Green around the gills - MCV - Melbourne Community Voice for Gay and Lesbian Readers

Written by Reg Domingo Friday, 28 December 2007 04:09 - Last Updated Friday, 28 December 2007 04:10

S.M. King takes a bleary-eyed look at hangover cures.

There’s a proper term for a hangover. And, no, it’s not, “Oh My Christ, somebody kill me now please.” It’s a tad more Latin-sounding than that. It’s veisalgia.

I looked it up in a medical dictionary once after a particularly rough night on the turps in the hope of making myself feel less wretched.  Unsurprisingly, saying “veisalgia” doesn’t make the veisalgia go away.

Exactly what does frighten off the collective symptoms known as a hangover is a subject for frenzied debate. It’s likely, of course, that you have your own never-fail hangover cure. I’m willing to bet you’re not foolhardy enough to use it on your own dehydrated self.

1/3

Green around the gills - MCV - Melbourne Community Voice for Gay and Lesbian Readers
Written by Reg Domingo Friday, 28 December 2007 04:09 - Last Updated Friday, 28 December 2007 04:10

First, a word about responsible drinking. There is no known way to restore the hungover to health. In fact, a clinical study published in the British Medical Journal found ‘no compelling evidence’ to suggest that any popular or obscure remedy actually worked. Naturally, the best way to cure a hangover is prevention. Given the pace of life and the force of temptation, that’s not going to happen, is it?

So, let’s ignore the advice of professionals, as is our wont, and examine the possible usefulness of some favourites.

Home hangover remedies range from the absurd to the (relatively) sober.

For instance, there is the much-vaunted junk food therapy. And, sure, a gut full of trans-fats and amphetamine sugars might perk you up for a sterling fifteen minutes. As one who has suspended her hamburger franchise hatred in the haze of a hangover and shovelled this dubious medicine in her mouth, let me tell you: it works for an instant and then the hangover returns twofold.

Stay away from grease and sugar.

Veisalgia describes the group of horrid indications that make up a hangover.

Chief among these is dehydration. So, rather obviously, you should sip constantly on water. Don’t drench your organs. Take two to three litres slowly over the entire day. And, please, if you’re over the age of 23, try not to look in the mirror until your hydration work is done. We old girls tend not to bounce back from the desert of the drunk as quickly as once we did.

There is a raft of herbal helpers available. I’ve tried ‘em all. Frankly, all I got was high quality urine.

However, there is some evidence to suggest that ingesting B Group and C vitamins can help.

2/3

Green around the gills - MCV - Melbourne Community Voice for Gay and Lesbian Readers
Written by Reg Domingo Friday, 28 December 2007 04:09 - Last Updated Friday, 28 December 2007 04:10

Of course, you can consume high dosages of these in synthetic form. But, as should be your daily practise, please preference vitamin-rich foods over pill-popping.

Fresh fruit juice is great for C. (It’s also great as a cocktail base. If all else fails: hair of the dog.) Vegemite is a tried and true B favourite. Avocadoes and bananas can also prove useful. In fact, some dodgy trials have found that B6, also found in fish, wheat germ (bleugh) and salad can help a drunken sailor find his sea legs. My partner tells me exercise helps. I just laugh.

Of course, one can simply choose to stay drunk for an entire party season.

If one has the requisite cash and contacts to check into Promises Rehab or the Betty Ford Center, you could always try that. kingsm@bigpond.net.au

3/3

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful