Lookbook
Photo: JUSTIN BRIDGES

13

The (Totally Unofficial) Lego
Bartender Collection
Story: BRAD THOMAS PARSONS | Photos: ANDREW BOHRER

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Made of Moonshine
Story: LORA SMITH | Illustration: JACQUELYN MORRIS

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The Sherry Cobbler
TALIA BAIOCCHI, Editor in Chief

Photo: DANIEL KRIEGER

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Editors & Contributors
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FRONTIERS

In Search of True Tequila
Story: WYATT PEABODY | Photos: PEDEN + MUNK

In an industry rife with artifice, Felipe Camerena is quietly
working against the tide to preserve true Tequila.

T

here has never been a time in the
tequila industry wrought with more
controversy and subterfuge than
today. There are more than 1,300 brands
coming out of some 150 distilleries, while the
vast majority of production is controlled by
a handful of companies—almost all of which
are foreign-owned. Then there are the celebrity brands, dubious government regulators,
truckloads of un-ripened Oaxacan maguey
crossing into Jalisco to quench scarcity and
the growing number of faux tequilas being
distilled in China.
In the midst of such confusion, it’s easy to
lose sight of the fact that real tequila is one of
the greatest and most important spirits that
the world has ever known, and that each agave
plant—with its long lifecycle and singular
expression—is, in fact, sacred.

Enter the Camarena family. In the Jalisco
Highlands no name carries more weight, and
in recent years no one has generated more
buzz than Felipe Camarena. From a long line
of agaveros
harvest agave in Los Altos. (His great-grandfather, Don Pedro Camarena, watched his virgin
distillery burn to the ground in the Mexican
Revolution of 1910 and his grandfather, Don
Felipe Camarena, established the fabled La
Alteña distillery, in 1937.) After working
alongside his brother, Carlos Camarena—master distiller of El Tesoro, Tapatio, Ocho and
Excellia—Felipe decided to blaze some new
trails of his own and in 2011 he broke ground
on what would become the most forwardthinking distillery in Mexico—Destilería El
Pandillo. – P

1. Field to Bottle
An El Pandillo jimador harvesting agave at Rancho
Las Pomez. While many producers buy agave on
the open market—which unleashes myriad vulnerabilities, from how the plants were farmed to the use
of fertilizers and pesticides to whether they were
harvested at a complete state of maturity—Felipe
Camarena controls every step of the process from
organically and harvested based on the seven-year
(minimum) lifecycle of each individual plant.
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FALL 2013

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4. Fresh from the Oven
After harvest, the piñas (agave hearts) are
transported to the ovens, called hornos, where
they’re cooked slowly, converting their complex
starches into sugars. Felipe, of course, has his own
twist—steaming the top and bottom of the batch
for an even roast—while most simply cook from the
bottom-up.

5. First Crush
In a singularly Mexican fashion, Felipe conjured up
a reimagined production facility unlike any other:
parts were sourced from steamrollers, semi tractortrailers and railroad cars to fabricate the crusher
(Felipenstein) and shredder (Igor).

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2. As Far As The Eye Can See
The quintessential Highlands palette: vibrant sagegreen agave blades, iron-rich red dirt and piercing
blue cloudless skies. Collectively, the Camarena
of agave in Los Altos; Felipe alone owns around
above sea level, the unique microclimates, exposures and soil types of this region yield some of the
purest, ripest expressions of blue agave known.

3. Force of Nature
When it comes to his quest to protect true tequila,
Felipe Camarena often speaks of how much work
he has yet to do, and how little time he has left. He
barely tolerates conversations that don’t revolve
around science or tequila—and even then one can
still see the wheels turning in his head, as if imaging new ways to push the envelope.

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FALL 2013

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6. The Family Stone

7. Tahona Reimagined

This large stone wheel, called a tahona, is
traditionally used to mash the piñas in tequila
production. It’s the last vestige of Felipe’s greatgrandfather’s still, which was crushed during the
Mexican Revolution over a century ago. Felipe
christened his Destilería El Pandillo with this
relic of Don Pedro Camarena, which acts as a
very personal reminder of human fragility and
impermanence.

When the piñas come out of the oven, they’re
turned over to Igor, the shredder, and then onto
his partner in crime, Felipenstein, who crushes
the agave (slow and low) prior to fermentation.
tahona has soul, and that said traditional practices
should be preserved. To that, Felipe would say that
we humans are evolving, and so is tequila.

UPCOMING ON PUNCHDRINK.COM

All of the Wine, and Always
M.F.K. Fisher’s lesser-known musings on wine and its indelible link to living well.
Story: ANNE ZIMMERMAN | Photo: THE PRIVATE COLLECTION OF M.F.K. FISHER

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PUNCH

FALL 2013

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N

ancy Whang doesn’t drink much
when she performs. Not anymore
anyway. Compared to her whiskey
and Champagne-fueled days as one part of forof temperance is a pronounced shift. Whang
now roams the world DJing gay disco parties

and she was happy to have an international
drinking companion for once. “Touring isn’t
all bad, but I start to feel like a traveling salesman sitting in hotel bars alone,” she says.
Whang requests a light red wine, and he
pours a lean, cherry-tinged Touraine pinot
and a tortilla and the bartender throws in the

out solo in Barcelona, Modena, Mexico City
and Moscow and drinks in hotel bars in her
being on the circuit as a perpetual creature of
nightlife.
“If I get too drunk when I’m DJing, it’s
a train wreck,” she laughs. “I can’t process

EXTREME BEHAVIOR

Drinking with LCD
Soundsystem’s Nancy Whang
Story: LESLIE PARISEAU | Photo: RUVAN WIJESOORIYA

The it-girl DJ lets PUNCH in on dealing with stage anxiety,
why being into wine is just like collecting records and
the time she killed a microphone.

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PUNCH

particularly delightful anecdote about playing
a festival with LCD after one too many Pimm’s
Cups. It ends with her destroying the microphone with a drumstick.
Before LCD dispersed, the band had begun
to eat and drink in serious pursuit, seeking
out top restaurants while waiting for shows
to start. Whang explains the band’s interest
in all three—music, drinking and eating—by
acknowledging that they each inspire a disregard for balance, which is generally replaced
with serious zeal.
“Food and music attract a certain personality type that isn’t fit for normal, everyday
life. It’s extreme behavior—really intense and
all-consuming.” Like drinking abundantly.
And up until recently, drinking was always
a part of Whang’s stage life. “I have terrible
stage anxiety, so James [Murphy] would make
me this drink before we went on. It’s any
combination of Champagne and Jameson. It
sounds terrible, but it’s not that bad,” she says,
smiling. “It’s called the Irish Cunt.”
New York, Whang leads a very full, omnivorous life (just with a little less Jameson).
While sitting with a couple of friends
Bells, she embraces the burly bartender across
the bar. They recount a recent evening spent
together in Barcelona; both of them happened
to be passing through around the same time,

like dirt, the more I like it,” she says of her

New York musicians for natural wine, and
many have taken it up as a sort of companion
hobby. Jon Fine of post-hardcore band Bitch
Magnet discovered a preoccupation with the
subject comparing the genre to indie rock in
a James Beard Award-winning piece for Food
& Wine
the guitarist of Turing Machine, became a
champion for natural wine while working
at Brooklyn wine shop UVA, and passed his
interest on to a set of friends and musicians,
including Whang.

music when she was younger. “I don’t think
I pursue wine very seriously, but I realize it’s
something that resonates with me,” she says.
an essay Chearno once wrote comparing collecting records and exploring wine. If the band
is the wine, and the label is the winemaker,
like. And you start to get to know what its particular sound is, you start to understand how
other labels are related to each other.” In the
same way, she can understand how one winemaker and style is related to another and take
it from there. But Whang doesn’t talk about
music with precious revelry, and similarly, she
doesn’t attempt to intellectualize her fondness
for wine: “I like to know what’s out there, but
I’m not making a career out of it,” she says.
“But then again that’s what I thought all along
about music.” – P

FALL 2013

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T

hree Russians walk into a bar. The
first one looks around. The second
whispers to his friend. The third
says, “This is it? Where’s the VIP room?” Alex
Waldman, the bartender and owner of a small,
single-room cocktail bar in the Asmalimescit
neighborhood of Istanbul’s Beyoglu district is
quick to reply, “It’s downstairs.” He is referring, sarcastically, to the bathroom, which is
down the spiral wrought-iron staircase that the
Russians stare at skeptically. Not getting the
joke, they nervously exchange whispers. Alex
shoves the menu in their direction. The three
Russians promptly exit.
It is a scene that will repeat itself in varithroughout the night. First-time visitors hear
through the grapevine that someone is doing
interesting cocktails in Istanbul’s bingedrinking epicenter. They make their way down
man’s unmarked bar. But “Alex’s Place,” as the
indeed it’s quite unlike its neighbors, which
sell industrial lagers and conventional mixed
drinks.
Yet there is no other area Alex’s Place
of Istanbul’s drinking culture for well over a

FOREIGN AFFAIRS

Istanbul’s First and Last
Craft Cocktail Bar
Story: KATIE PARLA | Photo: INNES WELBOURNE

Between the government’s aggressive push toward prohibition
and the high cost of liquor, Turkey’s only craft cocktail bar, run
by American Alex Waldman, is already an endangered species.

