QUOCIRCA INSIGHT REPORT

April 2008

Total telecoms expense management
…looking beyond cost cutting to gain greater value
Contacts:
Rob Bamforth Quocirca Ltd Tel +44 1962 849746
rob.bamforth@quocirca.com

Voice and data communications are taking up an increasing amount of organisations’ budgets as more information is shared between and across more businesses. Person to person contact now includes richer media, more participants and is becoming increasingly mobile. Historically, telecoms expense management has focused on the mechanistic processing of bills, payment and costs of individual items. It is too simplistic to make blanket cuts or restrict use and opting for cheap alternatives may lead to a loss of business value. A better approach is needed for managing telecoms expense, so what best practices should companies adopt to meet their total communications needs and avoid unnecessary costs? • Too much focus on just cutting telecoms costs can lead to a blinkered view It is easier to measure and manage those responsible for cost centres on objective criteria such as meeting or beating budget line items, than assess an individuals’ broader impact on value to the organisation. However, an overemphasis on targeting separate telecoms costs means businesses run the risk of missing out on wider efficiencies and benefits. • Reducing expensive line items does not always translate into reducing organisational costs More companies perceive that total mobile costs are rising even as individual tariffs are falling, citing increasing usage and increasing numbers of users. Restricting users or usage is ultimately ineffective, so growth needs to be factored into planning and procurement. • Lack of consolidation means that individual bills do not reflect the bigger picture A diversity of suppliers and services makes life complex to manage at the contract level. This, and variations in the level of apportionment to cost centres, means that managers will rarely have the full set of facts they need to make accurate decisions. • Poor cost centre management practices are reflected elsewhere Organisations where managers have complete visibility and take action on discrepancies or overruns are likely to be more proactive and regularly auditing their telecoms needs. Visibility and interest at senior levels has an impact on motivating those managing costs at a lower level.

Bob Tarzey Quocirca Ltd Tel +44 1753 855794
bob.tarzey@quocirca.com

Matt Atkinson AKJ Tel +44 1634 673800
Matt.Atkinson@akjl.co.uk

Aldo Rossi ttMobiles Tel +44 1235 829400
Aldo.Rossi@ttmobiles.com

Research Note:
The information presented in this report is based on a survey of 120 organisations in the UK. It was completed in February of 2008. Those surveyed included organisations with an annual total telecommunications budget of over £250,000, with around half of those interviewed having a budget totalling over £1m per annum. These budgets include mobile and fixed telephony as well as internet and other data communications costs. Quocirca would like to thank all the respondents to the survey and the sponsors of this report.

• Lack of resources is the main challenge to effective telecoms management Those companies with total telecoms spend of less than £1m per year are also limited by the tools and technology they have at their disposal. • Personal use of business mobile phones is not always tightly accounted for For almost half of businesses, employees make only a partial or zero contribution to personal calls costs, and although almost two thirds of organisations fully and accurately account for the personal use by their employees, the remainder are less strict. • The format of billing data does not always support the need for precision and visibility Fewer than half of companies consistently receive fully itemised electronic bills, reducing the timeliness and visibility of information that is necessary to impact employee behaviour. CONCLUSION: Many companies naively think they are doing a reasonable job managing their telecoms expenses, but the reality is that most could do more at both ends of the problem—usage and billing. There is a need to focus on the day-to-day details to make sure billing, invoicing and payment accurately reflect the services delivered, meaning that those with responsibility for costs understand their impact and personal accountability. However, these details should not drive the overall strategy. This has to take a broader corporate view rather than that of individual fiefdoms, looking at the needs of the business and the value and effectiveness derived from communications, not just the cost. Some converged thinking, combining IT and telecoms budgets as the technologies converge, will help, as will bringing in outside support with rigorous processes and wider strategic insight. This is not a one off exercise and, like the careful regular accounting of budgets, has to take place on a sufficiently frequent basis for the organisation to properly manage and optimise its total telecommunications estate.

