JSTANDARD.

COM
2013 83
G.I. Jews
NOVEMBER 8, 2013
VOL. LXXXIII NO. 9 $1.00
page 22
A special Veterans Day
look at local heroes
SHOLEM ALEICHEM’S BIOGRAPHER page 6
RELIGIOUS SCHOOLS ARE A-CHANGIN’ page 9
HELPING A TINY TERROR VICTIM page 12
A WISSE TAKE ON JEWISH HUMOR page 37
2 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013
JS-2
Voted “Best Retirement Community” AND “Best Independent Living” 2013
by Jewish Standard readers.
I N D E P E N D E N T L I V I N G • A S S I S T E D L I V I N G
Call 201-836-7474 to reserve your seat. Seating is limited.
RSVP today to receive your free copy of
“FiveStar Senior Living Signature Recipes” upon attendance.
655 Pomander Walk • Teaneck, NJ 07666
201-836-7474
www.FiveStarPremier-Teaneck.com
©2013 Five Star Quality Care, Inc.
Spice Up Your Holiday Table:
NE W WAY S OF COOK I NG WI T H P UMP K I N
Monday,
November 18th
10:30 am
FI VE STAR
PREMI ER RESI DENCES
OF TEANECK
Join us for a cooking demonstration presented by our executive chef, Rob Derin.
Sample new takes on the familiar fall favorite, and discover all the ingredients for
engaging retirement living.
Pet
Friendly
Executive Chef,
Rob Derin
Page 3
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013 3
JS-3*
PUBLISHER’S STATEMENT: (USPS 275-700 ISN 0021-6747)
is published weekly on Fridays with an additional edition
every October, by the New Jersey Jewish Media Group, 1086
Teaneck Road, Teaneck, NJ 07666. Periodicals postage paid
at Hackensack, NJ and additional offices. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to New Jersey Jewish Media Group,
1086 Teaneck Road, Teaneck, NJ 07666. Subscription price
is $30.00 per year. Out-of-state subscriptions are $45.00,
Foreign countries subscriptions are $75.00.
The appearance of an advertisement in The Jewish Standard
does not constitute a kashrut endorsement. The publishing
of a paid political advertisement does not constitute an
endorsement of any candidate political party or political
position by the newspaper, the Federation or any employees.
The Jewish Standard assumes no responsibility to return
unsolicited editorial or graphic materials. All rights in letters
and unsolicited editorial, and graphic material will be treated
as unconditionally assigned for publication and copyright
purposes and subject to JEWISH STANDARD’s unrestricted
right to edit and to comment editorially. Nothing may be
reprinted in whole or in part without written permission from
the publisher. © 2013
NOSHES ...................................................5
OPINION ................................................ 18
COVER STORY .................................... 22
TORAH COMMENTARY ................... 35
CROSSWORD PUZZLE .................... 36
ARTS AND CULTURE........................ 37
CALENDAR .......................................... 38
GALLERY ............................................... 41
OBITUARIES ........................................ 42
CLASSIFIEDS ......................................44
HOME DESIGN ....................................46
REAL ESTATE ...................................... 49
For convenient home delivery,
call 201-837-8818 or bit.ly/jsubscribe
CONTENTS
LETTERS
The word mitzvah means any commandment
from God, whether ethical or ritual. Why define it,
then, as simply meaning good deeds?
MARTIN POLACK, TEANECK
F.Y.I.
Paddling to Israel
●“Woot! I yelled out at the empty sea
around me” — From Dov Neimand’s
blog, describing his exuberance on de-
parting Naples, destination Haifa.
No ordinary traveler, Mr. Neimand,
who grew up in Teaneck and whose
parents still live there, is kayaking his
way to the Holy Land.
This is Part 2 of his epic journey.
The first part began and ended in
2010, when he set out from Barcelona,
Spain. That trip was beset by delays
and problems, including, at one point,
the theft of all his gear. Mr. Neimand,
30, a certified kayak instructor, made it
as far as Naples, but then had to return
to his graduate studies in mathematics
at Bar-Ilan University.
He expects the present 1,700-nau-
tical-mile route to take about six
months, but delays in getting his kayak
delivered to him to Italy already have
set back his timetable. His travels will
take him along the coasts of Greece,
Turkey, and Cyprus, and thence to Is-
rael. He will go ashore each night and
either camp or find friendly lodging.
Mr. Neimand’s trip requires strength
and stamina, and he spent many hours
paddling on his visit to the States last
summer. He has roots in Teaneck and
is a graduate of the Torah Academy of
Bergen County.
Mr. Neimand, who keeps kosher, had
to turn down many offers from people
he met along the way, rejecting offers
to share meals that often sounded as if
they would have been delicious. “I just
tell them I am a vegetarian, and they
understand that,” he said.
Mr. Neimand has another rule: Pad-
dling only a half-day on Friday and not
at all on Shabbat. As he did on the first
part of the trip, he will try to find syna-
gogues along the way.
Besides a good supply of lentils for
nourishment, Mr. Neimand manages
to stuff apparel, a two-way radio, an
emergency beacon, a camp stove, a
sleeping bag, and a computer aboard
his craft.
The trek has been an unconvention-
al education for him. “When you go
outside the walls, you learn the most
amazing stuff,” he said.
“I’ve met some super friendly peo-
ple, and some super mean people,” he
said in an interview before he left. Mr.
Neimand has a colorful flare for telling
his story and is blogging along the
way; as he tells it, his story is part trav-
elogue, part adventure tale. Check him
out at kayakdov.wordpress.com.
CHARLES ZUSMAN
Candlelighting: Friday, November 8, 4:27 p.m.
Shabbat ends: Saturday, November 9, 5:27 p.m.
The roots of Israel’s wild boars
You can blame the Philistines for
bring pigs to the Holy Land.
That’s the finding of a study of
genetic and archeological evidence
tracing the origins of Israel’s wild
boars published in the journal Sci-
ence Reports this week.
A team of archaeologists and
zoologists followed up on an earlier
study, which found that the DNA of
Israel’s boars was closer to that of
European boars than those in Egypt
or Syria.
This study replicated those find-
ings in contemporary animals, and
tested preserved boar bones to find
their DNA.
Earlier pig bones, however, showed
the same DNA as in other Near East-
ern boar populations.
“The major shift,” according to the
report, “took place around 900 b.c.e.”
which corresponded to the local ar-
rival of the “Sea People” — better
known as the Philistines of the Bible.
The Sea People originated in Greece,
Turkey, or Cyprus — and according
to the bones they left behind, they
raised and ate much more pork than
did the indigenous inhabitants of the
Land of Israel.
The article can be found at http://
bit.ly/js-boar
LARRY YUDELSON
●Having conquered coffee, Starbucks
is now moving into tea. The coffee gi-
ant’s newest venture,
Teavana, launched
with a tea bar on the
Upper East Side of
Manhattan.
Starbucks CEO
Howard Schultz says he
doesn’t expect the new
venture to be as big as
the coffeehouse chain.
(“Tea lacks the major
caffeine count,” he
explains.) But he is
hoping to draw in kashrut-keeping
consumers.
“It will be [kosher]. It hasn’t been
certified,” Schultz told Forbes. “No
rabbi has come in to bless it yet!”
It looks like Schultz, who is Jewish,
has fallen prey to the common
misconception that kosher
status is conveyed via a
blessing. But if Teavana is to
succeed by peddling its drinks
at $4.95 a cup, it will need the
blessing of luxury tea fans.
TALIA LAVIN / JTA WIRE SERVICE
Starbucks promises a kosher tea party
4 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013
JS-4
We reserve the right to limit sales to 1 per family. Prices effective this store only. Not responsible for typographical errors. Some pictures are for design purposes only and do not necessarily represent items on sale.While Supply Lasts. No rain checks.
`
646 Cedar Lane • Teaneck, NJ 07666
Tel: 201-855-8500 • Fax: 201-801-0225
Visit Our Website at:
www.thecedarmarket.com
5ales Ellective
zz/zo/zj thru zz/z¸/zj
5TORE HOUR5
5UN - TUE: 7AM - 9PM
WED: 7AM - 10PM
THUR5: 7AM - 11PM
FRI: 7AM - 2 HOUR5
BEFORE 5UNDOWN

5U5HI
Watch For Our
Loyalty Card
Coming 5oon.
Visit Our Website To Join!!
646 Cedar Lane • Teaneck, NJ 07666
201-855-8500 • Fax: 201-801-0225
www.thecedarmarket.com
info@thecedarmarket.com
646 Cedar Lane • Teaneck, NJ 07666
201-855-8500 • Fax: 201-801-0225
www.thecedarmarket.com
info@thecedarmarket.com
M A R K E T
M A R K E T
TERMS &CONDITIONS: This card is the property of Cedar Market, Inc. and is intended for exclusive
use of the recipient and their household members. Card is not transferable. We reserve the right to
change or rescind the terms and conditions of the Cedar Market loyalty programat any time, and
without notice. By using this card, the cardholder signifes his/her agreement to the terms &
conditions for use. Not to be combined with any other Discount/Store Coupon/Ofer. *Loyalty Card
must be presented at time of purchase along
with IDfor verifcation. Purchase cannot be
reversed once sale is completed.
CEDAR MARKET
Loyalty
Program
CEDAR MARKET
Loyalty
Program
Fine Foods
Great Savings
5/$
5 lor
Whole, Low 5odium Or Cream
Green Giant
5weet Corn
z¸ oz. can
Regular $z.¸ç ea.
2/$
3 lor
Original or BBQ
Pringles
Potato Chips
z6 oz. box
Regular $z.)ç ea.
2/$
7 lor
Original
Ocean 5pray
Craisins
zo oz. pkg.
Regular $¿.6ç ea.
$
1
99
each
5ave On!
Empire
Chicken or
Turkey Franks
z6 oz. pkg.
Regular $z.çç
2/$
4 lor
Reg. &Low 5odium
Kikkoman
5oy 5auce
zo oz. btl.
Regular $z.6ç ea.
each
each
5ave On!
Vanilla
Rugelach
z¿ oz. pkg.
Black &White
5even
Layer
Cakez6 oz.
5ave On!
5picy 5almon
Roll
$
4
95
each 5ave On!
Carrot &
Cucumber Roll
$
4
25
each
Breaded
Tilapia
Fillet
$
5
99
lb.
Family Pack
5almon
Fillet
$
8
99
lb.
All
5ushi Rolls
FREE!
BUY 2, GET 1
OF EQUAL OR LESSER VALUE
D
irect Receivers o
l F
a
r
m
Fresh Produ
ce
FI5H
$
1
99
each
5liced
Miller’s
Muenster
or Mozzarella
6 oz. pkg.
$
5
99
each
5ave On!
Mixed
5prinkle Cookies
z¸ oz. pkg.
PRODUCE
Farm Fresh
Broccoli
Bunch
5/$
5 lor
Fresh
Iceberg
Lettuce
5/$
5 lor
Bartlett or
Bosc
Pears
89
¢
lb.
New Crop
5weet
Tangerines
10/$
3 lor
Red or Golden
Delicious
Apples
ó9
¢
lb.
Fresh
Juicy
Lemons
10/$
2 lor
BAKERY
5/$
5 lor
oX & zX
Fage Total
Yogurt
¸.j oz. cont.
Regular $z.6ç
2/$
3 lor
Reg. &Light
Axelrod
5our Cream
z6 oz. cont.
Regular $z.¸ç
$
1
99
lor
Assorted
Axelrod
Cottage Cheese
z6 oz. cont.
Regular $j.zç
lor
Original &Calcium
Tropicana
Orange Juice
¸ç oz. cont.
Regular $j.çç
$
3
79
each
Fat Free zooX&FF Calcium
Lactaid
Milk
6¿ oz. cont.
Regular $¿.¿ç
$
1
99
each
Assorted
5mart Balance
5preadable
Butter
).¸ oz. cont.
Regular $z.6ç
2/$
4
lor
Assorted
International
Delight
Creamers
z6 oz. cont.
Regular $z.6ç
FROZEN
5/$
5
lor
Hunt’s
Crushed
Tomatoes or
Tomato 5auce
zç oz. cans
GROCERY
2/$
4 lor
Granulated
Domino
5ugar
¿ lb.
Regular $j.çç ea.
$
3
99
each
Light
Hellmann’s
Mayonnaise
jo oz. .
Regular $¸.çç
2/$
4
lor
Assorted
5napple
Iced Tea
6¿ oz. btl.
Regular $z.çç ea.
2/$
7
lor
Assorted
Absolut
5orbet
z pint cont.
Regular $¿.çç
$
4
99
each
Real Kosher
Chopped
Beel Liver
zz oz. cont.
Regular $6.¸ç
2/$
5 lor
Assorted
Golden
Blintzes
6 pack
89
¢
each
Non Dairy
Rich’s
Whip Topping
8 oz. cont
Regular $z.zç
All American
Black Angus Beef
5houlder
London Broil
$
7
99
lb.
All American Beef
Pepper
5teak
$
7
99
lb.
Stuffed
Chicken
Legs
$
3
29
lb.
READY TO BAKE
Breaded
Chicken
Drumsticks
$
3
79
lb.
Regular $6.çç
Regular $).çç
$
1
99
each
5ave On!
Miller’s 5tring
Cheese
6 oz. pkg.
Regular $z.çç
$
1
99
each
5ave On!
Miller’s
5moked Cheese
¸ oz. pkg.
Regular $z.çç
Regular $z.çç
$
4
99
each
Minced
Dr. Praeger’s
Fish 5ticks
¿z ct.
Regular $6.çç
5ave On!
5amurai’s
Roll
$
9
95
each
Fresh
Whole
Chicken
2 in a pack
$
1
79
lb.
Freshly Ground
Chicken
Breast
$
4
99
lb.
All American
Black Angus
5houlder
Roast
$
7
99
lb.
M
EAT
Fresh
Black Beauty
Eggplants
ó9
¢
lb.
2/$
ó
$
ó
99
$
4
99
4/$
3
lor
5ave On!
Arm & Hamer
Baking 5oda
z6 oz. box
Regular çç¢ ea.
99
¢
each
Assorted
Applesnax
Applesauce
¿ pack
Regular $z.jç
2/$
5
lor
Assorted
Ken’s
Dressings
z6 oz. btl.
Regular $¿.zç ea.
lor
Regular $j.zç ea.
All Purpose
Gold Medal
Flour
¸ lb. bag
2/$
4
2/$
7
lor
Regular ¸.çç ea.
Original Kelogg’s
5pecial K
Cereal
z8 oz. box
3/$
4
lor
5ave On!
Apple & Eve
Apple Juice
j pack, 8.¿¸ oz.
Regular $z.¸ç ea.
5/$
4 lor
In Juice or 5yrup
Dole Crushed
Pineapple
8 oz. can
Regular çç¢ ea.
2/$
5 lor
Gelen
Pizza or
Marinara 5auce
z6 oz. jar
Regular $j.zç
3/$
2 lor
5tems &Pieces
Lieber’s
Mushrooms
¿ oz. can
Regular $z.¿ç
Rapidrise &Active
Fleischmann’s
Dry Yeast
j pack
2/$
3 lor
Regular $z.¿ç ea.
2/$
ó lor
5ave On!
Dr. Praeger’s
Pizza Bagels
zj oz. pkg.
Regular $¿.çç
each
5ave On!
Golden
Potato Pancakes
zo.6 oz. pkg.
2/$
5
Regular $j.zç
$
2
99
each
ç Inch
Oronoque
Deep Dish
Crust
z pack
2/$
7
lor
5ave On!
5hindler’s
Flounder Fillet
z¿ oz. pkg.
Regular $¿.çç
Regular $8.çç
2/$
4 lor
Regular $z.jç ea
Coarse &Fine
Morton’s
5ea 5alt
z).6 oz. cont.
lb.
9
9
¢
Fresh
5nappy
5tring Beans
All American Beef
Boneless
Cholent
Meat
$
5
99
lb.
Assorted
Yo Crunch
Yogurt
6 oz. cont.
Regular $z.oç ea.
2/$
1 lor
Regular $j.¸ç
DAIRY
Regular $j.zç
Local
6 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013
JS-6*
Exploring ‘The Worlds of Sholem Aleichem’
Former Teaneck resident Dr. Jeremy Dauber to speak in Englewood
LARRY YUDELSON
S
holem Aleichem would have
been pleased by Professor Jeremy
Dauber’s work.
And that would have been true
even before Dr. Dauber started work on his
third book, “The Worlds of Sholem Aleichem:
The Remarkable Life and Afterlife of the Man
Who Created Tevye,” which was published
last month.
As professor of Yiddish language, litera-
ture, and culture at Columbia University,
Dauber’s professional work involves taking
Yiddish literature seriously.
And that, as the early pages of Dr. Dauber’s
smart, eminently readable biography makes
clear, meant all the world to the man born as
Sholem Aleichem Rabinovich.
The question of which
language to write in was
not a simple one for
Sholem Aleichem and
his contemporaries.
Yiddish was looked
down upon as a “jar-
gon,” inferior to reined
Hebrew. But for Sholem
Aleichem, the masses of
Jews who spoke, under-
stood, and read Yid-
dish consecrated the
language; why write if
not to be read? As Dr.
Dauber shows, Sholem
Aleichem was no less idealistic than his col-
leagues who wrote in Hebrew; he sought to
enlighten the Jewish world with literature
that rose to the highest standards of truth and
beauty, the equivalent of Chekhov and Gogol,
“able to do all the things a truly engaged and
high-flying modern literature can do. That
was a breakthrough.”
He even wrote a 50 page book condemn-
ing the most popular writer of Yiddish
books, Nokhem Mayer Shaykevitch, who
churned out dozens of potboiler romances
each year under the pen name “Shomer” —
books Sholem Aleichem indicted for failing to
reflect Jewish life
The plot of Sholem Aleichem’s own life
wouldn’t have measured up to his own stan-
dards of literary realism: romantic young love
that overcomes obstacles, sudden wealth,
inancial ruin, literary fame, and one of New
York City’s largest funeral processions at his
death in 1914, and his characters adapted into
a musical performed around the world.
Dr. Dauber discovered that Sholem
Aleichem Aleichem’s life was as interesting
as his stories when he irst taught the writer’s
works at Columbia; writing the biography
was “a great way to tell both the story of a
remarkable life, a world that he
presented and encompassed,
and the story of a how a certain
kind of great Jewish literature
worked, all in one package.”
“The Worlds of Sholem
Aleichem” has the smooth
writing we have come to
expect from the NextBook
Jewish Encounters book series,
but it is weightier than most in
heft and in scholarship. Dr.
Dauber found, to his surprise,
that he is the irst to chronicle
Sholem Aleichem’s life.
Dr. Dauber, 40, grew up in Teaneck; his
parents now live in Englewood and he lives
in Manhattan, near Columbia. He graduated
from the Frisch School in Paramus and went
to Harvard for his undergraduate degree. He
irst read Sholem Aleichem when he was a
summer intern at the National Yiddish Book
Center; he read more once he was back in col-
lege, where he studied under Dr. Ruth Wisse,
who had just begun teaching at Harvard.
Dr. Dauber said he has read most of Sholem
Aleichem’s writings. “He was tremendously
proliic, both because he needed to make a
living, and also because he loved to write,” he
said. “His collected works runs to about 20
volumes, and that doesn’t cover all the mate-
rial he wrote. It doesn’t include the myriads
of letters he wrote to friends and others.
“He took on a whole bunch of different
genres that were popular at the time. He was
well-read in contemporary Russian and Euro-
pean literature. He would play with these
genres, whether stories told from the per-
spective of local travelers, literary sketches,
a poem in prose, an exchange of letters — he
would take all of these genres and make them
about his chosen theme, which was the Jew-
ish community he loved and which was in
transition.”
Dr. Dauber said he enjoyed discovering
Sholem Aleichem’s “the human dimen-
sions — both the positive — I love the way he
was absolutely devoted to his family — and
the negative — he was sometimes overbear-
ing and patriarchal and would have mood
swings.
“He was a human being.”
One of the things that surprised Dr. Dauber
was “how much of his writing had to do with
the ebbs and glows of capitalism. He’s a great
writer about the economy; about business.”
Looking toward his next project, Dr.
Dauber is interested in whether there is “a
unique Jewish horror.”
He said that “a good number of Sholem
Aleichem’s stories have horriic elements
to them. They have the trappings of folk
fantasy, a folktale that he gives a horriic or
nervous twist. In the story translated as ‘The
Enchanted Tailor,’ on the one hand it’s clear
that everything that happens in the story has
a rational explanation. But the story itself has
a haunted feeling to it, that grows and grows.
“At the end, you’re not sure whether it’s
wholly grounded in this world at all. There’s
an atmosphere that floats over it. He’s good
at that effect.”
On Saturday night, Dr. Dauber will speak
in Englewood. He will screen the 1939 Yid-
dish ilm Tevye, adapting the same stories
that became the basis for “Fiddler on the
Roof.” (Here’s a fun factoid from the biogra-
phy: There actually was a Tevye, who was
the milkman in the village where Sholem
Aleichem took his family to live every sum-
mer; they’d rent a different unfurnished
house each time, and schlep their own fur-
niture to ill it.)
Tevye has shaped the perception of
Sholem Aleichem’s legacy.
“When he died, it’s probable that his
reputation in the non-Jewish world would
have rested on his stories about children,”
Dr. Dauber said. “That’s what was beginning
to be the most popular side of him. Later,
the combination of Fiddler the vicissitudes
of 20th century Jewish history made Fiddler
such a strong representative of his work.
“The themes of modernity and tradition,
of generational change, were important to
Sholem Aleichem as well. It’s also the case
that because of the Holocaust, the world
understood that there was a world — of Yid-
dish speaking Jewry — that was no more.
“Fiddler was very much evoking that
world.
“Sholem Aleichem understood that Tevye
A night at the movies
What: Dr. Jeremy Dauber will talk, sign books, and present the 1939 Yiddish
movie “Tevye” (with English subtitles)
When: Saturday night, November 9, 8 p.m.
Where: Congregation Ahavat Torah, 250 Broad St., Englewood
Professor Jeremy Dauber
Maurice Schwartz played the title character in the 1939 Yiddish film “Tevye,”
which will be screened Saturday night in Englewood.
SEE SHOLEM ALEICHEM PAGE 33
Local
JS-7*
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013 7
ALL ABOARD!
TEANECK EXPRESS
MONEY MARKET
$100,000 OR MORE : 1.00 %
$75,000.00-$99,999.99 : .80 %
$50,000.00-$74,999.99 : .70 %
$25,000.00-$49,999.99 : .60 %
$10,000.00-$24,999.99 : .50 %
1008 Teaneck Road, Teaneck, NJ 07666
(201) 530-0700 www.firstcommercebk.com
Minimum balance to open is $50.00. Rate is effective as of 10/23/2013. Tiered interest
rates based on account balance. Minimum balance to receive stated interest rate is
$10,000.00. If unable to maintain a daily balance of $10,000.00, a $10.00 monthly fee
will be imposed. This money market account is limited to a combination of no more than
six preauthorized withdrawals, POS purchases or transfers via telephone and internet per
statement cycle. Account holder will be charged $5.00 for all withdrawals over the allowed
six transactions. Interest rate and terms are subject to change without prior notice.
GREAT SERVICE  GREAT RATES  GREAT PEOPLE
www.jstandard.com
AMC series as morality play
Emanuel panel
to discuss ‘Walking
Dead’ issues
JOANNE PALMER
“The Walking Dead,” for those of you who
haven’t heard of it, is a popular AMC show,
based on a comic book series, that shows
the adventures of a group of human beings
as they try to survive a post-apocalyptic
world filled with flesh-eating zombies.
Whether or not that appeals to you as a
premise that will lure you to sitting slack-
jawed in front of your television set (or your
computer, or your iPad, or your tiny little
cellphone), clearly the characters’ situation
would lead them to have to make a number
of moral decisions. Our world is rarely as
stark as theirs, so our choices rarely are as
black and white.
That is a great opportunity for a rabbi,
so Joseph Prouser of Temple Emanuel in
Franklin Lakes — whose children watch the
show, and have lured him into its orbit, as
well — decided to take it.
On November 10, a panel will meet at the
shul to consider “‘The Walking Dead’ and
Moral Absolutes.”
“I would say that there are moral
dilemmas in every episode of the show,”
Rabbi Prouser said. “It is a very violent
show — it is about a zombie apocalypse
— but every episode examines what the
core group of characters is willing to do
to survive and to protect each other, and
how they relate to each other. The ques-
tion is how we retain our humanity and
our moral compass when we are in the
most extreme possible positions, and
our inner morality is challenged.
“This has implications for all of us; it cer-
tainly has Jewish implications, and moral
implications for Jewish history.”
To make the discussion more complex,
Rabbi Prouser invited a broad range of
speakers to look at moral issues from many
angles. The speakers are Archpriest Eric
Tosi, who is both secretary of the Orthodox
Church in America (Russian Orthodox, that
is), and a former U.S. Army captain and
tank platoon commander; Dr. Alyssa Gray,
who was just named to a chair in rabbinics
at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of
Religion; and two lawyers, Moshe Horn, a
former Manhattan assistant district attor-
ney who specializes in criminal ethics, and
Richard Altabef, who advises CBS News,
“60 Minutes,” and Univision News.
“There certainly will be a Jewish per-
spective, but the program is not exclusively
Jewish,” Rabbi Prouser said. “Father Tosi, I
imagine, will imagine it from a theological
perspective. Dr. Gray will give the rabbinic
perspective, and draw from Jewish history,
and extreme situations in which Jews have
found themselves. Moshe Horn and Rich-
ard Altabef will bring the legal perspective
— was this action defensive or criminal? As
a lawyer, how would you defend it?”
“We are fascinated by zombies,” Dr.
Gray said. “They are beings that clearly
once were human — but are they still
human? What is the difference between
them and us?
According to legend, “They’re not like
vampires; they were people just like you
and me; they died and were reanimated,”
she said.
But are they still human? “If I pick up a
gun and shoot a zombie, have I committed
murder?” she asked.
“There are some ideas in rabbinic and
medieval Judaism about what makes a
human being,” she continued. “One way of
referring to a human being is as a medaber
— a being that can speak.” It’s the ability to
communicate, not necessarily through
speech but in some way, that makes us
human, in the view, she said, of Onkelos
and Rashi, among other commentators.
“But zombies have lost that ability.
“It is the presence of an intellect, a soul,
that makes a difference. A zombie is essen-
tially a walking robot with very, very bad
programming.
“The panel will be a lot of fun,” Dr.
Gray concluded.
Who: Rabbi Joseph Prouser, Archpriest Eric Tosi, Dr. Alyssa Gray, Moshe Horn,
and Richard Altabef.
What: A panel discussion, “The Walking Dead” and Moral Absolutes.
Where: Temple Emanuel of North Jersey, 558 High Mountain Road, Franklin Lakes
When: Sunday, November 10, at 7 p.m.
Why: To discuss the real-world moral dilemmas that the TV show highlights,
albeit unrealistically.
How: For more information and reservations — which are suggested — call
201-560-0200 or email office@tenjfl.org.
Caveat: The evening will include often-gory excerpts from the show; parents
are warned.
Moral issues aside, violence and
gore also characterize “Walking
Dead,” as this still makes clear.
Local
8 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013
JS-8*
ADL hosts key Iran players
at centennial meeting
Bergen County’s Abe Foxman leads discussion on foreign policy, anti-Semitism
JOSH LIPOWSKY
NEW YORK — The United States is test-
ing Iran’s diplomatic intentions, but
remains “clear-eyed” on Iran’s role as a
state-sponsor of terror and exporter of
extremism, U.S. Secretary of Defense
Chuck Hagel said.
“But foreign policy is not a zero-sum
game,” he said. “If we can find ways to
resolve disputes peacefully, we are wise
to explore them.”
Secretary Hagel’s comments on Iranian
nuclear negotiations came last week at
the Anti-Defamation League’s centennial
meeting in Manhattan, which attracted
some 600 people. It also attracted Amer-
ican policy heavyweights as speakers,
including Mr. Hagel, U.N. Ambassador
Samantha Power, and former Defense
Secretary Leon Panetta. Discussion cen-
tered on Iran and the Israeli-Palestinian
peace process.
Mr. Hagel used the opportunity to
announce that the United States is pro-
viding Israel with six new V-22 Osprey air-
craft in an “historic agreement” that will
enhance the range of Israel’s military.
“The Israeli and American defense
relationship is stronger than ever, and
it will continue to strengthen,” he said,
noting that he ordered the shipment be
expedited.
Mr. Hagel went on to introduce his pre-
decessor, Mr. Panetta, who received the
ADL’s William & Naomi Gorowitz Service
Award. Mr. Panetta, also a former CIA
director, called for negotiations to deter-
mine Iran’s seriousness, while maintain-
ing “healthy skepticism.” The Iranians are
unlikely to give up on uranium enrich-
ment so the United States must be ready
to use military force to ensure Iran does
not develop nuclear weapons, he said.
Mr. Panetta urged caution not only
toward Iran, but also toward such rising
powers as China; he also warned about
the possible re-emergence of Russia. He
also predicted that cyber warfare could
be the “Pearl Harbor of the future.”
“This is a time when we must maintain
our military strength and our role in the
world as a world leader,” he said. “We
cannot retreat from the responsibilities
the United States has in the world today.”
Political gridlock in Washington, how-
ever, is the biggest threat to U.S. security
today, Mr. Panetta added. Government
shutdowns send messages of weakness
to the rest of the world, creating “self-
inflicted wounds” that can be avoided.
“Our leaders have to be willing to take
risks,” he said. “The real strength of Amer-
ica lies in the American people; it lies in
those men and women in uniform who
are willing to put their lives on the line in
order to protect us.”
Ms. Power, speaking earlier in the day,
praised the ADL’s mission, calling National
Director Abe Foxman, who lives in Bergen
County, “a fearless advocate of fairness
and an outspoken defender of truth — and
by outspoken, I mean breaking-the-sound-
barrier outspoken.
“When most leaders speak, people lis-
ten. When Abe Foxman speaks — what
other choice do we have?”
Turning to the crisis in Syria, Ms. Power
said that the United
States seeks an end to
the killings and a new
Syria that is represen-
tative of all religions,
opinions, and political
affiliations.
She emphasi zed
that President Obama
is determined to pre-
vent Iran from acquir-
ing a nuclear weapon.
She credited the inter-
national support the
president has garnered
for multilateral sanc-
tions on Iran for pres-
suring Iran to change
its tactics about nuclear
negotiations.
The level of mistrust between America
and Iran is deep, she said, and she under-
stands skepticism of diplomatic efforts.
America is not “engaging Iran for the sake
of engaging Iran,” she said, and “no deal is
better than a bad deal.”
“By engaging, by probing, by negotiat-
ing, we are striving to secure an unam-
biguous and verifiable guarantee that
Iran’s nuclear program is a peaceful one
and that its government will not build or
acquire a nuclear weapon,” Ms. Power
said. “We must get this done and, if we
do, the world will be safer and prospects
for stability throughout the region will
improve.”
The ADL released its latest poll on
anti-Semitic attitudes in America, which
showed that 12 percent of Americans har-
bor anti-Semitic feelings. That is down 3
percent from the 2011 poll. The poll mea-
sured Americans’ agreement with vari-
ous statements of anti-Semitic rhetoric,
from Jewish responsibility for the death
of Jesus to how much control Jews have of
the media. When the ADL began its poll
in 1964, it found that 29
percent of Americans
held anti-Semitic views.
“It is heartening that
attitudes toward Jews
have improved over
the last few years,”
Mr. Foxman said. “The
poll shows that while
we have made great
progress in promoting
understanding in American society, the
most enduring anti-Semitic canards con-
tinue to hold sway among some segments
of the American public.”
Modern anti-Semitism has transformed
from Nazis and Skinheads to the demoni-
zation of Israel, said Ira Forman, the
U.S. State Department’s special envoy
tasked with monitoring and combating
anti-Semitism, during a session on global
anti-Semitism. The U.S. government does
not believe Israel is above criticism, and
it should be treated like any other state,
Mr. Forman said.
“When that criticism goes to the three
Ds: delegitimization, demonization or
double standards on Israel — that’s when
that criticism crosses the line from a U.S.
government perspective,” he added.
The U.S. Jewish community has to
mobilize against anti-Semitism as it did
for Soviet Jewry in the 1980s, Mr. Forman
said, but this fight doesn’t have visible,
concrete results, as that one did.
The U.S. government has to be involved
as well, he said; that is why the posi-
tion he now holds was created in 2004.
Finally, he urged the Jewish community
to be open to allies in the Christian and
Muslim communities.
“These voices are important allies we
will need to mobilize if we’re going to fight
anti-Semitism,” Mr. Forman said.
Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel, the ADL’s Abe Foxman,
and former Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta all spoke at the
ADL’s centennial. ADL/DAVID KARP
Samantha Power is the United
States’ ambassador to the
United Nations. ADL/DAVID KARP
Anti-Semitism: Behind the numbers
The Anti-Defamation League survey of the American people found that 12 percent
of Americans harbor deeply entrenched anti-Semitic attitudes. Specifically:
14% — agreed with the statement “Jews have too much power in the U.S. today.”
15% — believe Jews are “more willing to use shady practices.”
17% — say Jews have too much control on Wall Street.
18% — say Jews have too much influence over American news media.
19% — believe Jews have too much power in the business world.
24% — agreed the movie and television industries are run by Jews.
26% — believe “Jews were responsible for the death of Christ.”
30% — continue to say American Jews are “more loyal to Israel” than to their
own country.
Overall, the poll found a 3 percent decline in anti-Semitic attitudes since the ADL’s
last survey in 2011. SOURCE: ANTI-DEFAMATION LEAGUE
Local
JS-9*
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013 9
446 Cedar Lane · Teaneck, NJ · 201-692-0192 · Fax 201-692-3656
www.maadan.com
RCBC
Ma’adan is owner operated
serving the community for 30 years.
All cooking is done on premises
with no preservatives.
1 BBQ Chicken
+ 1 Side Dish
Only $10.99
1 Southern Fried Chicken
+ 1 Side Dish
Only $13.99
2 Southern Fried Chickens
+ 1 lb. Each Side Dish & Salad
or 1 Qt. Soup
Only $25.99
2 BBQ Chickens
+ 1 lb. Each Side Dish + Salad
or 1 Qt. Soup
Only $19.95
1 Southern Fried Chicken
+ 1 BBQ Chicken + 2 Side Dishes
or 1 Qt. Soup
Only $24.99
CHICKEN SPECIALS
COUPON
THURSDAY & FRIDAY SPECIALS
Visit our new
GRAB & GO CASE
for all our homemade
Kugels, Salads, Herrings & Dressings
In Our Freezer
Healthy Low-Carb Meals
Beef, Chicken, Fish all with 2 sides
$5.99 -$8.99
Ma’adan’s Famous
Meat Chulent Reg. $6.99 lb. ... Sale $3.99 lb.
Potato Kugel Reg. $5.99 lb. .... Sale $3.99 lb.
Deli Roll Reg. $17.99 lb. ......... Sale $11.99 lb.
Valid through 12/31/13
Can a Jewish educational
standby become
new and improved?
LARRY YUDELSON
I
t’s time to think about changing syna-
gogue religious schools.
That’s the message being sent by
the leaders of the Synagogue Life Ini-
tiative of the Jewish Federation of Northern
New Jersey, which next week will hold an
evening meeting exploring innovative mod-
els of Jewish religious school education.
“Religious schools are using a model that
was created 60 years ago,” said Lisa Harris
Ms. Glass, the federation’s managing direc-
tor for community planning and impact
and SLI’s longtime head. “Think of all the
innovations in education in all schools
since then, in integration of technology, in
a greater understanding of how kids learn.”
And think of the changes in society. Ms.
Glass likes to cite the change in television
programming — “I could tell you what show
I like to watch but I can’t tell you when it
airs,” thanks to her digital video recorder.”
Synagogue schools, she said, have to
address the underlying “in-demand and
on-demand” modes of today’s world,
where for everything “there’s an expecta-
tion that you can get it in a framework that
works for you.” The schools must “figure
out how we can deliver what we deliver in
multiple ways.”
“It’s about making sure that synagogue-
based religious schools continue to be
relevant,” added Stephanie Hauser, SLI’s
change specialist. “There’s competition
now from different sources. It’s not just
synagogue-based religious school versus
day school; it’s religious school versus pri-
vate tutor or bar mitzvah-on-the-fly.”
Over this year, SLI will work with seven
congregations to help them innovate with
their religious schools, offering five ses-
sions of training and discussion to which
each congregation will bring a rabbi, an
educational director, a teacher, and board
members.
Thursday’s meeting is part of this pro-
gram (called ATID — Hebrew for future,
and the acronym for Addressing Trans-
formative Innovative Design in Jewish
Education ), but it is open to the broader
community of synagogue leaders and to
anyone interested in religious schools.
Attendees will hear from representa-
tives of religious schools that have tried
unconventional approaches.
One such school is that of Barnert Tem-
ple in Franklin Lakes, where Sara Losch,
director of lifelong learning, is working
to integrate technology into the religious
school.
Ms. Losch said that her synagogue is
considering a major change in its educa-
tional programming. “We’re in the mid-
dle of talking about some very interesting
models,” she said. She expects details to
be finalized and announced early next
year.
“Whatever we offer has to be at a very
high level,” she said. “It has to be acces-
sible. It has to be engaging.
“We know that there are more exciting
but also efficient ways of working. How do
we engage them while giving them high
content material, and how do we put that
together in a way that allows choice?”
Meanwhile, she has been integrating
technology into existing programs.
Recently she took the sixth graders to the
Lower East Side Tenement Museum. Rather
than culminating a unit of study — a tradi-
tional field trip model — “we did not learn
anything about it before we went. The idea
was that the experience would lead to discus-
sion and learning afterward,” she said.
Afterward, she posted pictures she had
taken online, along with a text about welcom-
ing strangers, and wrote a list of questions. At
home that week, the students responded to the
questions.
She said online discussions get a different
response than classroom conversations.
“When you have an introverted child who
rarely raises her hand in class, that child is
more likely to write something very thoughtful
in a computer community than in a face-to-face
community,” she said.
Information
ATID: Exploring alternatives in Jewish
education. Learn how other synagogues are
changing their religious school models to
accommodate current demands.
When: Thursday, November 14, 6:30 sharp
to 9 p.m. (A light supper will be served dur-
ing the program.)
Where: Jewish Federation of Northern New
Jersey, 50 Eisenhower Drive, Paramus
To register: Contact Nancy Perlman at
nancyp@jfnnj.org or (201) 820-3904
Adults and children learn together at the Family School of Beth Haverim
Shir Shalom.
SEE STANDBY PAGE 35
Local
10 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013
JS-10*
Past, present, and beyond
At Berman talk in Wyckoff, historian explains how our world got this way
JOANNE PALMER
W
hat was that about the end
of history?
Oh, right.
In 1992, political scien-
tist Francis Fukuyama opined that because
human culture had pretty much perfected
itself, nothing much beyond tiny refine-
ment was possible.
A lot has happened since then.
Dr. Stephen M. Berk, the Henry and
Sally Schaffer Professor of Holocaust and
Jewish Studies at Union College in Sche-
nectady, N.Y., is an effortless speaker who
can draw on his wide knowledge of world
history to tie together seemingly uncon-
nected events.
That is a storyteller’s art, and last week
it was on display at Amy Silna Shafron’s
house in Wyckoff in tribute to the first 28
years of the Gerrard Berman Day School
in Oakland, a Solomon Schechter-affiliated
Conservative institution that draws chil-
dren from Bergen, Passaic, Rockland, and
Orange counties.
To celebrate that history, Dr. Berk talked
about some of what had happened in the
world — with a special emphasis on history
likely to be relevant to Jews — to an audi-
ence of the school’s supporters, parents,
and alumni. He is the proud grandfather
of GBDS students, and Ms. Shafron is not
only the school’s development director
but a parent there as well, so the themes
of family and history were woven together,
to create a fabric of community.
Dr. Berk talked “about the demise of the
Soviet Union, which no one had predicted
but really was a consequence both of inter-
nal problems and the spiritual bankruptcy
of Marxism/Leninism,” he reported. “The
consequences of this for the Jewish peo-
ple was that the gates were now open, and
hundreds of thousands of people from the
former Soviet Union would come to Israel.
This would have a tremendously invigorat-
ing effect on the Israeli economy, particu-
larly in science and technology.”
Another fallout was that “millions of
people who had been enslaved by com-
munism would now really be free, so we
would have democratic countries all over
eastern and central Europe. And even
though [President Vladimir] Putin rules
Russia with an iron hand, it’s not the same
as it was under the communists.
“With the destruction of the Soviet
Union, too, the threat of a nuclear confla-
gration is no longer there. There are ten-
sions, but they are not of the same magni-
tude. Russia is much weaker now.”
Another change in the last 28 years has
been “the emergence of a powerful China,”
Dr. Berk continued. “It has come on very
strong economically. That’s the results of
Deng Xiaoping, who led systematic reform
at the end of the ‘70s.
“A third factor was the emergence of a
strong sense of Islamic extremism, which
I attribute to the coming to power [in 1979]
of Ayatollah [Ruhollah] Khomeini, and to
the success of the mujahideen in throw-
ing the Red Army out of Afghanistan. That
emboldened extremists who thought they
could fight the United States and over-
throw Israel.
“There also were positive develop-
ments,” Dr. Berk said. “In 1990, Nel-
son Mandela was released from prison,
and soon he became the democratically
elected president of South Africa. Apart-
heid was thrown into the garbage can of
history.”
Israel continued to develop scientifi-
cally and economically, he continued. “It
became Silicon Valley East. A country of
no more than 8 million people, devoid
of natural resources, has so much brain-
power. It has engineers, physicists, and
mathematicians, many from the former
Soviet Union — although of course native
Israeli talent played an important part as
well.
“Unfortunately, though, Israel is a good
country in a bad neighborhood — and that
neighborhood has gotten worse. Israel
faces a number of threats, including the
existential one from Iran.
“Internally, Israel faces two very dra-
matic problems. One is income inequality”
— many Israelis are not benefiting from the
booming high-tech economy. “The other
is the continuing struggle between more
secular and more religious elements about
what kind of country Israel is going to be.”
Then Dr. Berk shifted gears, returning
to this country. “The most positive devel-
opment since 1985 was the extension of
toleration on the part of large numbers of
Americans toward gays and lesbians, and
minorities in general,” he said. “No matter
Dr. Stephen M. Berk addresses Gerrard Berman Day School parents, alumni, and supporters.
Local
JS-11
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013 11
w World-class Science, Technology, Engineering
& Mathematics (STEM Program)
w Inquiry-based Approach
w Middot/Character Education Program
w Hebrew language and Israel studies program
w Warm, Inclusive Community
w “Busy 3s” through Grade 8
Find Out About Our...
Ideal for young
children ages 2-7
Meet our administrators in your
neighborhood on the following dates:
Parlor
Meetings
FOR PROSPECTIVE PARENTS
FREE! Open to the public!
Exact address will be provided upon RSVP
RSVP: www.ssdsbergen.org/schechter-rocks
Accredited by
Tuesday, November 12, 7-9 pm: Teaneck
Thursday, November 21, 7-9 pm: Englewood
Tuesday, December 10, 7-9 pm: Fort Lee
Hanukkah Concert
Funkey Monkeys!
with the
Sunday, November 17 @ 10 am
275 McKinley Avenue, New Milford, NJ 07646
Solomon Schechter Day School of Bergen County
RSVP: www.ssdsbergen.org/schechter-rocks
what you think of Barack Obama, it was a great thing
to elect an African-American president.
“The negative aspect, though, is the stagnation of
the American middle class. Real income for the mid-
dle class has not increased in a very long time. It’s a
consequence of globalization, the decline of the manu-
facturing sector, and our country’s failure to provide
meaningful education in science and technology,
which would allow the middle class to grow, and peo-
ple to enter it.”
He criticized President Obama “not as much in
terms of domestic policy, but foreign policy. Israelis,
Saudis, Iranians, Turks, Syrians, Egyptians — they just
don’t take him seriously any more,” he said. “He made
a mistake in not intervening in Syria early on, in 2011,
when the rebels were more secular. But to draw red
lines and not to follow up on them, to turn the issue
over to Congress — it makes him look very weak, and
in the Middle East weakness doesn’t go over very well.
“Governments there don’t take an Obama threat
seriously any more, and that can have dangerous
consequences.”
He is worried about Europe, Dr. Berk said. “If this
were 1945, and I were to say that Jews wearing kip-
pot would be attacked in the street, Jewish schools
would be attacked, Jewish boys and girls weren’t
safe, people would say, ‘Oh those Poles! Those Ukrai-
nians!’ But the fact is that these things are happen-
ing in Paris, Brussels, Marseilles, even in London.
Anti-Semitism has become mainstream in some of
these countries, and now they are taking off the
mask of anti-Zionism,” behind which true anti-Sem-
itism lurked. “Anti-Semitism is coming back out of
the woodwork.”
Dr. Berk returned to the GBDS anniversary. “A
28-year slice of history is just a blink of an eye for a his-
torian,” he said. “I am not a navi — I am not a prophet
— but I will say that the next 28 years are sure to bring
very interesting developments.
“And I hope that this very fine school to which my
grandchildren go will continue to provide interesting
and inspiring education, so the Jewish community can
continue to be invigorated.”
Cardiologist Dr. Ed Julie’s children graduated from
GBDS long ago — his wife, Beth Julie, was one of its
first presidents — but he still sits on the board. He was
enthusiastic both about the school and about Dr. Berk.
“The conclusion of his lecture had to do with the
importance of Jewish education in maintaining our
legacy,” Dr. Julie said. “He underscored the impor-
tance of developing future community leaders who
will have an impact on Jewish events, and on the rela-
tionships between different communities.”
The negative
aspect, though, is
the stagnation of
the American
middle class. Real
income for the
middle class has
not increased in a
very long time.
DR. STEPHEN M. BERK
Local
12 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013
JS-12*
ABIGAIL KLEIN LEICHMAN
L
ast March in Israel, 3-year-old Adelle
Biton was critically injured in a car acci-
dent caused by Arab teenagers as they
threw large rocks onto a roadway near
the city of Ariel.
Adelle was hospitalized for four months, and she
remains at Beit Levenstein Rehabilitation Center in
Ra’anana with severe brain injuries.
The story may have faded from the headlines,
but dozens of volunteers in Ra’anana — including
Teaneck natives Estie Feldman Agus and Shoshana
Twersky Baker — make the Biton family part of
their daily lives through the local OneFamily Fund
terror victims support center.
“Our goal is to get them to accept a little help
so they can have some semblance of a nor-
mal life,” said Ms. Agus, who moved to Israel
from Tenafly with her husband and children
in 2004. Her mother, Rella Feldman, still lives
in Teaneck, where OneFamily’s U.S. office is
headquartered.
Last spring, Ms. Agus accompanied a volunteer
to Schneider Children’s Medical Center, where
Adva Biton — a college lecturer in statistics, chem-
istry, and math — spends all day with Adelle after
taking her three other young daughters to school.
Her husband, Rafi, takes over the bedside vigil
every night.
“I was so taken with Adva and the story of the
tragedy that I started visiting a couple of times a
week when they moved her to Beit Levenstein,”
Ms. Agus said, speaking with the Jewish Standard
by phone as she drove over to the rehab hospital
with the lunch she’d just prepared.
Others in Ra’anana also went into action. Mem-
bers of the national religious Zionist youth move-
ment Bnei Akiva sit at Adelle’s bedside on Friday
nights, freeing Adva and Rafi to have Shabbat din-
ner at home. Another local resident comes to the
hospital to give Adva manicures. OneFamily pro-
vides the family with such services as psychologi-
cal counseling and art therapy.
When Ms. Agus was heading to New Jersey for
the summer, she asked her friend Shoshana Baker
to fill in for her.
“She introduced me to Adva, and from the first
time we met there was an inexplicable chemistry,”
said Ms. Baker, who is 42 years old, the daughter
of Nahum and Sivie Twersky of Teaneck, and the
mother of four children, who range in age from
8 to 14. “Adva is an amazing, personable, lovely
woman. I realized the food was secondary to the
idea of somebody letting her know she wasn’t
alone, and that it gave her the strength to face
every day.”
Ms. Baker worked with OneFamily and local
synagogues to put together a rotation of 40
women willing to bring meals to Adva at Beit
Levenstein, and she continues to visit once or
twice a week. She arranged for the municipality
Shoshana Baker, standing with Adva Biton, shows off
her Amsterdam marathon shirt.
Veterans Day marks family’s deliverance day
JONATHAN LAZARUS
V
eterans Day holds special signifi-
cance for Edith Samuel Maclin,
82, of Paramus.
That’s been true of every Veter-
ans Day since 1938.
On November 11 that year, Maclin, her par-
ents and siblings entered New York Harbor
aboard the SS Washington. They had fled
Germany just before the chilling events of
Kristallnacht.
The family — mother, father, four sisters
and a brother — found them themselves in
a modest apartment in Washington Heights,
embarking on a challenging life in a new
country they soon learned to love. Today,
much of that original family is gone, but Ms.
Maclin now has three children, 10 grandchil-
dren — eight of whom live in Israel — and two
great-grandchildren.
Although she was 7 in 1938 and Veterans
Day was called Armistice Day, the importance
of the moment was not lost on her, either
then or now.
“It is always very much on my mind and
very meaningful for me,” she said. “I’m a
staunch American.”
Ms. Maclin used to mount the Stars and
Stripes in a special display. But now she must
content herself with two modest flags, one
embedded in a plant and the other in the
storm door. To her, overt patriotic expres-
sions are relevant and meaningful.
“We got our citizenship as soon as pos-
sible,” she said, indicating that was a direct
reflection of her family’s priorities.
Ms. Maclin’s brother, who died in 1985,
served in the Army during World War II. She
met her husband, Ernest, when both were
engineering students at City College. He took
leave while he was stationed in the Air Force
in Japan to come home and propose to her.
She followed him back.
Ernest Maclin died in 2006, just after
the couple celebrated their 50th anniver-
sary. “He was the love of my life and the
loss of my life,” Edith Maclin said.
The Maclins had three children, Alan
Maclin, 55, of Chicago, a lawyer and consul-
tant who divides his time between the United
States and Israel where his wife, Lisa, lives;
Deborah Maclin, 52, of Massachusetts; and
Julie Nuciforo, 49, who lives in Park Ridge
with her husband, James, and their children.
Ms. Maclin’s father died in 1962, always
expressing gratitude to his adopted coun-
try, even though his years here were dif-
ficult as he worked as a dishwasher at a
Manhattan restaurant. Her mother, Gabri-
ele, who cleaned homes to supplement the
family income, died in 1995, and a sister
died in 2001.
Two sisters remain from the family whose
Edith Samuel Maclin looks at the article she wrote for the Jewish Standard in
1988.
Running for Adelle
Former Teaneck residents provide support to critically injured toddler’s family
Local
JS-13*
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013 13
YC ’14 | Software Engineering Intern, Google Jordan
SCW ’09 | Associate Engineer, Con Edison Julie
November 10, 2013
OPEN HOUSE
FOR WOMEN
November 17, 2013
OPEN HOUSE
FOR MEN
The only thing more remarkable than what our students accomplish in the classroom is what they
achieve in their professional lives. They gain valuable experience through internships at prestigious
top-tier institutions and continue on remarkable journeys that take them to the highest levels of every
professional field. 95% of our latest graduates are professionally employed, in graduate school, or
both, and tens of thousands of our alumni are succeeding worldwide. Call our Office of Admissions
at 212.960.5277 to schedule a preliminary consultation.
*Source: Yeshiva University Career Center survey
500 West 185th Street | New York, NY 10033 | 212.960.5277 | yuadmit@yu.edu
At Yeshiva University, a remarkable career
begins with a remarkable education.
Visit www.yu.edu/NJstandard
for more information and to register.
flight from the Nazis Maclin poignantly described in an
article for the Jewish Standard on November 11, 1988.
She is proud of the years she spent raising her children,
and of her second career as a math teacher.
Ms. Maclin is a member of the Jewish Community Cen-
ter of Paramus/Congregation Beth Tikvah. The irony in the
closeness of Veterans Day and the anniversary of Kristall-
nacht has never been lost on her.
The Samuel family in New York; Edith is at the
far right.
to provide full summer camp scholarships to the
other Biton daughters. “The communal support
has been phenomenal,” she said.
On October 20, Ms. Baker ran for Team OneFamily
at the 38th Amsterdam TCS Marathon, raising funds
and awareness for the Bitons. She had participated
in the New York Marathon two years ago to help the
EyeCan Childhood Eye Cancer Foundation in Israel
buy early-detection equipment for Hadassah Medi-
cal Center.
“Sporting events have become a springboard for
raising money,” Ms. Baker said. “The emotional
component of running for a greater cause is very
meaningful.”
Team OneFamily was formed in response to that
trend. This multi-sports training and fundraising
platform facilitates participation in endurance events
to benefit the organization’s programs for Israeli ter-
ror victims.
Ms. Baker had not yet met the Bitons when her
husband, Mark, surprised her with a ticket to Amster-
dam. As soon as she became aware of the situation,
she decided to use the event to aid the family.
“The Bitons’ lives have been turned upside down,”
she said. “They get financial support from the gov-
ernment, but so many things need to be done.
“For instance, their house must be remodeled
so that when Adelle comes home for Shabbat —
and, please God, permanently — she can manage
in a wheelchair. Private funding would take that to
another level.”
Ms. Baker also wants to be able to hire a private-
duty nurse to take some of the pressure off Adva and
Rafi Biton.
“She and her husband have never left Adelle’s
side since March,” she said. “The only way they may
hand over the mantle is if they could have a paid pri-
vate nurse, because Adelle needs 24-hour care and
somebody has to be supervising it.
“We need to reach deep into our pockets to help them
do this.”
At the marathon, Baker wore a shirt whose front was
emblazoned with Adelle’s photograph and the OneFam-
ily logo. On the back, it included an Israeli flag and the
words “Am Yisrael Chai” — “The nation of Israel lives.”
“The race was amazing, but the physical success was
secondary to the emotional empowerment I received from
it,” she said. “At least 10 Israeli runners tapped me on the
shoulder during the race to run with me and to say that
I’d given them the strength to keep going. They wanted to
know more about Adelle, so we talked as we ran.”
When she returned to Israel, she gave the shirt to Adva.
“She also enjoys running, and I told her we’re going to run
together someday.”
To contribute, go to www.onefamilytogether.org and
click first on the “Donate Now” tab and then on the appro-
priate country flag. Note that the donation is for the ben-
efit of Adelle Biton.

