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Breanna Brisley Per.

3 Research Paper: Mirrors Chapter 13 Section 3

Mirrors, specifically concave and convex were the main topics in Chapter 13 Section 3. Concave and convex are the two types of spherical mirrors that both give off different images.Convex mirrors curve outward and the image is always reflected, that means it is also smaller, upright and virtual. Some examples of convex mirrors are side-view mirrors on a car and security mirrors like you would see at a supermarket or mall. Concave mirrors curve inward and the curve causes the parallel rays to be focused on a single point from a distance. Examples of concave mirrors are headlights on a car, a dentist mirror and a makeup mirror, all of these focus on one point and enhance and enlarge the image. Concave and convex mirrors all give off different properties of the image. A concave mirror is not going to give of the same image a convex mirror would. For a concave mirror the image is magnified and this enlarges the image you see, the closer your object is to the mirror the larger it seems. Convex mirrors on the other hand shrink the image and flip it upside down, and make the image virtual. Distinguishing between real and virtual image is something that also ties into concave and convex mirrors. A real image is produced on a screen or a projector. The image may be smaller or larger it all depends on the objects distance from the mirror. A virtual image is what our eyes see, its when light is reflected back to our eyes, like when we look into convex mirrors we see a smaller image. Another part of Ch.13 Section 3 is describing a simple ray diagram. Simple ray diagrams are just diagrams with lines that represent the light rays are eyes see and what happens when they are reflected off of the mirrors. For concave mirrors the light ray reflected off and move downward to flip the image. With convex mirrors the light rays go through the mirror and hit the focal point and curvature of the mirror and make the image smaller. Also remember that these are concave and convex mirrors not lens, and each mirror has different characteristics, that make it easier to distinguish between the two. If you remember all this then you should be fine.

Breanna Brisley Per.3 Research Paper: Mirrors Chapter 13 Section 3

Bibliography
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