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Contents
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 The inexorable rise of usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 The cost / value balancing act . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Naivety and bad practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Visibility and control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Conclusion—the need for converged thinking . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Appendix A: Interview sample distribution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 About Aurora Kendrick James . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 About ttMobiles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 About Quocirca . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14

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Introduction
This report looks at the degree to which today’s UK businesses adequately manage their total telecommunications expenditure—including fixed line and mobile telephony and external data communications—and where good practice is lacking. It is intended to be read by those who carry out this task in their own organisation, and those who are looking to see how to get the best value out of telecommunications right across their business, rather than it simply being seen as a cost. The research behind this report involved interviews with 120 UK-based senior managers with operational or commercial responsibility for telecommunications in organisations with annual total telecoms budgets of over £250,000. Quocirca would like to thank all the participants for their time to take part in the telephone interviews from which the data for this research was derived. Without their participation such reports would not be possible.

employee, employer and taxman as the line between personal and work use blurs. Remote access to IT increases this complexity. Whilst remote working once might have involved a hotel network connection for a road warrior’s laptop to dial in to read email, it is now far more likely to encompass other, faster forms of connection and other locations, in particular the home (Figure 2).1

The inexorable rise of usage
The use of sophisticated information technology has spread from smallish numbers of isolated powerful computers to pervasive information and access to applications almost anywhere through open and interoperable standards. At the same time, telecommunications capabilities have grown in speed, capacity and reach, including high bandwidth fixed and low cost mobile networks, bringing voice and data communications everywhere. The IT and telecoms industries have ‘collided’ with a convergence around open standards, and this has increased the availability and use of technology for both consumer and business purposes. Each feed off the other. Where once the business world led with concepts that then emerged into the consumer marketplace, now the reverse is more often true. All this makes the business of managing an organisation’s communications needs—voice, data, fixed, mobile—more complex as a whole set of different technologies merge. Depending on their job role, many employees have come to expect to use some form of mobile or remote access device— phone and/or laptop—and some form of network connection. Whether provided by the employee or the business, the mobile phone has become an important part of many people’s lives and has become a very useful business tool. Also the number of mobile users continues to grow (Figure 1). This further blurs the divide between personal and business use, especially if an employee is regularly expected to work in diverse locations, whilst still remaining in an environment controlled and secured by the IT department. The remote employee might be using other business-critical applications in addition to email, or they may be using IP telephony bridged into the corporate PBX to appear like any other extension, even when working from home, therefore increasing the need for quality and security controls. Even within the office there are new applications to make further use of the available communications facilities, and to enhance the simpler methods of communication, such as basic phone calls or text-based email messages with richer content and increased interactivity. This is, in part, also driven by the needs and requests of end users (Figure 3).2

The initially simple proposition of providing a mobile phone on a corporate tariff is now more complex as individuals have their own personal preferences, styles and usage criteria for mobile phones. The business-supplied mobile phone has also at times necessitated a more intricate sharing of costs between

All sorts of collaborative tools are used by consumers for social interaction, either by phoning or texting their friends and family via a mobile phone or sharing photographs and videos on the internet with increasingly large social groupings of ‘friends’ and network contacts. This widespread use makes it inevitable that these consumer-friendly technologies will also move into the workplace (Figure 4).2 As they do, the communications managers in every organisation will be faced with more users, mechanisms and messages clamouring for capacity in the network.

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As further standards emerge, smaller, embedded devices become more capable of being network citizens, adding further variety of usage patterns and needs. This machine-to-machine communication, in both the fixed and mobile domains, allows remote sensing and monitoring to be extended to many existing applications, improving their effectiveness, but also adding to the load on infrastructure. Together, these all add to an increasing use of communications technology, with more connections being made, often with richer media—video, shared applications or collaboration— and involving more participants. There seems little doubt that more communication is a good thing, but with more dispersed organisations and teams, a global marketplace and new reasons to communicate more frequently, this increases the risk of rapidly escalating costs. Right now, many organisations say communications costs are already a significant part of their budgets and would like to reduce them or keep them under control. This then has to be balanced against the benefits that increased communications is delivering.