14 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013
JS-14*
Local
14 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013
Mitzvah Day 2013
What made this past Sunday’s Jewish Fed-
eration of Northern New Jersey Mitzvah
Day special was the way in which volun-
teers reached into every part of the com-
munity, from the Great Falls in Paterson to
the Hoboken Emergency Food Pantry, and
at 42 other sites in between.
Volunteers removed trash from Van Saun
Mill Brook. Community Blood Services
set up in four locations and donors gave
134 units of blood. The littlest volunteers
decorated flower pots and planted seedlings
for residents of the Jewish Home at
Rockleigh. The Gerrard Berman Day School
choir performed for residents of Federation
apartments, and dozens of Bonim builders
put a fresh coat of paint on the walls
at Family Promise of Bergen County in
Ridgewood. This is just a sampling of what
went on at the many different sites. More
than 1,200 volunteers, in total, took part.
PHOTOS COURTESY JFNNJ
n 1 Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park
n 2 County of Bergen Housing, Health, and
Human Services Center, Hackensack.
n 3 Tenafly Nature Center
n 4 Hoboken Emergency Food Pantry
n 5 Federation Apartments, Paterson
n 6 Bergen County YJCC, Washington Township
n 7 Family Promise of Bergen County, Ridgewood
n 8 JCCP/Cong Beth Tikvah, Paramus
n 9 Van Saun Mill Brook, Paramus
n 10 Center for United Methodist Aid to
the Community (CUMAC), Paterson
1
2 3 4
5 6 7
8
9 10
Local
JS-15*
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013 15
The Charles Bronfman Prize celebrates the vision and
endeavor of an individual or team under fifty years of age
whose humanitarian work, combined with their Jewish values,
has significantly improved the world. Its goal is to recognize
dynamic humanitarians whose innovation, leadership, and
impact provide inspiration for the next generations.
An internationally recognized panel of judges selects the Prize
recipient(s) and bestows an award of $100,000. For information
about the nomination process, including guidelines and forms,
please visit www.TheCharlesBronfmanPrize.com
The call for nominations from around the world is open
November 1, 2013 to January 15, 2014.
CELEBRATING A DECADE OF JEWISH VALUES MAKING A GLOBAL IMPACT
Factory Outlet Store
501 Broad Avenue
Ridgefield, NJ 07657
201-943-7500/9470
Sale Store Hours
Daily 10 am – 6 pm
Thursday 10 am-8 pm
Closed Sunday
Present this ad to Elaine and receive a surprise discount!!!!
“Final Clearance”
ENTIRE INVENTORY
MUST GO!!
DRASTICALLY REDUCED PRICES
TO CLEAR OUT INVENTORY
Starting Friday, Nov. 8 thru Monday, Nov. 18
Like us on Facebook.
facebook.com/jewishstandard
From
Englewood
to the stars
Amateur astronomer
offers visitors a
crystal-clear look
at Israel’s skies
ABIGAIL KLEIN LEICHMAN
O
n a moonless night in the
Negev desert town of Mitz-
peh Ramon, Ira “Star Man”
Machefsky drives visitors to
a desolate plateau where he has set up a
telescope and chairs.
Good pairs of binoculars rest on the
chairs. A cooler holds hot-water bottles
to take the chill out of the two-hour
nighttime stargazing tour.
Until he moved to Israel during Chanu-
kah 2009, this lifelong amateur astron-
omer had been living a very different
life. In 1998, Mr. Machefsky, his wife,
and their daughter had moved to Engle-
wood from Palo Alto, Calif., so he could
join a venture capital irm in Manhattan.
He had been raised in Memphis, Tenn.,
and graduated from the University of
Chicago.
“We kids would go out and play and
spend time in the evening looking at the
sky,” said Mr. Machefsky, who is now
66 years old. “One night I saw a shoot-
ing star crossing the sky, very bright and
yellow. It was like seeing a woman and
falling in love at irst sight. I was totally
obsessed.”
While he was in high school, he built
his own telescope. “These days, it’s
easier to buy one than to build one,” he
said, although the telescope he uses for
his sky tours was imported into Israel
with no small amount of bureaucratic
hassle and expense.
“Welcome to tonight’s Dark Skies of
Mitzpeh Ramon,” Mr. Machefsky begins,
shooting a green laser light into the
horizon.
It’s the same Milky Way, whether you
observe it from Englewood or from
Israel. But the lack of light or air pollu-
tion, plus the nearly 3,000-foot altitude,
make for a crystal-clear view of the ion-
ized hydrogen and interstellar dust that
make up our home galaxy, its billions of
stars formed from the fusion of hydro-
gen into helium.
“That’s a thermonuclear reaction;
that’s what makes hydrogen bombs go
off,” Mr. Machefsky said. “So stars are
basically huge thermonuclear weap-
ons that God put in the sky, going off
continuously.”
Mr. Machefsky explained that the
names of the constellations come from
Greek mytholoy by way of the Romans,
handed down through the Arabs and
then back to the Roman West during the
Renaissance.
“That’s why we see mostly Greek
mythological igures with Latin names,
such as Cygnus the swan,” Mr. Machef-
sky said. “Then the Arabs renamed most
of the stars,” he added, pointing out
Deneb, the Arabic word for tail (“zanav”
in Hebrew). Renaissance astronomers
named stars using the Greek alphabet
and the genitive case of the Latin name,
yielding stars such as Alpha Cygni.
A close-up look through the telescope
provides a spectacular shot of Jupiter
and its four moons. Mr. Machefsky calls
the view from this plateau “nature’s own
planetarium.”
Ira and Pamela Machefsky probably
would not have claimed this piece of
heaven if not for their only child, Chavie,
now 28. Chavie Machefsky Fuchs gradu-
ated from Ma’ayanot Yeshiva High School
for Girls in Teaneck, came to Israel for
her gap year, and stayed. She married
Donny Fuchs and moved to Mitzpeh
Ramon, which would be like any other
dusty Negev locale if not for its geologi-
cal jewel: the world’s largest natural
crater. Because of the Machtesh Ramon
crater and the wildlife that inhabit it, a
booming tourism industry flourishes in
Mitzpeh Ramon, an hour’s drive south
of Beersheva.
“Chavie and Donny are here for ideo-
logical reasons, to populate the desert
in the tradition of Ben-Gurion, and they
love the severe beauty of the landscape
and the wildlife,” Mr. Machefsky said.
He and Pamela decided to retire to
Mitzpeh Ramon, population 5,000,
where they can watch their three grand-
children feeding wild ibex in the yard.
Few American immigrants choose to set-
tle in the Negev, but he seems to thrive
on the Israeli frontier.
Ira Machefsky at his telescope.
COURTESY IRA MACHEFSKY
SEE STARS PAGE 33
Local
JS-16*
JFSNJ
community
program focuses
on Asperger’s
Jewish Family Service of North Jer-
sey presents a discussion with ther-
apist Steven Paglierani, who treats
children and adults with Asperger’s
Syndrome. Paglierani himself has
Asperger’s.
The parenting program will be on
Tuesday, November 19, at 7 p.m., at
the Fair Lawn Jewish Center/Congre-
gation B’nai Israel. There also will be
a question and answer session. For
information, call (973) 595-0111 or go
to www.jfsnorthjersey.org
Aliyah seminar
for medical
professionals
and students
Nefesh B’Nefesh holds an aliyah sem-
inar for medical professionals and
students in the Convene Conference
Center, 730 Third Ave., between 45th
and 46th streets, on Sunday, Novem-
ber 17, at 12:30 p.m. The seminar is
for doctors, dentists, nurses, psychol-
ogists, occupational, physical and
speech therapists, dental hygienists,
and dietitians. The head of the licens-
ing department of Israel’s Ministry
of Health will be on hand to discuss
licensing and certification.
Call (866) 4-ALIYAH or go to www.
nbn.org.il/mdseminar.
Rabbi Sacks appointed to posts
at Yeshiva, New York University
Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks of the United Kingdom has been
appointed to a dual professorship at New York University
and Yeshiva University. A world-renowned scholar, philoso-
pher, religious leader, author, and moral voice, Rabbi Sacks
was chief rabbi of the United Hebrew Congregations of the
Commonwealth from September 1991 until September 2013.
He was the sixth person to hold the position since it was for-
malized in 1845. During his tenure, Anglo-Jewry was reinvigo-
rated through a series of communal projects in the fields of
education, cultural creativity, and leadership development,
together with a call for a renewed commitment to the ethical
dimension of Judaism.
Rabbi Sacks will be the Kressel and Efrat Family University
Professor of Jewish Thought at YU.
UK’s Rabbi Lord
Jonathan Sacks
COURTESY YU
Emunah benefit
dinner on
November 16
Estelle and Lenny Glass of Teaneck
will receive the Maurice Oelbaum
Memorial Tribute at Emunah’s Circle
of Life benefit dinner on Saturday
evening, November 16. The couple
will be honored for their devotion
to Emunah’s children in Israel. Dr.
Shimmy and Lani Tennenbaum of
Teaneck are the campaign chairs.
The dinner, at the Sheraton New
York Times Square Hotel, also will
celebrate Emunah’s accomplish-
ments in Israel, where it is a leader
in providing social welfare and edu-
cational, cultural, and humanitarian
efforts.
Rabbi Sharon Shalom, one of the
first Ethiopians to be ordained by the
chief rabbi of Israel, who is a gradu-
ate of an Emunah residential home, is
the guest speaker.
Other honorees include Elaine
Frankel, Aishet Chayil awardee;
Batsheva and Shaul Katz, Keter Shem
Tov awardees, and Rebecca Kirschen-
baum, Young Leadership awardee.
Memorial tributes will be given
to Emunah supporters Maurice Oel-
baum, father of Ronnie Oelbaum of
Teaneck and husband of Melanie Oel-
baum of Fort Lee, and Jack Singer,
who died this year.
Dinner proceeds will help maintain
Emunah’s vast social service and edu-
cational network throughout Israel.
For reservations, journal ads and
information, call (212) 564-9045, ext.
303, or go to www.emunah.org/dinner.
Lenny and Estelle Glass
COURTESY EMUNAH
YJCC Pacesetter
dinner next week
The Bergen County YJCC in Wash-
ington Township will hold its annual
Pacesetter Dinner at the YJCC on
Thursday, November 14, at 6:30 p.m.
The YJCC’s 2014 honorees will be
introduced at the event. They will
be honored at the YJCC’s annual ad
journal gala in the spring. Debbie
and Ron Eisenberg will be the Couple
of the Year; Jayne and David Petak,
the Community Builders; and Jenni-
fer and Jason Auerbach, the Young
Leaders.
The Pacesetter Dinner begins the
YJCC’s annual operating campaign that
funds scholarships and programs and
services for children and young adults
with special needs and senior adults.
Pacesetters are those who contrib-
ute a minimum of $1,800 to the YJCC.
The dinner is an additional $100 per
person. Call Bonnie Singer at (201)
666-6610, ext. 5830, bsinger@yjcc.org.
Last spring, Cantor Mark and Bette Biddelman of
Temple Emanuel of the Pascack Valley had the privi-
lege of writing the first letter in a new Torah with the
help of scribe Rabbi Gedaliah Druin.
COURTESY TEPV
Letter
writing
for Torah
project
On Sunday, November 17,
members of Temple Eman-
uel of the Pascack Valley
will have another opportu-
nity to write a letter in the
new Torah. Letter writing is
by appointment only from
noon to 5 p.m. The Torah is
scheduled for completion in
June, and it will be marked
with a Siyum HaTorah (con-
gregational celebration). Call
(201) 391-0801.
www.jstandard.com
16 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013
YU offers Jewish
philanthropy certificate
As Jewish causes face more fundraising
challenges than ever before — including
increased competition both from within
the Jewish world and from other nonprofits
and donors hit hard by the economic reces-
sion — Yeshiva University’s Wurzweiler
School of Social Work has launched a new
certificate program in Jewish philanthropy
to provide talented Jewish communal pro-
fessionals with the tools they need to suc-
ceed in the modern philanthropic arena.
The program kicked off this semester
with 20 participants from a wide range
of Jewish organizations and professional
backgrounds, including the UJA Federa-
tion of New York, the Joint Distribution
Committee, the American Jewish World
Service, Yachad, and American Friends
of Shalva. Classes meet twice a week and
are offered in the “Art and Science of Fund
Raising” and the “Jewish Philanthropic
Tradition.” Both are frequently guest-
taught by leaders in the field, including Jef-
frey Solomon, president of the Andrea and
Charles Bronfman Philanthropies; Ruth
Messinger, president of the American Jew-
ish World Service, and Yossi Prager, execu-
tive director for North America at the Avi
Chai Foundation.
The program also features a 56-hour
internship with top-level professional
mentoring in a Jewish development office,
either within the institutions where fellows
now work or as an independent project.
For information, email Dr. Saul Andron
at sandron@yu.edu.
Students in YU’s Certificate of Jewish
Philanthropy program. COURTESY YU
JS-17
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013 17
KAPLEN JCC on the Palisades 411 EAST CLINTON AVENUE, TENAFLY, NJ 07670 | 201.569.7900 | jccotp.org
TO REGISTER OR FOR MORE INFO, VISIT
jccotp.org OR CALL 201. 569.7900.
PUBLIC AFFAIRS
Son of My Land with Sagi Melamed
Israeli author and Harvard graduate, Sagi Melamed
presents a lively overview of some of the most pointed
questions about Israel: where is Israel heading now,
and are the Chosen People and the Promised Land truly
fulfilling their promise? Made possible in part by the
Berit and Martin Bernstein Open Forum Endowment
Fund and the Edwin Soforenko Foundation.
Thurs, Nov 21, 7:30 pm,
Free and open to the community
UPCOMING AT
XXX
FOR
ALL
NURSERY
Don’t miss this annual shopping extravaganza featuring
jewelry, women’s fashions, stationery, sunglasses,
children’s clothing and accessories and much more.
It’s the perfect place and time to pick up holiday gifts
for family, friends and you! Co-chairs: Tara Jagid,
Samantha Zimmerman, Andrea Messinger and Jeanine
Casty. For more information, contact Felice Popper at
201.408.1435 or fpopper@jccotp.org. All proceeds to
benefit the Early Childhood Special Programs.
Sun, Nov 17, 10 am-5 pm
& Mon, Nov 18, 9 am-4 pm
THE LEONARD & SYRIL RUBIN
Nursery School Open House
Come see what we’re all about! Our school
curriculum includes cognitive learning and
enrichment; fine and gross motor skills;
reading readiness skills; sensory experiences;
Judaic programming; art, music, dramatic
play; gym and swimming. Options for
toddlers, 2s, 3s, 4s, and Kindergarteners,
including extended day programs. RSVP to
201.408.1436 or sheksch@jccotp.org.
Nov 15, Dec 10, Jan 22, Mar 5, 9:30-10:30 am
mad science
JOIN US FOR THE
Big Night Out on 11.23.13
An evening of delectable food, drinks, and
great music to raise funds to support
JCC programs and services.
Honoring: NANCY AND HOWARD BROWN,
DANA AND MICHAEL RUNYON, and
JODI AND SAUL SCHERL, for their extraordinary
contributions to the JCC.
To place your reservation or support the event,
please contact Sharon at skestenbaum@jccotp.org
or 201.408.1406.
Sat, Nov 23, 7:30 pm
Come to the JCC for a Saturday night full of fun with
free swim, snacks, games and a mind-blowing Mad
Science program where you’ll learn the secrets behind
famous magic that you can recreate for yourself!
Pre-registration is required. Call 201.408.1467.
Sat, Nov 16, 7:15-10 pm, $25/$30
GOT A 6TH OR 7TH GRADER? Join us for
Win, Lose or Cook ofered at the same time!
KAPLEN JCC on the Palisades
Thanksgivukkah
Feel the spirit throughout the JCC!
FOOD & TOY DRIVE: Collection bin in the
lobby all month.
MENURKEY WORKSHOP: Make a hand-crafted
turkey menorah in the JCC lobby.
Thurs, Nov 14, 3-6 pm, $10/$12
+
more!
SATURDAY NIGHT
EVENT FOR K-5
EVENT
Fall Boutique
Editorial
1086 Teaneck Road
Teaneck, NJ 07666
(201) 837-8818
Fax 201-833-4959
Publisher
James L. Janoff
Associate Publisher
Marcia Garfinkle
Executive Editor
Shammai Engelmayer
Editor
Joanne Palmer
Associate Editor
Larry Yudelson
Guide/Gallery Editor
Beth Janoff Chananie
Contributing Editor
Phil Jacobs
Correspondents
Warren Boroson
Lois Goldrich
Abigail K. Leichman
Miriam Rinn
Dr. Miryam Z. Wahrman
About Our Children Editor
Heidi Mae Bratt
Advertising Director
Natalie D. Jay
Classified Director
Janice Rosen
Advertising Coordinator
Jane Carr
Account Executives
Peggy Elias
George Kroll
Karen Nathanson
Brenda Sutcliffe
International Media Placement
P.O. Box 7195 Jerusalem 91077
Tel: 02-6252933, 02-6247919
Fax: 02-6249240
Israeli Representative
Production Manager
Jerry Szubin
Graphic Artists
Deborah Herman
Bob O'Brien
Bookkeeper
Alice Trost
Credit Manager
Marion Raindorf
Receptionist
Ruth Hirsch
Jewish
Standard
jstandard.com
Founder
Morris J. Janoff (1911–1987)
Editor Emeritus
Meyer Pesin (1901–1989)
City Editor
Mort Cornin (1915–1984)
Editorial Consultant
Max Milians (1908-2005)
Secretary
Ceil Wolf (1914-2008)
Editor Emerita
Rebecca Kaplan Boroson
When push comes to shove
H
ardly had we written the
words of last week’s edito-
rial regarding the release
of 21 convicted Palestin-
ian murderers and would-be murder-
ers when some of our worst fears were
realized.
The worst fear, of course, is that one
or more of these 21 and those from the
first group released in August would
resume their killing. That is a high
enough price to pay for the possibility
of a peace agreement with the Palestin-
ian Authority. It is too high a price to
pay if Israel actually has no intention of
reaching such an agreement.
Its actions last week and this sug-
gest that even if Prime Minister Bin-
yamin Netanyahu is eager to achieve
that goal, he is unwilling to stand up
to those within his governing coalition
who do not want an agreement under
any conditions.
Thus, as Secretary of State John Kerry
prepared to visit Jerusalem, Israel
announced new construction in the
west bank. That was followed by an
announcement from the Jerusalem
municipality that it will destroy a num-
ber of Arab apartment buildings in Arab
sections of east Jerusalem.
Israel is a sovereign state and gets
to make its own decisions. We are
not commenting on that. We are con-
cerned, however, about the prisoner
release, which puts terrorists back on
the streets for no apparent good reason,
as we wrote last week.
Beyond that, we also are concerned
about the fallout from such Israeli pre-
varication and provocation. In recent
months, Israel has benefited from the
appearance of pursuing peace. The
prisoner releases have helped. Even
the boycott-Israel movement has been
somewhat slowed because of it. The
announced housing plans, however,
send a different message that can work
only to Israel’s detriment.
As Netanyahu’s retiring national
security adviser, Ya’akov Amidror, one
of the prime minister’s closest and
most trusted advisers, reportedly told
the cabinet on Sunday, things will go
downhill internationally very quickly if
the peace talks fail and Israel is seen as
being at fault.
The moment of truth is now fast
approaching. The United States is about
to abandon its role as facilitator. By the
beginning of 2014, according to news
reports, it will present both sides with
its own proposal for a peace agreement.
It intends the proposal to be a frame-
work for an agreement and expects
both sides to discuss the plan seriously.
As with every United States-proposed
plan since November 1967, this one
reportedly will include a return to the
June 1967 borders, modified to take into
account Israel’s security concerns, with
land swaps added to take into account
so-called “facts on the ground,” a
euphemism for several well-established
west bank settlements. Both Israel and
the Palestinians will be able to call Jeru-
salem their capital city.
Unless Netanyahu does something
— and soon — about creating a national
unity government dedicated to serious
negotiations, however, not only will
murderers have been freed for no rea-
son, but Amidror’s analysis will prove
on the money. That is not good news
for anyone.
Also not good news — not for Israel
and not for American supporters of
Israel — is the Netanyahu penchant for
embarrassing high-level United States
officials publicly and pointedly on the
eve of their visits. Sooner or later, there
must be a price to pay for using the visit
of a vice president or a secretary of
state as an opportunity to announce an
action that both undermines the pur-
pose of the visit and defies a 46-year-
old U.S. policy. Netanyahu could have
waited until after Kerry left the region
to make the announcement; the Jerusa-
lem municipality certainly could have
done so, especially since no one seri-
ously believes it will tear down the east
Jerusalem apartment buildings. Several
years ago, Netanyahu could have waited
until Vice President Joe Biden came and
went. Instead, such announcements are
made in advance; in Biden’s case, he
was already in the air, flying to Israel.
Netanyahu did something similar
during a visit to Washington some years
ago, when, while he was in his car en
route to the White House, the Housing
Ministry in Jerusalem announced new
west bank construction.
It is hard to remain friends with
someone who constantly embarrasses
you in public.
KEEPING THE FAITH
Defining the
‘greatest task’
I
n the early fourth century, the talmudic master
Rabbi Elazar ben Pedat said: “The Holy One,
blessed be He, exiled Israel among the nations
only in order that converts might join them.”
(See the Babylonian Talmud tractate Pesachim 87b.)
Sixteen hundred years earlier, the alien curser-
for-hire, Bilam, said that Israel was “a people that
dwells apart, not counted among the nations.” (See
Numbers 23:9.)
Which are we — a people exiled among the nations
in order to spread God’s word by example, or a peo-
ple who are supposed to
live apart from the nations,
untouched by their morals,
mores, ethics, and beliefs?
In Judaism, the answer is
almost always somewhere
in the middle. In this case,
we are supposed to live
among the peoples of the
world, so that they can see
how beautiful life can be if
everyone followed God’s
ways. But we also are sup-
posed to maintain a sepa-
ration between “us” and “them” — not because we
want to stand aloof, but because the beautiful life
that Judaism is meant to promote can be nurtured
only when our uniqueness is reinforced by those
around us, rather than our standing out like a sore
thumb in the broader world in which we live.
That is why I contend that building community
is more important than fostering observance as we
seek to reverse the downward spiral American Juda-
ism has been in for the last several decades. If you
build community, observance will come.
There is little about us that is different from “the
other,” truth be told. Christians and Muslims sub-
scribe to virtually the same moral and ethical code to
which we subscribe. That this code is not optional for
Jews, but mandatory, is what distinguishes us from
“them,” as does the fact that we also are obligated to
observe certain rituals and practices that are specifi-
cally designed to keep us focused on our sacred task.
Shammai Engelmayer is rabbi of Temple Israel
Community Center | Congregation Heichal Yisrael
in Cliffside Park. Although he is the executive editor
of the Jewish Standard, the views expressed in his
columns do not necessarily reflect the opinions of this
newspaper.
18 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013
JS-18*
WoW what a day!
On Monday, as Jews around the
world ushered in the month of Kislev,
Women of the Wall marked its 25th
anniversary in a remarkably unre-
markable way: Its supporters prayed
at the Western Wall without much
incident. In fact, this may have been
the largest Rosh Chodesh gathering
for the group in many years. Police
estimates put the size of the WoW
demonstrators at around 500; the
group itself claims 1,000 participants.
While there was some harassment
and some name-calling, there was no
violence. There were far fewer cha-
redi yeshivah girls present to taunt the
more liberal-minded women, and an
expected contingent of young religious
Zionist women failed to materialize. On
the men’s side, there were the usual
attempts to drown out the women with
loudspeakers, but there were no chairs
thrown, no fistfights, no attempts to
harm the women in any way.
It is a welcome change that took a
great deal of behind-the-scenes work to
accomplish. Now that we know it can be
done, however, we hope such peaceful
prayer services will continue until a per-
manent solution is in place.
Shammai
Engelmayer
Op-Ed
Living “in community” means not having to feel
out of place in the broader world; not having to
make difficult choices that inevitably water down
our Judaism. Last week, as October came to an end,
at least one New Jersey synagogue’s after-school
program was canceled when only two students
showed up for class; the rest opted for trick-or-
treating. (The school is not in our area.) Parents
often feel they must choose sending their child to a
school or little league ballgame on a Shabbat morn-
ing, rather than to junior congregation. Inviting
non-Jewish neighbors to our homes for dinner is
awkward when it is not possible for us to have din-
ner at their homes.
Community, however, as used here, means much
more than not feeling different.
There are three Hebrew words for community,
each with a critically nuanced difference.
In some ways (perhaps too many), we are a tzibbur,
a “mass,” a word derived from a root meaning pile.
We are a pile of people under a single umbrella, but
with no unified notion of who and what we are, or
why we are, with “every man [doing] that which he
deems proper.” (See Deuteronomy 12:8.)
At times, we are a kehillah. It is as disparate a
grouping as tzibbur is, but in this case separate indi-
viduals congregate for a common purpose — such
as for prayer, which is why we refer to a synagogue
as a “kehillah kedoshah,” a sacred gathering, or
assemblage.
Finally, and most important, we are an edah, a wit-
nessing community.
“Edah comes from the word ed, meaning ‘wit-
ness...,’” wrote former British Chief Rabbi Lord
Jonathan Sacks several years ago. “The people who
constitute an edah have a strong sense of collective
identity. They have witnessed the same things. They
are bent on the same purpose.... The word empha-
sizes strong identity.”
Living “in community” as an edah, we witness to
each other all that is good about Jewish life, even as
we bear witness to the outside world the beauty and
the benefit of creating a just and equitable society
built around the Torah’s moral and ethical code. And
because we feel comfortable in our own milieu, we
enable each other to assimilate into the broader cul-
ture and take from it all that is good, without com-
promising our unique Jewish identity.
Jews have always “assimilated,” in this adaptive
sense. “Jewish culture” is richer for the poetry of
medieval Muslim poets. “Jewish music” has many
flavors — from Middle Eastern, to eastern European
folk tunes, to North African chants, to Spanish love
songs, to contemporary American ballads.
We even have benefited from the philosophies
of the other. Centuries before Hillel taught “what
is hateful to you, do not do to your neighbor; that
is the sum of the Torah,” a sacred Hindu text, the
Mahabharata, declared: “This is the sum of duty: Do
nothing to others that, if done to you, would cause
you pain.”
We could take from the other because we had a
strong sense of who we are. We need to regain that
sense. To do so means joining together all three
words for community. As Lord Sacks wrote, we
need to “preserve the diversity of a tzibbur with the
unity of purpose of an edah — that is the challenge of
kehillah-formation, community-building....”
He called that “the greatest task.” If Judaism in
America is to have a future, that is the task that is
before us now.
JS-19*
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013 19
KEEPING THE FAITH
Defining the
‘greatest task’
I
n the early fourth century, the talmudic master
Rabbi Elazar ben Pedat said: “The Holy One,
blessed be He, exiled Israel among the nations
only in order that converts might join them.”
(See the Babylonian Talmud tractate Pesachim 87b.)
Sixteen hundred years earlier, the alien curser-
for-hire, Bilam, said that Israel was “a people that
dwells apart, not counted among the nations.” (See
Numbers 23:9.)
Which are we — a people exiled among the nations
in order to spread God’s word by example, or a peo-
ple who are supposed to
live apart from the nations,
untouched by their morals,
mores, ethics, and beliefs?
In Judaism, the answer is
almost always somewhere
in the middle. In this case,
we are supposed to live
among the peoples of the
world, so that they can see
how beautiful life can be if
everyone followed God’s
ways. But we also are sup-
posed to maintain a sepa-
ration between “us” and “them” — not because we
want to stand aloof, but because the beautiful life
that Judaism is meant to promote can be nurtured
only when our uniqueness is reinforced by those
around us, rather than our standing out like a sore
thumb in the broader world in which we live.
That is why I contend that building community
is more important than fostering observance as we
seek to reverse the downward spiral American Juda-
ism has been in for the last several decades. If you
build community, observance will come.
There is little about us that is different from “the
other,” truth be told. Christians and Muslims sub-
scribe to virtually the same moral and ethical code to
which we subscribe. That this code is not optional for
Jews, but mandatory, is what distinguishes us from
“them,” as does the fact that we also are obligated to
observe certain rituals and practices that are specifi-
cally designed to keep us focused on our sacred task.
Iran’s nuclear program —
We have only ourselves to blame
O
ne of the most irritating
aspects of the interna-
tional efforts to deal with
Iran’s nuclear program
lies in the unrealistic expectations
that negotiations create, even among
those—like the American Jewish advo-
cacy groups who met with the White
House on October 29 to discuss the
nuclear issue — who have every rea-
son to be cynical.
From November 7 to 8, members
of the so-called P5+1, which is made
up of the five members of the U.N.
Security Council along with Ger-
many, were scheduled
to meet with repre-
sentatives of the Ira-
nian regime in Geneva.
These talks follow from
preliminary discussions
whose content has not
been revealed, yet we
are assured that they
were “very intensive
and very important”
(Catherine Ashton, EU
foreign policy chief ),
and that the Iranians
brought with them a proposal “with
a level of seriousness and substance
that we had not seen before” ( Jay
Carney, White House spokesman).
Hence, the sense we are getting is
that one of the most intractable prob-
lems facing the Middle East is on the
cusp of being resolved.
That’s why I’m going to break ranks
by issuing a spoiler alert.
These talks aren’t going to lead to
a deal. Instead, they will function
as they have always done. They will
allow the Iranians to buy time, safe in
the knowledge that the other options
we are told are always on the table
— from tighter sanctions to pre-emp-
tive military action — are on the back
burner for now.
There are three main reasons
behind my assertion. Firstly, the P5+1
cannot for a moment pretend to rep-
resent an international consensus.
On the inside, you have the Russians
and the Chinese, who have backed
Iran consistently during the nuclear
dispute of the last decade. And on
the outside, you have Israel and the
conservative Arab states, whose trust
in the Obama administration when it
comes to Iran is close to evaporating,
and who thus may well reject any
agreement framework.
Secondly, all the attention paid to
the apparently constructive atmo-
sphere at the preliminary discus-
sions, along with the public relations
offensive unleashed by Iran’s new
president, Hasan Rouhani, cannot
camouflage some very basic facts. For
example, if Rouhani really does want
to reach a deal, how come he won’t
explain why Iran’s nuclear program
was a clandestine enterprise from
the beginning? The answer is simple:
He is faithfully parroting the mullahs’
line that Iran’s intentions were always
peaceful, that the regime never
intended to build nuclear weapons,
and that anyone who thinks other-
wise has fallen victim to an Israeli plot
that seeks, in Rouhani’s own words,
“to divert international attention not
only from its own clan-
destine and dangerous
nuclear weapons pro-
gram, but also from its
destabilizing and inhu-
man policies and prac-
tices in Palestine and
the Middle East.”
T h i r d l y, we ’ v e
already had the oppor-
tunity to test Iran’s
peaceful intentions out-
side the scope of the
nuclear negotiations,
and the result is an unmistakable “F.”
A recent BBC report included foot-
age of Iranian Revolutionary Guards
fighting with the Assad regime in
Syria, under the watchful eye of
a commander named Ismail Hey-
dari, who described Assad’s bloody
onslaught against his own people as a
war “of Islam against the infidels.” So
rather than praising the Iranians over
their willingness to talk about talking
(about talking about talking...) about
their nuclear program, we should
be hauling them before the Security
Council to demand answers over
Tehran’s decision to cross an interna-
tional border in order to defend one of
the world’s most monstrous regimes.
Yet it’s unrealistic to expect the
Americans or the Europeans to raise
any of these objections. After all, they
shamefully folded over the use of
chemical weapons in Syria, so why
should Iran be any different?
Moreover, even if they agree on a
vague declaration of principles with
the Iranians, these will collapse under
the weight of details like the kind of
monitoring regime to be put in place.
For you can rest assured that what-
ever is acceptable to the Iranians will
likely be unacceptable to the Israelis,
the Saudis, and the Bahrainis, among
others. And in any case, according to
Olli Heinonen, a former International
Atomic Energy Agency inspector, the
Iranians have very little more to do on
the uranium enrichment front before
reaching weaponization capacity.
What’s needed now is a bold domes-
tic voice to challenge the Obama
administration’s newfound confidence
in Iran’s rulers.
But if you’re looking to Jewish
establishment organizations to play
that role, forget it. Given that they’ve
already been persuaded by Obama to
drop support for further sanctions for
now, it’s unlikely that they will push
for the stronger measures that will be
necessary down the line.
Remember that line about the all-
powerful “Israel lobby?” If only it were
true.
If only. JNS.ORG
Ben Cohen, JNS.org’s Shillman analyst,
writes on Jewish affairs and Middle
Eastern politics. His work has been
published in Commentary, the New
York Post, Haaretz, Jewish Ideas Daily,
and many other publications.
Ben
Cohen
“The delicacy of diplomacy” by Nathan Moskowitz JNS.ORG
Op-Ed
20 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013
JS-20*
Space for critiques of Israel
opens essential two-way street
“I would rather stand up on the bimah on
Yom Kippur, eat a bacon sandwich, and
declare that I do not believe in God, than
criticize Israel from the pulpit.” Thus con-
fided a rabbi to me in a recent conversa-
tion that mirrored the results
of the survey just released by
the Jewish Council for Public
Affairs.
It’s deeply disturbing that
one third of American rab-
bis share this fear of publicly
criticizing Israel. Rabbis are
meant to be our communal
leaders, those who model
for us, their congregants, the
Jewish dispositions, patterns
of behavior, and cultural
norms that they would wish
us to value. Being able to freely express
criticism of Israel is not just about freedom
of speech; it’s about giving voice to rela-
tionships with Israel that are complex and
nuanced, which doesn’t mean less legiti-
mate or less connected to Israel. It’s also
about understanding that critical thinking
is a mark of an educated person. The rab-
bis in this survey are deeply committed to
Israel, and want to be allowed to criticize
Israel without that basic core commitment
being called into question. If they don’t
feel comfortable doing that, then how can
we expect other American Jews to do so?
In my recently published book, “Loving
the Real Israel: An Educational Agenda for
Liberal Zionism,” I set out what it would
mean to develop an educational discourse
that would not only allow but
encourage the kind of com-
mitted-but-critical approach
that these rabbis are seeking.
One of my central arguments
is that we must stop seeing
Israel education as an enter-
prise that is intended solely
to affect American Jews’
identities, and instead see it
as a two-way, dialogical, rela-
tional enterprise in which
American Jews should seek
both to be influenced and to
influence. As I write in my book:
“American Jews need to be exposed
to the remarkable, inspiring experience
of Israeli Jewish life as public, lived, sov-
ereign space; to the vibrancy of Israeli
ethnic-religious-cultural creativity; and to
a society whose foundational civic narra-
tives are rooted in Jewish texts and lan-
guage. American Judaism is the poorer for
the lack of such exposure.
“But Israeli Jews also have much to
learn from American Jews. Israeli Jews
need to be exposed to the remarkable,
inspiring experience of American Judaism
as an open, pluralist way of life, which can
speak to different people in different ways;
to the vibrancy of the diversity of Ameri-
can Jewish experiences of personal spiri-
tual meaning; and to a religious commu-
nity that has succeeded in having Jewish
messages inspire and infuse hundreds of
thousands of non-Jews. Israeli Judaism is
the poorer for the lack of such exposure.
“‘Influence and be influenced’ must be
the new catchphrase of dialogical liberal
Zionist Israel engagement.”
Once you develop a conceptual under-
standing of Israel engagement as a dialogi-
cal, two-way street, then criticism of Israel
becomes not just tolerable, but in fact a
marker of a robust, dynamic, vibrant rela-
tionship with Israel. Critique becomes an
educational goal in and of itself.
This approach to Israel education and
engagement can be liberating to rabbis,
Jewish educators, and indeed all Ameri-
can Jews who want to express their com-
mitment to Israel but don’t feel comfort-
able remaining silent about Israel’s faults.
These faults might include its attitude in
peace talks with the Palestinians (from
either side of the political spectrum), its
policy toward African refugees, its posi-
tion on non-Orthodox conversions and
marriages, or any number of other issues.
If we silence American Jews’ legitimate
concerns about Israel’s failings, it’s likely
that in the long run they will cease to care
about Israel qua Israel. Asking American
Jews to develop passionate, angry, car-
ing critique about Israel is an educational
mode that is likely to increase connection.
As the authors of the Jewish Council
for Public Affairs report write, “A stifled
debate means a less healthy discourse and
missed educational opportunities.” This
is true, but it’s only one step toward the
answer. We need to do some serious edu-
cational thinking about what this new dis-
course on Israel might look like, and how
we educate both young people and adults
toward it. Instead of treading on eggshells
when we speak about our disagreements
with Israel, we need instead to see debate
about it as machloket l’shem shamayim —
an argument for the sake of heaven. We
know how to apply that phrase to many
aspects of our Jewish lives and identities:
it’s time we applied it to Israel education
too.
Dr. Alex Sinclair is director of programs in
Israel education for the Jewish Theological
Seminary. His book, “Loving the Real
Israel: An Educational Agenda for Liberal
Zionism,” was published recently by Ben
Yehuda Press.
Dr. Alex
Sinclair
Hanging me out to dry … and liking it
Growing up in America, I always associ-
ated clothes-hanging with somehow being
lower class.
Not only did I never live in a household
that hung clothes, but I never lived in a
neighborhood in which I saw
clothes hanging on a line.
When we moved to Israel, we
moved into a house that had
a clothesline, all of our neigh-
bors hung their clothes out
to dry, and so I figured that
clothes-hanging was part of
my patriotic duty.
Israeli culture encourages
clothes-hanging. Clothespins
are sold in every grocery
store throughout the year.
When we first made aliyah, I
thought that if we own a dryer, it doesn’t
make sense to hang up clothes during the
rainy season. When I saw someone buying
clothespins during the winter, therefore, I
was surprised. But then I realized that if
you listen to the weather reports and get
those clothes out there early and then
keep transferring them to run after the sun
you can (go crazy and) dry your clothes
outside even during the winter. (Indeed,
there are middle-class Israelis who do not
own a dryer.)
Of course it has happened that the
weather guys have been wrong and my
clothes were soaked by a
sudden rainfall, but I try not
to think about those times.
There are different kinds
of clotheslines. We own lines
that are affixed to stationery
brackets in our yard. My
neighbor uses a pulley sys-
tem from the second floor of
her home. Portable plastic
clothes racks are popular for
people who rent, and have
no permanent lines. With
the portable racks you can
easily follow the sun, and if rain suddenly
threatens, you just move the whole thing
indoors.
The lifespan of a clothespin is alarmingly
short. Good, old-fashioned, long-lasting
wooden pins are hard to come by. Colorful
cheap plastic ones are pleasing to the eye,
but they must be replaced frequently. I
always forget that there is a strict corollary
between the price of the clothespins and
their sturdiness, and so I usually succumb
to the tantalizing sales at the shuk.
I figure: how bad can they be? The
answer: very bad.
The right way to hang clothes is to
stretch the garment out and put pins at
its edges. In an effort to protest against
forced labor, my children sometimes
will just cram their clothes onto the line
all bunched up. Yet during the long sum-
mer months even this sloppy way works,
because the sun essentially bakes the
clothes dry within an hour or two.
Recently, perhaps because of the dismal
clothespin situation, I made a startling dis-
covery: For most clothing, I do not need
pins. Unless the day is particularly windy,
all I need to do is drape the item over the
line and that’s it: I’ve saved both on pin-
ning (and unpinning) time as well as on
my expenditures for those seductive but
minimal-use clothespins.
Okay, I’ll admit it: There is the sticky
problem of lint. When you use a clothes
dryer, the lint magically flies off the clothes
into the lint holder. When you dry your
clothes on the line, the gosh-darned lint
sometimes refuses to fall off the clothes.
You would think that my children would
understand that they have perfectly clean
clothes, and if there is a little lint all they
have to do is brush it off.
Nothing doing.
The shrieks of agony that come from my
children when they see some lint on their
clothes could tear your heart out. Sarah is
called upon to do emergency lint-removal,
all the while muttering under her breath:
“This is it. Next time it’s the dryer.” In fact,
I will often grant heavily linted items a few
precious minutes of dryer time before
hanging them up.
See, I can be reasonable.
The truth of the matter is that I actually
like to hang clothes. I enjoy the fresh air, I
get to accomplish a household chore, and
I feel like I’ve done my small part for the
environment. In keeping with my incli-
nation toward full disclosure, however, I
should add what my children tell me about
this subject: “Face it Dad, you’re cheap.”
Teddy Weinberger is an Israeli-American
writer who made aliyah with his family
in 1997.
Teddy
Weinberger
Letters
JS-21
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013 21
Annual Percentage Yield (APY) is accurate as of publication date and is subject to change without notice. Minimum deposit to open account is $500. New Money ONLY. Existing
customers qualify too if also New Money. CD may be used for retirement accounts. Penalty for early withdrawals may apply except for interest and normal distributions. Interest
compounded daily. Interest is credited monthly for non-retirement accounts and quarterly for retirement accounts. Automatic renewal at maturity, with seven day grace period, at
prevailing rate. Accounts are insured up to $250,000. Not responsible for typographical errors.
41 Offices in New Jersey
1-800-273-3406 • kearnyfederalsavings.com
MEMBER
FDIC
54 Month
CD
1.85
%
54 Month
StarBanking Plus CD
2.00
%
StarBanking Plus is our premier relationship
account offering many important benefits.
See branch or website for details.
Avoid the ups and downs of other investments with
our safe, secure, solid CD. Earn a competitive return
with the safety that only an FDIC insured bank can deliver.
APY APY
Where is God
on Mitzvah Day?
How sad that after all these years, Mitz-
vah Day in Bergen County, sponsored
by the Federation of Northern New Jer-
sey, joined by dozens of synagogues and
Jewish schools, continues to be a day of
social action only (“Be part of Mitzvah
Day,” November 1). The word mitzvah
means any commandment from God,
whether ethical or ritual. Why define it,
then, as simply meaning good deeds?
At a time of massive assimilation and
intermarriage, it behooves all of our Jew-
ish organizations to have both kinds of
mitzvos available to the thousands of Jew-
ish adults, teens, and children involved.
This means we should be encouraging
the purchase of mezuzahs at discount,
the giving of inexpensive Shabbat cande-
labras with candles, the donning of t’fillin
and perhaps discount coupons to kosher
supermarkets in an attempt to increase
kashrut observance.
If Judaism continues to be a concentra-
tion on only ethical moral values, to the
majority of Jews then we will continue to
lose to assimilatory forces.
Martin Polack
Teaneck
Freedom for Pollard
I applaud your November 1 editorial
about Jonathan Pollard (“Hypocrisy
comes in from the cold”). Unfortunately,
I suspect that the editorial will do noth-
ing to secure his freedom, just as the let-
ters that I and many others have com-
posed have had no effect.
What we need is for Jewish organi-
zations to come together to organize
mass demonstrations in Washington,
week after week. It is a disgrace that we,
members of the Jewish community, who
believe that “If you save one person you
save the world,” apparently do not ascribe
to that idea when it comes to Mr. Pollard.
Perhaps people should think how they
would feel about the reaction of the Jew-
ish community if they or a loved one were
in Mr. Pollard’s shoes.
Furthermore, the juxtaposition of
your comments about Mr. Pollard with
your “Setting murderers free, part two”
(November 1) is very telling. It is obvious
that we cannot rely on Israel to fight on
Mr. Pollard’s behalf. It is hard to believe
that 104 Palestinian prisoners, many of
whom have killed, maimed, and injured
Jews, are released from prison, but one
Jew, a spy for Israel, cannot be release as
part of the deal, after 28 years in solitary
confinement.
I fear that the world laughs at us, while
God cries.
Chuck Levner
Bergenfield
More on Pollard
I wish to commend you for your Novem-
ber 1 editorial on the hypocrisy of keep-
ing Jonathan Pollard in jail for 28 years
for spying for a friendly nation, when
we have treated spies convicted of aid-
ing our enemies with lighter prison sen-
tences. Our country is constantly spying
against our enemies, as well as our allies,
just as these nations are spying against
us. It is clear to me and should be clear
to the entire Jewish community that the
only reason that Pollard is being treated
this way is because of anti-Semitism.
Seymour Berkowitz
Dumont
Remember Kristallnacht
I read the Jewish Standard every week to
find out about all the events taking place.
Therefore, I am very disappointed and
upset that so few synagogues in Bergen
County have a commemorative service
for Kristallnacht. I was born in Berlin and
remember November 9, 1938, very vividly.
I will never forget it.
I am a former member of Beth Tikvah/
New Milford Jewish Center; we had a com-
memorative service every year.
Are we already forgetting what hap-
pened in our lifetime?
Ellen Gerber
River Edge
Ugly reactions
I am greatly disturbed by some of the
comments in NJ.com that followed the
announcement of Valley Chabad’s plans
to develop the Galaxy Gardens in Wood-
cliff Lake. They clearly indicate the pres-
ence of xenophobia.
1) “You have to keep both eyes open
when dealing with these people. They
pulled a similar scheme off in Randolph
— with one of their “BS” chabads. They
have probably already “convinced” ($$$)
the local planning board of the benefits of
their plan. The property should be imme-
diately fenced off and posted “no trespass-
ing” as they will come in and just do what
they want to--.”
2) “This will be a crowd exceeding more
than a few thousand, I will bet this group
tends to produce very large families.”
3) “Careful, all of the taxes (that) they
saved in Lakewood will be used to buy
your entire town.”
4) “It sickens me how these ‘religious’
groups can take up entire towns, city
blocks, pay zero taxes and serve only their
own — and exclude others.”
These ugly statements serve only to
arouse fear and hostility. They are xeno-
phobic and should have no place in fair
debate.
Dr. Jerrold Terdiman
Woodcliff Lake
Opinions expressed in the op-ed and letters columns are not necessarily those of The Jewish Standard.
Include a day-time telephone number with your letters. The Jewish Standard reserves the right to
edit letters. Write to Letters, The Jewish Standard, 1086 Teaneck Road, Teaneck, NJ 07666, or e-mail
jstandardletters@gmail.com. Hand-written letters are not acceptable.
Your Other Family Doctors
OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
Dr. Jennifer Suss Dr. Amy Pellicano
www.bergenvet.com • 1680 Teaneck Rd., Teaneck
201.837.3470
0
0
0
3
4
8
1
6
5
4
-
0
1
©
N
J
M
G
Your Other Family Doctors
OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
Dr. Jennifer Suss Dr. Amy Pellicano
www.bergenvet.com • 1680 Teaneck Rd., Teaneck
201.837.3470
0
0
0
3
4
8
1
6
5
4
-
0
1
©
N
J
M
G
Exam, Heartworm &
Fecal Ova, Parasite &
Giardia Test Only
$
35
Celebrating Our One-Year Anniversary!
Celebrating Our One-Year Anniversary!
C
e
l
e
b
r
a
t
i
n
g

O
u
r

O
n
e
-
Y
e
a
r

A
n
n
i
v
e
r
s
a
r
y
!
C
e
l
e
b
r
a
t
i
n
g

O
u
r

O
n
e
-
Y
e
a
r

A
n
n
i
v
e
r
s
a
r
y
!
Exp.
11/30/13
22 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013
JS-22
Portraits
of veterans
Shot down
over Belgium
Local man remembers
the uncle he never knew
LARRY YUDELSON
I
f it weren’t for the war, Bernard
Nayovitz would have been a vet.
He had the degree, from Texas
A&M Uni versi t y. Vet eri nary
medicine was not a profession commonly
chosen by Jewish children born on
the Lower East side to Yiddish- and
Hungarian-speaking immigrant parents
in the final months of the Great War,
and raised in Brownsville, Brooklyn.
But it made sense at Texas A&M, which
had recruited him after seeing him play
football for Tilden High.
Bernie was big. In his bar mitzvah
pictures, he already stands shoulder to
shoulder with his parents.
His brother Joseph, three years younger,
today a resident of Teaneck, remembers
trying to chase after him in the park. He
could never catch up, of course.
Bernie was named All American
Fullback — until a dislocated shoulder
ended his sports career. Sidelined, he
lost his college scholarship. So he joined
Reserve Officers Training Corps.
And when graduation day came, he
was commissioned as a first lieutenant
immediately.
In another century, the Army might have
needed a freshly graduated veterinarian.
Not in World War II. He chose the air force.
His brother remembers building and
flying model airplanes made from balsa
wood. “He was interested in them — but
not more than most kids.”
After a six month pilots training course,
he was assigned to fly a B-17.
The all-American Jewish flyer gave his
plane a name that looked homeward back
to Brownsville: “Dear Mom.”

Joseph remembers the last time he saw his
older brother. He had come back for a sup-
per visit before flying back overseas. He
couldn’t say where he was going or how
he was leaving: There was a war going on
Joseph Nayowitz and his son Reuven pose with a portrait of their brother and
uncle Bernie, who was shot down over Belgium in 1943.
Cover Story
Cover Story
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013 23
JS-23
Portraits
of veterans
and loose lips could sink ships, whether in
the sea or in the air.
“Look out the window,” Bernie said,
knowingly.
And sure enough, after he said his
goodbyes and left, they heard the sound
of a low flying plane which tipped its wings
as it flew by.
“Time flies by so quickly,” Joseph
recalled this week. “It almost seems like
something I studied in school instead of
something I lived.”

It was August 1943 when the knock on the
door came. Joseph had a premonition. He
answered the door, and when he saw the
uniformed officer, the designated bearer
of bad news, he went out and closed
the door behind him, to spare his par-
ents, if only for a minute.
“Dear Mom” had been shot down
somewhere over Europe and Bernie
was dead, as were five others of the
10-man crew. Two soldiers had been
taken captive; two more escaped.
For 20 years, their mother tried not
to believe the news.
After the war, with secrecy lifted, the
family learned that Bernie was buried
near where his plane had crashed in
Belgium.
The army offered to relocate his
remains; he is buried now in Tel Aviv.

There was a third brother, Abra-
ham, who also was a pilot. He too
wanted to fly combat missions; the
air force wouldn’t allow it. Instead,
he flew transports, carrying troops
and equipment, and staying far away
from enemy fire. In the end, he logged
far more flight hours than his older
brother.

Reuven Nayowitz (only Bernie spelled
the family name with a V), owner of Juda-
ica House in Teaneck, had heard the sto-
ries of the uncle he never met, who died
three years before he was born. He had
seen the old pictures from the bar mitz-
vah, the picture of Bernie as a pilot to
which a light touch of color had been
added.
But all this abstract family memory
was pushed aside by the sharp details of
historical research in September. That’s
when he heard from an informal group of
amateur historians, most in Belgium, who
were dedicated to documenting the crew
of “Dear Mom.”
The effort started decades ago, back
when the response to typed letters
mailed to Washington were typed replies,
divulging what was known about the
plane’s crew. Now the group gathers on
Facebook and used the internet to bring
together far-flung researchers to piece
together the story of “Dear Mom” and its
doomed last mission.
And what they have found — between
government records, and memorabilia
held by the crewmembers’ families — is
amazing.
There are photos of the crew. There is
the sheet where Bernie signed out their
emergency kits on August 10. That day’s
flight was canceled; a week later, they took
their kits with them.
And there are the reports written by
the two soldiers who parachuted safely
from the falling plane, and, aided by the
Belgian resistance, made their way to
North Africa.
At the beginning of the report are
repeated warnings that all tales of escape
are secret. Any clue as to how it was done
might aid the enemy. Now, those wartime
secrets are long since declassified.
“I saw tracers hitting the front part of
our ship,” recounted Sergeant Beverly
Geyer in his formal debriefing. “It must
have hit our controls, for the plane fell
over on one wing. We were heavily hit in
the oil tanks. Oil and pieces of wing came
flying by me. The navigator called and
wanted to know what was popping. The
pilot ordered us to bail out.”

And there are the details of the mission.
The B-17 that Bernie flew was known as
“The Flying Fortress.” The Air Force had
hoped that its defenses — including many
machine guns — and its high altitude would
let it fly safely through Nazi airspace. The
reality was less kind to the pilots.
On August 17, 1943, “Dear Mom” was
among 376 B-17s that took off from several
bases in England in a daring daytime
mission aimed at two industrial targets:
The Messerschmitt fighter plane plant in
Regensburg, and the ball-bearing factories
of Schweinfurt.
“Dear Mom” was headed to Regensberg.
It was still 400 miles shy of its target
when it was shot down.
It was the first of 15 planes that didn’t
SEE NAYOVITZ PAGE 24
Just a boy
from Bayonne
Army service and a landmine
changed everything for Fort Lee man
JOANNE PALMER
I
t’s easy to say that what doesn’t kill
you makes you stronger.
Sometimes it might even be
true.
Martin Weinberger, who now lives
in Fort Lee, was born in Bayonne on
November 28, 1923; he turns 90 at the
end of this month. Although his father
came from New York, his mother, too,
was born into the once-vibrant Hudson
County Jewish community.
In 1939, the 16-year-old Martin entered
NYU. He was in the Reserve Officers
Training Corps for his first two years —
an NYU requirement for male students
in the immediate prewar era — and then
he chose to continue in ROTC through
graduation.
“I majored in liberal arts, but as the
time grew closer to senior year, all that
any of us ever thought about was going
into service,” Mr. Weinberger recalled.
“We didn’t pay much attention to our
studies. Some of us were premed or
prelaw, and they did, but not the rest of
us.
“This was a just war — later it turned
out to be the last just war,” he continued.
“Everyone was gung-ho about going to
war.”
Normally, four-year ROTC students
would graduate college as second
lieutenants, but by 1943 that had
changed, and Mr. Weinberger found
himself at Fort Benning, Ga., in basic
training; he was not commissioned until
he had completed it. Three months
later, training done, he was assigned to
the 75th Army division, which was on
maneuvers in Louisiana.
Basic training was the first time he
had ever lived away from home; the
only times he’d slept out of his house
was when he’d visited his grandparents.
He had lived at home throughout college
— it was a major trek to go between
Bayonne and NYU’s uptown campus, in
the Bronx, but he could sleep in his own
bed every night.
And then there was the strange
authority of his position.
“You have to understand that I was a
second lieutenant at 20 years of age,” Mr.
Weinberger said. “Everybody was much
older than I was. I had people who were
30 years old, and older, coming to me
with their troubles.
“I didn’t even know those troubles
existed, much less how to deal with
them,” he added ruefully.
Instead of staying with the 75th
division, Mr. Weinberger was sent to
England as a replacement to fill an
opening in the 8th Infantry Division. The
invasion of Omaha Beach was on June 6;
three weeks later, the 8th went in.
“There was a lull between the time we
landed and the middle of July, and then
a big push started,” he said. “On the first
day of that push, I was shot by a German
soldier who I thought was surrendering.
“He was a lone soldier in the middle
of the field, walking toward us, holding
SEE WEINBERGER PAGE 24
First Lieutenant Bernard Nayovitz
Huertgen Forest, November 1944; the battle there was both devastating and
inconclusive. BUNDESARCHIV, BILD 183-J28303 / CC-BY-SA
Cover Story
24 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013
JS-24
What More
Could You
Want For
Your Child?
Jewish values & identity • Exceptional teaching • Respect • Character development • Building community
P
h
o
t
o
g
r
a
p
h

©

D
i
a
n
e

L
e
v
y

P
h
o
t
o
g
r
a
p
h
y
Nurturing and Challenging the Whole Child:
Body, Mind & Soul
• Preschool 18 months-Kindergarten
• Elementary Grades 1-5
• Resource and Enrichment
• Early Drop off and Extended Care
• After-school Clubs
Lubavitch on the Palisades 11 Harold Street, Tenafy, NJ 07670 I www.lpsnj.org
For more information, 201.871.1152 ext. 505 or LPS@chabadlubavitch.org
B”H
make it over the target; another 45 planes
were downed before reaching their
destination bases. This was the crew’s 14th
mission. (A sense of the tension of life in
those bomber crews was captured in the
1949 Gregory Peck film “Twelve O’Clock
High.”)

August 17, 2013. Seventy years to the
day, and a ceremony is held in Lummen,
unveiling a monument to Nayovitz and
his comrades. An American honor guard
of young soldiers holds the American flag.
In the audience: the amateur historians
who had prodded the town to create the
monument, and some family members of
the crew. The Nayowitzes are not among
them. Contact had not yet been made.
For Reuven Nayowitz, one of the most
amazing things about this newly opened
chapter of family history is how young
his uncle was. True, Bernie was old for
an enlistee — 25. But to Reuven, 70 years
later, that seems terribly young to be flying
a plane into combat.
“I have a son almost that age. He’s
finishing up college,” Reuven says.
Nayovitz
FROM PAGE 23
a rifle over his head.
“I assumed he was surrendering.”
Weinberger was wrong.
“I turned to my radio operator, and
said, ‘When he comes in, take his rifle
and bring him back to headquarters.’
“The next thing I knew, he shot me.”
The wound, to his buttocks, normally
would have been painful, but not
dangerous, but because the bullet first
hit and then ricocheted off a dirty shovel
Mr. Weinberger had been carrying before
it penetrated him, doctors were worried
about infection. He was sent to England
— there were no closer surgical facilities.
He later rejoined his unit in Luxembourg.
And the German who shot him? “He
didn’t last for more than a few seconds,”
Mr. Weinberger said. “Everybody opened
fire. My whole platoon was lined up along
the hedgerow, and as soon as he shot
they fired.”
A few months after he returned to
active duty, his division replaced the 29th
division in Huertgen Forest in Germany.
“It was one of the worse campaigns of
the war,” Mr. Weinberger said. “There
is very little mention of it, because the
Battle of the Bulge was shortly after it, but
it was terrible. There was terrible loss of
life; incredible loss of life. The division
we replaced was decimated — no, it was
more than decimated. And we took a
terrible beating as well.”
The battle, in fact, was the longest
fought on German soil during World War
II. It was also the longest single battle that
the U.S. Army has ever fought. Reports
say that 33,000 Americans and 28,000
Germans were killed or wounded. It
is not clear who won; the fact that the
fight was inconclusive and the death toll
astronomic has led to the conclusion that
the Allies lost.
That soon became academic for Mr.
Weinberger.
“Right after Thanksgiving we were
ordered to advance,” he said. “We had
been ordered to advance three or four
times, and each time we met very heavy
fire. This time, it was incredibly bad. It is
hard — it is impossible — to describe the
constant bombardment. And this is in
heavy forest.
“We took terrible casualties.
“My company was down 50 percent by
the second week. The whole operation
was ill-conceived. There was no reason to
be fighting in the forest. We should have
bypassed it, and let the Air Force bomb
it — but that’s not how it works.
“A day or two after Thanksgiving,
we were ordered to advance, and my
forward squad called back, saying they
had reached barbed wire,” he continued.
“I said, ‘Let me come up.’
“And as I walked up, I said, ‘Be careful.
There might be mines.’
“And as I said that, I stepped on one.”
Martin Weinberger’s leg was mangled
beyond repair.
“I had to be brought down to the road
— we were on top of the hill. It had been
raining, and it was cold.
“My medic was two steps behind me,
and he gave me a shot of morphine
immediately. Still, it was a terrible trip,
just getting down to the aid station.
“And that,” he concluded, “is the story
of my life.”
He was taken to a hospital in Verviers,
Belgium, where his leg was amputated.
“That was on November 27,” he said. “On
the 28th, I became 21 years of age. That
was not a great birthday.”
When he was strong enough to be sent
home, the Army sent Mr. Weinberger to
Lawson General Hospital in Atlanta for
Weinberg
FROM PAGE 23
Cover Story
JS-25
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013 25
recuperation. “I was to have the
Army record for the longest-staying
single amputee, because I turned
out to be a very slow healer,” he
said. “I finally got to go in June of
1946. I was in the hospital longer
than some of my doctors had been
doctors.
“I was very anxious to get out. I
really had had enough of military
service, and of the hospital. I
wanted to get back and start my
life.”
He did. He earned an MBA at
NYU, got married, and worked in
an advertising agency, Riedel and
Freed; among other accounts,
the Clifton-based firm worked on
Dwight Eisenhower’s presidential
campaigns in New Jersey. He and his wife moved
to Teaneck; about eight years ago he moved to
Fort Lee.
There was nothing particularly Jewish that
characterized his Army career, Mr. Weinberger
said. He was used to a certain background level
of anti-Semitism. “When I lived in Bayonne, on
many Mondays I got beaten up because in the
Sunday sermon the kids had been told that the
Jews killed Christ. And I was a 90-pound weakling
as a youngster.
“My company commander and my battalion
commander were very anti-Semitic, and made no
bones about it, but I gave as well as I got.”
There is no question that the army changed his
life. Certainly it changed his body. Much of it was
terrible, but some of it was not. “I really had been
a weakling. I lived at home. And then I really grew
up, very rapidly.
“I learned a lot. It prepared me for life,” Mr.
Weinberger said.
As Army jeep stands outside the Hürtgen Hotel.
WWW.FREEREPUBLIC.COM
A 1st Infantry Division half-track plows its way through a muddy
road in the Huertgen Forest. EDWARD NORBUTH
Cover Story
26 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013
JS-26
For more information:
718-969-9100 www.majesticretreats.com
Majestic’s Passover Director
DAVID GROSS
Hosted by
JEFF BRAVERMAN
PASSOVER 2014
World Class
Fine Dining,
Daily BBQs, &
Magnificent
Tea Rooms
Casino, Outdoor
Movie Theater,
Nightly Shows
& More
Stimulating
Scholar-in-
Residence
Program
Full Court
Basketball,
Little Tykes
Playground,
Billiards,
Ping Pong,
Foosball...
Exciting Day
Camp/Tiny Tots/
Teen Programs
Daily Kids
Entertainment
& Shows
6,000 Sq Ft
Sundeck Oasis
Complimentary
Spa Treatments
Beach Front 4-Star
Resort & Spa
Featuring Our One-of-a-Kind
Majestic Beach Service
Including Beach BBQs,
Complimentary Jet Skiing & Water Sports
GLATT KOSHER
SUPERVISION
w
w
w
.A
liz
a
N
u
g
ie
lD
e
s
ig
n
s
.c
o
m
Avi & Shneur Faskowitz
once again bring you
an unparalleled
Passover Experience
JOINUS FOR
OUR
12TH
YEAR
INFLORIDA!
www.jstandard.com
A chaplain’s calling
Pastoral work in the USAF
led rabbi into life as a counselor
JOANNE PALMER
A
certain kind of impersonal
authority comes with some
positions — just for argu-
ment’s sake, say that position
is as a Jewish Air Force chaplain.
Then there’s the kind of authority that
someone — say, perhaps, a Jewish Air
Force chaplain — grows into.
That was the experience of Rabbi
Reuben E. Gross — now Dr. Gross, of
Teaneck, and then Lt. Gross, of the
United States Air Force — as he served
as chaplain in the Philippines. His
was a peacetime stint — he was in the
Philippines just before the just-begun
Vietnam war caused the United States
to bring what it called advisors there to
oversee that conflict.
Dr. Gross grew up in Borough Park,
Brooklyn, part of an actively practicing
Orthodox family, and went to college at
Yeshiva University. Six months before
the end of his senior year, he volunteered
to be a chaplain, and two weeks after he
graduated, with the smichah that made
him a rabbi and the okay from the Jewish
Welfare Board that acknowledged his
credentials to be kosher, he was ordered
to report to Lackland Air Force Base in
Texas for training.
Lackland was a pleasant experience
for him. He had not met many non-
Jews until then, but “my roommate was
a Baptist minister,” he said. “We had a
test every week. One was on the uniform
code of military justice. After studying
Gemara for 10 years, the uniform code
was easy.
“Then I was sent to another Air Force
base in Wichita Falls, Texas, where I was
the only chaplain.”
I n t he Uni t ed St at es Armed
Forces, chaplains minister to their
co-religionists, but they also act as
advisors and counselors to everyone,
of any faith. It could be a complicated
setup, but neither chaplains nor their
charges seem to find it problematic.
“I was a first lieutenant,” Dr. Gross
said. “If someone has a problem, he
would go to his captain, and on up the
chain of command. As a chaplain, I had
access to the general.
“It was a powerful position. Everyone
was very friendly to me, and I was 24
years old,” he said.
“I was a child.”
After a few months, Dr. Gross received
another letter. He was being reassigned
to Clark Air Force Base in Luzon. This
Brooklyn boy was going to the other side
of the world.
How do you get there? Well, “you’re
in the Air Force,” Dr. Gross said. “It’s like
taking a bus in Manhattan. You go there”
— in this case, “there” was San Francisco
— “and ask when is the next plane going
to the Philippines.”
He had bought a car in Texas, so he
drove north and west across the country
— “I stopped at the Grand Canyon,” he
said — and flew to Hawaii and then on to
Tokyo, where he spent a few (as it turned
out, unauthorized) days sightseeing on
his own, before reporting for duty at
Clark.
There was a handful of other
chaplains at Clark, Dr. Gross reported;
some Catholic, others Protestant. There
were only about 30 or so Jews on base;
nonetheless, he was welcomed with a
big story in the base newspaper, which
also announced the time for Friday night
services.
There were about 10 to 15 young men
on the base “who were really immersed
Rabbi Reuben Gross, center, blows a shofar in a posted picture taken before
Rosh Hashanah at Clark Air Force Base in the Phillipines.
✓Custom Tailored Events ✓Corporate Catering ✓Barbecues
✓Cocktail Parties ✓Dinner Parties ✓Kosher
Free consultation
Contact Chef Boris 
Email: gotham1chef@yahoo.com
Tel: 917-796-2249
GOTHAM CATERING COMPANY
AND PERSONAL CHEF SERVICE
Servicing Bergen County,
New York & Hamptons
Under Strict
Kosher
Supervision
Let us cater your
Thankgiving Dinner
Cover Story
JS-27
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013 27
Preview
Sunday, November 17, 2013
pre-register at rynj.org
9:30 am - 11:00 am
COME and PLAYwith the MOROT of RYNJ
For Prospective Preschool Children and Their Parents
P
r
e
s
c
h
o
o
l

A chaplain’s calling
Pastoral work in the USAF
led rabbi into life as a counselor
Forces, chaplains minister to their
co-religionists, but they also act as
advisors and counselors to everyone,
of any faith. It could be a complicated
setup, but neither chaplains nor their
charges seem to find it problematic.
“I was a first lieutenant,” Dr. Gross
said. “If someone has a problem, he
would go to his captain, and on up the
chain of command. As a chaplain, I had
access to the general.
“It was a powerful position. Everyone
was very friendly to me, and I was 24
years old,” he said.
“I was a child.”
After a few months, Dr. Gross received
another letter. He was being reassigned
to Clark Air Force Base in Luzon. This
Brooklyn boy was going to the other side
of the world.
How do you get there? Well, “you’re
in the Air Force,” Dr. Gross said. “It’s like
taking a bus in Manhattan. You go there”
— in this case, “there” was San Francisco
— “and ask when is the next plane going
to the Philippines.”
He had bought a car in Texas, so he
drove north and west across the country
— “I stopped at the Grand Canyon,” he
said — and flew to Hawaii and then on to
Tokyo, where he spent a few (as it turned
out, unauthorized) days sightseeing on
his own, before reporting for duty at
Clark.
There was a handful of other
chaplains at Clark, Dr. Gross reported;
some Catholic, others Protestant. There
were only about 30 or so Jews on base;
nonetheless, he was welcomed with a
big story in the base newspaper, which
also announced the time for Friday night
services.
There were about 10 to 15 young men
on the base “who were really immersed
in yiddishkeit,” and they formed the core
of his community, Dr. Gross said; there
were enough for a minyan, so they could
pray together, and he would hold shiurim,
study sessions, for them. There also was a
small ex-pat Jewish community in Manila.
He celebrated the holidays on the
base. Before Sukkot, “I was sitting in my
office, and I look up, and there’s a Filipino
coming into my office with a machete.
“I look at him, and he looks at me, and I
look at the machete on his hip, and he says,
‘I’m ready.’ I think, ‘Oh my God.” And then
he says, ‘What’s wrong, sir? I’m ready.’”
Ready, that was, to put up the sukkah.
And even in those pre-Chabad-menorah
years, the base erected a large chanukiah
to mark Festival of Lights. “You could see
it a mile away,” Dr. Gross said.
While he was at Clark, Dr. Gross earned
a master’s degree at the University of the
Phillipines; his thesis was about the State
of Israel.
During his time in the Philippines, Dr.
Gross, whose travel before he joined the
Air Force was limited by whether his
chosen destination had a subway stop,
was able to roam freely throughout the
Far East. “I would just hop on a plane,” he
said. “India, Bangkok, the ancient palace
at Ankor Watt, Japan. I always traveled
in uniform — you just show them your
orders, saying that you’re on vacation, and
then you go wherever you want.”
He remembers going to a minyan during
a Shabbat in Hong Kong.
He was given an aliyah. Normally,
that would mean that he would recite
the blessing before and after the Torah
reading, and then stand by as someone
else — someone who had advance
warning and had practiced — would chant
from the vowel-less scroll. “But this was
Sephardic minhag,” he said. The minyan
went by the customs of the Sephardic
community, which dictated that if a rabbi
were honored with an aliyah, he would be
expected to read.
Whoops.
As it happened, Dr. Gross has been
trained more thoroughly in Torah reading
— leyning — than most young men in his
position were, because his father had
believed such training to be necessary. But
In another posed picture, Rabbi Gross, center, explains a seder.
The chanukiah on the base could be
seen a mile away.
SEE GROSS PAGE 29
Cover Story
28 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013
JS-28
Closter Furs & Fashions
A must
have……!
Our 2013/2014
collection of furs,
leathers, shearling
and reversables
UNRIVALED
IN FASHION
& VALUE
TRADE-INS
or
amazing
RESTYLING
or
SHEARING
of your old furs
570 Piermont Rd.
Closter Commons
(near Annie Sez)
201-767-0448
“The Walking Dead”
What can zombies teach us about our moral absolutes?

Panel Discussion
Sunday, November 10, 2013 – 7:00 p.m.

Watch excerpts from “The Walking Dead” episodes

(Graphic content… Parental discretion is URGED)


Temple Emanuel of North Jersey
558 High Mountain Road, Franklin Lakes, NJ 07417

Admission is free… reservations suggested: (201) 560-0200; office@tenjfl.org
Panelists:

Archpriest Eric G. Tosi
Secretary of the Orthodox Church in America; former Chair, OCA Dept. of
Evangelization;
Former U.S. Army Captain, Tank Platoon Commander
Dr. Alyssa Gray
Associate Professor of Codes and Responsa,
Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion
Moshe Horn, Esq.
Partner, Seeger Weiss LLP; former Manhattan Asst. District Attorney;
Lecturer on Criminal Ethics
Richard Altabef, Esq.
Emmy Award Winning Counsel to CBS News & “Sixty Minutes”;
Legal Advisor to Univision News
Moderator: Rabbi Joseph H. Prouser
Temple Emanuel of North Jersey
“The Walking Dead”
What can zombies teach us about our moral absolutes?

Panel Discussion
Sunday, November 10, 2013 – 7:00 p.m.

Watch excerpts from “The Walking Dead” episodes

(Graphic content… Parental discretion is URGED)


Temple Emanuel of North Jersey
558 High Mountain Road, Franklin Lakes, NJ 07417

Admission is free…reservations suggested: (201) 560-0200; office@tenjfl.org
Panelists:

Archpriest Eric G. Tosi
Secretary of the Orthodox Church in America; former Chair, OCA Dept. of
Evangelization;
Former U.S. Army Captain, Tank Platoon Commander
Dr. Alyssa Gray
Associate Professor of Codes and Responsa,
Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion
Moshe Horn, Esq.
Partner, Seeger Weiss LLP; former Manhattan Asst. District Attorney;
Lecturer on Criminal Ethics
Richard Altabef, Esq.
Emmy Award Winning Counsel to CBS News & “Sixty Minutes”;
Legal Advisor to Univision News
Moderator: Rabbi Joseph H. Prouser
Temple Emanuel of North Jersey
“The Walking Dead”
What can zombies teach us about our moral absolutes?

Panel Discussion
Sunday, November 10, 2013 – 7:00 p.m.

Watch excerpts from “The Walking Dead” episodes

(Graphic content… Parental discretion is URGED)


Temple Emanuel of North Jersey
558 High Mountain Road, Franklin Lakes, NJ 07417

Admission is free… reservations suggested: (201) 560-0200; office@tenjfl.org
Panelists:

Archpriest Eric G. Tosi
Secretary of the Orthodox Church in America; former Chair, OCA Dept. of
Evangelization;
Former U.S. Army Captain, Tank Platoon Commander
Dr. Alyssa Gray
Associate Professor of Codes and Responsa,
Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion
Moshe Horn, Esq.
Partner, Seeger Weiss LLP; former Manhattan Asst. District Attorney;
Lecturer on Criminal Ethics
Richard Altabef, Esq.
Emmy Award Winning Counsel to CBS News & “Sixty Minutes”;
Legal Advisor to Univision News
Moderator: Rabbi Joseph H. Prouser
Temple Emanuel of North Jersey
“The Walking Dead”
What can zombies teach us about our moral absolutes?

Panel Discussion
Sunday, November 10, 2013 – 7:00 p.m.

Watch excerpts from “The Walking Dead” episodes

(Graphic content… Parental discretion is URGED)


Temple Emanuel of North Jersey
558 High Mountain Road, Franklin Lakes, NJ 07417

Admission is free…reservations suggested: (201) 560-0200; office@tenjfl.org
Panelists:

Archpriest Eric G. Tosi
Secretary of the Orthodox Church in America; former Chair, OCA Dept. of
Evangelization;
Former U.S. Army Captain, Tank Platoon Commander
Dr. Alyssa Gray
Associate Professor of Codes and Responsa,
Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion
Moshe Horn, Esq.
Partner, Seeger Weiss LLP; former Manhattan Asst. District Attorney;
Lecturer on Criminal Ethics
Richard Altabef, Esq.
Emmy Award Winning Counsel to CBS News & “Sixty Minutes”;
Legal Advisor to Univision News
Moderator: Rabbi Joseph H. Prouser
Temple Emanuel of North Jersey
“The Walking Dead”
What can zombies teach us about our moral absolutes?

Panel Discussion
Sunday, November 10, 2013 – 7:00 p.m.

Watch excerpts from “The Walking Dead” episodes

(Graphic content… Parental discretion is URGED)


Temple Emanuel of North Jersey
558 High Mountain Road, Franklin Lakes, NJ 07417

Admission is free… reservations suggested: (201) 560-0200; office@tenjfl.org
Panelists:

Archpriest Eric G. Tosi
Secretary of the Orthodox Church in America; former Chair, OCA Dept. of
Evangelization;
Former U.S. Army Captain, Tank Platoon Commander
Dr. Alyssa Gray
Associate Professor of Codes and Responsa,
Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion
Moshe Horn, Esq.
Partner, Seeger Weiss LLP; former Manhattan Asst. District Attorney;
Lecturer on Criminal Ethics
Richard Altabef, Esq.
Emmy Award Winning Counsel to CBS News & “Sixty Minutes”;
Legal Advisor to Univision News
Moderator: Rabbi Joseph H. Prouser
Temple Emanuel of North Jersey
“The Walking Dead”
What can zombies teach us about our moral absolutes?

Panel Discussion
Sunday, November 10, 2013 – 7:00 p.m.

Watch excerpts from “The Walking Dead” episodes

(Graphic content… Parental discretion is URGED)


Temple Emanuel of North Jersey
558 High Mountain Road, Franklin Lakes, NJ 07417

Admission is free… reservations suggested: (201) 560-0200; office@tenjfl.org
Panelists:

Archpriest Eric G. Tosi
Secretary of the Orthodox Church in America; former Chair, OCA Dept. of
Evangelization;
Former U.S. Army Captain, Tank Platoon Commander
Dr. Alyssa Gray
Associate Professor of Codes and Responsa,
Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion
Moshe Horn, Esq.
Partner, Seeger Weiss LLP; former Manhattan Asst. District Attorney;
Lecturer on Criminal Ethics
Richard Altabef, Esq.
Emmy Award Winning Counsel to CBS News & “Sixty Minutes”;
Legal Advisor to Univision News
Moderator: Rabbi Joseph H. Prouser
Temple Emanuel of North Jersey
He knew what he wanted
Camp counselor guided Bergen teen
to ROTC and an army career
JOANNE PALMER
F
rom the time he was in his early teens, Benja-
min Glasgall, who grew up in Harrington Park,
knew exactly what he wanted to do when he
grew up.
Other kids might have gone through their fireman and
policeman stages or aim themselves at law or medicine,
or — given that this was the 1980s, at the wads of money
wafting from the towers of Wall Street — but not Ben.
He didn’t even want to be politician, even though
when he got to high school, at Northern Valley in Old
Tappan, the large shadow cast by the fairly-recent-
graduate and all-around superman Corey Booker, in
defiance of all laws of physics, still was visible.
No, Ben wanted to be a soldier.
Benjamin Glasgall, who is 30, is now a captain in the
United States Army, a career serviceman well on his way
to becoming a major, and a two-time veteran of Iraq.
It began in 1997, when his parents, who were members
of Temple Emanu-el, which now is in Closter but then
was in Englewood, sent him to Camp Pok-o-MacCready
in Willsboro, N.Y. One of his counselors there had been
in the Army — he was a veteran of Operation Just Cause,
which removed Panama’s Gen. Manuel Noriega from
power. “He got me into physical fitness and weight
lifting, and getting into shape in general,” Capt. Glasgall
said. “He was a very positive influence on me at a young
and impressionable age.
“And here we are, 15 years later, give or take a year,
and he and his family are still friends of mine.”
So there was Ben, a good student in high school,
“weighing my options,” he said. “I knew where I wanted
to be, but I didn’t know how to get there.”
His parents were “dead set against my enlisting right
after high school. I briefly looked at the academy at
West Point, but I didn’t think I had the SATs for it. And
then my guidance counselor talked to me about ROTC;
how you can go to a normal college and have a normal
college experience, while at the same time you prepare
for the service, and at the end of your four years you get
a commission as an Army officer. A second lieutenant.
“So that’s what I did. I went to George Washington
University in Washington. Georgetown, also in
Washington, has an ROTC program, so I did academics
at GW and ROTC at Georgetown.”
In 2005, when he graduated, 2nd Lt. Glasgall was
commissioned as an active duty field artillery officer.
“I reported to Fort Sill, Okla., in a lovely town called
Lawton, which I never want to go back to again,” he said.
He took a six month course that taught him “everything
a lieutenant needs to know about being an artillery
officer,” he said.
From there, 2nd Lt. Glasgall was assigned to the
third armored cavalry regiment. “The back story is
that it has a distinguished heritage,” he said. “It’s one
of the oldest units in the Army. In 1846, it was created
to blaze the trail behind the explorers Lewis and Clark.
And then the Mexican American War kicked off, and
they got sent there. Then it was cavalry; over time, as
new technologies came about, they traded their horses
for tracked vehicles, wheeled vehicles, Bradleys. What
makes cavalry cavalry is not having horses, but what the
unit does. Its prime mission is to act as a reconnaissance
force for a larger unit.
“Flexibilit y and agilit y are the
hallmarks of the cavalry organization.”
Much of t he caval ry’s i coni c
paraphernalia goes back to its roots.
“They would wear spurs to control their
horses, so we wear spurs. We have to
earn them. If you have earned your
spurs, you have shown your mettle as a
cavalry man.” Unit members also wear
Stetsons, he added.
2nd Lt. Glasgall joined his unit in
August 2006. After more than a year of
training, it deployed to Iraq.
“I got there in the beginning of
November 2007, and I was deployed to
a city in the northern portion of Iraq, in
Ninewah Province.” The city was Mosul,
where some of the worst fighting in the
war took place. Ninewah is home to the
ancient city of Nineveh, the city where
God directed Jonah, greatly against his Then 2nd Lt. Glasgall, at left, was deployed to Iraq twice.
Captain Benjamin Glasgall
CUSTOMIZED
PRIVATE CAR TRAVEL
Travel arrangements specially designed just for
you by knowledgeable and experienced travel
staff. Specialists in Family Tours to Israel, Central
Europe, Africa and beyond by Private Car with
Private Guide. International travel is our
expertise. Ask about our special Bar/Bat Mitzvah
arrangements in Israel!
Please contact us by e.mail or phone.
globalvisionstravel@aol.com or 201-282-4434
Cover Story
JS-29
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013 29
STAJE.ORG
REGISTER ONLINE AT WWW.OUCOMMUNITY.ORG
OR CALL 212.613.8300
The
SAGE
Initiative
The SENIORS ACTIVELY GROWING AND EXPLORING
INITIATIVE is a forum focused on enhancing the
educational opportunities of the Jewish Community.
CONGREGATION BNAI YESHURUN
641 West Englewood Avenue, Teaneck, NJ 07666
MONDAYS 10/21, 11/4 & 18, 12/2
Registration and lunch 12:00 PM
Program 12:30-2:30 PM
Open to Men & Women. Walk-ins Welcome
Registration Fee: $20 for all four sessions
$10 per workshop
Includes lectures and lunch
JS 6.5x5 ad
Monday, November 18, 2013
Martin M. Shenkman, P.C.
BOOMERS – PLANNING FOR
RETIREMENT AND LATER LIFE:
ESTATE AND FINANCIAL
PLANNING
Rabbi Benjamin Yudin
CHANUKA: RECOGNIZING
THE MIRACLES AROUND US
Monday, December 2, 2013
Marc Weiner
HOW TO STRENGTHEN
YOUR EMPATHIC LISTENING
& COMMUNICATION SKILLS:
AN EMPATHY LABYRINTH
WORKSHOP
Reuben Ebrahimoff,
“The Haftorah Man”
THE BIBLICAL AND
HISTORICAL BACKGROUND
OF THE JEWISH HOLY DAYS

THE ORTHODOX UNION, IN COLLABORATION WITH STAJE AND CONGREGATION BNAI YESHURUN
IS PROUD TO PRESENT A 4-WEEK FALL SERIES THAT FOCUSES ON…
www.oucommunity.org
To view previous
presentations on line visit:
http://ow.ly/pQ4ss
Monday, October 21, 2013
Rabbi Steven Pruzansky
Alex Bailey, Psy.D.
Monday, November 4, 2013
Devorah Wechter, MS RD C DN
Rabbi Menahem Meier
there were some problems.
First, on a technical level, Sephardic and Ashkenazic
calligraphy are not the same; some words are spelled
differently, and the scroll itself, housed in a metal case, is
held up, not laid down on a desk.
And it’s hard to do well when you’re in a strange place,
reading from a strange scroll, with not only your honor
but your country’s at stake.
As he walked up to the bimah, a lamb to the slaughter,
Dr. Gross considered his options.
“If I say to the baal koreh” — the reader — “‘You leyn,’
then he’ll do it, but everyone will say, ‘Those American
rabbis. They can’t even leyn.’” But, of course, were he to
try and fail, the judgment would be at least as harsh.
“Caught between the devil and the deep blue sea,” he
said.
“I’m 25 years old, and it is the yichus of the American
rabbinate that I am holding in the palm of my hand.”
When he got to the bimah, “I looked at it, and I said
to myself, ‘I know this parashah,’” he said. He read it
effortlessly, he recalled, and the national honor was saved.
Dr. Gross spent a year and a half in the Philippines; as
his time there ended so did his enlistment in the Air Force.
After he came back to New York, he realized that pastoral
work was the part of his work as a rabbi that appealed
most to him.
His interests exposed him to much of the most exciting
trends in psychotherapy, which was at its cultural
height then, in the 1960s. Influenced strongly by Dr.
Norman Vincent Peale’s power of positive thinking,
he found himself drawn to the intersection of pastoral
and psychological counseling; eventually he decided
to practice psychotherapy. He earned a doctorate in
psychology and now specializes in marriage counseling.
By that time, he had grown into the authority that once
came with his uniform — and vanished when he took it off.
Now it was effortlessly his.
Gross
FROM PAGE 27
will, to urge the people to repent,
and where, to Jonah’s dismay, the
people actually did so.
2nd Lt. Glasgall’s experience
was not nearly as conflict-free
as Jonah’s. “This was part of the
surge in Iraq. I was never engaged
in direct combat, but I was ahead
of or behind a couple of those
roadside bombs — IEDs. That was
the high point of al Qaida in Iraq.
There were anywhere from 30 to
50 sig acts — short for significant
activities — a day; sig acts could be
anything from an IED going off to
a unit on patrol being shot at.
“As the deployment wore down we got things under
control, and that number decreased — but yeah…
“During the first part of the deployment, I was
running our operations center, so I was responsible
for a bunch of people who were working for me. We
would track the movement of the units throughout
the city, and if they needed support I would call over
to the aviators, who had the attack helicopters and
gunships, and they would call over to bring the air
support to kill the enemy.
“There is really no other way to say it. We would kill
the enemy.
“One of the things about the army is that we’re
here to defend freedom and democracy. And the
truth is that war is an ugly and violent business. The
army’s mission is to win the wars and kill the enemy.
Whatever it takes.”
Despite his overwhelming desire to be in the Army,
it was not always easy for him to adjust to what he
saw, Capt. Glasgall added. “I kept a journal during my
first deployment,” he said. “I would send it to a bunch
of people, family and friends. During the end of the
deployment, I was tired, angry, bitter — all that stuff.
And it kind of reflected in my writing.
“I got married on February 15, 2011, in the middle of
my second deployment, and my wife read the journals
and she said, ‘Yeah, if I had met you back then, I don’t
know if I would have married you.’”
Over time, though, he changed. Part of it was the
way a deployment usually goes, he said. “You’re just
tired. You want to go home. You’re looking at the light
at the end of the tunnel. and then someone gets killed,
and you’re like *** it…”
His second deployment — after a promotion to
the rank of captain — was to another part of Iraq — a
quieter section of the country during a more peaceful
time. It was easier. “I was 27, 28 — the first time I was
24 — so there also was a little bit of maturity in there,”
he said.
“But everyone goes through huge mood swings,”
he said. “They said that the most dangerous point
of a deployment is the first 100 day and the last 100
days. The first 100 days, you’re getting your feet wet.
The last 100 days, you have getting-home syndrome.
You’ve gotta remember that you’re not home until
you’re in America.”
Capt. Glasgall now lives in Ellensburg, Wash., with
his wife, Kristi, and their year-old twins, Alexandra
and Abigail. He is an ROTC instructor.
His being Jewish has never been an issue in any way,
he said. “One of the interesting things I found in my
military career is that by and large religion doesn’t
matter.” Neither does ethnicity. “Whether you’re
white, black, Hispanic, Chinese, Jewish, Muslim -- the
cliché is that everybody is green, and in my experience
it’s absolutely true.
“The Army is a microcosm of America,” he said.
“Diversity is a big thing — even though the officer corps by
and large is white males.
“Where I grew up, joining the military isn’t really a
thing that people do,” he continued. “In my high school
graduating class, out of 300, about five of us elected to join
the military in some way or another. You’re talking about
an incredibly small percentage.
“But I think that a lot of it has to do with a misperception.
I identify myself as a left-of-center Democrat; pretty
centrist on some things, but very liberal on social issues.
There is a misperception on the part of a lot of people on
the left that people in the military are stupid, or that they
have nothing else to do, or that they’re just bloodthirsty,
so they join the Army so that they can shoot a gun.
“That’s absolutely not been my experience. There are a
million different reasons why someone joins the military,
but those are misconceptions.
“I think its interesting that a lot of the kids I went to
high school with are still living within a 25-mile radius
of the high school,” he concluded. “That might be a
generalization, but they haven’t gone very far from home.”
He has gone very far, and learned and grown much on
his travels.
Ben Glasgall with his twins, Alexandra and Abigail, and his wife, Kristi.
Cover Story
30 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013
JS-30
116 MainStreet, Fort Lee
201.947.2500
www.inapoli.com
S
a
m
m
y

s
North Jersey’s Premier Italian
Steak, Seafood & Pasta Eatery
MondayandWednesday
areDelmonicoSteakNights
ComebyMon. throughSat.,
4:00-6:00pmforourawesome
earlybird, completemeal
withdrink
You asked for it for the last 20 years and
nowit’s here! Chef Sam’s Basil Vinaigrette
House Dressing is nowbottled to go.
Bring this Ad in
to receive a
Free Bottle
min. $40 purchase
Expires 6/30/13
only
$19.95
$19.95
3493212-01
napoli
5/17/13
subite
canali/singer
carrol/BB
This ad is copyrighted by North
Jersey Media Group and may not
be reproduced in any form, or
replicated in a similar version,
without approval from North
Jersey Media Group.
only
116 MainStreet, Fort Lee
201.947.2500
www.inapoli.com
S
am
m
y’s
North Jersey’s Premier Italian
Steak, Seafood & Pasta Eatery
MondayandWednesday
areDelmonicoSteakNights
ComebyMon. throughSat.,
4:00-6:00pmforourawesome
earlybird, completemeal
withdrink
You asked for it for the last 20 years and
nowit’s here! Chef Sam’s Basil Vinaigrette
House Dressing is nowbottled to go.
Bring this Ad in
to receive a
Free Bottle
min. $40 purchase
Expires 6/30/13
only
$19.95
$19.95
3493212-01
napoli
5/17/13
subite
canali/singer
carrol/BB
This ad is copyrighted by North
Jersey Media Group and may not
be reproduced in any form, or
replicated in a similar version,
without approval from North
Jersey Media Group.
only
116 MainStreet, Fort Lee
201.947.2500
www.inapoli.com
S
am
m
y’s
North Jersey’s Premier Italian
Steak, Seafood & Pasta Eatery
MondayandWednesday
areDelmonicoSteakNights
ComebyMon. throughSat.,
4:00-6:00pmforourawesome
earlybird, completemeal
withdrink
You asked for it for the last 20 years and
nowit’s here! Chef Sam’s Basil Vinaigrette
House Dressing is nowbottled to go.
Bring this Ad in
to receive a
Free Bottle
min. $40 purchase
Expires 6/30/13
only
$19.95
$19.95
3493212-01
napoli
5/17/13
subite
canali/singer
carrol/BB
This ad is copyrighted by North
Jersey Media Group and may not
be reproduced in any form, or
replicated in a similar version,
without approval from North
Jersey Media Group.
only
Tuesday and Thursday
Our famous seafood special
Call for details
ONLY
$19.95
ONLY
$19.95
ONLY
$19.95
Monday and Wednesday
are Delmonico Steak Nights
Come by Mon. through Sat.,
4:00-6:00pm for our awesome
early bird, complete meal
with drink
Bring this Ad
in to receive a
Free Bottle
min. $40
purchase
Expires 11/20/13
trrsss|tt
lrrrcrv|ao
Arìs
300 Knickerbocker Rd · Cresskill
Once Upon a Time • Creative Legos
0aoc|ao kro|sìr»ì|ca
in person - by phone - online
studio-info@cresskillperformingarts.com
www.cresskillperformingarts.com
201-390-7513 · 201-266-8830
New Workshops:
Stage Combat • Ages 8 and Up
Acting/Theater Games • Ages 6-9
D
a
n
c
e



A
c
t
i
n
g



M
u
s
i
c
a
l

T
h
e
a
t
e
r




V
o
i
c
e




C
h
o
r
e
o
g
r
a
p
h
y






F
e
n
c
i
n
g




P
r
i
n
c
e
s
s


D
a
n
c
e



a
n
d

m
o
r
e



a
g
e

2
-
1
/
2

t
o

a
d
u
l
t
s
READERS’
CHOICE
2013
TOP 3
DANCE SCHOOLS
Veterans day
wounds
PHIL JACOBS
T
he day after my 18th birthday, my father took
me to a place called the Customs House in
Baltimore. It was September 29, 1971, and
I was there to register with the Selective
Service.
A lady with silver grey curly hair and a darkly colored
print dress, whose badge said she was Mrs. Lieb, asked
me in businesslike tones why my birth certificate
spelled my first name Phillip with two ls but I filled out
the SS application as Philip with one l.
I didn’t know that my birth certificate had that error.
Neither did my father. Mrs. Lieb raised a perfectly
arched eyebrow. I guess she was worried that I was
trying in my own way to evade the draft.
It wasn’t long before I lost the first lottery of my life.
When September 28, 1953, was pulled from the bingo
drum full of numbers, it was number 70.
Soon I received a letter from the Selective Service,
starting with the word “Greetings.”
They assigned me to go to Baltimore’s Fort Holabird
for my physical and mental ability tests.
This was my freshman year of college, and near the
end of the Viet Nam war. The SS system already had
stopped issuing college deferments. I was 1A unless
proven differently. I was a news fanatic back then. My
passion was the U.S. Civil War, probably because my dad
would take our family to Civil War places – Gettysburg,
Richmond, Shiloh, Appomattox — for vacation.
I was a skinny kid, not going to intimidate anyone
on the athletic field. In high school I had a good friend
who was captain of the football, wrestling, and lacrosse
teams. For some reason, my gym teacher put us together
as wrestling partners. Burt, my friend, just said “Phil,
just fall down, I’ll pin you, and we’re done.” And that’s
what we did.
Fights?
Never had one as a teen, ever. I had Burt and other
friends who took care of the physical stuff in our
community. Sure there were times when I helped them
pass the English test or write their term papers, but
that’s what we did for each other.
Guns? I didn’t know anyone who owned a gun that
didn’t squirt water. War was history to me, nothing
more. But the Viet Nam War was the first war brought
into our living rooms in rainy green “living color.” Plus it
was an unpopular war. Vietnam vets did not receive the
welcome home that we give our soldiers returning from
Afghanistan today. Certainly they weren’t looked at as
heroes, as WWII vets were. No, we read about incidents
such as the Mai Lai Massacre. We were fed casualty
numbers, that just made us numb after a while. The
number of dead Viet Cong was always greater than dead
U.S. servicemen. I can remember, during a University
of Maryland basketball game, when a crowd of 14,500
shouted boos at the military pre-game color guard.
That’s the way it was.
No one I knew was rushing to the local recruiter, lying
about his age and going to Viet Nam to fight against
Communism. This was different. Our grandparents,
many refugees from Europe, had felt that it was their
obligation to pay back this society, which gave freedom
and allowed them to live openly as Jews.
Bottom line: It wasn’t good to have September 28,
Phil Jacobs and Lisa Cohen at their senior prom.
They now have been married for 37 years.
Lelia Marcus
Certified Personal Trainer
info@TeaneckPersonalTrainer.com
TeaneckPersonalTrainer.com
201-371-3184
Improve your Health & Fitness
Increase Flexibility, Muscle Tone & Endurance
Specializing in Weight Loss, Pre & Post Natal,
Post Physical Therapy 15+ years experience
Cover Story
JS-31
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013 31
INCLUDES:
Roast Turkey (14-16 lbs. pre-roasted weight)
Choice of Chestnut or Bread Stuffing
Giblet Gravy
Candied Sweet Potatoes
Homemade Cranberry Sauce
THANKSGIVING SPECIAL
Full line of
Wines & Liquors
Fruit Platters · Crudite Platters
Deli Wraps · Fish Platters
Cake & Pastry Platters
446 Cedar Lane · Teaneck, NJ
www.maadan.com or glattkosher.com
The fnest in Glatt Kosher take home foods 201-692-0192
Our reputation for quality and kashruth is our best advertisement Supervised by The Rabbinical Council of Bergen County (RCBC)
THANKSGIVING DAY ONLY:
SWEET POTATO
LATKES!
ONLY $189.99 Serves 10-12 people
CHOICE OF SOUP (3 QUARTS)
Chicken, Vegetable,
Mushroom Barley or Butternut Squash
CHOICE OF PIE OR CAKE (Select One)
Apple, Chocolate Cream,
Pumpkin or Meltaway
Orders accepted until Thursday 11/21/13
FOR CHANUKAH:
Jelly Donuts · Custard Donuts
Best Homemade Potato Latkes in Town!
1953, as your birthday, and the number 70 as your
lottery number.
My sister, Enid, an active pacifist who marched for
peace on Washington, wanted me to talk to American
Friends Service Committee or the Quakers. And I did.
They suggested that I attempt to change my 1A status
to CO — conscientious objector. I was taught how to
answer questions, most of which asked what would I
do if knew Hitler were torturing my mother. Would I
still advocate for non-violence then?
The Friends counselor and I role played; he took
the part of the tough SS employee. After a while, I
confessed to my sister and parents that I couldn’t do
this.
Here’s where it gets difficult.
Difficult, because I am so grateful for the men and
women who have volunteered to put themselves in
harm’s way to preserve the canopy of freedom that
protects my way of life.
Since September 11, 2001, when I saw video of first
responders, uncertain if they would return alive, rush
into the white hot fire that would destroy two iconic
New York buildings, but worse the lives of mothers,
fathers, sons and daughters, sisters and brothers, from
all walks of life.
When people volunteer to meet returning vets at
airports, it produces a knot in my stomach. When
I see these wonderful shots of uniformed, medal-
bedecked moms and dads surprising their children
at their elementary schools upon their return from
Afghanistan, it brings out my tears.
My own son-in-law, a former soldier in the IDF and
now a rabbi, cannot watch a movie about war. He’s
seen more than he ever wanted to see. My cousin, a
captain of a Marine rifle company, bounded into war
with energy and belief, and came back to the States
after an eight-month deployment with post-traumatic
stress disorder.
What did I do?
I was a freshman at the University of Maryland. I
knew something. I knew that if you were extremely
overweight or underweight, it would decrease your
chance of going to Viet Nam.
So I would sit at breakfast, drink black coffee, skip
lunch, and then eat a piece of meat for protein. That
was it. I was tired, day in and day out. My mother, a
typical over protective Jewish mom who wanted to say
“eat,” was always near tears when she saw me.
In 17 days, my weight had dropped from 139 to 125.
That’s the weight an Army doctor noted on my chart
when I stood on the scale. I was nearly 6’4”. He asked
me if I were always so thin, and I produced a note from
my family doctor attesting to my weight.
He had me get dressed and told me to report to
a room where I watched TV game shows with two
morbidly obese “winners” of this lottery.
I took the Army induction written test. The officer
administering the test told a room filled with mostly black
semi-frightened young men that if they failed the math,
English, or vocational tests, they’d be more likely to see the
front lines in ‘Nam.
At 18, I wasn’t much of a sociologist. It does not take a
rocket scientist to look around and see that the people going
through this mass physical lived in a different world than I
did. There was but a small handful of white people there.
I even knew a Jewish young man from BBYO. We tried to
stick together.
By the end of the day I received another draft card, with
the figures “4F” on it, meaning my weight had earned me a
medical deferment.
I do not know if any other of the other guys in the room
ended up in Viet Nam. The war would end in two years.
I knew that many of these young men were most likely
fighting to survive in the outside world. They were battle
weary. I was a journalism major trying to lose weight.
Over the years, I finished college and married my high
school sweetheart; we have two wonderful daughters. In
the spirit of my father’s interest, I would take my family to
Gettysburg, Antietam, and other Civil War battlefields. My
father-in-law, Sam Cohen, was a medic in France during
World War II, and I finally pried some stories out of him. He
kept what he saw and what he had to do secret. He never
told his wife what happened when he landed in Normandy
six days after the invasion. I finally got him to talk about it.
I read about Seal Team Six, and the successful mission to
eliminate Osama Bin Laden. I talk to young men and women
I’ve known since they were little kids, and they tell me what
they can about serving in the IDF or in the U.S. military
service.
One dear friend of mine, part of a howitzer unit, returned
home with a souvenir he had been given by an Iraqi woman,
a parchment page from a Torah that she felt she had to give
him.
I teach my high school students in religious school about
Hannah Senesh, the young soldier who sacrificed herself
instead of turning over secret radio codes to the Gestapo.
On Tisha B’av, for many years it’s been my tradition to
travel to a battlefield or to a military cemetery, such as the
National Cemetery in Arlington, to pay my respects to the
people who gave the last full measure for this country.
On Veteran’s Day, I will honor those who made the choice
to serve. I feel this day with extreme guilt and sometimes
sadness that I didn’t give back in a military sense.
There are plenty of Viet Nam veterans still alive, who
deserve every bit the amount of praise and honor for their
service. At the time, though, when veterans returned home
from the places like Viet Nam, Laos and Cambodia, there
weren’t parades, there weren’t public town square meetings
with patriotic music and medals.
It was a time I still haven’t figured out. I think I would
There are plenty of
Viet Nam veterans
still alive, who
deserve every bit
the amount of
praise and honor
for their service.
SEE WOUNDS PAGE 32
32 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013
JS-32
Cover Story
32 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013
JS-32
Alan Berger Director and Host
Robyn Hartman Program Manager
For reservations or more information, please contact our team at:
1-877-PESACH4 (1-877-737-2244) or 516-734-0840
info@passovergg.com
www.passovergrandgetaways.com
Celebrates our 5th Anniversary! Join us at the incomparable
Waldorf Astoria Hotel
Passover 2014 in Orlando, FL
Featured Scholars-in-Residence
Special Guest
Richard M. Joel
President and Bravmann Family
University Professor
Yeshiva University
Rabbi Kenneth N. Hain
Senior Rabbi and Spiritual Leader
Congregation Beth Shalom
Lawrence, NY
Rabbi Benjamin Blech
Rabbi Emeritus
Young Israel of Oceanside
Maggid Shiur, Yeshiva University
Rabbi Shmuel Hain
Rabbi, Young Israel Ohab Zedek
of North Riverdale/Yonkers
Senior Ra”m and
Rosh Beit Midrash
SAR High School
GG WAO 10Wx14H Ad 5774 #3.indd 1 10/23/13 1:34 PM
have served in a “just” war such as WWI
or WWII or even in Iraq and Afghanistan.
There was a draft for Viet Nam, not one
for Iraq and Afghanistan.
I would never recommend to anyone
the path I took to stay out of the military
service, though. I wear my regret as my
own form of wound, almost in disgrace.
And I wish that I could go back there
and volunteer in a military hospital or a
military base. It’s not too late. I hope to
give back when I retire.
I think every day in our nation is
“Veterans’ Day,” not just November 11.
Yet on that day, I’ll thank my late father
for serving in the WWII Army Reserves, my
late father-in-law for serving in the Army.
I’ll thank my son-in-law, the IDF artillery
soldier, and my second cousin, home from
deployment in Afghanistan. But I’ll always
wish I’d know what they know. Because
to a man, it was hard for them to tell me,
and I asked time after time. Still, when son-
in-law and my second get together, they
speak a language I never will understand.
It makes me proud, though.
So on November 11, I’ll think of how
my father-in-law did his part as a medic
to liberate a hospital outside of Paris.
I’ll think of my dad, who described the
Browning automatic rifle he learned to
fire. I will honor my son-in-law and cousin,
who for now don’t want to talk about it.
I wish I knew how that felt.
Chaplains at war
These two photographs
come from a book called
“The Jews of Chaplain
Hill,” published by the Jew-
ish Welfare Board’s Jewish
Chaplains Council.
There is a story behind
the book.
Ke n Kr a e t z e r di d
research about Chaplains
Hill at Arlington National
Cemetery a few years ago.
He was di smayed to
realize that there were
three memorials there —
one for Catholic chaplains,
and two for Protestant denominations —
but none of them commemorated Jewish
chaplains.
Working with his old friend Sol Moglen
of Caldwell, he decided to change that.
It was not an easy change to effect,
Moglen learned; it could only be done
by an act of Congress.
He got it done.
The resolution, which was a rider to a
larger bill dealing with veterans’ affairs,
passed in May 2011; it was written by now-
disgraced former congressman Anthony
Weiner, supported by representatives
Debbie Wasserman Schultz and Jeff
Miller and Senator Chuck Schumer,
and passed the House with 440 yesses
and no nos. “It was beautiful to see
Democrats and Republicans working
together,” Moglen said. And, to top it off,
May is Jewish Heritage Month.
Next he had to compl ete the
fundrai sing project to build the
monument. He did, and it was dedicated
in October 2011.
The monument honors the 14 Jewish
chaplains, from World War II through
Vietnam, who died on active duty. “The
Jew of Chaplains Hill” honors them as
well.
“Many people don’t realize that
550,000 Jewish men and women
served our country during World
War II, and 1,000 rabbis volunteered
to be chaplains,” Moglen said. “The
government chose 311, and we lost eight
of them.
“In the center of the monument is the
emblem that Jewish chaplains wear on
their lapels, the 10 Commandments. And
I insisted that it also include the lions of
Judah, as does every synagogue around
the world.”
Richard Manberg of Hackensack, who
has been friends with Moglen since they
met in Brooklyn as teenagers, added that
when Moglen raised funds, he would
accept no more than $1,000 from any
one donor. “He wanted small donation
so that everybody could feel part of it,”
Manberg said.
- JOANNE PALMER
Wartime services somewhere in Europe. SOL MOGLEW
Chaplain Robert Marcus leads services after the
Battle of the Bulge.
Wounds
FROM PAGE 31
Like us on Facebook
facebook.com/jewishstandard
Local
JS-33*
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013 33
3565622
FLEISCHMAN FURS
ENGLEWOOD CITY
NOV 2013
FALAH
vm
This ad is copyrighted by North Jersey
Media Group and may not be reproduced
in any form, or replicated in a similar version,
without approval from North Jersey
Media Group.
This Holiday,
a Special Gift
for that
Special Person
Fur ear muffs, head bands, lined & fur-trimmed
leather gloves, and mink teddy bears.
A large selection of fur vests and sheared
mink, sheared beaver fur-lined reversible
water-repellent coats and jackets.
fleischman
furs
201-568-2242
112 Engle St., Englewood
MONDAY THRU SATURDAY 9- 5
PRI VATE PARKI NG
FleischmanFurs_3565622__ 10/3/13 12:25 PM Page 1
1245 Teaneck Rd.
Teaneck
837-8700
Tallesim Cleaned • speCial shabbos Rush seRviCe
We want your business and we go the extra
mile to make you a regular customer
WE OFFER REPAIRS
AND ALTERATIONS
59 East Ridgewood Avenue Ridgewood, NJ
201.689.1800 • www.redvelvetluxe.com
Personal Appearance (7pm – 8:30pm)
Freida Rothman OF Belargo
“From Brooklyn to Ridgewood”
Trunk Show
Thursday, November 14th – All Day
Inspired by New York City’s sophisticated edge, Freida Rothman jewelry
is designed with the urban woman in mind. Unexpected finishes and
decorative edges give this luxe-looking line its signature mark.
Sterling silver & 14k gold
vermeil, black - rhodium
& rose - gold plated finishes,
with CZ & colored stones
like quartz.
“Where’s the sushi?” he said with a laugh.
“Really, it’s not such a big shock. In Engle-
wood, we lived in a large house and paid
outrageous mortgage and taxes. Now we
live in a little apartment on the ground
floor. It’s more comfortable; I can take it
easy and do what I like.”
He did not expect to turn his hobby
into a business, but the opportunity
was ripe — especially with the recent
opening of the Beresheet resort over-
looking the crater, and Chez Eugene,
a swanky boutique hotel. These have
attracted a greater number of English-
speaking tourists, who can afford little
extras like a nighttime star tour for NIS
150 per person — that’s about $42.
And anyway, as Mr. Machefsky
describes on astronomyisrael.com,
Mitzpeh Ramon boasts “the clearest,
darkest skies in the country.” Tel Aviv
University built its research observa-
tory here, the only one of its kind in the
Middle East.
“When one of our friends heard we
were moving to Mitzpeh Ramon, he
said it’s a great place for astronomy,”
Mr. Machefsky said. “I was really
intrigued. It occurred to me nobody
was taking advantage of the beautiful
skies here to do something for [English-
speaking] tourists. Like many things
in my life, it was an accident — or you
could call it divine providence.”
Rather than make hi s wife “an
astronomy widow,” he jokes, he set
himself up in business and advertises
at all the hotels. He does not work on
Friday nights or holiday evenings.
You can email him at machefsky@
gmail.com.
Stars
FROM PAGE 15
was one of his most important works. He
was interested in creating his own adap-
tations of it. He even wrote a silent film
scenario for it,” Dr. Dauber added.
Bottom line: Why should someone read
Sholem Aleichem?
“I never want to give any reason to read
Yiddish literature that I wouldn’t give to
encourage you read any other literature,”
Dr. Dauber said. “It helps open up the way
we view the world, it teaches us things, it
makes us think.
“Sholem Aleichem, as a great writer, does
all of these things. Additionally, he provides
wonderful perspectives on a moment in
Jewish history, a time of transition.
“He was a world writer — but also a
deeply Jewish writer.”
Sholem Aleichem
FROM PAGE 6
A scene from the 1939 Yiddish film “Tevye.” According to “The Worlds of
Sholem Aleichem,” Tevye was based on a real milkman named Tevye.
www.jstandard.com
Jewish World
34 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013
JS-34*
David’s Dog Training
Obedience Training for Dogs
Education for Humans
201-286-9898
DavidsDogTrainingNJ@nj.rr.com
DavidsDogTrainingNJ.com
If you want to understand banking and Wall Street
but everything you read seems so complicated and
difcult... it is. But the speakers representing the
Alternative Banking Collaborative plan to make the
ABCs of Wall Street and banking plain and simple.
NOVEMBER 21 AT 7:30PM
Fairleigh Dickinson University, Dickinson Hall/Wilson Auditorium
800 University Plaza Drive (also Temple Place) Hackensack,NJ
(of Hackensack Avenue)
SPEAKERS:
Cathy O'Neil Ph.D, Linda Brown & Attorney Tamir Rosenblum
MODERATOR:
Gil Sandler, North Jersey Public Policy Network
rsvp: info@njppn.org
Program is FREE/Open to all - pre-registration recommended
Wall Street
Re-Visited
Five Years Later
Visit the NJPPN website:www.northjerseypublicpolicy.org
Sesame Coated
Pretzel Rings
The Best Selection of
Talliot and
Kippot anywhere.
Exquisite Styles
for Women, Men,
Bar and Bat Mitzvah
www.thetallislady.com · info@thetallislady.com
Lisa Prawer
Convenient Bergen County Location · 201-321-4995
Beautifully Beaded, Crystal,
Crocheted, Suede, Lace
Kippot, Tallit Clips
Mention this ad for
10% OFF
Whither the Jewish macher?
Upstarts increasingly setting Jewish agenda
RON KAMPEAS
WASHINGTON — On Sept. 27, the
conservative political blogger Ken
Berwitz was enraged. Not by Demo-
cratic malfeasance, his favored bug-
bear, but by the policies of an Okla-
homa-based chain of craft stores.
Berwitz was bothered not only
that Hobby Lobby was keeping Cha-
nukah tchotchkes off its shelves,
but that a clerk at a New Jersey out-
let had accounted for the omission
by explaining that the store doesn’t
“cater to you people.”
“I will never set foot in a hobby
lobby. Ever,” Berwitz seethed on his
blog. “I will be sure to tell everyone I
know and, obviously, everyone who
reads this blog, the reason why.”
The story quickly went viral.
Within a week, Hobby Lobby had
apologized and announced that
it would be stocking dreidels and
menorahs in some stores in time for
the holiday season. The Anti-Defa-
mation League posted the apology
on its website while noting that not
stocking Jewish items did not indicate
bigotry.
A swift victory in the Internet age?
Abraham Foxman, the ADL’s
national director, isn’t so sure. In
fact, the whole experience left him
uneasy.
“In the good old days, when some-
one said something critical or nasty,
you could ignore it,” Foxman said.
“Now everyone has a megaphone.
Your supporters come and say, ‘Did
you hear?’ You’re forced to deal and
engage.”
From matters of state to determi-
nations of what should and should
not offend Jews, the major Jewish
organizations have been forced to
contend in recent years with people
or small activist groups that increas-
ingly determine which issues domi-
nate the communal agenda.
Recent controversies over reli-
gious freedom in the military and
American recognition of Jerusalem
as Israel’s capital have been driven
not by the country’s largest Jewish
groups but by people who bypass
traditional channels of Jewish
advocacy.
One of the more consequen-
tial recent examples was a lawsuit
brought by Nathan and Alyza Lewin
on behalf of Menachem Zivotofsky,
an American citizen born in Jeru-
salem. The father-daughter legal
team sought to force the U.S. State
Department to hew to a 2002 law
allowing Jerusalem-born Americans
to list their country of birth as Israel
— a law ignored by both President
Obama and his predecessor, George
W. Bush, citing presidential preroga-
tive in shaping foreign policy.
The American Jewish Committee
initially opposed the lawsuit, consid-
ering it dangerous to bring the issue
of Jerusalem before the courts. But
pressure from donors and right-wing
activists ultimately persuaded the
AJC and other major Jewish groups
to sign on.
The lawsuit backfired. In July,
the U.S. Court of Appeals for the
District of Columbia upheld the
president’s exclusive power “to
determine whether to recognize a
foreign sovereign,” enshrining in
legal precedent the president’s pre-
eminence in foreign policy matters
over Congress, which historically
has proved a pro-Israel bulwark at
moments of tension between Israel
and the White House.
“How far Congress has the power
to rein in the executive is not trivial,”
one regretful senior official at a group
that backed the lawsuit said at the
time of the ruling. Freelancers “do a
lot things that make short-term sense
for the cause and long-term very little
for the Jewish people as a whole.”
Alyza Lewin disputed the sug-
gestion that the Zivotofsky case had
done long-term damage to Jewish
interests, saying she is petitioning for
a Supreme Court review and is confi-
dent her position will prevail.
Steven Cohen, a sociologist who
directs the Berman Jewish Policy
Archive, said the pressure on Jew-
ish organizations has increased in
part because of the convergence of
social media and a resurgent activist
temperament that has been dormant
since the 1970s.
“There’s the decline of mainstream
Jewish organizations as the non-
Orthodox committed Jewish popula-
tion shrinks,” Cohen said. “There is
organizing in the postmodern age,
the ability of social media to link peo-
ple and to push issues that have reso-
nance to the forefront very quickly.
It’s not much different from the Arab
Spring in Tunisia.”
Two top establishment figures
speaking on background noted the
case of Mikey Weinstein as another
example of the ways major groups
have lost unfettered control over the
communal agenda. A former military
lawyer, Weinstein founded the Mili-
tary Religious Freedom Foundation
after hearing reports from his sons
that they had been exposed to Chris-
tian proselytizing as cadets at the U.S.
Air Force Academy.
Several establishment groups
took up the gauntlet and negotiated
reforms with the Pentagon, but the
reforms did not go far enough for
Weinstein, who now derides estab-
lishment groups as milquetoasts.
Weinstein remains influential, scor-
ing his own Pentagon meetings.
Whether the phenomenon results
from failures by establishment
groups or is a symptom of larger
shifts in the culture is in dispute.
What is clear is that the landscape
has dramatically changed.
“We are confronted more to
take positions we’ve never taken
before, things we’d ignore or phase
out, but now it’s harder to do so,”
Foxman said. JTA WIRE SERVICE
Nathan Lewin, left, and his daughter Alyza created headaches for
major Jewish groups by persevering with a so-far unsuccessful
lawsuit to get the State Department to recognize Jerusalem-born
Americans as born in Israel. WASHINGTON JEWISH WEEK
D’var Torah
JS-35*
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013 35
Veyetze: Leaving home, discovering home
A
braham was lucky. He fearlessly
left his parents’ house, strength-
ened by a sense of purpose.
Isaac, too, had it easy. He never
had to leave home; he never set foot on
unfamiliar ground. Poor Jacob. Jacob alone
among the patriarchs had great difficulty in
leaving home.
Our Torah portion begins “Vayetze yaa-
kov miber sheva” — Jacob went out from Ber
Sheva. Jacob’s passage out from his child-
hood home already had been reported in
last week’s portion. Our tradition teaches
that there is a reason for every redundancy
in the Torah. What can account for the rep-
etition of Jacob’s leave-taking? I believe that
Jacob had to leave home. He could not stay
on familiar terrain, as his father, Isaac, had
done. He was unable to journey forward
with purpose, like his grandfather Abra-
ham. Our Torah portion emphasizes Jacob’s
departure from his parents’ house because
leaving home was the last thing that Jacob
wanted to do. Yet leaving home was the one
thing that Jacob needed to do in order to dis-
cover his true self.
The differences between Jacob and his
twin, Esau, were striking. Esau was a muscu-
lar man, who loved a good hunt and thrived
in the outdoors, despite the
dangers lurking in the world.
Jacob, on the other hand, was
a consummate homebody.
He was a mild, cerebral man,
who found comfort dwelling in
the tents of his family’s camp.
When he did finally leave,
Jacob was practically pushed
out from behind the tent flaps
by his mother and father.
Reluctantly, Jacob entered
the wilderness, where every
arid shrub and animal’s howl
was alien to him. Trembling,
he happened upon a no-man’s land, an
undistinguished place, a spot to lay his head
for the night. For a man who lived in the
interior world of the mind, the wide-open
space of the desert must have been terri-
fying. Outside his parents’ home, Jacob’s
entire identity was called into question.
As night fell, Jacob gathered stones and
laid his head upon them. Soon, he bur-
rowed into the shelter of sleep. He dreamed,
of course, of that famous ladder, that escape
route out from ordinary earth toward
extraordinary heaven. On this, his first day
out on his own, away from his family, a
marvelous thing happened:
God appeared in Jacob’s
dream and said: “Remember,
I am with you: I will protect
you wherever you go. I will
not leave you.”
Through his dream, Jacob
discovered that he possessed
untapped resources within
himself. He was capable
of journeying through that
strange terrain all alone. In
this unfamiliar, unremark-
able place, Jacob learned that
until now he had been only
half aware of his potential. For the first time
in his life, when he opened his eyes, Jacob
was truly awake. He cried out: “Surely, God
is in this strange place, and I did not know
it. How awesome is this place. This is none
other than the home of God.” At last, having
revealed new parts of his soul, Jacob felt at
home in the wild world beyond his family’s
tent.
For many people, Jacob’s story is our
story. Even if we are well beyond young
adulthood, many adults are at an emo-
tional standstill. Some of us wax nostalgic
about our childhoods, never feeling that our
present lives have quite the richness of our
pasts. Others of us have had brutal pasts,
and we stay stuck there, continually reliving
the pain of our youth. Still others perhaps
have emerged into our adult identities, and
yet we are still playing old, familial roles in
our everyday lives.
Like Jacob, somewhere, there is a voice
calling us, telling us that a fuller life awaits
us. Jacob discovered his true self when he
risked crossing the boundary into the wil-
derness, leaving the past behind him. The
psychologist Alice Miller writes that when
people remain tied to their past, “the true
self is in a state of non-communication. It
is only after the true self has been liberated
[from the past] that it can grow and develop
its creativity. Where there had only been
fearful emptiness, there now is an unex-
pected wealth of vitality. This is not a home-
coming, since this home had never before
existed. It is the discovery of home.”
That is what Jacob experienced on that
dark night. Jacob learned that by living his
own life, he is at home in the world, no mat-
ter where he may find himself. On this Shab-
bat, may we also wake up to God’s presence
and discover that we, too, are at home in
this world, wherever we may find ourselves.
Rabbi Ruth
A. Zlotnick
Temple Beth
Or, Washington
Township, Reform
There are other ways technology can
expand the synagogue’s community and
reach.
“When our associate rabbi was pregnant
and on bedrest, she was doing a lot of her bar
mitzvah training on Skype,” Ms. Losch said.
The parents were delighted, and not just
because they didn’t have to drive to school
for the lessons. “It was because the child was
practicing in the house and on the computer.
Parents were actually hearing the practice
and were more engaged than when they
come to the synagogue and go to the office
and close the door.”
By contrast, at Beth Haverim Shir Shalom’s
religious school, the innovation comes in cre-
ating a unique in-class community. Not that
it’s new; the Mahwah congregation has been
running a “Family School” alternative track
within its traditional religious school for a
decade now.
The Family School brings children and
adults — generally a parent — to study
together on Sunday mornings.
The program includes Hebrew study,
Judaic study, a half hour of worship, and a
15-minute bagel break.
The program attracts about 45 families; a
small portion of the 340 students registered
in the school.
“A lot of our best students are non-Jew-
ish parents,” said Rebecca McVeigh, the
synagogue’s educator. “We have parents who
are studying Hebrew, doing homework, get-
ting called on, taking tests.”
By studying together (some lessons sepa-
rate out the adult from the children), the
religious school can be the subject of shared
conversations.
“Not only do these parents know what
the kids do, they talk about it in the car.
They have a little more connectedness,” Ms.
McVeigh said.
That, she said, is in contrast to a typical
parent-child after class conversation: “What
did you do in religious school today?” “Stuff.”
Having parents in the classroom changes
the dynamic; the adult leading the class is not
outnumbered by children. But not all grown-
ups prove to be ideal students.
“We have parents who are on their phones.
We have to give them the same speech we
give everyone else.”
Ms. McVeigh herself took part in the first
Family School group; she and her chil-
dren remain close friends with their fellow
participants.
“We think the family school is so amaz-
ing, that there was some talk about making
it mandatory. But we met with Family School
parents who said, ‘Why would I want to be in
Family School with people who didn’t want
to be there?’”
Other models being discussed at the SLI
event include a Shabbat school and a camp-
based program.
Standby
FROM PAGE 9
BRIEFS
Temple Mount visits by Jews
will lead to intifada, Arab MKs warn
Arab Members of the Knesset protested
the standardization of Jewish visitation
rights to the Temple Mount at a session
of the Israeli Knesset Committee for the
Interior on Monday.
Deputy Minister for Religious Services
Eli Ben-Dahan said during the meeting
that he is seeking an agreement on
the visitation rights with Israel’s chief
rabbinate. But MKs Ahmad Tibi, Jamal
Zahalka, and other Arab MKs who
attended the meeting threatened dire
consequences, including a new intifada,
if any proposals on the issue would be
agreed upon.
“There is no Temple Mount. There
is only the Al-Aqsa Mosque,” shouted
Zahalka, according to the Jerusalem Post.
Tibi said another intifada “will break out
again, also because of Al-Aqsa.” JNS.ORG
Detroit Tigers name Brad Ausmus,
Jewish former catcher, as new manager
Former Major League Baseball catcher
Brad Ausmus, who is Jewish, was named
the manager of the Detroit Tigers.
Ausmus, 44, will be the league’s only
Jewish manager. He played for the Tigers,
Houston Astros, San Diego Padres, and
Los Angeles Dodgers from 1993 to 2010.
“Jewish fans would come up to me
and talk about how they were proud
to have a Jewish major leaguer on their
team, whether I was in San Diego,
Detroit or Houston,” Ausmus said in
2011 for a story on the Israeli national
team he managed that was trying to
qualify for the World Baseball Classic. “I
would get letters from Jewish children.
I quickly realized that American Jews
identified with me because of my
heritage. I’m very proud of that.”
JNS.ORG
www.jstandard.com
36 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013
JS-36
271 Livingston St., Northvale, NJ
(Next to Applebee’s)
201-784-2665
www.booksandgreetings.com
MON.-WED. 10AM-6PM • THURS & FRI.
10AM-8PM • SAT. 10AM-6PM• SUN. 12-5PM
EVENTS
RAINBOW LOOM IS HERE! RAINBOW LOOM IS HERE! RAINBOW LOOM IS HERE!
RAINBOW LOOM IS HERE! RAINBOW LOOM IS HERE!
DOLVETT QUINCE
FROM NBC
THE BIGGEST LOSER!
TUESDAY, NOV. 12TH
7:00PM
CELEBRITY TRAINER
LIDIA BASTIANICH
FAMOUS CHEF
& AUTHOR
SUNDAY, DEC. 8TH
NOON
MEET
KENNY LOGGINS
Grammy Award
Winning Singer
& Songwriter
TUESDAY, NOV. 19TH
6:30PM
RAINBOW LOOM IS HERE!
DR. J
JULIUS ERVING
NBA SUPERSTAR
THURSDAY, NOV. 7TH
6:00PM
BOOK SIGNING
BOOK SIGNING & BRUNCH
ADRIANA TRIGIANI
ROCKLEIGH
COUNTRY
CLUB
SUNDAY, DEC. 15TH
10:00AM
GET
TICKETS
NOW!
SAVE
THE
DATE!
271 Livingston St., Northvale, NJ
(Next to Applebee’s)
201-784-2665
www.booksandgreetings.com
MON.-WED. 10AM-6PM • THURS & FRI.
10AM-8PM • SAT. 10AM-6PM• SUN. 12-5PM
EVENTS
RAINBOW LOOM IS HERE! RAINBOW LOOM IS HERE! RAINBOW LOOM IS HERE!
RAINBOW LOOM IS HERE! RAINBOW LOOM IS HERE!
DOLVETT QUINCE
FROM NBC
THE BIGGEST LOSER!
TUESDAY, NOV. 12TH
7:00PM
CELEBRITY TRAINER
LIDIA BASTIANICH
FAMOUS CHEF
& AUTHOR
SUNDAY, DEC. 8TH
NOON
MEET
KENNY LOGGINS
Grammy Award
Winning Singer
& Songwriter
TUESDAY, NOV. 19TH
6:30PM
RAINBOW LOOM IS HERE!
DR. J
JULIUS ERVING
NBA SUPERSTAR
THURSDAY, NOV. 7TH
6:00PM
BOOK SIGNING
BOOK SIGNING & BRUNCH
ADRIANA TRIGIANI
ROCKLEIGH
COUNTRY
CLUB
SUNDAY, DEC. 15TH
10:00AM
GET
TICKETS
NOW!
SAVE
THE
DATE!
NOV. 23RD
SATURDAY 2PM
COLIN
COWHERD
HOST on ESPN’s
‘THE HERD with Colin Cowherd’
For more information call or email:
Leorah 201-837-8309 • lmarcus14@gmail.com
Laurie 201-387-8218 • blgopin@verizon.net
Aggie 201-833-1134 x 105 • asiletski@sinaischools.org
CHANUKAH
Boutique
Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013
6:30-10 p.m.
at Marriott Glenpointe
100 Frank W Burr Blvd.
Teaneck, NJ 07666