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one side by Istiklal Caddesi, a wide avenue
from which Asmalimescit’s dimly-lit streets
originate, carrying visitors to restaurants serving raki, taverns and pubs. Amidst the dozens
of bars, Alex Waldman tends Istanbul’s only
craft cocktail bar.
Waldman, a California native, came to
But as his cinematography career waned, he
looked for alternatives. The self-taught bartender started mixing drinks at home and then
did some guest bartending before opening his
own place. He quickly earned a reputation as
ents and style set him apart in a city where few
drink and even fewer drink well.
His discerning and loyal clientele is a

blend of local food activists, chefs, writers and
artists who congregate inside the brick-walled
pocket square of a bar or prop themselves up
on scooters and against walls outside. There is
slab of wood, but these are handed out only to
to Waldman’s will.
be unique in New York or London, but in
Istanbul, it is profoundly novel. Turkey is a
raki and wine-producing country where cocktails have little cultural relevance. Waldman
describes Istanbul’s cocktail scene, which is
mostly limited to Asmalimescit, as driven by
“Red Bull with vodka and mojitos” and refuses
to make either.

A craft cocktail
bar could easily
fall victim to the
government’s antialcohol policies.
Instead, his cocktails draw on American
classics and personal inventions. His mise en
place is packed with homemade bitters made
from fruits and herbs culled from the city’s
produce markets. Waldman relies on these
aromas and, in a way, to cover the industrial
liquors he works with out of necessity.
Turkey’s liquor supply is monopolized
by global brands, with whiskey and vodka
dominating catalogues. There is no rye, the
tequila options are slim, sherry is virtually
non-existent and serious bartenders must
choose from a narrow menu assembled by big
distributors who can absorb Turkey’s exorbitant importation costs.
has amped up its anti-alcohol rhetoric and
regulation. Public promotion of alcohol, be it

FALL 2013

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a local wine festival or an advertisement, has
also been banned. While standing in front of
his bar in June, Waldman gestured inside,
“I’m not even going to be able to have the
doors open because having the bottles in view
constitutes promotion.”
The new rules don’t ban alcohol altogether, but certainly aim to impose economic
hardship on business owners who serve booze.
“The government’s strategy is really quite
basic,” says Waldman. “They are trying to
price alcohol out of reasonable consumption
patterns. They’re not making it illegal and,
certainly in Beyoglu, they’re not making it so
less comfortable and they’re making it more
took power a decade ago, taxes on alcohol
have risen threefold.
Bar owners are able to pass some, but
certainly not all, of that increase on to customers in order to remain competitive. At Alex’s
on average, roughly half the cost of a full meal
with raki at the surrounding restaurants. On a
recent visit, I shared a drink with Waldman’s

government strategy, it appears, is working.
These high prices, along with increased regulation, are a tangible threat to Waldman and
Beyoglu’s other bar owners.
“When I started making drinks maybe

Daniels, or any other liquor, will be served in
Turkey at all.
What the future holds for Istanbul’s drinking culture is uncertain. Violent government
retaliation to recent protests has exacerbated
fears that the democratically-elected AKP is
becoming increasingly totalitarian. A small
craft cocktail bar could easily fall victim to the
government’s anti-alcohol policies, a reality
his bar, Waldman explains in a matter-of-fact
tone, “When we got into this place we made

a street where tear gas lingered in the air just
weeks before, I had the feeling that time might
–P

LOOKBOOK
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Building the Brooklyn Bar
The design duo the Haslegrave Brothers unwittingly perfected the Brooklyn
aesthetic. Now they’re bringing it to Manhattan.
Story: LESLIE PARISEAU | Photo: JUSTIN BRIDGES

Patrick Cappiello
Wine Director & Managing Partner, Pearl & Ash, NYC
One of New York’s top sommeliers, Patrick Cappiello—and alum of Veritas, Tribeca
Grill and GILT—traded in his suit and tie to see what would happen if he brought a wellstocked list of vintage Bordeaux and Burgundy to a casual downtown restaurant, mixed
it with quirky wines from France’s lunatic fringe, knocked down prices, threw on a Black
Flag T-shirt and started sabering bottles of wine on the bar during service. His modernization of the French tradition of sabering in restaurants, and his wine program at Pearl
& Ash, are challenging expectations about where and how we encounter great wine.
Photo: JUSTIN BRIDGES

12

PUNCH

EXTRACURRICULARS

The (Totally Unofficial)
Lego Bartender Collection
Story: BRAD THOMAS PARSONS | Photo: ANDREW BOHRER

glasses to accessorize his collection. The Harry
Potter Lego sets have proved to be a sartorial
gold mine.
“Bartenders dress like they’re in Harry
Potter movies,” says Bohrer. “They may not
want to believe it but it’s true. If they’re dressed
to form they’re probably from a Harry Potter
set.” Female minifigs have been problematic
as Bohrer finds their facial expressions less

to express them.”
While you’re browsing through his bartender collection you might wonder why a
isn’t in the line-up. Bohrer has an answer:
“Regan is a rough one. For me—and maybe
it’s just because I’m jealous—it’s the hair. That
man’s hair can’t be tamed by plastic.” – P

Brad Thomas Parsons talks with Andrew Bohrer, bartender,
spirits educator and confessed AFOL (Adult Fan of Lego),
about casting the world’s top bartenders in plastic.

H

e still hasn’t made a pilgrimage to
Legoland, but when Andrew Bohrer

Center in New York City, he spent more time
observing the ornate Lego sculpture of 30 Rock
on display inside the store than he did soaking in the splendor of the actual building just
across the plaza.
tle home he shares with his fiancée Michelle
Broderick, Bohrer maintains two industrial
tool boxes containing a continuingly growing
collection of thousands of “disturbingly sorted”
Vinum Wine Importing, Bohrer has worked
including Vessel, Mistral Kitchen and Rob
Roy—and is also the author of The Best Shots
You’ve Never Tried and the keeper of Cask
Strength, his smart and always-opinionated
spirits blog. While he likes to consider himself
a spirits educator, he’s also an admitted AFOL
(Adult Fan of Lego).
Bohrer has loved Legos since he was a boy,
but he reembraced them in his early 20s when

14

his parents’ house in preparation for a move to
been donated to charity, somehow the Legos
survived. He found that sorting through the
many loose sets of Legos and organizing the
pieces by shape and color gave him “an OCD
sense of calm.”
His passions for booze and Legos eventually crossed paths when he began immortalizing
bartenders and spirits world personalities as
Lego miniature figures (minifigs). The first
was Jim Romdall, his friend and colleague at
“One Lego head came out and I was like,
goddamnit, that is Jim Romdall’s head,” recalls
Bohrer. “It was uncanny. I was actually a little
freaked out by it. But I made myself a Lego Jim
Romdall and took it from there.” He started
people who influenced him in the industry.
After posting his Lego rogues gallery on his
blog many of the subjects adopted their Lego
incarnations as their social media avatars.
Bohrer continues to hunt down rare and
special pieces online and has even found
accessories like Lego bottles, mugs, and wine

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1. David Wondrich

4. Robert Hess

Bohrer admits the Gandalf beard (lifted from a
Lord of the Rings Lego set) on the wise and wondrous David Wondrich is overkill compared to the
cocktail historian’s actual signature facial hair but
adds: “It’s overkill that stems from beard respect.”

Bohrer on Hess: “Robert has a Lego bus driver’s
head. When you run into him at a non-cocktail

2. Hidetsugu Ueno

5. Jim Meehan

Bohrer deems his interpretation of the Japanese
bartending legend “probably the best dressed Lego
where he was wearing a characteristic pinstripe
suit. “He was very formal in a world of bartenders
who were profoundly drunk.”

3. Paul Clarke
-

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talk. This is the low-key guy I know.”

a “humble construction worker” and his ensemble
is rounded out with a gangster torso and “stylish
pants from a Lego baseball player.”

6. Jamie Boudreau
Canon Whiskey & Bitters Emporium comes from
the 2002 Werewolf Ambush Lego set. Along with
his trademark vest, Bohrer considers the smirk an
essential aspect of Jamie Boudreau.

FALL 2013

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T

ging came from my grandfather about
a bad batch of bathtub gin that snuck
up on the men of Corbin, Kentucky.
As he told it, the local bootlegger turned
out a toxic batch when he poured a fuel additive into the mix. Grandpa said that suspicion
of the bad gin surfaced when all around town
the men started walking funny. First it was the
workers in the train yards. Then folks started
seeing men turn up all over walking peculiarly—their full foot, toe and heel included,
books.
As word spread, a raid seemed imminent.
But after several conspicuous days absent

HOMELANDS

Made of Moonshine
Story: LORA SMITH | Illustration: JACQUELYN MORRIS

Lora Smith grew up in a corner of Kentucky where
bootlegging didn’t die with Prohibition. Up until the 2000s
it defined their culture of drinking—and fostered a sense of
belonging—that, however crooked, was theirs.

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their way to the courthouse. Everyone knew
who’d been sipping from the bootleggers
trough and no one went to jail.
During the Prohibition years, this peculiar
gait became know as “jake leg” or “jake walk,”
so named for an alcoholic tincture made with
Jamaican ginger root, nicknamed “jake.”
Categorized as a medicinal, but containing
60-80% alcohol content, jake helped drinkers
sidestep the law. When authorities realized
it was being used as an intoxicant and mixed
into homemade liquor, they forced producers
to lower the alcohol content. That’s when a
pair of kitchen-sink chemists created a version containing a fuel additive and plasticizer
called TOCP (tri-ortho-cresyl-phosphate) that
they hoped would mask the alcohol. Initially
believed to be harmless, TOCP turned out to
be a dangerous neurotoxin whose consumption resulted in, among other unpleasant
things, the paralysis of leg muscles. The cases
that a small canon of folk songs on the subject
emerged in both white and African-American
communities, from the country blues of The
to “Jake Walk Papa” by Asa Martin.

When Prohibition ended, bootlegging and
the dangers that coincided with unregulated
alcohol faded from most parts of America. But
not in my corner of Kentucky.
Appalachian Kentucky remains dotted
with “dry” counties—areas where the sale
of alcohol, both packaged and served, has
remained illegal. This irony is not lost on
people in a state known for producing one of
the world’s most-loved libations, as evidenced
by local bumper stickers that protest, “Legalize
Bourbon!”
A mix of religious fervor and a holdover
of anti-government sentiment left places
like Corbin dry for over a century and kept
bootleggers in business. When a vote on legal
liquor came up during those years, an unlikely
alliance was struck between the bootleggers
their large congregations to the polls, while
the bootleggers bought votes.
The real lynchpin to the bootleg trade
belonged to corruption within local governments. Let’s be clear: bootlegging cannot exist
without corruption. It depends on a cycle of
payoffs and kickbacks. In my grandfather’s
account, law enforcement and high-ranking
bootleggers, ensuring that the business kept
up and running. Most of the time no one said
anything, and no one went to jail.
In an economically distressed area, bootlegging was accepted as a legitimate way to
make a living. Most bootlegging operations
were family-run businesses that spanned genand Perkins ran popular places the community
relied on for alcohol.
By the time I was in high school, the place
to go with a carload of friends on a Friday
night to buy whiskey and beer belonged to the

the streetlights and buildings of town, and into

FALL 2013

17

the open spaces of Whitley County. Crossing
over railroad tracks, you hung a right into
Woodbine and continued for several miles,
looking for the sign that marked the turn into
a cut off to a large barn. There, you’d find a
guy we called Old Red, a wiry Willie Nelson
look-alike with long red braids sitting inside a
makeshift drive-thru taking orders.
Looking back, one thing I still don’t
understand about the religious crowd in
those days—folks determined to keep their
communities and youth dry—was that banning alcohol made under-age drinking more
accessible. The majority of bootleggers didn’t
care what age you were, and Old Red wasn’t
exactly checking IDs.
After I left for college, things began to
change. Encouraged by surrounding counties going “moist”—a term meaning that
alcohol could be served in restaurants with

Bootleggers are now mostly gone from the
county, replaced by bars and liquor stores. A
Liquor King sits along the Cumberland Falls
Highway, its bright red neon sign proudly
declaring the town’s new ruler of alcohol sales.
While Corbin has changed, so has the
broader culture. Today the world can participate in our bootlegging past through the
consumption of white whiskeys marketed as
“legal moonshine.” Bootlegging characters
have become reality TV stars on shows like the
Discovery Channel’s Moonshiners, perpetuating the hillbilly stereotype that the region
can’t seem to shake. And speakeasy-themed
bars serve craft gin cocktails derived from

Beyond catching a
buzz, bootlegging
was one way small
towns created a
culture of insiders
and outsiders.

legal alcohol sales could help the town’s
struggling economy.
But a shift in popular opinion was needed.
The continuation of the hillbilly stereotype
by popular media made people in my region
touchy about the issue of modernity. Most
people I grew up with wanted franchises, malls
what the folks in larger cities had and were
proof we weren’t so backwards.
It was no surprise then, that the first
serious campaign to change city liquor laws
was accompanied by a mass mailing of glossy
postcards that included logos of Red Lobster,
Applebee’s, TGI Fridays and other franchises
that were allegedly waiting on legal sales
Interstate I-75.
In 2006, Corbin successfully voted to go
moist and, in 2012, the town voted to go wet,
permitting package liquor sales by a thin margin: 887 in favor and 789 against.

18

Prohibition-era recipes, providing the illusion
of secrecy in an era where we voluntarily and
publicly share our every move through incessant check-ins on Facebook and Instagram.
goes mainstream? My father insists that our
town’s moonshining and bootlegging history
doesn’t make Corbin a more colorful place
to live. But his answer comes bookended by
colorful stories: stumbling across an active still
as a child while hunting with his grandfather,
and memories of buying moonshine in R.C.
Cola bottles for 25 cents from a gas station.
Those kinds of stories may be on the verge of

PUNCH

Mudslide at the Applebee’s out by I-75 lends
itself to the same level of adventure.
Beyond catching a buzz, bootlegging
was one way small towns created a culture
of insiders and outsiders. You either knew
where to buy alcohol or you didn’t. It was a
crooked kind of belonging, but the shared
experience kept us connected to community
memory and site-specific places inside our

county. By keeping a secret, we defined an
identity not shared by members of the larger
American experience.
It’s hard to be nostalgic about bootlegging—a criminal activity with a history
headlights on a country road and the feeling
I had of belonging to a place rich with experience, that for a moment, was undeniably and
singularly ours. – P

UPCOMING ON PUNCHDRINK.COM

St. John’s Maxims of Wine As Told
by Mrs. St. John Himself
After a couple bottles of wine, Trevor Gulliver opens up about why he
thinks the business of natural wines is “twerpery,” what’s wrong with the
London wine scene and why cheap wine just isn’t what it used to be.
Story: MEREDITH ERICKSON | Photo: PATRICIA NIVEN

What Has Become of the
West Coast Cocktail?
Jordan Mackay tracks the rise of the “West Coast style” of cocktail, what
drove it, who embraced it, and just what’s happened to it.
Story: JORDAN MACKAY | Photo: DANIEL KRIEGER

FALL 2013

19

4

RIFF DIARIES

The Sherry Cobbler

5

Photos: DANIEL KRIEGER

T

born cocktail by most accounts.

shaken, poured over crushed ice and slurped
through a straw, the Cobbler is thought to have
originated sometime in the 1820s or early
1830s. But like most 19th century drinks, its
origins are foggy.
Cocktail historian David Wondrich is cred-

the straw to popular consciousness, we might
still be dumping ice down our chins to get to
the bottom of a drink.
Cobbler’s decades-long heyday, it’s being
rediscovered, both as a classic and a blue3

on the drink, hailing from Denver to New
Orleans, add everything from black tea to
mezcal. Garnish lavishly or omit the bells and
whistles—just don’t forget the straw. – P

Katherine Jane Ellice, a Canadian who took
But its great launching pad to international
renown came courtesy of Charles Dickens
and his The Life and Adventures of Martin
Chuzzlewit (1843-44). In a scene now famous
among cocktail dorks, Chuzzlewit, reacting

1

The Sherry Cobbler

The classic.
3 1/2 ounces sherry (preferably amontillado)
1 tablespoon sugar

century sentiment around the drink: “Martin
took the glass with an astonished look; applied
his lips to the reed; and cast up his eyes once
in ecstasy. He paused no more until the goblet
was drained to the last drop. ‘This wonderful
invention, sir,’ said Mark, tenderly patting the
bler when you name it long; cobbler, when
you name it short.’” Certainly Chuzzlewit was
astonished at the drink’s beauty, but also at
the act of sipping through a straw—a novel

2 or 3 slices of orange
seasonal berries for garnish
Fill a tumbler with crushed ice, add all
ingredients except berries, shake well. Pour
unstrained into a Collins glass. Top with
remaining crushed ice. Garnish with ber-

2

ries in season and a straw.
Adapted from Jerry Thomas’s How
to Mix Drinks or The Bon Vivant’s
Companion, 1862

1

Cobbler, which is credited with introducing

The Variations

20

PUNCH

FALL 2013

21

The Sherry Cobbler, Cont’d.

2

Keep Your Dreams a Burnin’

4

PX Sweet Tea

The Cobbler, tikified.

Sherry gets a Southern updo in DC.

2 1/2 ounce manzanilla sherry

2 ounces Gonzalez Byass Nectar PX sherry
4 ounces black tea (Brown uses Black Dragon Pearls)

1/2 ounce orgeat

seasonal berries and mint for garnish

2 dashes Angostura bitters
2 lemon peels

In a highball glass, add sherry and black tea. Top

3 half lemon wheels and a cinnamon stick for garnish

with ice and swizzle to mix. Garnish with seasonal

powdered sugar for dusting

berries and mint.

Add all ingredients (including lemon peels) to a

DEREK BROWN
Mockingbird Hill, Washington, D.C.

cocktail shaker. Add ice and shake. Strain into a
half-lemon wheels and a cinnamon stick. Dust with
powdered sugar and add two long straws.

The Mexican Gentleman
(El Caballero Mexicano)
5

KIRK ESTOPINAL
Bellocq and Cure, New Orleans

Spain, meet Mexico.
1 ounce Hidalgo-La Gitana manzanilla sherry

PUNCH EDITORS

1 ounce 7 Leguas reposado tequila
3

Half Court Cobbler

1/2 ounce Lustau PX sherry

The Cobbler made bittersweet with
artichoke amaro and a dash of honey.

1/2 ounce Del Maguey Vida mezcal

TALIA BAIOCCHI, EDITOR IN CHIEF

LESLIE PARISEAU, DEPUTY EDITOR

2 blackberries, 2 raspberries, 1 strawberry

2 1/2 ounces Gonzalez Byass ViñaAB amontillado sherry

seasonal berries for garnish

Talia Baiocchi is the Editor in Chief of PUNCH and
the author of the forthcoming book Sherry (Ten
Speed Press, October 2014). She was the first-ever
wine editor at Eater, a former columnist at Wine
Spectator, and has written for the San Francisco
Chronicle, Decanter and Wine & Spirits Magazine,
among others. She has a degree in journalism and
political science from New York University and has
been featured in numerous publications,including Fo
rbes as a member of the magazine’s 2013 “30 under
30” list. She lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Leslie Pariseau is the Deputy Editor of PUNCH. She
has written about food, drinks and people for GQ,
Esquire and Saveur, among others. In her former life,
Leslie worked for Momofuku Ssäm Bar, reported at
the United Nations, and dropped out of grad school
to become a professional drinker. She has a degree in
art history from the University of Michigan and lives
(immoderately) in Brooklyn, New York.

1 orange wheel

1/2 ounce Cynar
1/2 ounce honey syrup (2 parts honey to 1 part water)

In a cocktail shaker, lightly muddle berries and

1 orange wheel half

orange wheel. Add all other ingredients, add ice

1 large lemon wedge

and shake. Strain half over crushed ice and stir.

orange and lemon wheel for garnish

Add more ice and strain the remaining half over
the top. Stir to frost the glass and top with berries

In a Collins glass, muddle citrus with honey syrup.

to garnish.

Add sherry, Cynar and crushed ice. Swizzle with
a straw or spoon to mix. Garnish with an orange
and lemon wheel.

SEAN KENYON
Williams & Graham and Squeaky Bean, Denver

DAN GREENBAUM
The Beagle, New York City

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PUNCH

FALL 2013

23

CONTRIBUTORS

BRAD THOMAS PARSONS
Brad Thomas Parsons is the author of Bitters: A
Spirited History of a Classic Cure-All, which was
the winner of the James Beard and IACP Cookbook
Awards. Parsons received an MFA in writing from
Columbia University, and his work has appeared
in Bon Appétit and Food & Wine, among others.
He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

KATIE PARLA
Katie Parla is a food and beverage educator, cultural
historian and journalist whose work has appeared
in The New York Times, Saveur, Travel + Leisure and
elsewhere. She is the author of the blog Parla Food,
the co-founder of The Rome Digest, and the creator
of the dining and drinking apps “Katie Parla’s Rome”
and “Katie Parla’s Istanbul.” She lives in Rome.

ALICE LASCELLES
Alice Lascelles is the liquor columnist for The Times
of London and Sunday Times, and a founding editor
of Imbibe, the award-winning drinks magazine for
bartenders and sommeliers in the UK. She lives in
London.

LORA SMITH
Lora Smith is a writer living in Greensboro, NC.
She holds a B.A. from New York University, studied
folklore at UNC Chapel Hill and documentary radio
production at Duke University. She splits here time
between North Carolina and weekend work in Egypt,
Kentucky, where she and her husband are transforming a piece of property into an organic farm.

WYATT PEABODY
Wyatt Peabody is a wine advisor, archivist and
journalist. He is a former contributing editor at the
Los Angeles Times Magazine, where he wrote
about spirits, cocktails and food. His work has also
appeared in Robb Report, Fortune, The Washington
Post and elsewhere. He lives in Los Angeles.
DAVY ROTHBART
Davy Rothbart is the creator of Found Magazine, a
frequent contributor to This American Life, the author
of the essay collection My Heart Is An Idiot and
the story collection The Lone Surfer of Montana,
Kansas. He writes regularly for GQ and Grantland
and his work has appeared in The New Yorker, the
New York Times and The Believer. His documentary
film, Medora, premiered at the SXSW Film Festival, and will be released nationwide in November
2013. He lives in Los Angeles and his hometown of
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
MEREDITH ERICKSON
Meredith Erickson has written for the New York
Times, Elle, The National Post, enRoute and Lucky
Peach. She is the co-author of The Art of Living
According to Joe Beef and the Le Pigeon Cookbook, as
well as the project editor of Ferran Adria’s The Family Meal, an international bestseller. She splits her
time between Montreal and London.

24

JENNIFER CACICIO
Jennifer Cacicio is a Boston-born, LA-based freelance writer whose work has appeared in the New
York Times, Salon, Bust, and elsewhere. She received
her MFA from Boston University, where she also
taught Creative Writing. She is at work on a novel,
a cookbook and a television series. In her free time,
she bakes a lot of pies.
MATT AND TED LEE
Siblings Matt Lee and Ted Lee grew up and learned
to cook in Charleston, SC. Their cookbooks, The Lee
Bros. Southern Cookbook and The Lee Bros. Simple
Fresh Southern, have won five James Beard and
IACP Awards. They are currently on-air commentators for Cooking Channel’s Unique Eats, and their
most recent cookbook, The Lee Bros. Charleston
Kitchen, was published in March 2013.
ANNE ZIMMERMAN
Anne Zimmerman is the author of An Extravagant
Hunger: The Passionate Years of M.F.K. Fisher and
M.F.K. Fisher: Musings on Wine and Other Libations
and the editor of Love In A Dish and Other Culinary
Delights. Her work has appeared in Mix Magazine,
Meatpaper, Diner’s Journal, Remedy Quarterly,
Playboy and more. She lives in San Francisco.

PUNCH

CONTRIBUTORS

JORDAN MACKAY
Jordan Mackay is the wine and spirits writer for
San Francisco magazine. His writing has also
appeared in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times,
San Francisco Chronicle, Decanter, The Art of Eating,
Food & Wine, Gourmet and many others. He is the
author of Passion for Pinot and (with Rajat Parr) the
James Beard Award-winning Secrets of the Sommeliers. Currently, he is working on a book about Texas
barbecue and two more books on wine. He lives in
San Francisco.
CHARLES ANTIN
Charles Antin is Specialist Head of Sale, Associate Vice President and auctioneer in the Christie’s
Wine Department, New York. His essays and other
writings have appeared in Food & Wine, the New
York Times and the Philadelphia Inquirer. His fiction
has appeared in numerous publications including The
Virginia Quarterly Review, The Gettysburg Review,
The Michigan Quarterly Review, Alimentum, Fugue,
Unstuck and Glimmer Train, where he won the award
for short fiction. He holds an MFA in creative writing
from New York University.
CELIA SACK
Celia Sack was born and raised in San Francisco.
During her seven-year tenure at Pacific Book Auction, Celia channeled her passion for rare books into
a private antiquarian cookbook collection. In 2008,
she opened Omnivore Books on Food, San Francisco’s
only culinary bookshop. Featuring new and antiquarian titles, her store has become the destination for
internationally-known food writers touring their new
books, and for collectors expanding their shelves.
EDWARD LEE
Chef Edward Lee is a Korean-American who grew up
in Brooklyn, trained in NYC kitchens and now owns
and runs 610 Magnolia restaurant in Louisville, KY.
Lee’s innovative cuisine has twice earned him a
finalist nomination for the James Beard Foundation’s award for Best Chef: Southeast. He is author
of Smoke & Pickles: Recipes and Stories from a New
Southern Kitchen. His writing has also appeared in
Gastronomica and Food & Wine, among others.

PEDEN + MUNK
PEDEN + MUNK (Jen Munk & Taylor Peden) have
been working together as a photography team for
more than eight years. They have studios on both the
East and West Coasts and shoot extensively on location. Their work has appeared in Bon Appétit, Gather,
GQ, Condé Nast Traveler, Martha Stewart Living and
Glamour, among others.
ED ANDERSON
Ed Anderson is a photographer specializing in
food, drinks and the people who make them. His
work has appeared in numerous magazines and
cookbooks, including A16: Food + Wine, Collards &
Carbonara, Secrets of the Sommeliers and Bitters.
He lives with his family in Petaluma, California.
NICOLE FRANZEN
Nicole Franzen is a food and lifestyle photographer
based in Brooklyn, New York. She has shot for
Kinfolk, Bon Appétit and New York Magazine, among
others. She can often be found sipping negronis.
ERIC WOLFINGER
Eric Wolfinger was a cook and a baker before working behind the lens. His first project was Tartine
Bread where his self-taught photography work
was nominated for a James Beard Award. After
six more cookbooks and a range of editorial work
for national and international publications, his
improvisational style—shot from a cook’s perspective— has made him one of the food world’s most
recognizable photographers.
DANIEL KRIEGER
Daniel Krieger is an award-winning food, restaurant and portrait photographer based in New York
City. He is regular contributor to the dining section
of the New York Times and the head photographer
at Eater. His work has also appeared in Esquire,Food
& Wine, GQ, The Wall Street Journal and the James
Beard Award-winning Edible publications.
EMILY ROBERTSON
Using color, tone and pattern to explore ideas
of image making, Emily Robertson creates her
delicately organic illustrations with watercolor and
ink. Working as an illustrator since she graduated
from the Glasgow School Of Art in 2006, Robertson
has worked with a wide range of clients including
Apartamento, Condé Nast Traveler, Wolf Magazine,
Anthropologie, and more.

FALL 2013

25

LAUNCHING FALL 2013 | PUNCHDRINK.COM

INQUIRIES
Kelly Snowden • Marketing & Publicity
Ten Speed Press • 6001 Shellmound Street, 4th Floor• Emeryville, CA 94608
T: 510.285.2974 • kelly.snowden@tenspeed.com
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