There is also strong concern around the effect of usage, which in many areas will be growing, even if the number of employees is static. This could be for many reasons such as the result of initiatives elsewhere in the business. For example, a reduction in travel for environmental or cost reasons might increase the number of phone calls and use of rich media conferencing services. Or a strategic initiative to encourage tele-working, but implemented without due consideration to the current inventory of assets or existing infrastructure, may switch originally fixed-line calls to be made using mobile phones. Although low down on the scale of importance, the deployment of new services, the utilisation of existing assets and new working modes—mobile, home or remote working—will all impact total costs as much, and probably more, than programs simply designed to cut costs in individual line items or renegotiate single services. Taking the lowest cost purchasing route works well for commodity products, where apples are compared with apples and bought by the crate at the best price, or where telephony is simply paid for by the minute. However, the communications arena has become more complex. Voice telephony is becoming tightly bound with other IT needs, and increasingly overlaps with other carrier data services. The decision-making process of telecommunications now not only has to look at direct costs, but at the broader impact, including value and the cost of missed opportunities right across the business, just like any other complex IT project. For the most part employees have a home life too, and personal use is increasingly blurring with business. On the one hand, many now take work home and put up with being called out of hours, whilst on the other, management of domestic issues, such as banking and bill payments, are being carried out during normal working hours.

The cost / value balancing act
Finding the right level between cost control and delivering value is a challenge because, although it is fairly easy to measure cost, it is difficult to quantify business value and put it on a balance sheet. This affects management behaviour when setting objectives, which means that hitting budgets (and making savings against them when finances are tight) is far easier to measure than adding value or, even, working more effectively. The problem increases as budgets are split and passed further down the organisation in an attempt to increase individual responsibility. While this may have some impact in tackling cost overspend at an individual level, visibility of overall effectiveness is lost. Given the personal need for managers to meet individual goals and the potential impact on remuneration and, perhaps, progress through the organisation, most are directed to cut costs as their instinctual or a mandated priority (Figure 5). The value of increased visibility noted by over a quarter of respondents is likely to have more to do with its impact on control—for example by making individuals aware of their own contribution—than a willingness to build a bigger picture of spending patterns across the organisation. In other words, pushing visibility ‘down’ for cost control reasons rather than ‘up’ for a broader view of value and impact. As well as cost reduction, visibility and control feature high in importance to the overall management of telecoms services (Figure 6).

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Employees also have broader social networks and, thanks to the internet, these are taking even more of their time and attention, perhaps despite the wishes of their bosses. Managing personal and business use of communications is a growing issue for many businesses, affecting voice, data, fixed and mobile needs. The use of broadband services from home is one particularly difficult area, where the organisation not only has to balance control of the connection—which provider, quality of service and security—but also costs, as the connection will no doubt be used for family and consumer applications too. Deciding how to apportion these costs will become harder as even more consumer services are delivered over the same connection as those used for business (Figure 7).

This is an area where the organisation overall is obtaining broad business value, despite the direct measurable effect on an individual cost centre. The challenge is to increase the visibility of the value across the business and, where possible, assign credible financial sums to quantify the gain and explain or justify the cost. A more problematic set of responses are those who believe the tariffs themselves are rising. While this is not impossible and may be the case with some carrier offers, it is likely that it is also due to either a lack of effective negotiation with current suppliers or not putting sufficient effort into finding what alternatives are available from rival suppliers. Setting policies for use of home broadband would therefore be very difficult, but it is a different matter when it comes to an employee’s mobile phone, as this is likely to be an official business contact point. Security and standardisation are often mentioned as important when looking at mobile use by employees. However, when pressed for the reasons behind mobile usage policy, cost control and preventing employee abuse of the phone—essentially also about keeping a lid on costs—are the main aims (Figure 8). Given the strong focus on cost cutting and the breadth of offers in the market, this is an area where more companies should be able to feel they are getting a good deal, and, if not, realise they need to be investigating further.

Naivety and bad practice
In considering what alternatives might be suitable, either for a lower cost or more effective option, it is first necessary to understand the structure of current expense. This requires accuracy, detail and a broader picture of the total combined telecommunications costs. At a detailed level, much of the information is thought to be present, although the managers in procurement, commercial and finance departments are less satisfied than telecoms mangers (Figure 10).

Competitive pressures, especially from the consumer market and a maturing of the industry overall, have resulted in mobile tariffs falling, or at least the size of call minutes, text and data bundles rising while costs remain static. Despite this emphasis on telecoms cost reduction and attempts to control usage, most companies are still seeing costs rise (Figure 9). Of the reasons given, it is no surprise that the number of users and the amount to which they are making use of mobile technology are both growing. Increased mobility and remote access are widely thought to be improving productivity, competitive advantage and customer responsiveness, and this has been evident in previous Quocirca research.3,4 Part of the reason is based on the technical versus business view of how costs break down. Telecoms managers are more likely to be focussing on too high a level of split, say between different providers, and perhaps different technology categories—mobile voice, fixed voice, internet connectivity, private

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circuits etc. The commercial managers, however, will be looking further down in the details of the individuals and departments that are involved in the business process. For this reason they are also more likely to want to see costs against the right budgets and cost centres (Figure 11).

Neither approach is perfect, as too much emphasis on the detailed apportionment of cost will mean that opportunities to combine or consolidate (thereby, perhaps, making larger cost savings) will be missed. Insufficient attention to detail, from not checking and obtaining sufficient accuracy to take action when problems or cost overruns are spotted, could be characterised as a naive assumption that all suppliers have always got things right or are always acting in the best interests of their customers. The best way to ensure that maximum value is being achieved is to frequently take a broad, business level view of the positive impact of communications and audit the usage and costs across the entire telecoms estate. Those that take a more prudent approach to cost centre management, in that they make detailed bills visible to cost centre managers and empower them to deal with problems, do embark on more frequent audits (Figure 12).

An alternative, especially for those with a lack of resources in terms of people and time, is to outsource the work and have someone else take care of the problem. Some of this can be pushed back to the suppliers with requests for more detailed breakdown of costs by cost centre, and online access to bills to ensure broadest visibility, but each additional supplier adds to the difficulty in doing this. The problem for most organisations is that they have too many suppliers, and the complexity of dealing with them can be a challenge (Figure 14).

However, the bigger picture of total telecoms expenses will only emerge when the details from multiple suppliers can be examined and compared by whatever means is useful at each level within the business. This might be the board member trying to understand how telecoms plays a role in boosting productivity and reducing environmental footprint, or the individual employee trying to discriminate between their personal and business usage. In some circumstances there are outside organisations that have an interest in telecoms billing details, such as tax authorities, which can be critical to the good governance of the business. This is a particular area of focus concerning the personal use of mobile phones and how this affects both the individual’s income tax liability and that of the organisation for VAT. This is still an area where many companies demonstrate a naive approach, lacking rigorous processes for dealing with the issue, presumably on the assumption that it will never happen to them. This poor attention to regulatory issues is particularly prevalent in those companies with a lax approach to cost centre management (Figure 15).

This more regular checking means that better deals can be negotiated, errors can be spotted earlier, and unexpected costs from those who have already moved to another employer but not had their services properly closed, should not arise. Even for those with the knowledge and skills to know how to address this, it all comes at a price. It takes time and resource to be thorough, and with a diversity of suppliers and billing systems, it also requires the right tools, technology and systems in place. These tend to be in short supply in organisations with lower levels of expenditure because of the significant up-front investment that this would require to bring the right tools inhouse (Figure 13).

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While that might require external or additional support, dealing with the details of individual employees is something any organisation could address immediately internally. Personal use of mobile phones is potentially one of the most rapidly escalating costs, especially with international use. The precise scale of this should be visible to the business, yet over a third do not check and account thoroughly (Figure 17).

While poor cost management can simply reduce profits, a poor attitude to tax law and tax issues can be far more damaging, and ignorance is no excuse. Companies not aware of their responsibilities should call in external advice to ensure they comply.

Visibility and control
In addition to taking a more pro-active approach to the strategic issues of telecoms cost management, there are several other basic aspects that can be dealt with more immediately by improving the visibility of existing information at lower levels and acting upon it. The first thing is to check that suppliers are billing correctly. Many of the potential problems need someone who can examine the details, whether it is a line manager checking that only the right team members are being billed against their cost centre, or a telecoms manager checking that only the lines connected are appearing on the bills. For those in IT used to identifying discrepancies in larger or aggregated bills—only five servers delivered instead of six—the real error rate might be underestimated (Figure 16). More businesses should follow the approach of the others who do check, as there are many who may take advantage of a lax attitude, either deliberately or accidentally. In any event, personal use of mobile phones is high and growing, and there are taxation and regulatory issues to consider. These also are affected by what level of contribution the employee is expected to make. Companies are fairly evenly split in their approach between whether they do or do not subsidise their employees’ personal use of a business mobile phone (Figure 18). For those who are also not checking specific use or are relying solely on employee estimates, any subsidy could be a relatively unknown quantity.

It might be that many of the errors missed are financially small and seem relatively inconsequential, but it does highlight the need for visibility at the right level, individual call details for the employee, grossed up by person for the line managers, and so on. It also requires someone to be specifically tasked— internally or externally—with the responsibility on a supplierby-supplier and service-by-service level to check and validate the consolidated bills. In order for this to be cost effective, there has to be the right balance between how much time is spent and the cost saving.

The person with the most visibility as to whether personal use is fair and reasonable or has strayed into an area that might be labelled ‘misuse’ is the manager with responsibility for the cost centre, and those who work within it. While telecoms costs may be seen as high or significant elsewhere in the organisation, they may only form a small fraction of a cost centre manager’s budget after salaries, travel and other costs. For the manager, the relative balance between these different costs might be more of an issue than the absolute levels of each.

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They may also regard the time taken to investigate the details of telecoms costs as not worth the return for them personally. After all, they will probably be measured on meeting a total budget, not on each line item, and so might not take responsibility for checking telecoms costs as seriously as those in charge of the total telecoms estate might prefer (Figure 19).

This may not always be their fault, as it will depend on what format bills are available in and at what level of detail. Electronic fully itemised bills available via a portal allow for access with a degree of control, whereas those still delivered in paper form carry the risk of being lost, inappropriately copied and sent to the wrong individuals. Further analysis through sorting, searching and filtering is also difficult to accomplish with paper records. The use of different formats for billing varies somewhat from service to service and carrier to carrier, but the majority still do not get the most useful form or level of detail (Figure 20).

However, in many instances this is not part of an ongoing program but simply a one off exercise to address a particular pain point. While this may have satisfied an individual manager’s need to fix a budget overrun or cost problem, it might have had a broader negative impact on the business value gained for the organisation. Point solutions do not often address strategic or wide-ranging issues, and will often result in returning to the problem once again. Those companies where telecommunication costs are a smaller percentage of their overall IT spend are less likely to have called on any external help. However, as we have seen, this is an area where usage will continue to grow and, as a business places greater emphasis on tightly managing its costs, more attention will need to be paid to ensure that communications projects are not simply cut without realising the value they might bring to the wider organisation. Often, only an external perspective can make the organisation aware of the wider impact. In deciding where to go for information, many companies take the simple route of going back to their current suppliers, or perhaps other competing suppliers (Figure 22).

The need to consolidate multiple bills from several suppliers is sometimes dealt with by calling in outside specialist help. While this is often termed telecoms expense management, the real scope of the term should be viewed as much wider, since billing management is only one part of a broad set of telecoms management services that are available from a wide variety of specialised suppliers. Not everyone likes to ask for outside help, no matter how specialised the requirement, but those companies where telecommunications costs form a greater percentage of their total IT spend are much more inclined to use external support (Figure 21).

This is a good route for negotiating on a service-by-service basis, but will not help provide the broadest perspective. While industry peers can also provide some wider experience, as can be seen from earlier figures, many companies are in a similar position, and so to get a real external perspective it is necessary to go further. There are specialists in the area of telecoms expense management, and consultants who also focus on the area, but further broad knowledge is often to be found among the membership of relevant industry bodies, perhaps in this case, the Communications Management Association (www.thecma.org).

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Conclusion—the need for converged thinking
Convergence is a term often applied to several current technology trends in IT and telecommunications, but it applies equally well when looking at cost management. The many different services and providers need to be aggregated together into a broad strategy of total telecoms management, not just identifying expense but also value. This has to correctly identify and allocate the relevant charges to the appropriate budgets at the right level of detail as well as provide an abstracted view of the implications to the business overall. This requires a strategy that takes a wider view than just lineby-line costs and not only at one moment in time, but as part of an ongoing process, including the following considerations: • Bring business objectives into the communications strategy. Whether the organisation is looking to move or expand office locations, encourage flexible working, or reduce its environmental footprint, these business decisions will have an impact on the use of communications technology. This impact goes far beyond simply accounting for costs, but will also significantly affect decisions made early on in supplier and service selection, during procurement and ongoing support and service levels. • Identify and quantify value gains as well as cost savings. This might mean efficiencies that come from combining otherwise separate services, consolidating resources across multiple departments and sharing a combined, but lower, total cost. It will also include ‘softer’ benefits such as the impact on staff, organisational structure and external partner relationships. • Outsource processes where internal knowledge adds little extra value and which require repetitive and consistent checking, for example in the consolidation and error processing in the billing and invoicing processes. • resent billing and usage information in a way that can be P granted controlled and secured access from anywhere. If this is also consolidated into a single portal it makes personal and departmental level management processes simpler, and provides the necessary visibility. • ush cost visibility down to the level where the informaP tion has the clearest meaning. This means personal call cost records should be visible to the individual employee so that they can understand their own impact, and departmental costs are rolled up so that managers can take effective and immediate action where it affects their budget. • ncourage personal as well as managerial action. Making E individuals aware of costs allows them to decide what and when is most appropriate. This has to go along with an informed and supportive management approach with does not compel employees to switch to cheaper options to the detriment of their work or the business overall, but allows them to make informed choices. • ring in independent, external perspective. Internal strucB tures and departmental or personal agendas can cause friction that can be minimised by using an outside agency of some kind. These external partners can also bring a different point of view, allowing experiences and good practices learned elsewhere to be shared. As has been shown, all too often companies are taking a narrow view of telecommunications services, regarding each as separate line of budget cost items. In many cases different managers will be responsible for different services or suppliers—an IT manager for the internet and wide area network connectivity, a facilities manager for the fixed line telephony and a telecoms specialist for the mobile phones, and perhaps their data tariffs. This is increasingly inefficient as the technologies and providers converge. Sometimes this may reduce the number of suppliers, but many new specialists are emerging to deal with the new opportunities and technical services available from dual mode Wi-Fi converged phones and IP telephony to hosted email and outsourced mobile device configuration management. This increase in complexity adds to the challenge of keeping track of individual costs and, more importantly, makes strategic decisions about the impact and value of changing working practices—mobile and remote working—harder to assess. This is where the impact of effective and total telecoms expense management will be most keenly felt.

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Appendix A: Interview sample distribution
The information presented in this report was derived from 120 interviews with senior decision makers, who have responsibility for their company’s telecommunications financial or operational control, during a survey completed in February 2008. The sample distribution was split as follows (Figures 23 to 26):

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References
Reference 1 2 3 4 Title Convergence or Confusion Visual Impact Commodity or Value add ? Web-enabled applications and the internet Author Quocirca Quocirca Quocirca Quocirca Published 2007 2007 2006 2007

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About Aurora Kendrick James
Aurora Kendrick James (AKJ) is one of the UK’s leading providers of telecoms billing and management information services. We combine industry leading technology, benchmarking, best practice management techniques and market knowledge to help our customers to unlock significant cost and efficiency savings from their telecoms estates. Established for over 10 years and with over 50 experienced staff, our customers include organisations in both the public and private sectors, including McDonald’s Restaurants, Alfred McAlpine PLC, Mencap and NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde. From initial audit and benchmarking projects through to ongoing monthly management reporting and monitoring, we can offer the support that your organisation needs to understand and gain control of its telecoms cost base, effectively manage inventory and optimise usage. We call this process Telecom Expense Management (TEM).

AKJ’s Telecom Expense Management (TEM) Services
AKJ’s services start with an Insight Review; following an initial fact finding meeting and based on your recent supplier billing data, this initial audit is designed to help your business to fully understand its current costs and to highlight opportunities to reduce costs from within the estate. Using our best practice guidelines and exception rules that we agree with your business, we will highlight examples of where your organisation could optimise their telecoms costs in the short term and avoid costs through improved management and processes in the long term. This review looks at supplier pricing, billing accuracy, usage trends and policy, utilisation of services and equipment as well as a range of service-specific issues and processes to highlight operational improvements and opportunities to reduce cost. AKJ will then present these headline findings to your business with qualified examples of where issues currently exist. Following the Insight Review, and with a clearer picture of the opportunity available to your business, you can choose to either manage your own internal telecom expense management programme or work with us to support a detailed Optimisation Audit to drive down costs and reduce wastage. For organisations looking to tackle specific issues such as managing mobile usage and inventory management, our Ongoing Reporting and Mobile Management Reporting services take away the challenges of processing large volumes of billing data, and provide your business managers and users with a streamlined process to manage costs and make users and cost centres accountable for their expenditure. Finally, where resources are limited, AKJ’s Telecoms and Mobile Manager services offers a managed service where we can proactively manage some or all of your telecoms estate (voice, data, mobile) on your behalf based on the guidelines that we agree with your business. As part of this service we can take responsibility for cost management, validating supplier’s invoices, managing service meetings with suppliers, right through to order management and ongoing device and inventory management. Again this service can be tailored to support your specific requirements.