NEW
LOCATION!
Refreshments from GOTHAM BURGER.
• Chanukah Oil
• Hats
• Judaica
• Gifts for Every Occasion
• Jewelry
• Toys, Games & Stationery
• Tablecloths
• Children’s & Ladies’ Clothing
• Men’s Shirts & Ties
• Kippot & Tzitzit
• Headbands & Hair Accessories
• AND LOTS, LOTS MORE!!
Crossword BY DAVID BENKOF
Across
1. Anne Frank, technically
5. Highly capable
10. Fortas and Beame
14. Yiddish eight
15. Mitzvot, in a way
16. Jeans pioneer Strauss
17. Leave, as out of fear
18. Stiller’s comedy partner
19. “The Bedside Torah” author Artson
20. Mystery novelist (“The Ritual Bath”)
born in St. Louis
23. On both sides of
24. “I could crush you like ___”
27. Bumped off, Biblically
28. He played “Meathead”
32. Early Eve?
34. A film like “Hannah Arendt” or “Rosa
Luxemberg”
35. Al-___ Mosque (Jerusalem sight)
36. “Da Ali G Show” network
39. Brian Schatz is one for Hawaii
42. Uri Geller talent, supposedly
43. “At Seventeen” singer Janis and
family
45. Son of ___ (Killer David Berkowitz)
46. Purim mo., occasionally
48. Fed chairman, 1987-2006
51. CD “Freilach in ___: Jewish Wedding
Dances”
54. Give birth to, as a chick
55. Getting rid of
58. First woman judge of Canada
62. “Brian’s Song” star James
64. Fortifies
65. Yarmulke fastener
66. 2400 to Josephus
67. Go off on ___ (complain)
68. “American ___” (1974 Paul Simon hit)
69. Says, “Mah Nishtana?”
70. Farfel, e.g.
71. “Have they not ___?” (Judges 5:30)
Down
1. Falafel holder
2. Of the first category
3. Wig for Orthodox women
4. One at the wheel
5. In possession of an Uzi
6. Mandy Patinkin’s character in “The
Princess Bride” is one
7. Company with a Magen David in its
logo
8. Euro pop?
9. Peter or Paul but not Mary
10. Country whose Jewish population
increased tenfold after Kristallnacht
11. Fed chairman, 2006-2013
12. Lisa on “Green Acres”
13. A famous Caesar
21. Small round fruits that are green
inside
22. “She Done Him Wrong” actress West
25. ___ Ziona (Israeli city)
26. Arab shuk (Jerusalem tourist ___)
29. It often follows Hussein
30. Took the hook
31. “Fiddler on the ___”
33. Former Jewish Miss America
Myerson
36. USY ___ (Secondary program for
Jewish teens in Israel)
37. “Salome” of 1918
38. Type of mind
40. Schluf
41. “They tried to make me go to ___, I
said, ‘no, no, no’” (Amy Winehouse
lyrics)
44. Additional helping of food
47. Divides, maybe
49. Org. for kids with great grades
50. Negative contraction
52. Pump purchase
53. Way Israelis don’t like to wait
56. “The Jewish ___” (Matisyahu sobri-
quet)
57. Stared in wonder
59. Have ___ in one’s knowledge
60. Shekel predecessor
61. Eisenstein and Gershwin
62. ___ Awards
63. Times for Shacharit
The solution to last week’s
puzzle is on page 45.

JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013 37
JS-37*
Arts & Culture
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013 37
‘No Joke’
Ruth Wisse explores Jewish humor
JONATHAN E. LAZARUS
O
pening this review with
a story about a particu-
larly Jewish predica-
ment and ending it with
a punch line would have been expe-
dient. It could have been set in italics
and placed above the lead paragraph
for added flair. Perhaps it would
involve a rabbi, a tiger, and a bar....
Yes, there will be some shpritzes for
readers to chortle over later, but the
proper way to launch an appraisal of
“No Joke: Making Jewish Humor,” Ruth
Wisse’s excursion through the world
of Jewish jocularity, is to immediately
brand her book as intellectually
bracing, disarmingly entertaining, and
disturbingly candid.
Wi sse, a professor of Yiddi sh
literature at Harvard, showcases some
of the best material in the world — stuff
that has been honed
and riffed over the
centuries — with the
context and conidence
needed to nuzzle all
the sweet spots, or,
more accurately, the
bittersweet spots as
laughter and tears mix
with equal force.
Jews have always
deployed humor as
the ultimate double-
edged sword. Thrust
outward, it helped
buffer repeated blows from the hostile
world of gentiles, Arabs, and Cossacks.
Turned inward, it signiied any number
of tropes from pride to self-loathing to
otherness. All corners of the diaspora and
Israel proper have swelled the storehouse
of the Judaically risible.
This phenomena ranges from the blunt
and unvarnished varieties to kinder,
gentler expressions. They can pivot on
very narrow or quite universal situations,
slyly unfolding with irony, parody,
inversion, whimsy, spoof, sarcasm, and
compression. Whether satire, folk tale,
fable, or comic masterwork, Jewish humor
can pit modernity against tradition, the
talmudically obscure against the absurdly
common, and patron against peasant, all
iltered through a welter of languages.
Take t he
predicament of a drowning
person and the ickleness of
geography. Wisse cites the
tendency of Israelis to insist
on unaccented Hebrew,
free of European inflections
and baggage, a language
that speaks to the strength,
focus, and identity of the
Jewish state. She notes that a
swimmer in trouble, let’s say
off a Haifa beach, could be in
even deeper water unless they
cried out for help in acceptably enunciated
Hebrew.
Contrast this with a possible scene at
the Jersey Shore, one which stands tall in
the pantheon of Jewish mother jibes, and
imagine the regional accent:
Mrs. Markowitz was walking along the
beach with her grandson when suddenly
a wave came and washed the 3-year-old-
boy out to sea.
“Oh Lord!” she cried. “If you’ll just bring
that boy back alive I’ll do anything. I’ll be
the best person. I’ll give to charity. I’ll go to
temple. Please God! Send him back!”
At that moment, a wave washed the
child up on the sand, safe and sound. His
grandmother looked at the boy and then
up to the heavens.
“Okay!” she exclaimed. “So where’s his
hat?”
Here’s one from the blunter domain
that can be told most effectively though
not exclusively in Yiddish. Freud, who
loved jokes and traded them with gusto
among the Jewish glitterati of Vienna,
would have labeled this a prime example
of galgehumor (gallows humor):
Two Jews before a iring squad are asked
whether they have a inal wish.
One requests a cigarette.
The other snaps, “Shush, Moshe! Don’t
make trouble.”
In just three mordant sentences, the
tribe is taken to task for passivity, although
sabras and IDF veterans would bristle at
such a suggestion.
From the second, kinder- gentler
category, comes this example:
A woman, feeling sorry for a beggar
who had come to her door, invited him
in and offered him food. On the table was
a pile of dark bread — and a few slices of
challah. The shnorrer promptly fell on
the challah.
“There’s black bread, too,” the woman
hinted.
“I prefer challah.”
“But challah is much more expensive.”
“Lady,” said the beggar, “it’s worth it.”
And si nce t he t hi rd t i me can
be a charm, an offering from the
assimilation-at-any-cost-school:
A wealthy American Jewish widow,
determined to rise in society, hires
coaches in elocution, manners, and dress
to help her shed her Yiddish accent and
coarse Jewish ways. Once she feels ready,
she registers at a restricted resort, enters
the dining room perfectly coiffed, wearing
a basic black dress with a single string of
pearls, and orders a dry martini — which
the waiter maladroitly spills on her lap.
The woman cries: “Oy vey! — whatever
that means.”
These tidbits are part of a rich tapestry
stretching from Berlin to Bialystok, and
Beersheba to the Borsch Belt. Wisse’s
ability to suss out the essential DNA in
Jewish humor while delving into the
darker question of whether one people’s
tribulations have been treated with too
much palliative self-mockery and shrugs
of resignation commands and demands
our attention.
Her analysis begins with the diaspora,
continues through the indecencies of
the Middle Ages, and sails into the fresh
breezes of the Enlightenment. For Wisse,
a watershed moment occurs with the
birth of Heinrich Heine in 1797. The poet
and satirist was a Jew who converted to
Christianity, losing credibility in both
camps but occupying the perfect perch
with which to skewer each contingent’s
foibles and pretensions, and doing so
through elegant German constructs.
While Heine failed to speak to the Jews
of Poland, Russia, Ukraine, and the Baltics,
Sholem Aleichem’s writings certainly did,
and in a mongrel tongue that became the
lingua franca of the Pale of Settlement.
In her Yiddish Heartland chapter, Wisse
extols Aleichem’s beloved characters
Menahem-Mendl, Sheyne-Sheyndl, and
Tevye the Dairyman. His Yiddishkeidt
legacy subsequently pulsed through
theater, painting, and music on both sides
of the Atlantic.
Although Aleichem never became
wildly popular in America, Isaac Bashevis
Singer did, and may have served as the
bridge to Saul Bellow, Bernard Malamud,
and Philip Roth, sometimes referred to
as the Hart, Shaffner & Marx of Jewish-
American literature. Roth, as Wisse
notes, trod where no other author had
gone by both insulting gentiles and then
bedding them.
In parallel, the Borsch Belt, Hollywood
and TV stoked an insatiable appetite
for hip, New York-centric shtick. As
Red Buttons presciently explained: All
the Jewish kids became comics and
all the Italian kids became crooners,
separated by a year of high school. Henny
Youngman’s one-liners, Lenny Bruce’s
profanity-laced screeds, a madcap Danny
Kaye movie, or Woody Allen’s anguished
self-deconstruction attest nicely to this
postwar phenomenon.
Without missing a beat, Wisse returns
to the former Russia of shtetls, now
transmogriied into the Soviet Union
of Stalin. Purges, famines, and forced
collectivization generate a reservoir
of trenchant commentary covering
everything from chronic shortages to
an authoritarian regime that rivaled and
outlasted Nazi Germany (here Wisse
limns a meager, underground supply,
Poland being the exception). The cast is
now ruthless instead of Romanov, but the
anti-Semitism is vintage. An example:
Haim is walking down the street when
someone calls him a Jew bastard.
He mutters: “Ay, if only there were
meat in the shops, it would be like czarist
times.””
Wisse concludes her trans-continental
baedeker of humor with a focus on
Israel. As Zionists labored to build the
SEE NO JOKE PAGE 50
Ruth Wisse
Jonathan E. Lazarus is a former news
editor at the Star-Ledger.
Calendar
38 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013
JS-38*
Friday
NOVEMBER 8
Shabbat in Wayne:
Shomrei Torah honors
and thanks Jewish War
Veterans & Auxiliary
members, during
services, 8 p.m. There will
be photos of members
who served in the Armed
Forces. 30 Hinchman
Ave. (973) 696-2500.
Shabbat in Woodcliff
Lake: Dr. Nily Shiryon,
an Israeli psychologist
and educator, discusses
“The Jewish Right —
and Imperative — of
Questioning” after 8 p.m.
services at Temple
Emanuel of the Pascack
Valley, 87 Overlook Drive.
(201) 391-0801.
Saturday
NOVEMBER 9
Deborah Lipstadt
Shabbat in Closter:
Professor Deborah
Lipstadt is the scholar-
in-residence at Temple
Emanu-El during services
that begin at 9 a.m. She
will discuss issues facing
the Jewish community
and its fight against
Holocaust deniers. 180
Piermont Road, (201)
750-9997 or www.
templeemanu-el.com.
Sunday
NOVEMBER 10
School open house in
Paramus: The Frisch
School holds an open
house, 9 a.m. 120 West
Century Road. (201)
267-9100, ext. 201,
openhouse.frisch.org, or
admissions@frisch.org.
Rummage sale in
Closter: The sisterhood
of Temple Beth El
of Northern Valley
holds its semi-annual
rummage sale, 10 a.m.-
noon and 1-3 p.m. 221
Schraalenburgh Road.
(201) 768-5112.
Circle of life:
Congregation B’nai Israel
in Emerson hosts “All You
Need is Love,” focusing
on “Birth, Bris, & Baby
Namings,” with Rabbi
Debra Orenstein and
Cantor Lenny Mandel,
10 a.m. 53 Palisade Ave.
(201) 265-2272 or www.
bisrael.com.
Honoring veterans
in Fair Lawn: Temple
Beth Sholom’s men’s
club hosts a program in
recognition of Veterans
Day, featuring guest
speaker Col. Glenn H.
Goldman, director of
military instruction at
West Point, 10:30 a.m.
Light breakfast. 40-25
Fair Lawn Ave. (201) 797-
9321 or mensclub@tbsfl.
org.
Hadassah meets:
Teaneck-Hackensack
Hadassah hosts a brunch
at a private home in
Teaneck, 11 a.m. Funds
raised benefit the
Hadassah Medical Center.
(201) 836-9689.
Tamara Freeman
Marking Kristallnacht in
Teaneck: Congregation
Beth Sholom marks
the 75th anniversary
of Kristallnacht with
a special musical
program, 11 a.m. Dr.
Tamara Freeman, an
ethnomusicologist and
concert violist, performs
pieces composed in
World War II ghettos and
concentration camps on
her 1935 viola. Brunch
and candle lighting
ceremony. 354 Maitland
Ave.(201) 833-2620 or
office@cbsteaneck.org.
Appraisals in Fair
Lawn: The Fair Lawn
Community Center
offers “What’s It Worth?
– A Valuation Event,”
11 a.m.-3 p.m., with
professional appraisers,
including those skilled
in Judaica. Hosted by
the Knights of Pythias,
Benjamin N. Cardozo
Lodge. Proceeds benefit
the restoration of the
Naugle House and
support the lodge’s
charity fund. 10-10
20th St. Jon Taner,
WhatsitWorthNJ@gmail.
com.
Yiddish theater trip:
Temple Beth Rishon
travels to see the
National Yiddish Theatre
production of “Lies My
Father Told Me,” 2 p.m.,
at the Baruch Performing
Arts Center in Manhattan.
Cantor Ilan Mamber,
(201) 891-4466 or www.
bethrishon.org.
The Walking Dead in
Franklin Lakes: Temple
Emanuel of North
Jersey hosts a panel
of prominent religious
and community leaders
discussing “The Walking
Dead: What Can Zombies
Teach us About Moral
Absolutes?” based on
the AMC television series,
“The Walking Dead,”
7 p.m. 558 High Mountain
Road. (201) 560-0200 or
www.tenjfl.org.
Restoring Polish
cemeteries: Avi
Mizrachi describes
“Mending a Broken
Link: Jewish Cemeteries
Restoration in Poland
Through Education and
Dialogue” for the annual
Susan Nelson Glasser
Memorial Kristallnacht
commemoration
at Congregation
Shomrei Torah in
Fair Lawn, 7:30 p.m.
Mizrachi is co-founder/
executive director of
the Foundation for
Holocaust Education
Projects. Refreshments.
19-10 Morlot Ave.
(201) 791-7910 or
mediahappenings@
gmail.com.
Monday
NOVEMBER 11
School open house in
East Brunswick: The
Pre-Collegiate Learning
Center High School
(PCLC) holds an open
house, 10 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
511 Ryders Lane. (732)
387-2693 or www.pclcnj.
com/openhouse.
Nazi death camps: Dr.
Bernard Raab is the
guest lecturer for the
adult study institute at
Young Israel of Fort Lee,
noon. Raab, a former
YIFL president, will
discuss “Is Obama More
Upset About Poison Gas
Than Was Roosevelt?
Nazi Death Camps: What
Did We Know and When
Did We Know It?” Lunch.
1610 Parker Ave. (201)
592-1518 or yiftlee.org
Hadassah meets: The
Teaneck-Hackensack
chapter of Hadassah
meets at Congregation
Beth Sholom in Teaneck
to celebrate Ruth
Gruber’s 102nd birthday,
1 p.m. The film “Ahead of
Time,” based on Gruber’s
life, will be will screened.
Gruber will not be there.
Refreshments. 354
Maitland Ave. (201) 836-
9689.
School open house
in Tenafly: Lubavitch
on the Palisades
Elementary School
holds an open house for
prospective parents of
kindergarteners through
fifth-graders, 7:45 p.m.
11 Harold St. (201) 871-
1152, ext. 505 or LPS@
chabadlubavitch.org.
Tuesday
NOVEMBER 12
Chief Justice
Stuart Rabner
Holocaust survivor
group in Fair Lawn:
Cafe Europa, a social
program the Jewish
Family Service of North
Jersey sponsors for
Holocaust survivors,
funded in part by
the Conference on
Material Claims Against
Germany, the Jewish
Federation of Northern
New Jersey, and private
donations, meets at
the Fair Lawn Jewish
Center/Congregation
B’nai Israel, 11 a.m. Chief
Justice Stuart Rabner
discusses “The New
Jersey Supreme Court:
An Inside View.” Light
lunch. 10-10 Norma Ave.
Transportation available.
(973) 595-0111 or www.
jfsnorthjersey.org.
“Jeopardy” contestant
speaks: The Englewood
& Cliffs Chapter of ORT
America meets to hear
Rabbi Joyce Newmark
share her story, “My
Jeopardy Journey,” at
Congregation Gesher
Shalom/JCC Fort Lee,
12:30 p.m. Group will also
play “Jewpardy” with
actual clues used on the
show. Cake and coffee.
1449 Anderson Ave. (201)
568-9274.
Author in Wayne:
David Wilson offers a
discussion for his book
“Jews of Paterson,” for
Temple Beth Tikvah’s
Senior Daytime Series,
1 p.m. 950 Preakness Ave.
(973) 595-6565.
School open house in
Elizabeth: The Jewish
Educational Center’s Rav
Teitz Mesivta Academy
holds an open house,
7 p.m. 330 Elmora Ave.
(908) 355-4850 or www.
RTMA.thejec.org.
ADHD discussion in
Washington Township:
The Valley Hospital
offers a program
on Attention Deficit
Hyperactivity Disorder
with Dr. Marivic Santiano,
neurodevelopmental
pediatrician at the
Kierker Center for Child
Development, at the
Bergen County YJCC,
7 p.m. 605 Pascack
Road. www.valleyhealth.
com/events, 1-800-Valley,
or (201) 666-6610.
Overcoming adversity:
Temple Emanuel of
the Pascack Valley in
Woodcliff Lake hosts
Cheryl Mandel, whose
son, Lt. Daniel Mandel, an
IDF soldier, was killed in
battle, 7 p.m. 87 Overlook
Drive. (201) 794-9572 or
www.onefamilytogether.
org.
Book discussion in
Washington Township:
A book group at the
Bergen County YJCC
discusses Gillian Flynn’s
novel, “Gone Girl,”
7:30 p.m. 605 Pascack
Road. Jill Brown, (201)
666-6610, ext. 5812 or
jbrown@yjcc.org.
Dan Naturman Cantor Paul Zim Jon Fisch
Congregation Gesher Shalom/JCC of Fort
Lee hosts a “Comedy Concert,” starring
comedians Dan Naturman and Jon Fisch,
with music by Cantor Paul Zim, a.k.a., the
“Jewish Music Man,” who will sing music from Broadway
and the Italian and Jewish traditions. Saturday,
November 9, 8 p.m. Free babysitting with reservation.
Sparkling drinks and desserts. 1449 Anderson Ave.
(201) 947-1735 or www.geshershalom.org. PHOTOS PROVIDED
NOV.
9
Calendar
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013 39
JS-39*
School parlor meeting:
The Bergen County High
School of Jewish Studies
holds a parlor meeting
at a private home in
Woodcliff Lake, 7:30 p.m.
BCHSJS Hebrew high
students will share
their experiences.
Refreshments. 75
Winding Way. (201) 488-
0834 or office@bchsjs.
org.
Shahar Azani
Discussing Israel:
Shahar Azani, the Israeli
consulate’s consul for
media affairs, discusses
current events in Israel,
for a meeting of the Israel
committee and the men’s
progress club at the Fair
Lawn Jewish Center/
Congregation B’nai Israel,
8 p.m. Refreshments.
10-10 Norma Ave. (201)
796-5040.
Chanukah in Wayne:
Shomrei Torah holds a
discussion of Chanukah
celebrations around the
world through the eyes
of congregants, including
destinations in Poland,
the former Soviet Union,
Israel kibbutzim, and
Syria, 8 p.m. Dessert. 30
Hinchman Ave. (973)
696-2500 or office@
shomreitorahwcc.org.
Wednesday
NOVEMBER 13
Book discussion in Fort
Lee: The Sisterhood of
Congregation Gesher
Shalom/JCC of Fort Lee
meets as Kathy Grazian
and Naomi Altschul
discuss Michael Lavigne’s
novel, “The Wanting,”
8:15 p.m. Refreshments.
1449 Anderson Ave. (201)
947-1735.
Thursday
NOVEMBER 14
Book fair in Rockleigh:
The Jewish Home
at Rockleigh holds a
book/gift fair by Books
Are Fun; 30 to 70
percent off retail prices.
10 a.m.- 4 p.m. Portion
of sales benefits the JHR
residents’ fund. Esther
Stone, (201) 784-1414.
Using your iPhone: Fred
Seltzer leads a workshop
on using an iPhone at the
computer learning center
at the Kaplen JCC on
the Palisades in Tenafly,
10:30 a.m. (201) 569-
7900.
Interfaith relationships:
Temple Emanuel of
the Pascack Valley
in Woodcliff Lake
continues its “Keruv”
series, “Keeping in
Touch,” developed
by the Federation of
Jewish Men’s Clubs to
help couples, parents,
extended families, and
synagogues deal with
interfaith relationships
and marriage, led by
Rabbi Leanna Moritt,
7:30 p.m. (201) 391-0801.
Michal Negrin
fundraiser in Paramus:
The Bergen County High
School of Jewish Studies
hosts an evening of
shopping, champagne,
and berries at the
Michal Negrin Concept
Store in the Westfield
Garden State Plaza Mall,
7-9 p.m. 15 percent of
all purchases will be
donated to BCHSJS.
The store will offer a
buy one/get one at
50% off. If you cannot
attend, mention BCHSJS
through December 6
for the discount and
donation. Level 1, next
to Lord & Taylor. Elayne
Kalina, (201) 320-6556 or
elaynekalina@gmail.com.
Friday
NOVEMBER 15
Shabbat celebration:
Sha’ar Communities
hosts Friday Night Live!
with music and melodies,
inspiring teachings,
spirituality, creative
ritual, activities, and food
at a private location,
6:30 p.m. JoAnne, (201)
213-9569 or joanne@
shaarcommunities.org.
Shabbat in Closter:
Temple Beth El offers
services led by Rabbi
David S. Widzer and
Cantor Rica Timman with
the Shabbat Unplugged
Band, 7:30 p.m. 221
Schraalenburgh Road.
(201) 768-5112 or www.
tbenv.org.
Saturday
NOVEMBER 16
Shabbat in Emerson:
Congregation B’nai Israel
offers its monthly family
Shabbat, with separate
groups for different ages,
celebrating Chanukah,
10 a.m. Pizza, salads,
and ice cream lunch.
53 Palisade Ave. (201)
265-2272 or bnaioffice@
bisrael.com.
Family entertainment/
dinner in Paramus:
The APT parents
group at the JCC of
Paramus/Congregation
Beth Tikvah offers
entertainment by Gemini,
including comedy,
ventriloquism, and
magic, 7 p.m. Gemini has
performed in Las Vegas,
Atlantic City, Caroline’s
Comedy Club, and on
Letterman, Leno, and
HBO. Chinese dinner.
East 304 Midland Ave.
Reservations, (201) 262-
7691, www.jccparamus.
org or julieleopold@
yahoo.com.
Music in Leonia: Eugene
Marlow’s Heritage
Ensemble performs
at Congregation Adas
Emuno, 7 p.m. Featured
band members include
Grammy Award-nominee
Bobby Sanabria. Coffee
and dessert. 254 Broad
Ave. (201) 592-1712 or
www.adasemuno.org.
Sunday
NOVEMBER 17
Holiday boutique:
The Sisterhood of
the Fair Lawn Jewish
Center/Congregation
B’nai Israel offers its
vendor boutique, with
handcrafted jewelry,
ceramics, scarves, art,
buckles, makeup, As
Seen on TV items,
Judaica from Priceless
Possessions, and gifts
from Teaneck’s Cohen
Printing, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
10-10 Norma Ave. (201)
796- 5040.
In New York
Sunday
NOVEMBER 10
School open house
for women: Yeshiva
University holds an open
house for women. 500
West 185th St. (212) 960-
5277 or www.yu.edu/
NJstandard.
Kristallnacht: The
Museum of Jewish
Heritage — A Living
Memorial to the
Holocaust marks the
75th anniversary of
Kristallnacht with
NYU historian Marion
Kaplan discussing the
“November Pogrom,”
2:30 p.m. Inaugural
program of a series
honoring the 50th
anniversary of the
ordination of Temple
Emanu-El’s senior rabbi
emeritus, Rabbi Ronald
B. Sobel. 36 Battery
Place. (646) 437-4202 or
www.mjhnyc.org.
Sunday
NOVEMBER 17
School open house for
men: Yeshiva University
holds an open house for
men. 500 West 185th St.
(212) 960-5277 or www.
yu.edu/NJstandard.
Aliyah seminar:
Nefesh B’Nefesh holds
an aliyah seminar for
medical professionals
and students in the
Convene Conference
Center, 730 Third Ave.,
between 45th and 46th
streets, 12:30 p.m. (866)
4-ALIYAH or www.nbn.
org.il.
Singles
Sunday
NOVEMBER 10
Senior singles meet in
West Nyack: Singles
65+ meet at the JCC
Rockland, 11 a.m. 450
West Nyack Road. Gene
Arkin, (845) 356-5525.
Sunday
NOVEMBER 17
Singles meet in
Caldwell: New Jersey
Jewish Singles 45+ hosts
a pre-Thanksgiving/
Chanukah celebration at
Congregation Agudath
Israel, 12: 30 p.m. Lunch.
$10. 20 Academy Road.
(973) 226-3600 or
singles@agudath.org.
Friday
November 22nd 8pm
Michael
Feinstein Trio
Sponsored by
The Blanche and Irving Laurie Foundation
Saturday
November 23rd 8pm
Jackie
Mason
Character tot
Shabbat in
Franklin Lakes
Join characters resembling Sponge-
Bob, Elmo, Spiderman, and Tinkerbell
at Character Tot Shabbat on Friday,
November 15, from 4 to 5 p.m., at the
Chabad Center, 375 Pulis Avenue, in
Franklin Lakes.
The monthly program for children
up to 6, with their parents, features
lively Shabbat songs with props and
favorite children’s characters. There
also will be a kid-friendly dinner and
Torah crafts using food products.
More Tot Shabbats have been sched-
uled for December 13, January 10, Feb-
ruary 7, and March 7.
For information, call (201) 848-0449
or go to www.chabadplace.org.
From a recent tot Shabbat.
COURTESY CHABAD
40 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013
JS-40*
Bubblemania, an “eye-
popping, belly-laughing,
fun-filled bubble extrava-
ganza,” is coming to the
Wayne YMCA on Sunday,
November 24, at 11 a.m.
The unique and popu-
lar show combines artistic
skills, visual comedy, quick
wit, and big band swing
music with liquid spheres,
ranging from intricate
bubble sculptures to giant
bubbles that can encase
onlookers.
To buy tickets online,
go to www.wayneymca.
org and click on the Rosen
Theater icon at the right,
or call (973) 595-0100.
The Y is at 1 Pike Drive in
Wayne. The Metro YMCAs
of the Oranges is a partner
of the YM-YWHA of North
Jersey.
Pinkalicious at bergenPAC
The Bergen Performing Arts Center in
Englewood presents “Pinkalicious” on
Sunday, November 24, at 1 and 4 p.m.
The show, in its sixth year, began at Vital
Theatre Company’s home theater at 76th
Street and Broadway. Tickets are available
at www.ticketmaster.com or www.bergen-
pac.org or at the box office, (201) 227-1030.
Bubblemania
coming to Wayne
COURTESY WAYNE Y
Amphion String Quartet JANETTE BECKMAN
World’s oldest Holocaust survivor
honored with words, film, and music
On Wednesday, November 20, at 7
p.m., the Museum of Jewish Heritage
— A Living Memorial to the Holocaust
in Manhattan will welcome pianist
Caroline Stoessinger and the Amphion
String Quartet as they present “Living
Legend: Alice Herz-Sommer,” a loving
tribute to the world’s oldest Holocaust
survivor. Herz-Sommer, 109, who lives
in England, will be honored at the
museum with words, music, and film.
Born in Prague in 1903 to a family
of Jewish intellectuals and musicians,
Herz-Sommer socialized with the likes
of Kafka. In 1943, she, her husband,
and their young son were deported to
Theresienstadt. An accomplished con-
cert pianist, she played more than 100
concerts for her fellow prisoners. Her
son was one of only 93 children to sur-
vive that camp.
Stoessinger, a pianist and a professor
of music at John Jay College of Criminal
Justice, is working on a documentary
film about Alice Herz-Sommer.
The Amphion String Quartet is a
winner of the 2011 Concert Artists
Guild Victor Elmaleh Competition. Call
(646) 437-4202 or go to www.mjhnyc.
org.
Alice Herz-Sommer and Caroline
Stoessinger COURTESY MJHNYC
Calendar
R.C.B.C. rwk Kosher
NEW CAFE & PIZZERIA
Bergen County YJCC
Some of our Specialties:
Bagels & Cream Cheese • Omelets • Tuna Melts
Salads • Soups • Pasta • Calzones • Falafels
605 Pascack Rd. • Washington Township, NJ
201-666-6610, ext. 5656
Run and walk event to raise money for Yavneh
Hundreds of runners and walkers from
the community will pound the pave-
ment Sunday in Yavneh Academy’s ninth
Annual Benjamin Schwartz Memorial 5K
Run and One Mile Fun Run/Walk at the
Garden State Plaza.
The event, which benefits the Para-
mus school’s scholarship needs, is
named for the brother of Yavneh parent
and Teaneck resident Mendy Schwartz.
The run typically draws more than 800
participants and has raised more than
$35,000 each year.
Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. fol-
lowed by the 5K run at 8:30 a.m. Break-
fast will be served to participating run-
ners and walkers beginning at 8:45 a.m.
The one-mile event begins at 9:30.
Participants will gather at the Nord-
strom entrance of the mall. For infor-
mation call Heidi Kuperman at 201-262-
8494, ext. 309.
Gallery
JS-41*
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013 41
1 2
3 4
5 6
7
n 1 Teenagers from Temple Emanu-El
of Closter went to the IMAX theater at
the Palisades Mall to see “Jerusalem.”
The synagogue plans a congregational
trip to see the movie on November 17.
COURTESY EMANU-EL
n 2 Sha’ar Communities supported
the work of PetResQ at Woofstock, the
group’s annual outdoor pet adoption fair,
while sharing Sha’ar’s creative approach
to Jewish engagement. COURTESY SHA’AR
n 3 The Jewish Federation of Northern
New Jersey’s Commerce & Professional
Division’s fall power networking breakfast
featured Joe Apfelbaum, left, CEO of Ajax
Union, and Stephanie Abrams, CEO of
SocialFly, center, who discussed how to
market in the virtual world and the impact
on a company’s relationships with clients
and prospects. Steven Adler, second from
left, and Karen Scharfstein, second from
right, were event chairs. JFNNJ secretary
Dan Shlufman is at right. COURTESY JFNNJ
n 4 Adi Rubin, a schlicha for the Jewish
Agency for Israel, leads a workshop with
Club 34, one of the youth groups at Tem-
ple Beth Rishon in Wyckoff. COURTESY TBR
n 5 Yeshiva University’s Bernard Revel
Graduate School of Jewish Studies
recently held the first talk of the fall
semester’s lecture series, “Nehama Lei-
bowitz and Tanakh Study: Yesterday
and Today,” at YU’s Wilf Campus. The
lecture, which drew more than 200,
included personal recollections of Lei-
bowitz by one of her earliest pupils,
Esther Manischewitz, as well as an academic
lecture about Leibowitz’s Bible scholarship
by Revel’s associate dean, Bible professor Dr.
Mordechai Z. Cohen. Manischewitz and Co-
hen both live in Teaneck. COURTESY YU
n 6 Sixth graders at the Moriah School take
part in a simulated archaeological dig as part
of a social studies unit. COURTESY MORIAH
n 7 Author Devyn Rose reads from her book,
“Little Girls Should Not Wear Make-up,” at the
Bergen County YJCC’s Sefer Celebration: A
Festival of Children’s Books. The event, also
featuring Carol Roth, author of “Little Bunny’s
Sleepless Night,” included a book sale to ben-
efit the William Seth Glazer Children’s Book
Fund at the YJCC. COURTESY YJCC
Obituaries
42 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013
JS-42
SAMUEL HALPERN ה”ע
a renowned philanthropist who survived the
holocaust and was a passionate supporter of
israel and the jewish people
a longtime member of the touro
board of governors
friend and confidant to our late founder
and President dr. bernard lander ל”צז
his loss will be felt throughout the
global jewish community
Rabbi Doniel Lander
Rosh HaYeshiva
and Chancellor

Dr. Mark Hasten
Chairman, Board
of Trustees
Dr. Alan Kadish
President
and CEO
THE TOURO COLLEGE &
UNIVERSITY SYSTEM
PAYS TRIBUTE TO
Bruce Granat
Bruce David Granat, 68, of Paramus, for-
merly of New Rochelle, and Manhattan,
died on November 4 in New Brunswick.
Born in the Bronx, he was a graduate of
New York and Pace universities. He owned
Bruce Graphics and also worked in home
improvement. He was an active member of
the Jewish Community Center of Paramus/
Congregation Beth Tikvah.
He is survived by his wife, Marilyn, neé
Schiff, daughters, Karen Barbara ( Jerry),
and Danielle Mirshy (Steven); a brother,
Richard (Nancy); sister and brother-in-law,
Fran and Tom Wills; and grandchildren,
Tyler, David, and Nathan.
Contributions can be made to JCC of
Paramus/CBT, or the cardiac units of
Hackensack University Medical Center or
Robert Wood Johnson Medical Center.
Arrangements were by Gutterman
and Musicant Jewish Funeral Directors,
Hackensack.
Wilma Greston
Wilma Greston of Mamaroneck, N.Y.,
formerly of Paterson, died on November
4. Arrangements were by Louis Suburban
Chapel, Fair Lawn.
Leonard Horn
Leonard Horn, 84, of Del Ray Beach,
Fla., died on October 30 at Hospice of
Palm Beach County.
Born in Brooklyn, he is survived by
his wife, Devora, daughters Donna
Neuhaus and Sharon Horn, both of Fort
Lee, and five grandchildren.
Arrangements were by Eden Memorial
Chapels, Inc., Fort Lee.
Joel Lefkowitz
Joel A. Lefkowitz, 79, of Pompton
Plains, formerly of Paterson, died on
November 3.
An Air Force veteran of the
Korean War, he owned Aerospace
Requirements, Inc. in Paterson before
retiring.
He is survived by his wife, Jean,
children, Ross Damelio and John
Damelio (Barbara); five grandchildren,
and three great-grandchildren.
Donations can be made to St. Jude’s
Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis,
Tenn. Arrangements were by Louis
Suburban Chapel, Fair Lawn.
Gerald Schraub
Gerald “Jerry” Schraub, 74, of Glen Rock
died on September 23.
Born in Elizabeth, he graduated from
Brooklyn Talmudic Academy, City Col-
lege of New York, and Fairleigh Dickinson
University.
He worked in the computer field as a sys-
tems analyst for more than 40 years. He was
a Bronze Life Master in the American Con-
tract Bridge League and a board member of
Unit 106 of the ACBL. He was a member of
Temple Israel & JCC in Ridgewood, where he
held board positions and was an accom-
plished Torah reader.
He is survived by his wife of 45 years, Mar-
ion, neé Kearney, children Deborah Crisp
(Matthew), and Jessica Norman (Maxwell),
both of California; a sister, Helen Krane; five
grandchildren, and nieces, nephews, grand-
nieces, and a grand-nephew.
Donations can be sent to a charity of
choice. Arrangements were by Schoem’s
Menorah Chapel, Paramus.
Bruno Simon
Bruno Simon, 97, of Fort Lee, died on Octo-
ber 30.
Born in Germany, he was a tailor.
Predeceased by his wife, Ruth, neé
Wertheim, he is survived by his children,
Eve Perlman and David Simon; two
grandchildren, and one great-grandchild.
Arrangements were by Eden Memorial
Chapels, Inc., Fort Lee.
Barbara Tamary
Barbara Tamary, 99, died on
October 30.
Born in Queens, she was a member
of the Workmen’s Circle in Hudson
and Bergen counties. She was head of
housekeeping at Manhattan hotels.
Many friends survive her.
Arrangements were by Eden Memorial
Chapels, Inc., Fort Lee.
Kathie Williams
Kathie Williams, neé Friedman, 58, of
Franklin Lakes, formerly of Manhattan
and the Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn.,
area, died on October 30 from
complications following a stem cell
transplant in treatment of non-hodgkins
lymphoma.
Born in Minneapolis, she attended
Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. She
was a past president of Barnert Temple
in Franklin Lakes and volunteered with
many community organizations
She is survived by her husband of
30 years, John; her parents, Paul and
Sandra Friedman; children, Molly and
Sam; and a brother, Kirk Friedman of
Minnetonka, Minn.
Donations can be sent to the Barnert
Temple Lifelong Learning Fund or
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer
Center. Services were at Barnert Temple
with arrangements by Robert Schoem’s
Menorah Chapel, Paramus.
BRIEFS
General Motors using Israeli
technology to develop self-driving cars
Israel is home to a significant amount of the
technology General Motors is using to cre-
ate the cars of the future, which will include
features such as self-driving capability.
“The technologies that will power
autonomous vehicles include smart
sensi ng, vi si on i magi ng, human
machine interface, WifF and 4G/LTE
communications, and much of that is
being done at our Herzliya facility in
conjunction with GM’s other R&D facility
in Silicon Valley,” said Gil Golan, director
of GM’s Advanced Technical Center in
Israel, the Times of Israel reported.
GM started working in Israel nearly 20
years ago, according to Golan. JNS.ORG
Documents: IDF turned off devices
that could have predicted Yom Kippur War
Newly declassified documents show that
former Israel Defense Forces Military Intel-
ligence Director Eli Zeira asked that sophis-
ticated devices meant to provide an early
warning of any attack remained switched
off before the 1973 Yom Kippur War.
The documents show that Menachem
Digli, then head of the IDF Intelligence
Corps Collection Department, repeatedly
asked Zeira to approve the activation of
the devices, only to be rebuffed each time.
Zeira said, “My criterion for turning [the
devices] on was a situation of uncertainty.”
He said he felt that way only twice before
the war — between September 30 and
October 1, and between October 4 and
October 5, when he learned that Soviet
advisers were leaving Egypt.
When the devices were turned on,
they “did not provide any indication on
a looming war until it actually started,”
according to Zeira. JNS.ORG
Obituaries
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013 43
JS-43
327 Main St, Fort Lee, NJ
201-947-3336 · 888-700-EDEN
www.edenmemorial.com
Pre-Planning Specialists
Graveside and Chapel Services
Barry Wien - NJ Lic. No. 2885
Frank Patti, Jr. - NJ Lic. No. 4169
Arthur Musicant - NJ Lic. No. 2544
Frank Patti, Sr. Director - NJ Lic. No. 2693
. ¸.......... ¸.... ,.¡...
Veterans are Honored Here
We are committed to celebrating the significance of lives that
have been lived, which is why we have always made service
to veterans and their families a priority.
We assure that all deceased veterans have an American
Flag and a Jewish War Veteran Medallion flagholder placed
at their graves at the time of interment. Our Advanced
Planning service has enabled us to expedite military
honors, when requested, because the need for the
documentation is immediate and it is part of the pre-need
protocol. And if requested, an American Flag may drape the
casket at a funeral service.
We have also established an “Honor Wall” of veterans names,
and it is a part of our Annual Veterans Memorial Service.
GUTTERMAN AND MUSICANT
JEWISH FUNERAL DIRECTORS
800-522-0588
WIEN & WIEN, INC.
MEMORIAL CHAPELS
800-322-0533
402 PARK STREET, HACKENSACK, NJ 07601
ALAN L. MUSICANT, Mgr., N.J. LIC. NO. 2890
MARTIN D. KASDAN, N.J. LIC. NO. 4482
IRVING KLEINBERG, N.J. LIC. NO. 2517
Advance Planning Conferences Conveniently Arranged
at Our Funeral Home or in Your Own Home
GuttermanMusicantWien.com
Community Owned & Operated Non Profit Since 1921
Chapel Services from $3,970.00*
Graveside Services from $3,820.00*
*Services include professional charge, chapel or graveside charge, wedge pine unfin. casket,
religious prep, shroud, Shomer (1 shift), refrigeration (24hr.), local removal, grave marker,
memorial pkg. & local hearse charge. Does not include cash disbursements
such as cemetery fees, death certificates, gratuities, etc. Prices effective until 12/31/2013.
Allen Edelstein, Manager • NJ License #3402
841 Allwood Road, Clifton, NJ 07012
(973) 779-3048 www.JewishMemorialChapel.org
201-791-0015 800-525-3834
LOUIS SUBURBAN CHAPEL, INC.
Exclusive Jewish Funeral Chapel
Sensitive to Needs of the Jewish Community for Over 50 Years
13-01 Broadway (Route 4 West) · Fair Lawn, NJ
Richard Louis - Manager George Louis - Founder
NJ Lic. No. 3088 1924-1996
• Serving NJ, NY, FL & Israel
• Graveside services at all NJ & NY cemeteries
• Prepaid funerals and all medicaid funeral benefts honored
“Always within a family’s financial means”
• Our Facilities Will Accommodate
Your Family’s Needs
• Handicap Accessibility From Large
Parking Area
Conveniently Located
W-150 Route 4 East • Paramus, NJ 07652
201.843.9090 1.800.426.5869
Robert Schoem’s Menorah Chapel, Inc
Jewish Funeral Directors
FAMILY OWNED & MANAGED
Generations of Lasting Service to the Jewish Community
• Serving NJ, NY, FL &
Throughout USA
• Prepaid & Preneed Planning
• Graveside Services
Gary Schoem – Manager - NJ Lic. 3811
BRIEFS
Hamas textbooks: Torah and Talmud ‘fabricated’
Hamas has introduced new textbooks into schools in the
Gaza Strip that characterize the Torah and Talmud as
“fabricated,” the New York Times reported.
Gaza schools previously used a curriculum approved
by the Palestinian Authority. The new Hamas textbooks
describe Zionism as a racist movement whose goals
include driving Arabs out of all of the area between the
Nile River in Africa and the Euphrates River in Iraq,
Syria, and Turkey.
“The Jews and the Zionist movement are not related to
Israel, because the sons of Israel are a nation which had
been annihilated,” the books say. JNS.ORG
Netanyahu: No change in Palestinian position since 1993
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Monday in a
Likud-Beiteinu alliance meeting that he sees “no real changes
in the Palestinian position since 1993,” the year the Oslo
Accords were signed.
Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas,
meanwhile, said Israel’s linking of its release of Palestinian
prisoners to expanded construction in the west bank
“is likely to bring about the termination” of the current
Israeli-Palestinian conflict negotiations, the Palestinian
news agency WAFA reported.
But Netanyahu said, “If the Palestinians can’t even meet
the agreements reached so far — we release prisoners but
continue building — how can I be sure they will live up to the
bigger issues, which their society is sure to find much more
controversial?”
“If you want to lead — get up and make the hard decisions.
That’s what I did and I expect the Palestinians to do the same,”
Netanyahu said, according to i24news. JNS.ORG
Israeli-Palestinian conflict deal
should have ‘minimal’ U.S. involvement, poll says
Sixty-two percent of American respondents in a new Anti-
Defamation League survey said an agreement to resolve
the Israeli-Palestinian conflict “must be reached with min-
imal involvement from the U.S.”
In the same poll, 76 percent of respondents said Israel
“can be counted on as a strong, loyal U.S. ally,” while
17 percent disagreed with that statement. Forty-eight
percent said they sympathized with Israel when it comes
to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, compared to 16 percent
who said they sympathize with the Palestinians. JNS.ORG
Classified
44 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013
JS-44
(201) 837-8818
We pay cash for
Antique Furniture
Used Furniture
Oil Paintings
Bronzes ❖ Silver
Porcelain ❖ China
Modern Art
Top Dollar For Any Kind of Jewelry &
Chinese Porcelain & Ivory
Over 25 years courteous service to tri-state area
We come to you ❖ Free Appraisals
Call Us!
ANS A
201-861-7770 ❖ 201-951-6224
www.ansantiques.com
Shommer
Shabbas
ANTIQUES
201-894-4770
Tyler Antiques
• Established by Bubbe in 1940! •
Antiques Wanted
Top Prices Paid
• Oil Paintings • Silver
• Bronzes • Porcelain
• Oriental Rugs • Furniture
• Marble Sculpture • Jewelry
• Tiffany Items • Pianos
• Chandeliers • Bric-A-Brac
Shomer Shabbos
tylerantiquesny@aol.com
Sterling Associates Auctions
SEEKING CONSIGNMENT AND OUT RIGHT PURCHASES
Sculpture • Paintings • Porcelain • Silver
Jewelry • Furniture • Etc.
TOP CASH PRICES PAID
201-768-1140 • www.antiquenj.com
sterlingauction@optonline.net
70 Herbert Avenue, Closter, N.J. 07642
ANTIQUES
Fuel surcharge added up to 10%· Additional charge may be applied to credit card payment
CAR SERVICE
Residential Dumpster Specials • 10 YDS • 15 YDS • 20 YDS
(201) 342-9333 · (973) 340-7454
WE REMOVE
• Pianos • Furniture
• Junk • Appliances
• Demo Work
WE CLEAN UP
• Attics • Basements • Yards
• Garages • Apartments
• Construction Debris
RUBBISH REMOVAL
Rick’s
CLEANOUTS INC.
SENIOR CITIZENS
10% OFF!
SAME DAY
SERVICE
CLEANING & HAULING
FLORIDA CONDO FOR RENT
VACATION CONDO-
DELRAY BEACH
Magnifcent new 55 plus com-
munity. Beautifully furnished 1
Bedroom. Great location! Near
Beach, Shopping, Restaurants.
Reasonable! Available Nov.,
Dec., Jan., April & May
215-576-0559
MOVING SALE
MOVING SALE
• Queen Size Rosewood
Bedroom Set
• Antique Chest
• Chinese Rug
• Queen Anne Table &
Chairs
• Plus Assorted Furniture &
Other Extras
“Very Reasonable”
201-489-4747
CEMETERY PLOTS FOR SALE
BETH ISRAEL/WOODBRIDGE,
NJ - 2 Gravesites, $1050 each
OBO. Call Mrs. K 561-740-4542
CRYPTS FOR SALE
TWO person, head-to-head, Gar-
den of Memories, Washington
Township, N.J. 2nd tier, eye level.
Desirable location! Paid $18,000,
asking $17,200. 201-803-9792
HELP WANTED
BANK TELLER -P/T
First Commerce Bank
Position available in
Closter & Teaneck
Able to work fexible schedule,
customer service, computer &
excellent communication skills.
Send resume to:
M.K.Malec, HR
105 River Avenue
Lakewood, NJ. 08701
(F) 732-364-0042
or email:
humanresources@
frstcommercebk.com
EOE/M/F/D/V
HELP WANTED
PART TIME
ADVERTISING SALES
For The
Rockland Jewish Standard
• Knowledge of Rockland Cty
• Previous Media Sales a plus
• You are a people person and
a go-getter.
• Use of Automobile
Generous Commission and
Car Allowance
email resume to:
natalie@jewishmediagroup.com
fax: 201-833-4959
COUNSELING
MOVING AHEAD:
An ongoing group of lively, ma-
ture surviving spouses who
have appreciation for the past,
and enjoy working on the pres-
ent and future.
Members are from varied Jew-
ish backgrounds.
Led by psychologist Dr. Larry
Gingold, a Medicare provider.
Teaneck
For more information:
201-736-9430
TUTORING
HELP YOUR CHILD HAVE A
SUCCESSFUL SCHOOL YEAR
Professional &
Proven Tutoring Services
• Reading Specialist
•Special Education Teacher
• Grades K - 8
• Test Prep Strategies
201-346-9895
TUTORING
HIGHLY EXPERIENCED
READING & LEARNING
SPECIALIST
with specialties in
WRITING...ORGANIZATION...
COMPREHENSION...STUDY
SKILLS
Tutoring in Your Home or Mine
(H) 201-346-1189
(C) 201-723-9225
SITUATIONS WANTED
A CARING experienced European
woman available now to care for
elderly/sick. Live-in/Out. English
speaking. References. Driver’s lics.
Call Lena 908-494-4540
CARING, experienced, reliable
woman seeks position as compan-
ion to elderly/sick. Days. Own
transportation. Call 908-277-3819
CARING, Pleasant, Reliable, Ex-
perienced CHHA looking to care
for elderly. Live-in. Also available
for Baby Sitting. Enlish speaking.
Call 973-960-6188
CARING, reliable lady with over 20
years experience willing to work 10
to 12 hours anytime/nightime shift
at $10. hour. Excellent references.
201-741-3042
CERTIFIED Home Health Aide/
Companion. I take care of elderly
people! Live-out/day/night/any
hours. Experienced! Good referen-
ces! Call for more particulars.
201-313-6956 or 201-927-9659
CHHA with 10 yrs experience,
live-in, excellent references, valid
driver’s license. Call 973-392-3028,
973-242-3679
EXPERIENCED CHHA and Baby
Sitter looking for live-in position.
Pleasant, caring, references. Call
973-816-3391
SITUATIONS WANTED
FEMALE Aide looking for Live-in
position to care for your loved one.
Excellent references. Call Sophia
347-277-4219; 201-820-3098
FEMALE AIDE looking for private
live-in position. I am experienced,
dependable, caring and trustwor-
thy. References available. Call
201-920-5924
HEBREW Day School Teacher.
Fluent in Hebrew, English, Russi-
an. Five years experience teaching
in Israel. Email: E.M.S.Rosen-
berg@gmail.com; cell 201-993-
1807
SPORTSWRITER adept at cover-
ing all team sports on both national
and local level. Have covered
Mets, Giants and NJ Nets. Can
cover all angles of sports; fnancial,
team or individual. Also interested
in writig about Travel.
Call: David 973-641-6781 or email:
DavidFox1114@aol.com
MATURE Homemaker/Aide avail-
able to give TLC to sick/elderly.
Willing to work fexible hours
/shifts. Good references. Call 201-
488-3652
SITUATIONS WANTED
DAUGHTER
FOR A DAY, LLC
LICENSED & INSURED
FOR YOUR
PROTECTION
• Case Management
• Handpicked
Certified Home
Health Aides
• Creative
companionship
interactive,
intelligent
conversation &
social outings
• Lifestyle Transitions
• Assist w/shopping,
errands, Drs, etc.
• Organize/process
paperwork,
bal. checkbook,
bookkeeping
• Resolve medical
insurance claims
Free Consultation
RITA FINE
201-214-1777
www.daughterforaday.com
CLEANING SERVICE
POLISH CLEANING WOMAN
- Homes, Apartments, Offices-
14 years experience, excellent
references.
Affordable rates!
Izabela 973-572-7031
Estates Bought & Sold
Fine Furniture
Antiques
Accessories
Cash Paid
201-920-8875
T U
NICHOLAS
ANTIQUES
BOOKS FOR SALE
SEFORIM
We sell and buy
new and used books.
• Hebrew • Judaica
• Children books -
English and Hebrew
•Learning Hebrew Books
visit us at:
WWW.LASHONKODESH.COM
or call us at: 201-414-7190
FURNITURE REPAIR
PARTY PLANNER
To advertise call
201-837-8818
Classified
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013 45
JS-45
Call us.
We are waiting for
your classifed ad!
201-837-8818
Solution to last week’s puzzle. This week’s puzzle is
on page 36.
CLEANING & HAULING
SITUATIONS WANTED
FEMALE Aide looking for Live-in
position to care for your loved one.
Excellent references. Call Sophia
347-277-4219; 201-820-3098
FEMALE AIDE looking for private
live-in position. I am experienced,
dependable, caring and trustwor-
thy. References available. Call
201-920-5924
HEBREW Day School Teacher.
Fluent in Hebrew, English, Russi-
an. Five years experience teaching
in Israel. Email: E.M.S.Rosen-
berg@gmail.com; cell 201-993-
1807
SPORTSWRITER adept at cover-
ing all team sports on both national
and local level. Have covered
Mets, Giants and NJ Nets. Can
cover all angles of sports; fnancial,
team or individual. Also interested
in writig about Travel.
Call: David 973-641-6781 or email:
DavidFox1114@aol.com
MATURE Homemaker/Aide avail-
able to give TLC to sick/elderly.
Willing to work fexible hours
/shifts. Good references. Call 201-
488-3652
Jewish Music with an Edge
Ari Greene · 201-837-6158
AGreene@BaRockorchestra.com
www.BaRockOrchestra.com
Free
Estimates
Roof
Repairs
201-487-5050
83 FIRST STREET
HACKENSACK, NJ 07601
ROOFING · SIDING GUTTERS · LEADERS
HACKENSACK HACKENSACK HACKENSACK HACKENSACK HACKENSACK
R RR RROO OO OO OO OOFING FING FING FING FING
C CC CCO OO OO. .. ..
INC. INC. INC. INC. INC.
ROOFING
CLEANING SERVICE
BOOKS FOR SALE
DRIVING SERVICE
MICHAEL’S CAR
SERVICE
LOWEST RATES
• Airports
• Manhattan/NYC
• School Transportation
201-836-8148
FLOORING
American Oak
Hardwood Floors
25 Years of Experience
Installation of All Types of
Carpets, Floors & Borders
Staining & Refinishing
Complete Repair Service
Quality Products
Free Estimates
Fully Insured
Oakland · Rutherford
201-651-9494 · 201-438-7105
FURNITURE FOR SALE
BEDROOM DRESSER
Like New
High Boy, 5 drawers
51.5 H x 33 W
Cherry color stained wood
$150.00
Call Karen
201-321-1839
FURNITURE REPAIR
FURNITURE DOCTOR
Why Buy New?
Repair The Old!
Repair • Refnish
Free Estimate
201-384-4526
HANDYMAN
Your Neighbor with Tools
Home Improvements & Handyman
Shomer Shabbat · Free Estimates
Over 15 Years Experience
Adam 201-675-0816 Jacob
Lic. & Ins. · NJ Lic. #13VH05023300
www.yourneighborwithtools.blogspot.com
HOME IMPROVEMENTS
BEST BEST
of the
Home Repair Service
Carpentry
Decks
Locks/Doors
Basements
Bathrooms
Plumbing
Tiles/Grout
Painting
Kitchens
Electrical
Paving/Masonry
Drains/Pumps
Maintenence
Hardwood Floors
NO JOB IS TOO SMALL
24 Hour x 5 1/2 Emergency Services
Shomer Shabbat Free Estimates
1-201-530-1873
B”H
General Repairs
PLUMBING
Complete Kitchen &
Bath Remodeling
Boilers · Hot Water Heaters · Leaks
EMERGENCY SERVICE
Fully Licensed, Bonded and Insured
NO JOB IS TOO SMALL!
201-358-1700· Lic. #12285
APL Plumbing & Heating LLC
RUBBISH REMOVAL
CHICHELO
RUBBISH REMOVED
973-325-2713 · 973-228-7928
201-704-0013
Appliances
Furniture
Wood·Metals
Construction
Debris
Homes · Estates
Factories · Contractors
P.O. Box 96119 Washington, D.C. 20090 | (800) 813-0557 | mazon.org
“We can’t put off paying my mom’s
medical bills and her oxygen, so we
struggle to get enough to eat.”
- Rhonda
Every day, hungry people have to make impossible choices, often
knowing that, no matter which option they choose, they will have
to accept negative consequences. It shouldn’t be this way.
MAZON is working to end hunger for Rhonda and the millions of
Americans and Israelis who struggle with food insecurity.
Please donate to MAZON today.
©2012 MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger/Barbara Grover
Home Design
46 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013
JS-46*
Bathroom Design Specialists
We do the entire job! Let the experts renovate your home.
For over 15 years we have been renovating bathrooms in
Bergen and Passaic Counties. We treat your home as our own!
COMPLETE gut and all debris removed.
NEW sheetrock and spackle · NEW ceramic tile walls and floor
ALL NEW fixtures, toilet, tub, sink and vanity
NEW medicine cabinet and light bar · NEW ceiling light/fan
NEW GFI receptacle and new switches
N.J. Contractor Lic. #13VHO1463800
Fully Insured… Pictures & References Available
Call Now… 973-696-6619 or 973-305-0980
“Custom Bath Remodeling”
ALL DECKS AND IMPROVEMENT, WAYNE, NJ · www.alldecksandimprovement.com
We also do full basement remodeling, full kitchen remodels, windows,
decks, and additions. Contact us now for your free in-home consultation.
WINTER SPECIAL
$9,995
Complete 5x7 Full Bathroom
Renovation
ASK ABOUT OUR OTHER SPECIALS!
Electric radiant heater warms bathroom floors
Economical addition adds comfort and a touch of luxury
MARK J. DONOVAN
Keep your bathroom comfy and cozy
this coming winter by installing an elec-
tric radiant heated bathroom floor sys-
tem. Installing an electric radiant heated
bathroom floor is a bit of a luxury, but it
is relatively inexpensive compared with
running tubes and installing a hydronic
floor heating system. Moreover, there’s
not the worry and risk of getting a bro-
ken tube and having water damage to
your home, as is often the case with a
hydronic system.
A typical wire-mesh mat electric
radiant heated bathroom floor system
will cost you about $10 per square foot
to install. In regard to operating costs,
on average expect to spend about 25
to 50 cents a day to heat a bathroom
floor anywhere from 80 to 100 square
feet in size.
Electric radiant floor heating is rela-
tively easy to install. The systems com-
prise mesh and wire mats, which are
installed underneath tiled or stone
floors, and an adjustable thermostat
that is located in the bathroom. With
some types of electric radiant floor
heating systems, the wire-mesh mat is
trimmable so you can tailor it to the
particular dimensions of the room.
Electric radiant floor heating sys-
tems can be installed underneath car-
pet, wood and vinyl floors; however,
they are not as efficient in these appli-
cations. The main reason for this is
that, unlike tile or stone, carpet, wood
and vinyl flooring do not transfer heat
as well. Instead, they act more like
insulators.
The systems are designed to pro-
vide a low heat that mainly keeps
the floor feeling comfortably warm.
Typically, they heat a floor to approxi-
mately 90 to 95 F. This said, electric
radiant heated bathroom floors also
help to create overall warmth in the
bathroom. However, they should be
considered a supplemental heating
system.
Besides the bathroom, electric radi-
ant floor heating is ideal for kitch-
ens and room additions where tile or
stone is the flooring type. Often when
building a room addition, a larger
furnace needs to be installed in the
home. With the use of electric radiant
floor heating systems, sometimes the
need to install a larger furnace in the
home can be avoided.
Advantages of electric
radiant floor heating
systems
Besides the ease of installation,
electric radiant floor heating has a
number of additional advantages.
Systems are absolutely silent. There is
no creaking of pipes or whooshing of
air, as is the case with hot water and
air heating systems.
Tile and stone, as well as a concrete
slab flooring substrate, have a large
thermal mass. Thus, they retain heat
for a long time after the electric radiant
heating system has been turned off.
Electric radiant floor heating sys-
tems can cut down energy costs on the
main heating system, such as an oil or
gas HVAC system.
Disadvantages of electric
radiant floor heating
systems
You can’t install them after you’ve
installed your new tiled floor. Thus,
you need to plan ahead. A retrofit job
is not an option.
Electricity is expensive. So even
though you may save some money on
your main heating system’s operating
costs, your overall energy costs may
creep up a bit.
If an electrical wire breaks in the
wire-mesh mat and the electric radi-
ant floor heating system becomes
inoperable, repair is very expensive.
That said, the likelihood of a broken
or corroded wire is fairly slim because
it is in a very static and dry position
underneath the tiled floor.
CREATORS.COM
Mark J. Donovan’s website is http://
www.HomeAdditionPlus.com.
A typical
wire-mesh
mat electric
radiant heated
bathroom floor
system will cost
you about $10
per square foot
to install.
Home Design
JS-47
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013 47
Window Fashions Direct Advantage:
4 Quality Products & Services 4 Factory Direct for Best Value
4 Free Shop-at-Home Service 4 Expert Sales and Installation
4 Lifetime Warranty
Factory/Showroom:
50 Louis Street · South Hackensack, NJ 07606
201-329-7422
www.windowfashionsdirect.net
Extraordinary
Window
Fashions
at
Factory
Direct
Prices
Cellular Shades · Roller Shades · Woven Woods
Wood & Faux Wood Blinds · Vertical Blinds
Shutters · Window Shadings
Draperies · Motorization
HOME
FURNISHINGS,
ACCESSORIES, GIFTS,
AND MORE…
67 Closter Plaza Shopping Center
Closter, New Jersey 07624
Phone: 201-784-6061 · Fax: 201-784-6082
25% OFF ONE ITEM
Expires 11/30/13
Not Valid on Sales, Clearance & Florals
Reg. Price
KIWI CLOSETS
Adam J. Goldberg
171 Garfeld Avenue
Passaic Park, NJ 07055
T 973-471-9696 • F 973-471-7610
kiwiclosets@yahoo.com
Great Designs at
Reasonable Prices!
We’ll organize and
maximize your space
with our creative designs
• Finest quality materials
and installation
• Prompt turn-around
• Affordable pricing
Adam J. Goldberg
171 Garfeld Avenue · Passaic Park, NJ
973-471-9696
kiwiclosets@yahoo.com
Why shlep to “California”?!
CLOSETS
KIWI
Paying Cash for:
Dishes • Glassware • Watches
Stamp Collections • Old Toys • Lamps
• Paintings • Dolls • Hummels
Jewelry - Rings, etc. • Flatware • Coins
Antique Furniture • Trains
Pocket Watches • Diamonds • Rugs
Buying Musical Instruments of All Kinds
We will turn your old stuff into cash!
Please call or stop in.
NOW OPEN!
Paramus Antiques
Estate Buyers
300 Route 17 North, Paramus
(3/4 mile north of Century Rd.)
Store: 201-967-0222 · Cell: 201-334-2257 Ask for Paul
Hours: Mon-Fri 9am-6-pm, Sat 9-9, or by appointment
Buying Anything Old!
One Piece or a House Full
Will Travel - House Calls
FREE
APPRAISALS
Ramapo College of New Jersey holds topping off
ceremony for new Adler Center for Nursing Excellence
Ramapo College’s new Adler Center for
Nursing Excellence moved a step closer
to completion recently, as donors Myron
and Elaine Adler and College officials
signed the last beam to “top off” the two-
and one-half story structure on the Col-
lege campus.
The Topping Off ceremony is a centu-
ries-old milestone celebrated during con-
struction projects. The beam was signed
by the Adlers, President Peter P. Mercer,
members of the Ramapo College Board
of the Trustees and Board of Governors,
and nursing students, and then raised by
a crane atop the structure.
“It is a wonderful day for us to see our
dream for the nurses of tomorrow come a
step closer to fruition,” said Elaine Adler.
“We feel blessed to able to help Ramapo
College graduate well-educated nursing
professionals who will be at the forefront
of the challenges facing society.”
In November 2010, the Adlers made a
$2 million gift to name the Adler Center
for Nursing Excellence. The Adler Center
will be the new home of Ramapo College’s
highly acclaimed and expanding nursing
programs, as well as state-of-the-art labs
to enhance the education of Ramapo Col-
lege students in the sciences. Ramapo’s
undergraduate nursing program has had
significant increases in enrollment since
its inception in 1993, and a master of sci-
ence in nursing education was added
in 2002. More than 460 students are
enrolled in both nursing programs and
will use the facilities of the Adler Center
for Nursing Excellence.
The new Adler Center for Nurs-
ing Excellence features three simula-
tion rooms where students will learn
to address emergencies involving their
computer-simulated patients. Nursing
faculty located in a control room recreate
medical scenarios that play out each day
in hospitals, making each patient encoun-
ter unique. Students are videotaped; in a
debriefing room, they receive invaluable
feedback from their instructors on how
to improve their skills and reaction times.
48 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013
JS-48
YES, I WOULD LIKE
A CHANUKAH GREETING
#1 #2 #3 #4
(or call 201-837-8818 for other sizes)
Wording ____________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
I want a shared greeting
Name _______________________________________________________________
Town _______________________________________________________________
Name ______________________________________________________________
Address ____________________________________________________________
Phone ______________________________________________________________
Credit Card # ________________________________________________________
Exp. date _________________________ Code _____________________________
Fax to 201-833-4959 or mail (with a check if you prefer) to:
The Jewish Standard · 1086 Teaneck Rd. · Teaneck, NJ 07666
DEADLINE NOV. 22
Wish your family, friends,
Jewish Standard readers
and customers a
Happy Holiday in our
CHANUKAH
GREETING
SECTION
NOVEMBER 29
You can have your
own personal greeting
(see samples at right)
OR add your family or
business name and town
to a shared greeting for $36
T
r
a
d
itio
n
!
-NAME-
Ad #1 - 1
1
/2"w x 2"d $36
Best Wishes
for a
Happy
Chanukah
-NAME-
Ad #4 - 5"w x 2½"d $135
We wish
the Jewish
Community
a Very Happy
Chanukah
Ad #3 - 3
1
/8"w x 2"d $72
May Your Home be Blessed
with Joy and Peace this
Chanukah Season