Find out more…
Whether your organisation works with a partner like AKJ to support its fixed and mobile telecoms management or has an internal team to manage this area, having a sound TEM strategy is an essential aspect of telecoms management. Typically a well implemented telecom expense management program will quickly deliver cost savings of in excess of 10–15% per annum, and will streamline inefficient processes to help you avoid costs and cut down on wastage. There is no such thing as a “one size fits all” solution when it comes to telecoms management and your policies must be tailored to the way your business operates and your own business culture. At AKJ we have over 10 years of experience of working with large organisations to tackle the issues they face in managing telecoms resources. We are totally independent and will always work to identify the simplest and most cost effective solution to a problem. To find out more about how AKJ could help your organisation, please contact us to arrange a confidential introductory meeting: Aurora Kendrick James, 7 Sherwood House, Walderslade Centre, Chatham, Kent ME5 9UD Tel: +44 1634 673 800 E-Mail: info@akjl.co.uk Web: http://www.aurorakendrickjames.com/tms.html

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About ttMobiles
ttMobiles is Europe’s leading provider of mobile phone management services to organisations in both the public and private sector. Independent of all mobile networks, ttMobiles stand alone in the market place as the only company where the management services are their core business and not an add-on to other more important business streams. Specialising in all aspects of the total administration of mobile phones, BlackBerrys, data cards and home broadband, management complexities surrounding the spiralling costs associated with a rapidly growing wireless user community are simplified and best practices ensure organisations achieve ongoing cost avoidance and genuine savings. The service solutions delivered by ttMobiles remove the ‘burden of doing’ from overstretched departments and allow organisations to focus on their own core business and areas of expertise. The ttMobiles’ suite of services enables organisations to gain control of their wireless fleet whilst still complying with internal policies and external VAT and tax legislation.

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About Quocirca
Quocirca is a primary research and analysis company specialising in the business impact of information technology and communications (ITC). With worldwide, native language reach, Quocirca provides in-depth insight into the views of buyers and influencers in large, mid-sized and small organisations. Its analyst team is made up of real-world practitioners with firsthand experience of ITC delivery who continuously research and track the industry in the following key areas: • • • • • • • • • • • Business process evolution and enablement Enterprise solutions and integration Business intelligence and reporting Communications, collaboration and mobility Infrastructure and IT systems management Systems security and end-point management Utility computing and delivery of IT as a service IT delivery channels and practices IT investment activity, behaviour and planning Public sector technology adoption and issues Integrated print management

Researching perceptions, Quocirca uncovers the real hurdles to technology adoption—the personal and political aspects of an organisation’s environment and the pressures of the need for demonstrable business value in any implementation. This capacity to uncover and report on end-user perceptions in the market enables Quocirca to advise on the realities of technology adoption, not the promises. Quocirca research is always pragmatic, business orientated and conducted in the context of the bigger picture. ITC has the ability to transform business and business process, but often fails to do so. Quocirca’s mission is to help organisations improve their success rate in process enablement through better levels of understanding and the adoption of the correct technologies at the correct time. Quocirca has a pro-active primary research programme, regularly surveying users, purchasers and resellers of ITC products and services on emerging, evolving and maturing technologies. Over time, Quocirca has built a picture of long-term investment trends, providing invaluable information for the whole of the ITC community. Quocirca works with global and local providers of ITC products and services to help them deliver on the promise that ITC holds for business. Quocirca’s clients include Oracle, Microsoft, IBM, Dell, T-Mobile, Vodafone, EMC, Symantec and Cisco, along with other large and medium sized vendors, service providers and more specialist firms. Sponsorship of specific studies by such organisations allows much of Quocirca’s research to be placed into the public domain at no cost. Quocirca’s reach is great—through a network of media partners, Quocirca publishes its research to an audience possibly measured in millions. Quocirca’s independent culture and the real-world experience of Quocirca’s analysts ensure that our research and analysis is always objective, accurate, actionable and challenging. Quocirca reports are freely available to everyone and may be requested via www.quocirca.com. Contact: Quocirca Ltd Mountbatten House Fairacres Windsor Berkshire SL4 4LE United Kingdom Tel +44 1753 754 838

© 2008 Quocirca Ltd

www.quocirca.com

April 2008

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