-NAME-
Wishing you a
Happy Chanukah
Mr. & Mrs. Mel Schwartz, Fair Lawn
Abby, Len, Rhea & Barry Roth, Teaneck
Dr. & Mrs. Steven Katz, Paramus
The Feingolds, Englewood Clifs
The Jewelry Place, Mahwah
Regal Realtors, Wayne
The Dental Group, Bergenfeld
SAMPLE SHARED GREETING PAGE
Ad #2 - 1.5"w x 3"d $54
-NAME-
Wishing
You a
Joy-Filled
Chanukah
Real Estate & Business
JS-49
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013 49
Need Help With
Your House Purchase?
We can help with a wide variety of
available programs, quick underwriting
and closings! Rates are still low, so call
us for a pre-approval or to look into
refinancing into a 15-year fixed,
ARM or for cash out!
Classic Mortgage, LLC
Serving NY, NJ & CT
25 E. Spring Valley Ave., Ste 100, Maywood, NJ
201-368-3140
www.classicmortgagellc.com
MLS #31149
Larry DeNike
President
MLO #58058
ladclassic@aol.com
Daniel M. Shlufman
Managing Director
MLO #6706
dshlufman@classicllc.com
Orna Jackson, Sales Associate 201-376-1389
TENAFLY
894-1234
TM
WASHINGTON TWP SECLUDED $1,588,888
Private country setting on 1.5 acres, 7 bedroom, 8 bath ranch is blend of modern &
traditional, master suite has 3 rooms, plus 2nd master with 2 baths, granite kitchen,
skylights, Jacuzzi, 2-sided fireplace, sauna, diving pool,
cabana, gas BBQ, garage for 7 cars.
ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS
568-1818
TENAFLY
894-1234
CRESSKILL
871-0800
ALPINE/CLOSTER
768-6868
RIVER VALE
666-0777
TEANECK OPEN HOUSES
1-3 PM
For Our Full Inventory & Directions
Visit our Website
www.RussoRealEstate.com
(201) 837-8800
READERS’
CHOICE
2013
FIRST PLACE
REAL ESTATE AGENCY
265 Grove St. $439,900
Beaut 5 Brm Tudor Col. Lg Ent Hall, LR/fplc, DR, EIK, Den/Sun
Rm. Screened Prch. Full, High Ceil Bsmt. H/W Flrs. 2 Car Gar.
330 Sherman Ave. $400,000
Lov 3 Brm, 2.5 Bth Col. Liv Rm/fplc, Lg, Form Din Rm/Sliders
to Deck, Updated, Grnte Eat In Kit, 3rd Flr Vaulted Ceil Office.
Fin Bsmt Recrm. Gar.
312 Van Buren $369,900
Beaut Updated Col. Lg Rms. Heated Encl Prch, LR/fplc, DR,
Den, Expand EIK, Deck. 4 BRs. Fin Walk-up Attic. Full Bsmt.
H/W Flrs. Gar.
311 Herrick $399,900
Side Hall Col. LR, Den, Form DR, Gorgeous Kit/Espresso
Cabinetry/Stainless Appl. 3 BRs, 2 Designer Bths. Gar.
Gazebo.
259 Elm Ave. $339,000
Well Maintained 3 BR (incl Mstr on 1st flr), 2 Bth Cape on
50’ X 150’ Prop. Updated Kit & Bths. H/W Flrs. Fin Bsmt.
C/A/C. Gar.
2-4 PM
1077 Dartmouth St. 309,900
Lg W Englwd Prop (61’X120’)/Expansion Poss. LR/fplc, Form
DR, EIK, Lg 1st Flr Mstr BR, Scrnd Por, Lg 2nd Flr BR + Fin
Rm. Gar.
TEANECK VIC OPEN HOUSE
1-3 PM
11 Melrose Ave., Bergenfield $345,900
Lov Expand Col. LR, Form DR, Deck, Mod EIK, 2 BR’s incl
Mstr on 1st Flr, 2 Addl 2nd Flr BRs. 2 Bths Tot. Part Fin
Bsmt/Fam Rm. C/A/C. Gar. Lots of Updates!

FOLLOW TEAM V&N ON FACEBOOK AND TWITTER
www.vera-nechama.com
201-692-3700
SMART * EXPERIENCED * BOLD
SUNDAY NOV 10TH - OPEN HOUSES
1533 Rugby Rd, Tnk $749,000 12:00-2:00pm
728 Cottage Pl, Tnk $579,000 1:00-3:00pm
196 Van Buren Ave, Tnk $519,000 1:00-3:00pm
420 Windsor Rd, Bgfld $419,000 1:00-3:00pm
JUST SOLD!
1672 Hanover St, Teaneck
NEW LISTING!
348 Winthrop Rd, Teaneck - $639,000
Real Estate Associates
Ann Murad, ABR, GRI
Sales Associate
NJAR Circle of Excellence Gold Level, 2001, 2003-2006
Silver Level, 1997-2000, 2002,2009,2011,2012
Direct: (201) 664 6181, Cell: (201) 981 7994
E-mai l : anni eget si t sol d@msn. com
123 Broadway, Woodcliff Lake, NJ 07677
(201) 573 8811 ext. 316
Each Office Independenty Owned and Operated
“ANNIE GETS IT SOLD”
EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY
HOUSING EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
Allan Dorfman
Broker/Associate
201-461-6764 Eve
201-970-4118 Cell
201-585-8080 x144 Office
Realtorallan@yahoo.com
SERVING BERGEN COUNTY
Serving Bergen County since 1985.
FORT LEE - THE COLONY
■ One bedroom. Renovated. High floor.
Sunset views. $184,900
■ Spectacular one bedroom. High floor. Fully
decorator furnished. $234,900
■ Two bedroom.Renovated. Full river views
with laundry. $399,000
■ Two bedroom. Fully renovated. Spectacular
master bath with jacuzzi. East and west
views. $569,000
Rentals available
starting at $2150 per month
Provident Bank Foundation
supports Zoe’s Place
The Provident Bank Foundation has provided a $3,500
grant to Zoe’s Place to enable the teen moms and their
babies to live at the house under the supervision of a
housemother.
“Zoe’s Place relies on the support of our community
partners and appreciates the $3,500 donation from the
Provident Bank Foundation,” said Jane Fiedler, president
of Zoe’s Place. “Provident Bank has been supportive of
the organization from the beginning and we are greatly
appreciative of all their support.”
Zoe’s Place provides safe, supervised housing to meet
the critical need for education, job skills, and support ser-
vices for pregnant teens and teen moms that will guide the
girls into self-suficiency. Zoe’s Place is designed to meet
these goals in a supportive, caring environment, drawing
on each girl’s strengths so that she may realize her full
potential.
“We are delighted to support Zoe’s Place in its efforts to
provide these teen moms with a safe supervised home,”
said Jane Kurek, executive director of The Provident Bank
Foundation. “By supporting the housemother position,
the women of the home are able to live more indepen-
dently and be a part of the community which is an impor-
tant part of the foundation’s mission.”
More information about Zoe’s Place is available at www.
zoesplaceinc.org or by calling (973) 4581007. For more
information about The Provident Bank Foundation, visit
www.ProvidentNJFoundation.org or call (862) 2603990.
The Provident Bank Foundation was established by
New Jersey’s oldest bank in 2003 to enhance the qual-
ity of life in New Jersey through support of not-for-proit
groups, institutions, schools, and other organizations that
provide services in communities served by The Provident
Bank. Since its founding, the foundation has provided
more than $18 million in grants for programs focusing on
education, health, wellness, recreation, the arts and social
and civic services.
Like us on Facebook
facebook.com/jewishstandard
Jeff@MironProperties.com · www.MironProperties.com
Ruth@MironProperties.com · www.MironProperties.com/NJ
Each Miron Properties office is independently owned and operated.
Contact us today for your complimentary consultation!
TENAFLY
Lovely 3 BR/2 BTH. C/A/C. $568K
TENAFLY
Tuscany in Bergen County. $879K
TENAFLY
Beautiful Colonial. E.H. cul-de-sac.
TENAFLY
7 BR/8+BTH w/pool. $3,748,000
P
R
I
M
E

L
O
C
A
T
I
O
N
!
U
N
I
Q
U
E

C
O
L
O
N
I
A
L
!
J
U
S
T

S
O
L
D
!
B
R
E
A
T
H
T
A
K
I
N
G

V
I
E
W
S
!
ENGLEWOOD
Spacious Colonial. Prime Area.
ENGLEWOOD
Beautiful Center Hall Col. $749K
ENGLEWOOD
Young pristine Col. $1,395,000
ENGLEWOOD
Amazing Construction. $1,550,000
U
N
D
E
R

C
O
N
T
R
A
C
T
!
I
D
E
A
L

L
O
C
A
T
I
O
N
!
H
A
L
F

A
C
R
E
+
!
M
E
D
I
T
E
R
R
A
N
E
A
N

C
O
L
O
N
I
A
L
!
TEANECK
Pool & Spa. Paradise in Bergen.
TEANECK
3 BR/2 BTH. Move In. Add on.
FORT LEE
2 BR/2.5 BTH. NY skyline view. $599K
FORT LEE
Great 2 BR/2.5 BTH corner unit. $538K
J
U
S
T

S
O
L
D
!
A
M
A
Z
I
N
G

P
O
T
E
N
T
I
A
L
!
T
H
E

P
A
L
I
S
A
D
E
S
!
B
U
C
K
I
N
G
H
A
M

T
O
W
E
R
!
WILLIAMSBURG
Stylish building. Heart of B’klyn.
REGO PARK
2 BR w/terrace & garage. $422K
TRIBECA
Posh penthouse. Prime location.
CHELSEA
Grand 3 BR/2.5 BTH. $2,750,000
S
O
L
D
!
G
R
E
A
T

V
A
L
U
E
!
S
O
L
D
!
I
N
D
I
G
O

C
O
N
D
O
M
I
N
I
U
M
!
CHELSEA
Spacious flex 1 BR. $700,000
MURRAY HILL
Magnificent loft living. Roof deck.
BROOKLYN HEIGHTS
Pre-war bldg. Magic in B’klyn.
WILLIAMSBURG
Great duplex with city views.
C
H
E
L
S
E
A

G
E
M
!
S
O
L
D
!
S
O
L
D
!
J
U
S
T

S
O
L
D
!
Jeffrey Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NY
Ruth Miron-Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NJ
NJ: T: 201.266.8555 • M: 201.906.6024
NY: T: 212.888.6250 • M: 917.576.0776
Remarkable Service. Exceptional Results.
Real Estate & Business
50 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013
JS-50*
NJ Sales Representative
NY Broker
281 Barr Ave.
Teaneck
Nicole Idler did it again!
Call Nicole & put her expertise to work for you.
Office 201-894-1234 · Cell 201 906-9338
LISTED & SOLD at 96%
of asking! She can get
your home SOLD, too!
SELLING YOUR HOME?
Call Susan Laskin Today
To Make Your Next Move A Successful One!
©2013 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.
An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC.
BergenCountyRealEstateSource.com Cell: 201-615-5353
post-1948 Jewish state, levity was a
precious commodity and somewhat
frowned upon, a legacy from Theodore
Herzl and the pioneers. How does one
crack wise so soon after the Shoah or
ind time to kibbitz on the kibbutz when
there are swamps to drain and ields to
plant?
But that was then and this is now.
Humor is irmly entrenched across a
wide swath of Israeli society. Television,
theater, ilm, and the lively arts sparkle
with skits and bits. Nothing is off limits:
For instance: Sara in Jerusalem heard
on the news about a bombing at a
popular café near the home of relatives
in Tel Aviv. She calls in a panic and
reaches her cousin, who assures her that
thankfully, the family is safe.
“And Anat?” Sara asks after the
teenager whose hangout it had been.
“Oh, Anat ,” says her mot her
reassuringly, “Anat’s ine. She’s at
Auschwitz.”
All of this leaves the reader with
an excellent overview of the subject,
although Witte admits that a hard
deinition of Jewish humor is beyond
elusive. Trying to apply the principles
of lexicography to a phenomenon as
fluid and global as a people’s treasured
hi story and excruci ati ng tri al s,
expressed through laughter, is nigh on
impossible, especially when everyone
from schlemiels to sages is targeted.
No Joke
FROM PAGE 37
Nursing school holds open house Nov. 13
H
oly Name Medical Center’s
School of Nursing (HNMC
SON) will be hosting an open
house on Wednesday, Novem-
ber 13 between 3:306 p.m. at 690 Teaneck
Road, Teaneck. Prospective students will
be able to get more information about two-
and three-year Registered Nurse programs
and the one-year Licensed Practical Nurse
program.
The School places emphasis on the
student’s development as a person and
a professional by offering a program of
liberal arts and sciences, nursing theory,
and closely supervised clinical experiences
to prepare the student for nursing practice
and State Board licensing examination.
The academic year extends from mid-
August to late June (two 16-week semesters
and one six-week Spring semester),
allowing eight to nine weeks off during the
summer. Both college and nursing courses
are taught at Holy Name Medical Center
School of Nursing, with some clinical
afiliations at other health care facilities.
The HNMC School of Nursing, through
its collaborative agreement with St. Peter’s
College, offers students the option of
taking an additional three college credits
over the basic curriculum to earn an
Associate of Applied Science (AAS degree)
in the Health Sciences from St. Peter’s
College. The AAS is in addition to the
diploma in Nursing from the Holy Name
Medical Center School of Nursing, and is
awarded to the graduate who has passed
all the prescribed courses and presents
veriication of NCLEX success to Saint
Peter’s College.
The School of Nursing is accredited by
the New Jersey Board of Nursing and the
National League for Nursing Accrediting
Commi ssi on. The School i s al so a
member of the Association of Diploma
Schools of Professional Nursing in New
Jersey, the National Coalition of Medical
Center Associated Schools and Colleges
of Nursing, and the National League for
Nursing.
The School participates in the Federal
Stafford and PLUS Loan programs, the
Federal Pell Grant, and Federal Nursing
Student Loan (NSL). There are alternative
loan programs if Stafford Loan limits are
insuficient. Scholarship information
is also available by linking on to http://
www.college-scholarships.com/free_
scholarship_searches.htm. This site offers
no-cost scholarship searches.
For information about the Holy Name
Medical Center’s School of Nursing, please
email school@holyname.org or call (201)
8333005. For more, visit: www.holyname.
org/SchoolOfNursing.
Joel Simon joins Friedberg
Marlyn Friedberg, bro-
ker- owner of Fri ed-
berg Properties, has
announced the addition
of Joel Simon to her staff
of professional real estate
associates at Friedberg’s
Cresskill ofice.
“Joel brings 25 years
of experience and exper-
tise to local and global
real estate markets and
we are delighted to have
him as a part of our
team” said Mrs. Friedberg.
With a graduate degree from Yeshiva
University and fluency in Hebrew,
Joel’s expertise includes residential
properties and reloca-
tion of individuals and
families. He brings a
deep sense of under-
standing of his client’s
real estate, inancial
and familial needs. Mr.
Simon can be reached
at Friedberg Properties/
Cresskill (201) 8710800
or on his cell phone
2016740037.
Friedberg Properties
& Associates is a full-
service, dynamic real estate company
with locations in Alpine, Cresskill,
Englewood Cliffs, Tenafly, and River
Vale and over 200 agents.
Joel Simon
www.jstandard.com
JS-51
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013 51
Jeff@MironProperties.com · www.MironProperties.com
Ruth@MironProperties.com · www.MironProperties.com/NJ
Each Miron Properties office is independently owned and operated.
Contact us today for your complimentary consultation!
TENAFLY
Lovely 3 BR/2 BTH. C/A/C. $568K
TENAFLY
Tuscany in Bergen County. $879K
TENAFLY
Beautiful Colonial. E.H. cul-de-sac.
TENAFLY
7 BR/8+BTH w/pool. $3,748,000
P
R
I
M
E

L
O
C
A
T
I
O
N
!
U
N
I
Q
U
E

C
O
L
O
N
I
A
L
!
J
U
S
T

S
O
L
D
!
B
R
E
A
T
H
T
A
K
I
N
G

V
I
E
W
S
!
ENGLEWOOD
Spacious Colonial. Prime Area.
ENGLEWOOD
Beautiful Center Hall Col. $749K
ENGLEWOOD
Young pristine Col. $1,395,000
ENGLEWOOD
Amazing Construction. $1,550,000
U
N
D
E
R

C
O
N
T
R
A
C
T
!
I
D
E
A
L

L
O
C
A
T
I
O
N
!
H
A
L
F

A
C
R
E
+
!
M
E
D
I
T
E
R
R
A
N
E
A
N

C
O
L
O
N
I
A
L
!
TEANECK
Pool & Spa. Paradise in Bergen.
TEANECK
3 BR/2 BTH. Move In. Add on.
FORT LEE
2 BR/2.5 BTH. NY skyline view. $599K
FORT LEE
Great 2 BR/2.5 BTH corner unit. $538K
J
U
S
T

S
O
L
D
!
A
M
A
Z
I
N
G

P
O
T
E
N
T
I
A
L
!
T
H
E

P
A
L
I
S
A
D
E
S
!
B
U
C
K
I
N
G
H
A
M

T
O
W
E
R
!
WILLIAMSBURG
Stylish building. Heart of B’klyn.
REGO PARK
2 BR w/terrace & garage. $422K
TRIBECA
Posh penthouse. Prime location.
CHELSEA
Grand 3 BR/2.5 BTH. $2,750,000
S
O
L
D
!
G
R
E
A
T

V
A
L
U
E
!
S
O
L
D
!
I
N
D
I
G
O

C
O
N
D
O
M
I
N
I
U
M
!
CHELSEA
Spacious flex 1 BR. $700,000
MURRAY HILL
Magnificent loft living. Roof deck.
BROOKLYN HEIGHTS
Pre-war bldg. Magic in B’klyn.
WILLIAMSBURG
Great duplex with city views.
C
H
E
L
S
E
A

G
E
M
!
S
O
L
D
!
S
O
L
D
!
J
U
S
T

S
O
L
D
!
Jeffrey Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NY
Ruth Miron-Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NJ
NJ: T: 201.266.8555 • M: 201.906.6024
NY: T: 212.888.6250 • M: 917.576.0776
Remarkable Service. Exceptional Results.
www.jstandard.com
52 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 8, 2013
JS-52
RCBC
Like Glatt Express
Supermarket on
Facebook for daily
specials and offers!
1400 Queen Anne Rd · Teaneck, NJ
201-837-8110
Mashgiach Temidi / Open Sun & Mon 7am-6pm · Tues 7am-7pm
Wed & Thurs 7am-9pm · Fri 7am-2:30pm
The
Qualit y
You
Expect,
The
Attention
You
Deser ve!
Never Sacrificing Quality For Price
Because We Care!

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful