The University of Arizona

>
TOURS 6
>
MAP 26-27
>
MUSEUMS 10-11
Fall/Winter 2009
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3
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
C
ontents
Everything in its Place
As the country’s largest
nonfederal archaeological
repository, the Arizona State
Museum has more than
20,000 boxes of artifacts
dating from prehistoric to
modern times. | 8
Fit at 50
On air since 1959, KUAT is one
of the most watched and most
supported public television
stations in the country. | 22
Red + Blue = Green!
A self-guided tour features
buildings that demonstrate the
UA’s commitment to being a
leader in sustainability. | 30
Academic Calendar 39
Dance 18
Dining Directory 25
Family Weekend/
Homecoming 15
Football Schedule 48
Galleries 43
Getting Around 7
Libraries 48
Museums 10
Music 18
Poetry 35
Steward
Observatory 48
Theater 21
Tours 6
Performances 16
Campus Map 26
Student Union Map 44
Parent-Friendly Map 40
Investing in Ideas
A UA Professor who helps
create planes that are safer
and more fuel-efficient
is the first 1885 Society
Presidential Chair. | 37
Coordinated Care for Kids
A new addition at the Arizona
Health Sciences Center will be
the only outpatient pediatric
center in Southern Arizona
that is dedicated to helping
children with neurological
problems. | 47
Doing the Right Thing
An innovative program
that teaches UA student-
athletes to take action
when their peers are in
trouble has become a
national model. | 12
4
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
5
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
UA
V
isitor
G
uide
The University of Arizona
Visitor Guide is published
twice a year by the Offce
of External Relations and
Arizona Student Media. Its
purpose is to provide useful
information about the UA
to visitors to our dynamic
community.
Editor
Pilar A. Martínez
Director of Campus
Communications,
External Relations
pila@u.arizona.edu
520-626-4348
Assistant Editor
Alexis Blue
Campus Communications
Assistant,
External Relations
ablue@email.arizona.edu
520-626-4407
Advertising & Distribution
Milani Hunt
Marketing Coordinator,
Arizona Student Media
milanih@email.arizona.edu
520-626-8546
Production
Cindy Callahan
Creative Services Manager,
Arizona Student Media
cynthiac@u.arizona.edu
520-621-3377
Circulation: 35,000
http://wc.arizona.edu/ads/
visitorguide
Copies of the UA Visitor Guide
are available at several loca-
tions on and off campus, includ-
ing the UA Visitor Center, the
Information Desk in the Student
Union Memorial Center and the
UA Main Library.
The UA Visitor Center
Heather Lukach, Director
811 N. Euclid Ave.
hlukach@email.arizona.edu
520-621-5130
The University of Arizona
www.arizona.edu
520-621-2211
Welcome to The University of Arizona!
O
n the
C
over
Whether you’re visiting campus as a
prospective student, as the parent of that
student, or as someone who simply wants
to know more about us, we’d like this
guide to give you an idea of what a very
unique place this is.
Don’t let our rain-harvesting cisterns
and solar panels fool you: We’re a lot
older than we look. We were established
in 1885, almost 30 years before Arizona
became a state, and broke ground for
our frst building on
land donated by two
gamblers and a saloon
owner.
Humble beginnings
indeed. Today, we’re
excited about defning
what it means to be
a modern land-grant
university. As we move
toward becoming one
of the 10 best public
research universities in the country, our
values remain the same as they were back
in the late 19th century: to improve the
lives of people in Arizona and beyond
through our research and outreach. You’ll
get a taste for how we’re doing this by
reading this guide. Here are a few high-
lights:
• If this is your frst time to the South-
west – or even your hundredth – take
some time to stop by the Arizona State
Museum, where you’ll be transported
thousands of years into the past. As the
country’s largest nonfederal archaeologi-
cal repository, the museum has more than
20,000 boxes of artifacts – everything from
prehistoric tools to a pair of dentures
from the 1930s (see p. 9).
• When we opened the doors of Old
Main to our frst students in 1891, we of-
fered two areas of study: agriculture and
mining. Back then, of course, we didn’t
know about concepts like “sustainability”
and “climate change.” But we did know it
gets a bit on the warm side here. So when
Old Main was built, it was designed with
deep porches and a partly recessed frst
foor – features that today are considered
“green” construction practices. We’ve con-
tinued that tradition across the years, and
across the campus. Some of our “green”
buildings are highlighted in a self-guided
tour (see p. 30) that I hope you’ll have
time to take while you’re here.
• The UA is about doing the right thing
for the environment – and for each other.
A great example is a student leadership
program (see p. 12) we developed that is
now a national model for NCAA schools.
This innovative program not only teaches
student-athletes to make good choices in
their own lives but how to “step up” and
take action when others are in trouble.
• A new clinic we’re opening at the
Arizona Health Sciences Center (see p.
47) will be the only outpatient pediatric
center in Southern Arizona dedicated to
helping children with neurological prob-
lems. The PANDA Children’s Neurological
Center will bring together UA specialists
in pediatrics, neonatology, epilepsy and
other areas to provide coordinated care
– and the best course of treatment – for
these kids and their families.
• Clinics and classrooms aren’t the
only places where we’re improving lives.
In fact, we’ve been doing some of this
work right inside the homes of Southern
Arizonans for half a century. Arizona Pub-
lic Media – the home of our public radio
and television stations – has been offering
educational and entertainment program-
ming since 1959 and today its television
station KUAT Channel 6 is one of the
most watched and most supported in the
United States (see p. 20).
These stories are just the beginning. I
have tons more to share about the incred-
ible things being done by our faculty, staff
and students. But I think I’ll instead give
you a chance to see it for yourself. Please
spend some time enjoying our campus,
meeting members of our diverse commu-
nity and learning more about where The
University of Arizona came from, where
we are and where we’re going.
Regards,
Robert N. Shelton
President
Dedicated in December, the Richard Jefferson Gymnasium offers
20,000 square feet of athletics practice space. Part of a project that
also included expanding the Mary Roby Gymnastics Training Center
and constructing the Kasser Family Pool within the Hillenbrand Aquat-
ic Center, the gym is named for former UA basketball player Richard
Jefferson, who donated $3.5 million to help fund its construction.
Cover photo by Bill Timmerman; photo at left by Luke Adams.
6
www.arizona.edu
UA
T
ours
Public Campus Tours are offered
by the UA Visitor Center during the
fall and spring semesters. Walking
Tours take place on Wednesday
mornings and Shuttle Bus Tours are
held on the frst Saturday of every
month. All tours begin at 10 a.m.
and start at the Visitor Center. Do-
cent guides share their knowledge
and experiences and participants
learn about UA landmarks, history
and traditions. Reservations are
recommended and can be made
by calling the UA Visitor Center at
621-5130.
Arizona Ambassador Tours are
led by UA students and offered
to prospective students and their
parents by the Offce of Admis-
sions. Old Main, Centennial Hall, a
residence hall, the Manuel Pacheco
Integrated Learning Center, the Stu-
dent Union Memorial Center and
the Main Library are showcased.
Tours are offered weekday morn-
ings and afternoons and Saturday
mornings during the fall and spring
semesters. Call 621-3641 for more
information. Prospective students
can register for campus tours at
www.takeuthere.arizona.edu.
Arizona State Museum Group
Tours are offered by appointment
Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. Visitors can choose from a
variety of guided tours, including a
collections overview or tours of the
museum’s temporary exhibitions,
conservation laboratory, archaeol-
ogy laboratories or library. Tours
are also available for the museum’s
two permanent exhibitions – “Paths
of Life,” which highlights 10 Ameri-
can Indian cultures of Arizona and
northern Mexico, and “The Pottery
Project,” which features specimens
from the museum’s renowned col-
lection of Southwest Indian pottery,
the world’s largest collection of its
kind. Tours are $10 per person. To
schedule a group tour, contact Dar-
lene Lizarraga at df@email.arizona.
edu or 626-8381.
The Steward Observatory Mirror
Lab Tours have returned and are
now open to the public. The tours
give a behind-the-scenes look at
the cutting-edge technology and
revolutionary processes involved
in making the next generation of
premier giant telescope mirrors
– from constructing the mold, to
casting, to polishing, to delivering
the fnished product on a moun-
taintop, to viewing the universe.
Tours to this world-renowned
facility are given Tuesday through
Friday with reservations required.
Participants must be 7 or older.
Admission is $15 per person, $5 for
students. Call 520-626-8792 or visit
http://mirrorlab.as.arizona.edu.
7
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
Getting To and Around Campus
The Visitor Center
From Tucson Inter-
national Airport
Exit airport north-
bound on Tucson
Boulevard. Turn left
at Valencia Road, the
frst traffc signal. Take
Valencia one block to
the light at Campbell
Avenue. Turn right onto
Campbell, following the
street through a mid-
way name change to
Kino Parkway. At Sixth
Street, Kino will be-
come Campbell again.
You will see the UA at
the northwest corner
of the intersection of
Campbell Avenue and Sixth Street.
From Interstate 10
Visitors approaching Tucson on I-10
should exit at Speedway Boulevard
(Exit 257). Turn east onto Speedway.
The UA will be on the right after Eu-
clid Avenue.
Parking on Campus
See the campus map (p. 26-27) for visi-
tor parking garages. Parking in High-
land Avenue, Main Gate, Second Street,
Park Avenue, Sixth Street, Cherry
Avenue and Tyndall Avenue garages
is on a space-available basis, 7 a.m.-12
a.m. For more information, visit http://
parking.arizona.edu/visitors.
Visitor Garage Rates
Campus parking garage
rates prior to 5 p.m. are
$1 per half hour for the
frst two hours and $1
each additional hour,
with a maximum daily
rate of $8. After 5 p.m.,
the rates are $1 per
hour, with a maximum
rate of $4. Garages
are free on weekends,
pending special event
parking restrictions.
CatTran Shuttle
A free campus shuttle.
For maps and sched-
ules, visit http://parking.
arizona.edu.
Old Pueblo Trolley
The trolley runs between Tucson’s
Fourth Avenue business district and
just outside the UA gates on Uni-
versity Boulevard. The trolley runs
Fridays 6 p.m.-10 p.m., Saturdays 12
p.m.-midnight and Sundays 12 p.m.-6
p.m. The fare is $1 for adults and 50
cents for children 6-12 each way on
Fridays and Saturdays. On Sundays,
the fare is 25 cents each way for all
patrons. All-day passes are $2.50 for
adults and $1.25 for children 6-12.
Detailed Campus Map
http://iiewww.ccit.arizona.edu/uamap
Make the UA Visitor Center
your frst stop when exploring
campus and learn about the
UA’s attractions, top-ranked
programs and talented commu-
nity of scholars and students.
The center offers:
• More than 80 UA and
community publications.
• E-mail and Internet ac-
cess.
• Information about cam-
pus performances and
activities, tour registra-
tion, parking and more.
At the northwest corner of
Euclid Avenue and University
Boulevard. Open 9 a.m. to
5 p.m. Monday through Friday,
closed weekends and UA holi-
days. For more information, call
621-5130 or write to visitor@
email.arizona.edu.

Situated at the Main Gate of The University of Arizona
…in a vibrant
social and cultural
neighborhood;
Main Gate Square
is just steps from
the front door
880 E. 2nd St. • Tucson, AZ 85719 • 520-792-4100 • Fax: 520-882-4100
- Tucson’s newest full-service hotel
- 9 floors, 233 rooms, 17 suites
- 12 meeting rooms, 11,791 sq. ft.
total meeting space
- Fitness Center, outdoor pool,
whirlpool
- Saguaro Grill restaurant for
breakfast, lunch and dinner
- High-speed internet access in all
guestrooms
- 32 restaurants, 4 museums, and
a multitude of shopping options
all within a 2-minute walk from
the Front Drive
At frst glance, the repository of
the Arizona State Museum can be a
bit overwhelming, with its trays of
artifacts, stacks of boxes and piles
of fles. But repository curator Ar-
thur Vokes, along with his assistant
and a team of student employees
and volunteers, knows there’s a
place for everything, and every-
thing has its place.
As the nation’s largest nonfed-
eral archaeological repository, the
Arizona State Museum boasts an
impressive array of artifacts be-
yond what visitors normally get to
see in the facility’s display cases.
Established in 1984 as the state’s
offcial repository, the museum
is charged under the Arizona An-
tiquities Act with receiving and
managing any archaeological
materials discovered on Arizona
state lands. Artifacts unearthed in
archeological excavations arrive in
a relatively regular stream, with the
repository processing between 700
With thousands of artifacts, dating from prehistoric
times to just a few decades ago, The Arizona State
Museum is the nation’s largest nonfederal
archaeological repository.
and 1,500 cubic-foot-sized boxes of
them per year.
Everything from prehistoric
tools and pottery shards to broken
dishes and old soda bottles are la-
beled, cataloged and stored, along
with documentation relevant to
their origin.
The repository is an important
resource for archaeologists and
researchers in Tucson and across
the globe, who can access the col-
lections for study.
“It’s not just the artifacts the
repository takes. It’s the maps,
the notes – and that information
is invaluable,” said Bill Doelle,
president of the Tucson archaeol-
ogy company Desert Archaeology
Inc. and president of the nonproft
Center for Desert Archaeology.
“Having them there at the reposi-
tory to re-evaluate is an incredible
resource.”
About 17,000 boxes of artifacts
line museum storage shelves span-
Everything
in its Place
Everything
in its Place
The Arizona State Museum processes up to 1,500
boxes of artifacts annually – mostly pottery and
pieces made from stone, shell or bone. From
top to bottom: A set of 109 shell beads dating
back to A.D. 1000-1075; a side-notched Cienega-
style point dating back to 400 B.C. to A.D. 50; a
pendant of turquoise and argillite on shell dating
back to A.D. 1150-1300.
The majority of the fnds – about
60 percent – brought in by archae-
ologists are pottery, Vokes said.
Stone artifacts make up the bulk of
the rest, with some bone and shell
pieces mixed in. Then there are the
occasional oddball, and more mod-
ern, discoveries – like a pair of den-
tures from the 1930s and a whole,
unbroken 1920s light bulb with the
flament still intact.
Pieces worthy of public display
are plucked from storage for in-
clusion in Arizona State Museum
exhibits or are loaned to other mu-
seums.
Many repository items are part
of the museum’s prehistoric jew-
elry exhibit, “Set in Stone: 2,000
Years of Gem and Mineral Trade in
the Southwest,” on display through
February. The museum is also
home to the world’s largest collec-
tion of Southwest American Indian
pottery, with more than 20,000
whole vessels, many of which are
on display as part of the ongoing
exhibit “The Pottery Project.”
With one of the world’s largest
research collections focused on
Anthropology
undergraduate
students
Aazar Haddad
and Erikalyn
Bassaraba
work to
rehouse
artifacts
and upgrade
inventory for
the repository’s
collections.
Arizona State Museum repository curator Arthur
Vokes shows artifacts to members of the public
during an open house at the museum.
ning fve foors. An additional 4,000
are housed in an off-campus ware-
house. Artifacts processed in the
repository are also photographed
and inventoried electronically, as
part of an ongoing effort to create a
publicly searchable database of the
museum’s collections.
Much of the work is done by UA
undergraduate and graduate stu-
dents.
For those students, who repre-
sent a variety of academic disci-
plines on campus, the opportunity
to work with museum collections
behind the scenes can be impor-
tant career development.
Rachel Hessick, a student cura-
torial assistant, categorizes arti-
facts as they come into the reposi-
tory. Her work in the museum is
helping her prepare for a potential
career in museum education.
“The most valuable thing I’ve
learned, as an archaeology student,
is the importance of what happens
to artifacts after they’re dug up,”
Hessick said. “It’s getting me famil-
iar with museums and the educa-
tion process.”
Arizona’s historic and prehistoric
cultures, the museum attracts re-
searchers from across the globe.
“Most states don’t have the rich-
ness of the archaeological record
in the sense of having thousands of
years of occupational history that
is still essentially intact,” Vokes
said.
As growth and development con-
tinue statewide, bringing ongoing
excavations of potential building
sites, unearthed archaeological
treasures will continue to come
into the repository, he said.
Before an archaeological project
on state lands can get under way,
companies must receive a permit
and a repository agreement for
their work, which is also handled
through the Arizona State Museum.
The museum issues agreements
for anywhere from 70 to 100 proj-
ects a year, Vokes said, and once
archaeologists’ excavations and
reports are complete, they pay the
museum a fee to manage and store
their fnds.
An affliate of the Smithsonian
Institution, the Arizona State Muse-
um is the oldest and largest anthro-
pology museum in the Southwest,
established in 1893. Visitors to the
museum can explore indigenous
cultures of Arizona and northern
Mexico through exhibits of Ameri-
can Indian artwork and artifacts.
For more information about mu-
seum exhibits, collections, services
and programming, visit www.state-
museum.arizona.edu.
Alexis Blue, Office of University Com-
munications
10
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
M
useums
Arizona State Museum
Experience the native cultures of
Arizona, the greater Southwest and
northern Mexico. Dynamic exhibitions,
engaging programs and an educational
museum store celebrate 13,000 years
of human history in the Southwest. The
Arizona State Museum is the oldest and
largest anthropology museum in the
region, established
in 1893. It is home to
the world’s largest
collection of South-
west Indian pottery
and is an affliate
of the Smithsonian
Institution.
Hours Monday-Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Closed Sundays and federal and state
holidays.
Admission Requested donation
Location 1013 E. University Blvd. Just
inside the UA Main Gate.
Parking Covered parking at Main Gate
and Tyndall Avenue garages. Free park-
ing on weekends.
Contact 621-6302,
www.statemuseum.arizona.edu
CENTENNIAL
HALL
ARIZONA
STATE
MUSEUM
ARIZONA
STATE
MUSEUM
SOUTH
Center for Creative
Photography
The Center for Creative Photography
collects, researches, preserves,
interprets and
makes available
materials essential
to understanding
photography and its
history. The center
holds more archives
and individual
works by 20th century North American
photographers than any other museum
in the world. The archives of more than
60 major American photographers –
including Ansel Adams, Harry Callahan,
W. Eugene Smith, Edward Weston and
Garry Winogrand – form the core of a
collection comprising more than 80,000
works.
Hours Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-5 p.m.,
weekends 1 p.m.-4 p.m.
Admission Call for prices. Free for UA
students and employees
Location UA Fine Arts Complex, 1030
N. Olive Road
Parking Park Avenue Garage,
pedestrian underpass gives direct
access. Parking directly behind center
(off Second Street) is free on weekends,
and weekdays after 5 p.m.
Contact 621-7968,
www.creativephotography.org
UA Museum of Art
Located near the
intersection of
Park Avenue and
Speedway Boulevard,
the Museum of
Art has intriguing
collections of classic
and contemporary
art that are among the fnest in the
region. From the medieval to the
modern, explore over seven centuries
of paintings, drawings, prints and
sculpture. Changing exhibitions present
the contemporary art of distinguished
as well as emerging artists.
Hours Tuesday-Friday 9 a.m.-5 p.m.,
weekends 12 p.m.-4 p.m.
Admission $5; free for students, UA
employees and children under 18
Location Near Park Avenue and
Speedway Boulevard
Parking Park Avenue Garage
Contact 621-7567,
www.artmuseum.arizona.edu
800-328-4122 ~ 520-318-4644
940 N. OLSEN AVE., TUCSON, AZ 85719
www.aroseinn.com
Fodor’s ~ Tripadvisor.com ~ AAA
A beautiful
1930’s
Adobe home
in the historic
Sam Hughes
neighborhood
just 2 blocks
east of the
UA. Enjoy
irresistible
breakfasts and
a pool/spa.
~ Safe, historic
neighborhood
~ Comfortable
and quiet
~ Areas for visiting,
indoors and out
~ Wireless internet
Bed & Breakfast
Adobe
Rose nn
Adobe
Rose nn
I I
Immediate Medical Care for all ages
OPEN 7 DAYS/WEEK
ALL MAJOR INSURANCE IS ACCEPTED
(520)298-9887
River Rd
N

S
t
o
n
e
Tucson Heart Hospital
E Croydon Park Rd
Conveniently located at N Stone, just
south of Tucson Heart Hospital
N
www.velomed.net
Monday - Friday 8 am - 7 pm
Saturday - Sunday 9 am - 4 pm
Sports Injuries
Sprains
Lacerations
Physical Exams
X-Rays
Illnesses
EKG/Laboratory
Work Injuries
DRAMA
MUSIC
ART
MUSEUM
OF ART
11
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
Flandrau Science Center and
UA Mineral Museum
Highlights of the cen-
ter include a 16-inch
telescope observa-
tory – the largest
public viewing tele-
scope in Southern
Arizona, an asteroid
cave, the Mars Wall,
astronomy education and enrichment
programs, and the UA Mineral Museum.
The museum is the longest continually
curated mineral museum west of the
Mississippi and contains one of the top
fve collections in the United States.
It has more than 27,000 specimens,
representing 1,566 different species, and
1,000 artifacts in its collection.
Hours Observatory, Wednesday-Satur-
day 7 p.m.-10 p.m. (weather permitting);
UA Mineral Museum, Friday-Saturday
9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Admission Museum, $4 for ages 4 and
up; CatCard holders $1; Observatory is
free and open to the public (donations
encouraged).
Location Corner of Cherry Avenue and
University Boulevard
Parking Free parking is available on
UA MALL
FLANDRAU
STEWARD
OBSERVATORY
UA MALL
campus all day Saturday and after
5 p.m. Friday in metered spaces and
many parking lots.
Contact 621-4516, www.UAsciencecen-
ter.org
The Arizona History Museum
The museum, located at the Arizona
Historical Society, features interactive
and traditional exhibits about Arizona’s
dynamic past, including an under-
ground copper mine, ranch and town
life of the 1870s, Victorian-era period
rooms, the archaeology of Tucson’s
downtown, an original stagecoach and
a 1923 Studebaker.
Hours Monday-
Saturday 10 a.m.-4
p.m.
Admission $5; se-
niors and students
12-18 $4; children
11 and younger,
library patrons and members free. Free
for all the frst Saturday of the month.
Location Park Avenue and Second
Street
Parking Main Gate Parking Garage
Contact 628-5774,
www.arizonahistoricalsociety.org
Jim Click Hall of
Champions
The Jim Click Hall of Champions show-
cases the heritage and rich traditions
of Arizona athletics. Visitors can learn
about their
favorite Wild-
cats, view the
men’s basket-
ball national
championship
trophy, learn
about Title IX,
discover which Wildcats are Olympians
and more.
Hours Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Saturday 12 p.m.-5 p.m. On basketball
game days, the hall closes two hours
before the game, reopens 15 minutes
into the start of the frst half and closes
at the start of the second half.
Admission Free
Location North side of McKale Memo-
rial Center, 1721 E. Enke Drive
Parking Cherry Avenue Garage is free
on weekends, except during special
events, and after 5 p.m. on weekdays.
Contact 621-2331,
www.arizonaathletics.com
ARIZONA
HISTORICAL
SOCIETY
McKALE
MEMORIAL
CENTER
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Reservations 520-299-2020 · 7000 N. Resort Drive · Tucson, AZ 85750
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Comfortable and convenient
campus apartment living
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Apartments
For leasing information or to see a
model apartment,
visit or call the La Aldea Of¿ce
825 E. Fifth St. (located on Euclid
between University Blvd. and Sixth St.)
520-626-0336
email: laaldea@life.arizona.edu
Visit: www.life.arizona.edu
12
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
While it’s easy for most people
to tell the difference between right
and wrong, it’s not always easy to
witness a wrong and make it right.
An innovative bystander interven-
tion program at The University
of Arizona, created for student-
athletes, teaches participants not
only how to make good choices in
their own lives, but how to identify
Doing the Right Thing
An innovative program at the UA that teaches student-
athletes to take action when their peers are in trouble is
a national model for NCAA leadership training.
and come to the aid of others in
trouble.
“Nine out of 10 students want
to do the right thing, but may not
have the skills or confdence, and
we want to help,” says Becky Bell,
associate athletics director at the
UA, who spearheaded the develop-
ment of the “STEP UP! Be a Leader,
Make a Difference!” program.
Dubbed “A Prosocial Behavior/
Bystander Intervention Program
for Student-Athletes,” STEP UP! fo-
cuses specifcally on the bystander
effect, a well-known phenomenon
in social psychology in which an in-
dividual is less likely to help some-
one in need when a large group of
people are present. The tendency
to think that someone else will
take care of the problem can lead
to dangerous outcomes, which the
STEP UP! program aims to prevent,
Bell says.
Bell, who heads the UA’s award-
winning C.A.T.S. (Commitment to
an Athlete’s Total Success) Life
A poster used to promote the STEP UP! program.
13
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
Skills Program, consulted with
experts across the country in the
various topic areas covered by the
program to develop a curriculum
that would reach students in a
more meaningful way than a simple
lecture on right and wrong.
Developed in partnership with
the NCAA, the STEP UP! materials
have been sent to every athletics
program in the NCAA, establish-
ing the UA-initiated program as a
national model for student-athlete
leadership training.
About 350 UA student-athletes
have completed the interactive
training since its launch in 2007.
Athletes in all sports are encour-
aged to participate, and some
coaches have even made it a re-
quirement, Bell said.
Athletes attend a three-hour,
on-campus training session, which
includes an interactive PowerPoint
presentation, followed by a break-
out session that allows groups of
students to talk through possible
real-life situations in which their
intervention could make a positive
difference. Each student receives a
paperback “Student-Athlete Guide,”
flled with examples of scenarios
where they might be able to help,
including situations involving al-
cohol, hazing, relationship abuse,
eating disorders, depression, dis-
crimination and more. The booklet
identifes several “Strategies for
Effective Helping” in emergency
and nonemergency situations and
outlines “The 5 Decision Making
Steps”: notice the event, interpret
the event as a problem/emergency,
assume personal responsibility,
know how to help, and implement
the help – or “step up.”
“It’s a great awareness program,”
said UA student Pat Metham, a
member of the UA men’s tennis
team who went through the train-
ing. “Now I can recognize a situa-
tion that needs intervention; it’s
much easier to pick up on it. It also
helps people realize even one per-
son can make a difference, and that
the impact won’t go unnoticed.”
Scott Goldman, a clinical and
sports psychologist
who works with stu-
dent-athletes at the
UA, said the STEP
UP! program
is valuable
because of its
proactive ap-
proach, which
encourages
students to re-
ally think about
the impacts of
their behavior
without using
stern lectures
or scare tactics
to get the mes-
sage across.
“What we’re trying to do is pro-
mote healthy behavior and develop
a community that looks out for
each other,” he said. ”We’re trying
to encourage our student-athletes
not only to be responsible and re-
spectful but also to be leaders in
the community.”
With peer pressure an undeni-
able part of college life, the pro-
gram is a helpful reminder for stu-
dents to make good choices, said
one student-athlete who completed
the training.
“It really opens your eyes about
what kinds of situations aren’t OK,”
said Maggie Callahan, a member of
the UA cross country and track and
feld teams.
“Especially going into college,
everyone’s trying to ft in and
they’re not necessarily going to
leave their comfort zone to help,”
she added.
Callahan is one of about 35
student-athletes in the UA’s P.A.L.,
or Peer Athletic Leaders, program,
which Bell advises. The peer men-
toring group is designed to help
freshmen athletes make the transi-
tion into college.
Teammate and fellow P.A.L.
member Shelly Splittberger said
STEP UP! helped provide her with
valuable information to pass along
to younger students.
“Freshmen are always so willing
to learn and look up to people so
it’s such a beneft for upperclass-
men” to go through the program,
she said.
Splittberger also appreciates
that the program brings together
athletes from all different sports on
campus for a community-building
experience.
Although STEP UP! originally
was designed for the student-ath-
lete population, Bell notes that the
program’s teachings are universally
applicable, and many other schools
across the country are adapting
the program for use in divisions
like Greek life, residence life, sexual
assault centers and student affairs.
Bell said she hopes the program
will continue to grow, encouraging
more people to take responsibility
and step up.
Alexis Blue, Office of University Com-
munications
“We’re trying
to encourage our
student-athletes
not only to be responsible and respectful
but also to be leaders in the community.”
Scott Goldman, Clinical and sports psychologist
Becky Bell heads the UA’s award-winning
C.A.T.S. Life Skills Program.
ht be able to help,
ions involving al-
elationship abuse,
s, depression, dis-
d more. The booklet
Scott Goldman,
sports
who w
dent-
UA
U
i
b
p
p
e
s
our
es
14
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
15
www.arizona.edu
Friday, Nov. 6
Homecoming Kick-Off Celebration and Bonfire Pep Rally, 7 p.m.
Join the crowd on the west side of Old Main to kick off the
weekend. Alumni, students, cheerleaders, President Robert N.
Shelton and football coach Mike Stoops will be in attendance
to cheer the Wildcats to victory.
Saturday, Nov. 7
Tents on the Mall, 11 a.m. until game time
Colleges, fraternities, sororities and other campus and stu-
dent organizations welcome their alumni on the UA Mall.
Homecoming Parade, 1 p.m.
More than 100 entries – including foats, bands, pep groups
and past and present royalty – circle the Mall from Campbell
Avenue to Old Main.
Arizona vs. Washington State, 4 p.m.
Tickets are available by calling the McKale Ticket Offce at
621-CATS or 800-452-CATS.
For a complete schedule of Homecoming events, visit
www.arizonaalumni.com or call 800-BEAT-ASU.
Family Weekend
Thursday, Oct. 15
Noon-5 p.m. Parents & Family Association
Family Weekend Golf Tournament/Awards
Reception
Friday, Oct. 16
8 a.m.-3 p.m. Open Classes for UA Families
10 a.m.-3 p.m. Kick-Off Fair
10 a.m.-3 p.m. Family Weekend Vendor
Fair
11 a.m.- 7 p.m. Wildcat World Fair
Noon-1:30 p.m. Parents & Family
Association Annual Faculty and Staff
Luncheon
Noon Drop-in Reception for Lesbian,
Gay, Bi, Transgender and Questioning
(LGBTQ) Students and Families
1 p.m.-3 p.m. Campus Tours
4:30 p.m. Read Like a Faculty Member
5 p.m.-7 p.m. Bear Down Friday
5 p.m.-7 p.m. Leadership Family Weekend
Service Project
5:30 p.m. Family Weekend Hillel Shabbat
Dinner
7 p.m. and 10 p.m. Double Feature
Weekend
7 p.m.-9 p.m. Gallery Reception
7 p.m.-9 p.m. Dinner with Special Guest
Jim Wand (hypnotist)
7 p.m.-9 p.m. Stargazing at Steward
(weather permitting)
Saturday, Oct. 17
9 a.m.-1 p.m. Recreation Center
Tournaments/”Work Out Like a Wildcat”
11 a.m.-12 p.m. Legacy Lunch
1 p.m.-4 p.m. ZonaZoo Tailgate
4 p.m. Arizona vs. Stanford (time subject to
change)
After the game Family Weekend BBQ
7 p.m. and 10 p.m. Double Feature
Weekend
9 p.m.-midnight Free Games Night
10 p.m. Comedy Corner Special: Family
Weekend Show
Sunday, Oct. 18
10 a.m.-1 p.m. Send-Off Brunch
For a complete list of Family Weekend events,
visit www.union.arizona.edu/csil/uab/
familyweekend2009.
Homecoming 2009
P
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t
o

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o
t
t

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i
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s
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www.arizona.edu
P
erformances
UApresents
Box Office Hours
Monday-Friday 10
a.m.-6 p.m., Satur-
day 12 p.m.-5 p.m.,
Sunday 12 p.m.-4
p.m. and two
hours before every
performance.
Admission Prices vary
Location Centennial Hall
Parking Tyndall Avenue Garage
Contact 621-3341, www.uapresents.org
CENTENNIAL
HALL
Oct. 3
The Ultimate Doo-Wop Show, 8 p.m.
Take a trip back in time to the cool
days – a time of black slacks, blue suede
shoes and poodle skirts. The harmony
style known as “doo-wop” emerged from
the streets of big cities like New York,
Philadelphia, Chicago and Baltimore
and spread across the nation on radio
waves and turntables. Every generation
since has rediscovered the magic of
doo-wop. Join us for an evening with the
hit-makers, including Charlie Thomas
and the Drifters, Jimmy Clanton and
The Blue Suede Orchestra.
Oct. 10
Tito Puente Jr.
and Orchestra,
8 p.m.
Celebrate the
high-voltage, Afro-
Cuban sounds
that made the
senior Tito
Puente “El Rey,”
the undisputed
king of Latin music. Hot horn arrange-
ments soar over irresistible, hard-driv-
ing, Latin polyrhythms as Tito Puente Jr.
celebrates his father’s legacy of mambo,
merengue, salsa and cha-cha-cha clas-
sics and introduces a few new favorites
with a contemporary fair.
Oct. 24
Joan Osborne, The Holmes Brothers
and Paul Thorn,
8 p.m.
Since her frst
hit, “(What if God
Were) One of Us”
in 1995, Osborne
has channeled
classic soul sing-
ers into a unique
style that’s won
fve Grammy nomi-
Serving you since 1953
ARIZONA
BOOKSTORE
• Reference materials
• Snacks and beverages
622-4717 • 845 N. Park Ave.
(B5 on campus map, in Marshall Bldg. next to University Marriott)
• Largest selection of UA
clothing & gift items
• Textbooks & general books
• Large selection of
school & office supplies
www.arizonabookstore.com
17
www.arizona.edu
nations. The Chicago Sun-Times calls
The Holmes Brothers “the undisputed
masters of blues-based American roots
music.” Former professional prizefghter
and son of a Pentecostal preacher from
Tupelo, Miss., Thorn performs songs
from his new CD, “A Long Way from Tu-
pelo,” with the searing yet incandescent
voice of a Mississippi poet and prophet.
Oct. 25
Mozarteum Orchestra Salzburg, 7 p.m.
Founded in 1841 by citizens of Salzburg,
together with Mozart’s widow, Con-
stanze, the orchestra dominated 19th
century Salzburg’s musical life and are
today the city’s musical ambassadors to
the world. Under the baton of Ivor Bol-
ton, the 90-member orchestra continues
to generate critical acclaim.
Nov. 7
Kathy Mattea: Moving Mountains,
8 p.m.
Grammy Award-winning Mattea has a
string of folk and country hits, includ-
ing “18 Wheels and A Dozen Roses” and
“Where’ve You Been.” Her chart-topping
2008 CD, “Coal,” reveals her rich,
compassionate alto at the height of her
powers, and with a newfound passion
for storytelling. Raised near Charles-
ton, W. Va., she grew up immersed in
the Appalachian culture. She turned to
bluegrass and her own family’s history
in the mines to give voice to the some-
times humorous, often perilous, culture
of coal mining.
Nov. 14
Ballroom with a
Twist, 8 p.m.
“Dancing with the
Stars” Emmy Award-
nominated Louis Van
Amstel produced,
directed and choreo-
graphed this program
of breathtaking per-
formances and stun-
ning costumes. With
the same passion
and excitement he
displayed on television with his celeb-
rity partners, he pushes the boundaries
of ballroom dance, infusing it with the
energy and intensity of the latest styles.
Two talented singers join him and a
dozen dancers from “So You Think You
Can Dance,” “Dancing With the Stars”
and “High School Musical.”
Nov. 20
B.B. King, 8 p.m.
Legendary B.B. King is without a doubt
the single most important electric
guitarist of the last half century and
the reigning king of the blues. A singer
capable of wringing every nuance from
any lyric, he has released more than
50 albums, many of them classics. He
has been inducted into the Rock and
Roll Hall of Fame and honored at the
Kennedy Center, and he has earned
the Presidential Medal of Freedom,
the National Medal of the Arts and the
Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.
Dec. 6
Mannheim Steamroller, 2 p.m.
Mannheim Steamroller is a group of
the most talented and versatile musi-
cians still touring the world. The band
is a consortium of musicians, techni-
cians and engineers using state-of-the-
art equipment to create Mannheim
Steamroller’s signature sound. Of the
top-selling bands of all time, Mannheim
Steamroller’s Christmas music has be-
come synonymous with the season.
∙ Two-room suites ∙ Heated pool and spa
∙ Free continental breakfast ∙ Library
Enjoy the Plaza’s fashion boutiques,
art galleries, gourmet restaurants and day spa
Next to Rillito River Path
Bicycles available for guests
800.547.4747 or 520.577.0007
4250 N. Campbell Ave.
(Only 4 miles from the UA)
Windmill Inn at
St. Philip’s Plaza
Please ask for
the Special UA
Visitor Rate!
• Newly Remodeled
with Refrigerator &
Microwave in ALL
ROOMS
• Free Deluxe Conti-
nental Breakfast &
“Make Your Own
Waffles”
• Beautiful Outdoor
Heated Pool
• Free WiFi Internet
Access and Lobby
Computer/Printer
• Guest Laundry and
Pay-per-view Movies
• Small Meeting
Room available
• Santa Cruz River
Park for walking,
running & bicycling
GROUPS
WELCOME
Stay one night
or a week
Toll-free Reservations
866.622.6491
Ask for your UA Visitor Rate
The Perfect
Place To Stay
…anytime!
5 minutes to the UA,
Tucson Convention Center,
Downtown Theatre
& Arts District, and
4th Avenue Shops
WYNDHAM REWARDS
SM
DENNY’S Restaurant Open 24/7
Tourist Hotspots,
Golf Courses, Restaurants
and Recreation Nearby
665 N. Freeway
Tucson 85745
www.tucsonramadalimited.com
For more information please contact LT Emillie Lemire
South Hall, NROTC University of Arizona
(520) 626-5775 • (520) 626-9254 (FAX)
n3@email.arizona.edu
Explore careers in the Naval ROTC at
18
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
School of
Music
Box Office Hours
Monday-Friday 11
a.m.-4 p.m. and one
hour prior to performance
School of Dance
Oct. 7-8
Jazz Dance Showcase, 7:30 p.m.
A celebration of the best in up-tempo
dance featuring the UA School of Dance
Ensemble.
Nov. 12-15
The New Vaudeville, 7:30 p.m. Nov.
12-14; 1:30 p.m. Nov. 15
Eccentric dance, the new Vaudeville in
America; wild, wacky, full of energy and
surprise.
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our outdoor waterscape for resort guests. Drift lazily along
the Starr Canyon River, brave the Monsoon Falls Water Slide,
lounge by the Reflection Pools or twirl in the Dancing Springs.
Just minutes away from the University of Arizona and Sentinel
Peak, JW Marriott Starr Pass Resort & Spa sits in a stunning
location that’s also convenient to the University and all that Tucson
has to offer. Next time, come roam where the Wildcats roam!
JW Marriott Starr Pass Resort & Spa
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Make your reservation today
and ask for Rate Code UAVX.
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Box Office
Hours
Monday-
Friday 11
a.m.-4 p.m.
and one
hour prior to performance
Admission $10-$25
Location Stevie Eller Dance Theatre,
1737 E. University Blvd.
Parking Cherry Avenue Garage
Contact 621-1162,
http://web.cfa.arizona.edu/dance
Sept. 10
Summit Records recording artist
Sylvan Street returns to the UA
campus in a special concert event
celebrating the release of the group’s
debut CD, “The Perfect Leaf.” The pro-
gressive Nu-jazz ensemble, led by UA
professor of music Jay Rees, performs
original works fusing jazz, rock, Latin
and funk styles. 7 p.m., Centennial Hall,
$5, $7, $9
Sept. 16
Faculty artists Mark Votapek, cello,
Mark Rush, violin, Tannis Gibson,
piano, 7 p.m., $5
Sept. 21
Faculty artists Norman Weinberg,
percussion, Michael Dauphinais, piano,
7:30 p.m., $5
ELLER
DANCE
THEATRE
GITTINGS
UA Mall C
a
m
p
b
e
l
l

A
v
e
n
u
e
P
erformances
Dec. 3-6
In the Sea-
son, 7:30 p.m.
Dec. 3-5; 1:30
p.m. Dec. 6
A collection
of new works
created by
young chore-
ographers at
the UA School
of Dance. All
works are adjudicated and the best of
the best are offered as a holiday treat.
Dec. 7-8
Last Chance to Dance, 7 p.m.
The fnal concerts of the semester
are created by young choreographers
experimenting with music, costumes,
collaboration and movement.
Admission Most concerts are free.
Others are priced from $5 to $30, with
discounts for students, seniors 55 and
over and UA employees.
Location Fine Arts complex, south-
east of Speedway Boulevard and Park
Avenue, and other locations.
Parking Park Avenue Garage
Contact 621-2998, 621-1162 (tickets),
www.music.arizona.edu
MARRONEY
THEATRE
DRAMA
MUSIC
ART
19
Sept. 2-13
Rum & Coke by Keith Reddin
Marroney Theatre
A comedy about the Bay of Pigs. An
idealistic political go-getter fnds
himself embroiled in one of the most
infamous political events of American
history as he sets out to do good “for
Discoer
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Sept. 24
UA Wind Ensemble and Wind Sympho-
ny Ensembles, 7:30 p.m., $5
Sept. 26
Arizona Symphony Orchestra,
7:30 p.m., $5
Sept. 27
Roy A. Johnson Memorial Organ
Series with guest artist Gail Archer,
organ, 2:30 p.m., $5, $7, $9
Sept. 29
Faculty artists Brian Luce, fute, Carrol
McLaughlin, harp, 7:30 p.m., $5
Oct. 1
UA Philharmonic Orchestra, 7:30 p.m.,
$5
Oct. 2
Faculty artist Moisés Paiewonsky,
trombone, with guest artists Michael
Wilkinson, trombone, Jeff Haskell,
piano, Fred Hayes, drums, and Jack
Wood, bass, 7:30 p.m., $5
Oct. 14
Faculty artists Kristin Dauphinais,
mezzo-soprano, Michael Dauphinais,
piano, 7:30 p.m., $5
Oct. 19
Arizona Wind Quintet, 7 p.m., $5
Oct. 21
UA Studio Jazz Ensemble, 7:30 p.m., $5
Oct. 22
UA Wind Ensemble, 7:30 p.m., $5
Oct. 25
Arizona Choir and Symphonic Choir,
3 p.m., Christ Church United Methodist,
655 N. Craycroft Road, free
Nov. 4
UA Archive Ensemble, 7:30 p.m., $5,
$7, $9
Nov. 6 and 8
University Community Chorus and
UA Philharmonic Orchestra “Town
and Gown,” music of Mozart and
Dvorák, 7:30 p.m. Nov. 6, 3 p.m. Nov. 8,
$5
Nov. 8
Beeston Guitar Competition Finals,
2:30 p.m., $5, $7, $9
Nov. 9
Faculty artists Kelly Thomas, tuba/eu-
phonium, Michael Dauphinais, piano,
7 p.m., $5
Nov. 12-13
The Assad Brothers, Grammy Award-
winning guitar duo Sergio Assad and
Odair Assad, 7 p.m., $20, $25, $30
Nov. 14
Roy A. Johnson Memorial Organ Se-
ries with faculty artist Pamela Decker,
7 p.m., $5, $7, $9
Nov. 15
Collegium Musicum, early music en-
semble, 2:30 p.m., free
Nov. 20 and 22
UA Opera Theater with the Arizona
Symphony Orchestra, “The Crucible,”
by Robert Ward, 7:30 p.m. Nov. 20,
3 p.m. Nov. 22, $10, $12, $15
Nov. 29
UA Steel Bands, “Traditional to Con-
temporary – The Sound of Steel,” 7:30
p.m., $5, $7, $9
Dec. 1
UA Opera Theater, “An Evening of
Opera Scenes,” 7:30 p.m., $5
Continued on page 21
National Register of Historic Places
Accommodations
Award-winning Dining
Private
Catered Functions
Less than a mile
from The
University of Arizona
2200 East Elm Street ~ Tucson, Arizona 85719
(800) 933-1093 ~ www.arizonainn.com
Conde Nast Traveler Gold List
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Travel and Leisure
“Top 500 Hotels in the World”
Zagat Survey of Top U.S. Hotels, Resorts & Spas
“Top 50 Small Hotels”
21
www.arizona.edu
Accommodations:
· 307 Sleeping Rooms
· Free High-Speed Internet
· Large Heated Outdoor Pool
· Coyote Café & Lounge on Property
· Easy Walking Distance to Restaurants,
Shopping & Entertainment
· Covered & Secure Parking
Close to:
· University of
Arizona (within
3 miles)
· I-10 Expressway
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· Tucson
International
Airport (within
10 miles)
When making your reservation, use the UA
Code (GOCATS) for the Special UA Rate!
Book your reservation online at
www.thehotelarizona.com
and we’ll give $5 to the UA Foundation!
(Remember to use the UA Code)
181 W. Broadway Blvd.
Tucson, AZ 85701
Reservations: (800) 845-4596
Telephone: (520) 624-8711
Fax: (520) 622-8143
P
erformances
School of Music
Continued from page 19
Sept. 2-13
Rum & Coke by Keith Reddin
Marroney Theatre
A comedy about the Bay of Pigs. An ide-
alistic political go-getter fnds himself
Arizona Repertory
Theatre
Box Office Hours
Monday-Friday
11 a.m.-4 p.m. and
one hour before
showtime, Marroney
Theatre, 1025 N. Olive Road
Admission Varies
Location Tornabene Theatre, Marroney
Theatre, southeast corner of Park Av-
enue and Speedway Boulevard
Parking Park Avenue Garage, located
on the northeast corner of Park Avenue
and Speedway Boulevard
Contact 621-1162, www.uatheatre.org
MARRONEY
THEATRE
DRAMA
MUSIC
ART
Tornabene
Theatre
Dec. 3
UA Wind Ensemble and UA Philhar-
monic Orchestra, 7:30 p.m., $5
Dec. 5
UA Percussion Ensembles and The
Pride of Arizona Drumline, 7:30 p.m.,
$5
Dec. 6
William Wolfe Guitar Award Recital,
2:30 p.m., $5, $7, $9
Dec. 6
The Arizona Choir, Symphonic Choir,
University Community Chorus, Tucson
Boys Chorus and Tucson Girls Chorus
present “Holiday Card to Tucson,” 3
p.m. and 7:30 p.m., St. Augustine Cathe-
dral, 192 S. Stone Ave., free
Dec. 7
Faculty artists Mark Votapek, cello,
John Milbauer, piano, and graduate
students, 7 p.m., free
embroiled in one of the most infamous
political events of American history
as he sets out to do good “for God, for
country, and for Yale.” Featuring iconic
fgures such as Fidel Castro and Richard
Nixon, this comic tale poignantly ex-
poses the pitfalls of youthful innocence
and its blind faith in a newly elected
president, in revolutionary fervor and
in the warm stirrings of frst love. “Rum
& Coke” offers an unforgettable glimpse
behind the scenes of a defning moment
for one young man and two nations.
Adult language and themes.
Oct. 4-25
The Diary of Anne Frank by Frances
Goodrich and Albert Hackett, newly
adapted by Wendy Kesselman
Tornabene Theatre
This transcendent Pulitzer- and Tony
Award-winning play tells the story of
Anne Frank, a young Jewish girl hiding
from the Nazis during World War II.
Secretly living in a cramped attic with
seven other people, Anne has only her
diary in which to confde. In a real-
ity where the slightest misstep could
lead to detection, Anne chronicles the
lives of the families forced into hiding.
Insightful, honest and at times heart-
breaking, this play shows us Anne and
her family’s journey through fear and
hope. Mature themes.
Nov. 8-Dec. 6
The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas
by Larry L. King and Peter Masterson,
music and lyrics by Carol Hall
Marroney Theatre
Featuring a catchy country-western
score, this energetic and bawdy Broad-
way hit recounts the true story of the
Chicken Ranch, a Texas brothel fre-
quented by politicians, victorious foot-
ball teams and even the town sheriff. At
Chicken Ranch, it’s business as usual
until Melvin P. Thorpe, an enterprising
television anchor, targets his cameras at
the house of ill repute. A tale of small-
town vice versus righteous indignation,
this rollicking romp will have you pull-
ing on your cowboy boots and stomping
along! Mature language and themes.
22
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
If you’re a fan of public
broadcasting – specifcally
National Public Radio and
the Public Broadcasting
Service – you’ll be happy
to know you can easily fnd
these broadcasting services
in Southern Arizona.
If your morning routine
includes tuning into “Morning Edi-
tion” on your radio, you can fnd it
on KUAZ 89.1 FM, where listeners
also get a healthy dose of local
news and evening jazz. Television
viewer favorites like “Antiques
Roadshow,” “NOVA” and the “News-
Hour with Jim Lehrer,” can be
On air since 1959, KUAT is one of the top
10 most watched and most supported
public television stations in the country.
Fit at 50
found on KUAT Channel 6.
Classical music is offered
24 hours a day on KUAT-
FM 90.5, and a full range of
on-demand videos and pro-
gram schedules are avail-
able on the Web at AZPM.
org.
This year KUAT Channel
6 and its public media organization
celebrate 50 years of service to the
Tucson community and Southern
Arizona.
KUAT is one of the top 10 most
watched and most supported
public stations (per capita) in the
country, and is ranked No. 1 when
compared with stations licensed to
Top-10 public research universities.
During an average week, more than
380,000 people in Southern Arizona
watch or listen to one or more of
our stations. And Channel 6 has the
greatest market share among all
stations in Tucson for children ages
2-11.
“When I had small children at
home, they literally grew up with
public television … whether it was
for entertainment or educational
programming, that’s where they
wanted to be,” said University of
Arizona President Robert N. Shel-
ton. “My wife and I still thrive on
An Arizona Public Media member gets a digital television camera
demonstration from staffer, 2009.
University of Arizona Radio-Television Bureau Chief Engineer
Hobart Paine in the KUAT control room in 1968.
23
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
the programming that KUAT and
public television provide.”
In the land grant tradition of the
UA, Arizona’s frst university, KUAT-
TV-6 launched on March 8, 1959,
and was the frst public station in
Arizona. The call letters approved
by the FCC stand for “University of
Arizona Television.”
The name Arizona Public Media,
AZPM for short, was adopted last
year for the parent organization of
the UA public media stations, now
offering six channels of television
content on two full-power digital
transmitters and a cable channel,
and three channels of radio. All of
these services operate from a facil-
ity on campus that was built in the
1960s for a single TV station. “It’s
been a long trail from the frst time
I watched a very snowy KUAT in
Bisbee to the all-digital TV signal
in 2009,” said nationally renowned
author J.A. Jance, a KUAT fan.
KUAT has delivered consistent,
award-winning, in-depth news
and public affairs, science and
nature, arts, entertainment and
educational children’s program-
ming for decades, and has moved
in a bold way into the digital age,
offering local coverage in virtually
every available communications
platform. Quality programs provid-
ing unique local perspectives and
covering important happenings in
this community include “Arizona
Illustrated,” “The Desert Speaks,”
the “Tucson Remembers” series
and “Phoenix Mars Mission: Ashes
to Ice,” as well as the “Arizona
Spotlight” weekly radio program.
In the coming years, Arizona
Public Media will continue to ex-
plore all options to keep the orga-
nization cost effective, more visible
and more responsive to both the
local community and the campus
community. These efforts are not
simply reactive to current condi-
tions, but refective of the respon-
sibility AZPM carries as custodian
for precious resources provided
through the generosity of mem-
bers, corporate underwriters and
the UA.
So enjoy your favorite public
broadcasting programs while you
visit the Tucson area and the UA.
And maybe you’ll even hear or see
a few new local programs that will
give you even more appreciation
of public broadcasting. As you ex-
plore new things around Southern
Arizona, it’s always comforting to
hear a familiar voice through Ari-
zona Public Media that will make
Tucson feel even more like home.
Jack Gibson, Arizona Public Media
Filming and editing of television news re-
ports begins at The University of Arizona
for use on KHPO-TV Phoenix.

University of Arizona Radio Bureau, es-
tablished in 1939, changes name to Radio
and Television Bureau, to better refect
the increasing importance of television.
Additional space is provided in Old Main
for frst television equipment acquired, in
the academic year 1954-55.
January Radio and Television Depart-
ment outgrows its housing in Old Main
and moves to the newly remodeled Her-
ring Hall, one of the oldest buildings on
campus.
November The 250-foot broadcast tower
adjacent to Herring Hall is completed.
Expected coverage is 20 miles using 1,000
watts of power.
KUAT-TV is launched as frst educational,
noncommercial television station in Ari-
zona, as an affliate of National Education
Television. Call letters stand for “Univer-
sity of Arizona Television.”
Oct. 1 Television transmissions in color
begin from new tower on Mount Bigelow.
Also this year: Television facilities are
moved into newly completed Modern
Languages building, and studio recording
in color begins.
Oct. 5 National Education Television is re-
placed with Public Broadcasting Service.
Dec. 20 KUAS-TV goes on the air to
provide coverage for Oro Valley and
northwest Tucson.
August University granted construction
permits to build stations capable
of digital transmission.
February KUAT-TV and KUAS-TV begin
transmitting in digital television. July
5 The Aspen Fire at the Mount Bigelow
transmitter site interrupts transmission
of KUAT-TV. Station temporarily goes off
air. Operations on KUAS-TV and cable
distribution are unaffected.
April 1 KUAT 6 cuts analog signal early
due to weather damage to equipment and
converts to digital television transmission
before the June 12 federal deadline. June
12 KUAS 27 (serving northwest Tucson,
including Marana and Oro Valley), ceases
program broadcasting in analog and con-
verts to digital transmission.
2
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9



2
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3

2
0
0
1

1
9
8
8

1
9
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1
9
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8

1
9
5
9


1
9
5
8

1
9
5
7


1
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5
3


1
9
5
1
Historical Timeline of KUAT6 and
Public Television in Southern Arizona
Students from the Radio-TV Bureau in the new studios during summer session 1968.
24
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
Tanning Bed · Fitness Center
Sand Volleyball Courts
Free Cable w/HBO · Free Hi-Speed Internet
Student Service Center
Tennis Courts · Basketball Courts
Shuttle to UA & Pima
THE RESERVE AT STAR PASS
520 ∙ 624 ∙ 3972
41 S. Shannon Rd.
YYour Homme Away From Hommmeee
W. Anklam Rd.
S
.

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a
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-
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.

S
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a
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R
d
.
W. Broadway
W. St. Mary’s
The University
of Arizona
E. Broadway
N
.

1
s
t

A
v
e
.
S
i
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v
e
r
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Office Hours: M-F 9 a.m.-8 p.m.
Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. ∙ Sun. Noon-5 p.m.
For Instant Leasing Info… text “STAR” to 47464*
Standard Rates Apply
Historic neighborhood, 1.5 blocks to campus. Wireless internet access.
2020 East 7th Street, Tucson AZ 85719 520-861-2191
Email: innkeeper@samhughesinn.com Web: www.samhughesinn.com
4627 E. Speedway west of Swan
323-1123
OPEN MONDAY-SATURDAY 9-6
Jewelry • Kachinas • Indian Arts • T-Shirts
Beads & Supplies • Southwestern Gifts
Jay’s of Tucson
Jay’s of Tucson
BRINGING THE WORLD
TO THE UA
With students from over 30 different
countries, the University of Arizona’s Center
for English as a Second Language offers
quality classes, including intensive, part-time
and teacher training. We are conveniently
located on the main UA campus. Stop in for
a tour! Our program is the only CEA
nationally accredited program in Arizona.
1100 E. James E. Rogers Way, Tucson, Arizona
(520) 621-3637
www.cesl.arizona.edu
A CAMPUS-WIDE RESOURCE
Disability Resources leads the campus
community in the creation of inclusive
and sustainable learning and working
environments and facilitates access,
discourse, and involvement through
innovative services and programs,
leadership, and collaboration. With a
sociopolitical view of disability and an
emphasis on good design, staff work to:
• Ensure the effective delivery of
reasonable accommodations
• Improve the recruitment, transition,
retention, and graduation of disabled
students
• Increase the hiring and retention of
disabled employees
• Work with faculty and staff in the
creation of fully accessible Websites
• Offer competitive adaptive athletic
opportunities and fitness programs
Contact us:
520.621.3268
uadrc@email.arizona.edu
http://drc.arizona.edu
25
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
– Cook-to-order Breakfast
– Two for one drinks at lounge
– High speed internet
– Restaurant & lounge onsite
– Suites w/jacuzzi tubs available
– Pool, spa, fitness center
– Less than a mile from the UA
Call for Special University
of Arizona Visitor Rates
Best Western Royal Sun Inn & Suites
1015 N. Stone Ave. ~ 1-800-545-8858 ~ bwroyalsun.com (520) 622-8871
N
e
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l
y
R
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n
o
v
a
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d
C
e
n
t
r
a
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L
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i
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n
A website for students at The University of
Arizona that serves as a resource to help
them help their friends stay safe & healthy.
notice.
care.
help.
F2F.health.arizona.edu
Comfort isn’t
complicated.
Step 1: Rest easy.
Step 2: Sleep in peace–
benefit a good cause.
Call for special UA rate and we’ll
donate $2 to the UA Foundation
good through Dec. 31, 2009
(877) 508-0173
Mention set number 58640
20% off room rate
for UA associates, students and visitors
fourpoints.com/tucsonwildcats
1900 E. Speedway
Tucson AZ 85719
American
Beyond Bread 6260 E. Speedway Blvd.
747-7477 and 3026 N. Campbell Ave.
322-9965 Mon.-Fri. 6:30 a.m.-8 p.m., Sat.
7 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun. 7 a.m.-6 p.m.
Scones, croissants, cakes, cookies, tarts, breads and
more. Sandwiches, salads, soups, coffee and espresso.
Dine-in, take-out. beyondbread.com
Frank’s/Francisco’s 3843 E. Pima St.
881-2710 Frank’s: Weekly 8 a.m.-3 p.m.
Francisco’s: Sun.-Thurs. 5-10 p.m., Fri. & Sat.
5 p.m.-Midnight
Greasy spoon by day, Francisco’s Mexican food by
night. “Elegant Dining Elsewhere.”
Lodge on the Desert 306 N. Alvernon Way
(north of Broadway) 325-3366
Breakfast Mon.-Fri. 7-10 a.m., Sat. 7-10 a.m.;
Lunch Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; Dinner Sun.-
Thurs. 5-9 p.m., Fri. & Sat. 5-10 p.m.
Eclectic southwestern offering scrumptious tasteful
menus. lodgeonthedesert.com
Maynards Market & Kitchen 400 N. Toole
Ave (between 4th Ave. and 6th Ave.)
545-0577 Kitchen: Daily 11 a.m.-10 p.m.,
Thurs.-Sat. til midnight. Sunday brunch
coming soon; Market: Sun.-Thurs. 10 a.m.-
8 p.m., Fri. & Sat. 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Fri. & Sat.
11 a.m.-12 a.m., Sun. 11 a.m.-9 p.m.
The Kitchen serves New American cuisine with
European influences on a seasonally changing
menu. Under the direction of Executive Chef Addam
Buzzalini. maynardsmarkettucson.com
Asian/Thai
Asian Bistro 3122 N. Campbell Ave. #110
881-7800 Mon.-Thurs. 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri. &
Sat. 11 a.m.-12 a.m., Sun. 11 a.m.-9 p.m.
Pacific Rim specialties; extensive dessert menu. Take
out 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Happy Hour 2-6 p.m. & 8 p.m.-close
7 days tucsonasianbistro.com
Asian Sandwich Deli LLC 1710 E. Speedway
Blvd. (between Cherry & Campbell)
326-3354 Mon.-Sat. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.
Fresh bread, healthy food, vegetarian, good service.
asiansandwichdeli@yahoo.com
Vila Thai Cuisine 972 E. University Blvd.
(upstairs) 393-3489 Mon.- Fri. Lunch
11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Mon.-Sun. Dinner 5-9 p.m.,
Happy Hour Mon.-Thurs. 3-6 p.m.
Authentic dishes from Thailand that can be prepared
vegetarian, and in many instances vegan.
vilathai.com
Bar & Grill
Flying V Bar & Grill 7000 N. Resort Drive
(north of Kolb & Sunrise) 615-5495 Mon.-
Sun. 5:30 p.m.-10 p.m.
Outdoor setting overlooking 18th hole, cascading
water and city lights. Southwestern fare with a Latin
flair. flyingvbarandgrill.com
Kingfisher Bar & Grill 2564 E. Grant Road
323-7739 Mon.-Fri. Lunch 11 a.m.-3 p.m.,
Dinner 5-10 p.m., Sat.-Sun. Dinner 5-10 p.m.,
Late Night 10 p.m.-Midnight
Seafood with an Arizona flair. Lunch, dinner, late
night, Live music Mondays & Saturdays, 9 p.m.-
Midnight. kingfisherbarandgrill.com
Café/Gourmet
Bentley’s House of Coffee & Tea 1730 E.
Speedway Blvd. 795-0338 Mon.-Sat. 7 a.m.-
midnight. Sun 8 a.m.-midnight.
Great food; quality, healthy ingredients. Vegetarian
and vegan conscious. Free wireless Internet. Catering.
bentleyscoffeehouse.com
Café 54 54 E. Pennington Road 622-1907
Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.-2 p.m.
Full service bistro serving lunch. Also provides
catering services, though its primary mission is an
award-winning training program serving individuals
recovering from mental illness. cafe54.org
Cup Café 311 E. Congress St. (Fourth Ave.
& Congress, inside Hotel Congress) 622-8848
Breakfast Mon.-Fri. 7-11 a.m., Sat. & Sun.
7 a.m.-1 p.m.; Lunch Mon.- Sun. 11 a.m.-
5 p.m.; Dinner Sun.-Sat. 5-10 p.m.; Late Night
Fri. & Sat. 11 p.m.-1 a.m.
Explore the food of India, Thailand, Mexico, Japan, the
Mediterranean, and down-home America. Featuring
award-winning desserts. hotelcongress.com
D
ining
D
irectory
Continued on page 29
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28
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
Commuters: You have options!
Change your habits... Change the Planet
Car Sharing:
A new program designed to provide hourly car rentals to students and staff. This is a great
program for our alternative transportation users that may have an off-campus appointment!
Biking:
Take advantage of the over 11,000 free bicycle parking spaces or park your bike with added security at one of
our secure lockers or enclosures. Biking is a joy for the mind and body – the perfect infusion of healthy energy
to get you where you need to be.

Carpooling:
Let’s pool it together! Sharing the ride to campus reduces fuel and maintenance expenses, decreases pollution
and eases the stress of fighting traffic. Sit back and chat with your carpool buddies, relax and enjoy the ride!
Sun Tran U-Pass:
All UA students, faculty and staff are eligible. The U-pass gives you unlimited use of Sun Tran. Parking
& Transportation pays for up to 50% of the cost of the full fare rate. Sun Tran provides maps,
schedules to help plan your route! No worries…just time to enjoy your journey.
Cat Tran:
Getting around campus is easier than ever with the Free CatTran Shuttle.
Six routes serve the campus with over 45 stops Three routes also serve six
off-campus Park and Ride Lots. Shuttles operate M-F, 6:30 am to 6:30 pm.
NightCat operates M-F, 6pm to 12:30 am. There’s a shuttle sure to suit your needs.
More Information:
Parking & Transportation Services
1117 E Sixth St. Tucson, AZ 85721-0181
520.626.RIDE (4733)
parking@email.arizona.edu
www.parking.arizona.edu
29
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
D
ining
D
irectory
Continued from page 25
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SkyNights • DiscoveryDays
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RESERVATIONS REQUIRED
Delectables Restaurant & Catering 533 N.
4th Ave. (6th St. & 4th Ave.) 884-9289
Sun.-Thurs. 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri. & Sat.
11 a.m.-11 p.m.
Enchiladas, Spinach & Cream Cheese Quiche, Pesto
Chicken Breast & Brie Sandwich, Tucson’s Best
Chef Salad, Guinness, Kendall Jackson Chardonnay,
cocktails and more. delectables.com
Tohono Chul Tea Room 7366 N. Paseo del
Norte (SW corner of Ina and Oracle)
797-1222 Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat. & Sun.
7 a.m.-4 p.m.
Serving breakfast, lunch and afternoon tea in the
Spanish Colonial West House with plant-filled court-
yard and welcoming patio. A favorite dining spot for
Tucson’s locals and visitors. tohonochulpark.org
Deli
eegee’s 2470 N. Campbell 325-9901; 2510
E. Speedway 881-3280. 7 days/wk
9:30 a.m.-10 p.m.
eegee’s is famous for its frozen fruit drinks & 16 vari-
eties of subs. Kid’s meals, salads. eegees.com
Jimmy John’s Gourmet Sandwiches 749
N. Park Ave. (just outside of Main Gate)
206-9999 7 days a week 10:30 a.m.-3 a.m.
Place an order for freaky fast delivery of Jimmy
John’s sandwiches. jimmyjohns.com
Mexican
El Charro Café 311 N. Court Ave. 622-1922;
6310 E. Broadway Blvd. 745-1922; 4699
E. Speedway 325-1922; 6910 E. Sunrise
514-1922 Mon.-Thurs. 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri. &
Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sun. Noon-9 p.m.
Traditional Sonoran-style and innovative Tucson-
style Mexican food. elcharrocafe.com
La Indita Restaurant 622 N. 4th Ave.,
792-0523 Sun. 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Mon.-Fri.
11 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat. 6-9 p.m.
Vegetarians welcome. Mexican dishes, Indian
frybreads, family recipes. Patio. Mexican beers.
Rio Café 2526 E. Grant Road, Ste. 121;
323-5003 Tues.-Fri. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.,
Sat. 4-10 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. & 4-9 p.m.
Latin American and North America dishes.
rio-cafe.com
Pizza/Italian
Magpies Gourmet Pizza 4654 E. Speedway
Blvd. 795-5977; 605 N. 4th Ave., 628-1661;
Locally owned and operated Italian Pizzeria with
six locations in Tucson.
magpiespizza.com
Zachary’s 1028 E. 6th St. (E. of Park Ave.,
across the street from campus) 623-6323
Mon.-Thurs. 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri. 11 a.m.-
11 p.m., Sat. 12-11 p.m., Sun. 12-9 p.m.
Old-fashioned Chicago-style pizza. 21 draft beers.
Southwestern
Barrio 135 S. 6th Avenue, 629-0191 Tues.
& Thurs. 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri. 11 a.m.-
Midnight, Sat. 5 p.m.-midnight, Sun.
5 p.m.-9 p.m.
Downtown, moments away from theatre, art, and
convention events. The restaurant features cozy
booths, an upbeat bar. barrioanddrink.com
Coyote Pause 2740 S. Kinney (near Ajo
& Kinney located within Cat Mountain
Emporium) 883-7297 Wed.-Sun. 8 a.m.-
2 p.m.
Unpretentious and charming café, acclaimed by
restaurant reviewers and adored by locals. Healthy
innovative fare. catmountainstation.com
Janos and J Bar 3770 E. Sunrise Dr.,
615-6100 Janos Mon.-Sat. 5:30-9:30 p.m.;
J BAR Mon.-Sat. 5 p.m.-2 a.m.
French-inspired Southwestern cuisine since 1983.
Chef Janos Wilder uses best of local harvest and
ingredients from around the world. J BAR features
grilled marinated meats, fish and poultry.
janos.com
Steakhouse
El Corral 2201 E. River Rd. (River Rd. &
Campbell Ave.) 299-6092 Mon.-Thurs.
5-10 p.m., Fri.-Sun. 4:30-10 p.m.
“Legendary” prime rib, steaks, chicken and fish for
more than 60 years! World Famous Beef & Spirits.
elcorraltucson.com
While The University of Arizona’s
colors remain a bold red and blue,
visitors to campus might also no-
tice a touch of “green” in the mix,
as the University strives to become
a leader in environmental sustain-
ability.
As groundbreaking research on
solar energy, global warming and
other topics in earth and environ-
mental science takes place in labs
throughout the University, one spe-
cial UA tour is highlighting ways
the campus itself is going green.
The self-guided Sustainability
Walking Tour was developed by the
Campus Sustainability Committee,
a group of faculty, staff, students
and administrators committed to
practicing sustainability on campus.
Created in 2007 at the request of
UA President Robert N. Shelton, the
committee is chaired by professor
Glenn Schrader, head of the UA’s
chemical and environmental engi-
neering department.
“The vision behind campus sus-
tainability is to use the University
as a laboratory for sustainability,”
Schrader said. “We can’t just in-
struct about sustainability. We have
to practice it also.”
The tour is part of the Sustain-
ability Committee’s “Project Sage: A
Different Shade of Green” initiative.
A shade of green well-represented in
the southern Arizona Desert, sage
was also one of the UA’s frst offcial
school colors, paired with silver.
The word “sage” further indicates
learning and wisdom, imperative to
discussions about sustainability.
The Sustainability Walking Tour
offers just a glimpse of the impor-
tant sustainability efforts on the UA
The self-guided
Sustainability Walking
Tour features buildings
that demonstrate the UA’s
commitment to being a
leader in sustainability –
a tradition that began with
Old Main, which was
completed in 1891.
The UA’s oldest building, Old Main, is shaded by deep roof overhangs, while a partially recessed
ground floor helps regulate temperature.
P
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Red +
31
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
campus, and is expected to grow
as those efforts continue. The tour
was offcially introduced to the
public on Earth Day 2009, highlight-
ing the following campus spots.
UA Visitor Center
Two 2,000-gallon metal cisterns col-
lect rainwater used to water plants,
and 36 rooftop photovoltaic solar
panels produce 8,500 kilowatt-
hours of direct electric current an-
nually.
Old Main
The UA’s oldest building, complet-
ed in 1891, boasted environmen-
tally friendly features long before
the modern green movement. Deep
roof overhangs shade the walls
of the red brick building, while
a wraparound porch provides a
shady place to sit. A ground foor
that’s partially recessed into the
earth provides additional thermal
control.
Harshbarger/Mines and
Metallurgy
This is the spot where many of the
UA’s top chemical, environmen-
tal, materials science, mining and
geological engineers do important
work related to sustainability.
College of Architecture and
Landscape Architecture
In the college’s Underwood Family
Sonoran Landscape Laboratory,
fve geographically distinct Sono-
ran Desert biomes, or ecosystems,
are sustained by roof runoff and
condensation from the building’s
cooling system. Other eco-friendly
• Want to take the tour? Find a
brochure and map at the UA
Visitor Center, 811 N. Euclid
Ave.
• Find more information about
UA sustainability efforts at
www.sustainability.arizona.edu.
• This tour was featured in
an episode of the
UANews “PodCats”
radio program. Listen
to it at http://uanews.
org/ecotourpodcats.
A glass wall of windows on the north side of the Meinel Optical Sciences Expansion provides
natural light while reducing the harsh impact of the desert sun.
P
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Blue =
Continued on page 32
32
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
features include a 12,000-gallon
rainwater harvesting cistern, inte-
grated into the building, and walk-
ing pathways made from recycled
brick and concrete.
Aerospace and Mechanical
Engineering
In 2006, students, staff and faculty
worked to contour bases around
trees to capture roof rainwater run-
off that once drained into adjacent
streets.
Thermal Ice Storage Plant
A unique ice storage system uses
chillers to make ice at night. Dur-
ing the day, the ice melts to cool
campus buildings, saving the Uni-
versity more than $400,000 a year
in energy costs.
Meinel Optical Sciences
Expansion
A windowless southern building
facade reduces the impact of the
desert sun, while a glass curtain
wall on the north facade provides
views and natural light. Relief air
from the building cools a sunken
outdoor amphitheater.
Manuel Pacheco Integrated
Learning Center
The underground building features
the UA’s frst “green roof.” A thick,
multilayered turf panel, irrigated
with reclaimed water, provides ex-
cellent insulation.
Laboratory for Tree-Ring
Research
Through the scientifc study of tree
rings, a feld established in 1937 at
the UA, researchers can uncover
important information about cli-
mate change to help them predict
future environmental issues.
Student Recreation Center
Expansion
This 53,000-square-foot project is
the frst and only UA building to
seek a Leadership in Energy and
Environmental Design, or LEED,
silver certifcation from the U.S.
Green Building Council. Among the
facility’s environmentally friendly
features is fooring made from re-
newable materials and eco-friendly
wood, certifed by the Forest
Stewardship Council. According to
University policy, all new construc-
tion on campus must meet LEED
standards.
Campus Arboretum
With 7,000 trees and native and
low-water use plants, the UA is
home to the oldest continually
maintained green space in Arizona.
As part of the UA’s outreach mis-
sion, Schrader said he hopes the
Sustainability Walking Tour will
help open the University to the
public in a new way, allowing com-
munity members to explore cam-
pus features they once may have
overlooked.
Finally, it’s worth noting what
makes this tour particularly eco-
friendly: It’s completely powered
by your feet.
Alexis Blue, Office of University Com-
munications
Red + Blue
= Green!
University Libraries
We’re more than just books − we keep our students connected!
t 3FTFBSDI)FMQo in person at the Information
Commons desks, by phone or online (IM/chat or e-mail)
t *OUFSMJCSBSZ-PBOoget books the Libraries do not
own and electronic delivery of articles
t 'SFF%PDVNFOU%FMJWFSZo get book chapters
and articles the Libraries own sent to you electronically
t &YQSFTT%PDVNFOU$FOUFSo Main Library, printing,
copying, scanning, digitizing, large-format poster prints
t 7JEFP4USFBNJOHo video and audio streaming of
course related materials
*OGPSNBUJPO$PNNPOTo
Computers, scanners, prlntlng · Prlendly, knowledgeable
research help · l000s of onllne research resources ·
Software for coursework · Collaboratlve learnlng space ·
3 presentatlon practlce rooms · Laptops and proìectors
for loan · Multlmedla Zone ln Maln Llbrary |nfo Commons
www.library.arizona.edu 520.621.6442 / 6443
Photo credits: © David Harden (top), Daniel Perezselsky
© Jackie Alpers (large photo)
Two
2,000-gallon
rainwater
cisterns are
used to harvest
rainwater at
the UA Visitor
Center.
Continued from page 31
33
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
The University of Arizona
The University of Arizona plays
a unique and instrumental role
in shaping the state’s future,
enriching its economy, improving
the human condition, and giving
Arizona families access to one of the
best educations in the world. The
University’s commitment to quality
in everything it does – teaching,
research and community outreach
– has earned it an international
reputation for excellence.
The UA enrolls 37,000 students
in 347 different degree felds. The
diverse enrollment of the University
includes students from every state
in America and 117 countries around
the globe. The University’s faculty
includes many of the world’s leading
scholars.
About Our Campus
Located in the heart of the Sonoran
Desert, the main UA campus covers
380 acres in central Tucson. The UA
campus is the oldest continually
maintained open green space in
Arizona, a unique collection of trees,
shrubs and plants from arid and
semi-arid climates around the world.
Red brick is the dominant theme
for 180 buildings on campus. Old
Main, the frst building on campus,
is still used by students and faculty.
Six museums offer visitors cultural
diversity, living-science laboratories,
world-class art and a showcase for
the history of Arizona Athletics.
Want to learn more? Students and
parents can take a 90-minute walking
tour, spend a full day on campus at a
“UA Up Close” event or attend class
with a current student. Call 621-3237
or go to www.admissions.arizona.
edu/visit to arrange a tour.
Highlights
• The National Science Foundation
has ranked physical sciences
research at the UA as No. 1 in the
nation
• U.S. News & World Report ranks
the UA in the top tier of the
nation’s universities
• The UA is the frst public
university to lead a NASA mission
to Mars
• The Entrepreneurship Program
at the UA Eller College of
Management has been ranked
by Princeton Review and
Entrepreneurship Magazine as
one of the best in the country
The leading public research university
in the American Southwest
Tucson
Lively, warm and welcoming, Tucson
attracts people from all over the
world. With a desirable climate, rich
culture, endless activities and beautiful
surroundings, many people who come to
Tucson never leave.
Set in the Sonoran Desert, Tucson is
surrounded by forests of cacti and rugged
mountains that frame dramatic sunrises
and sunsets.
Culturally diverse and growing, Tucson’s
greater metropolitan area recently
counted its one-millionth resident.
Tucsonans enjoy about 350 days of
sunshine every year. Two rainy seasons
keep the “Old Pueblo” green.
Driving Distance
Albuquerque 450
Durango 568
El Paso 317
Flagstaff 258
Las Cruces 275
Las Vegas 407
Los Angeles 486
Nogales 63
Phoenix 114
Rocky Point 216
San Diego 409
Yuma 238
in miles
34
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
~ Kitchen or expanded
kitchenette, stocked
with breakfast items
~ Private entrances,
most with access to
“world’s greatest
porch”
~ Hot/cold water for
supplied teas, cereals
~ Air ozone puri½ers
~ Hardwood ¾oors
~ LCD TVs w/300 digital
channels
Plus:
~ Parking with video
surveillance
~ Free WiFi throughout
plus internet work
station in a semi-
private alcove
~ Walk to University of
Arizona, Downtown
Tucson and Historic
4th Ave.
Te Big Blue House Inn
ALL-SUITE TUCSON BED AND BREAKFAST
DAILY, WEEKLY OR EXTENDED STAYS WELCOME
Each room features:
144 E. University Blvd.
Tucson AZ 85705 ~ 520-891-1827
info@BigBlueHouse.net ~ http://BigBlueHouse.net
Introducing Hyatt Place

Tucson Airport
Guests staying at Hyatt Place will find themselves surrounded
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The International Affairs Passport Application
Acceptance Facility provides a vital public service,
promotes public relations and is authorized to accept
and execute passport applications for United States
citizens. The facility makes it easy and convenient to
obtain and submit passport applications. This service is
provided to the University campus community as well as
the community-at-large.
On June 1, 2009, the U.S. government implemented
the full requirements of the land and sea phase of the
Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative. The new rule
requires U.S. citizens entering the United States at sea
or land ports of entry to have a U.S. passport. Currently,
U.S. passport applicants can obtain their U.S. passport
approximately six weeks after applying. Take advantage
of U.S. Department of State’s fast processing times now
and submit your passport application at the International
Affairs Passport Application Acceptance Facility!
The International Affairs Passport Application
Acceptance Facility is open on a walk in basis. We are
located at 1128 E. Mabel St. We offer a passport photo
service on site as well as the International Student
Identity Card for students traveling abroad. We are now
open on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from 9:00
to 5:00. For documentation requirements and passport
related fees please visit our website at www.passport.
arizona.edu or call (520) 626-7161.
Apply for a U.S. Passport at The University of Arizona Passport Application Acceptance Facility!
35
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
Sept. 10
Alison Deming Poet and essayist Dem-
ing is the author of 10 books of poetry
and nonfction, her most recent being a
collection of poems titled “Rope.” She
teaches creative writing at the UA.
Sept. 24
Terrain Release Party Musician, com-
poser and philosopher David Rothen-
berg creates soundscapes that connect
the living sounds of the natural world
to traditions of global rhythmic in-
novation. Rothenberg is the author of
“Why Birds Sing” and “Thousand Mile
Song,” a book about making music with
whales. Appearing with Rothenberg
will be authors published in the latest
issue of Terrain.org: A Journal of the
Built & Natural Environments.
Sept. 26
Poetry Joeys children’s poetry reading
and activities, 10 a.m.
Oct. 9
Sandra Alcosser Alcosser is the author
of “Except by Nature” and is a National
Poetry Series winner. She is the recipi-
ent of numerous awards, was the frst
state poet laureate of Montana and
founded the creative writing program
at San Diego State University, where
she teaches. Currently she is a part of
The Language of Conservation, a proj-
ect that places poetry in installations
at zoos nationwide to draw attention to
conservation of species.
Oct. 22
Jonathan Skinner Skinner is an eco-crit-
ic and editor of ecopoetics, an infuential
journal. He has also written a book of
poems titled “Political Cactus Poems.”
Oct. 23
Juliana Spahr Spahr is an avant-garde
Time 8 p.m. (unless otherwise noted)
Admission Free
Location UA Poetry
Center, 1508 E. Helen
St. (unless otherwise
noted)
Parking Paid parking
available in Highland
Avenue Garage. Free parking available
in UA parking lots weekdays after 5
p.m. and all day on weekends (except
during special events).
Contact 626-3765, poetry@email.
arizona.edu, www.poetrycenter.arizona.
edu
Poetry Center
R
eading series
SCHAEFER
POETRY
CENTER
C
h
e
r
r
y

A
v
e
n
u
e
V
i
n
e

A
v
e
n
u
e
Helen Street
Speedway Boulevard
poet whose work is intensely con-
nective, political and concerned with
geography, ecology and conservation.
She has written seven books of poetry,
her most recent being “The Transfor-
mation.”
Oct. 29
David Dunn Ecologist, composer and
explorer Dunn creates soundscapes
that use electro-acoustic resources,
voice and nonhuman living systems,
as well as traditional instruments. He
collaborates with scientists on environ-
mental problem solving through an art
and science synthesis, and is also an
author and the president of the Art and
Science Laboratory in Santa Fe, N.M.
Oct. 31
Poetry Joeys children’s poetry reading
and activities, 10 a.m.
Nov. 5
Lucinda Bliss and Alison Deming
Painter Bliss’s new work explores grave
ecological conditions through delicate,
even beautiful, representational work.
Her work has been exhibited in Port-
land, Ore., Tucson, Boston, Chicago,
Santa Fe, N.M., and Baghdad, Iraq.
Nov. 19
Lila Zemborain and Rosa Alcalá
Zemborain is an Argentine poet and
critic who has lived in New York
City since 1985. A number of her
poems and books, including “Mauve
Sea-Orchids,” have been translated
into English. Zemborain is also the
director and editor of the Rebel Road
series, and the curator of the KJCC
Poetry Series at New York Univer-
sity. Alcalá is the author of “Some
Maritime Disasters This Century”
and “Undocumentary.” She also has
translated work by Cecilia Vicuña,
Lourdes Vázquez, and Zemborain,
among others. She is poetry editor at
Noemi Press.
Nov. 21
Poetry Joeys children’s poetry reading
and activities, 10 a.m.
Dec. 4
Eleni Sikelianos Sikelianos has written
a number of books of poetry, includ-
ing “Body Clock” and “The California
Poem,” a book-length epic poem of
place – place as geography, biology,
culture, history and the imagination.
She has received numerous awards for
her work and currently teaches at the
University of Denver.
Dec. 5
Poetry Joeys children’s poetry reading
and activities, 10 a.m.
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ARIZONA DAILY WILDCAT
Read the
dailywildcat.com all the latest campus news
36
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
37
www.arizona.edu
Professor Hermann F. Fasel, shown here working with a graduate student, conducts research in aerodynamics.
University of Arizona professor
Hermann F. Fasel is seeing green.
As the inaugural 1885 Society
Presidential Chair, the professor
of Aerospace and Mechanical En-
gineering has money in his pocket
for exploratory research in alterna-
tive energy and biomedical fuid
mechanics.
The chair is the frst initiative
funded by the 1885 Society, a UA
donor group whose mem-
bers commit to providing
annual unrestricted cash
gifts of $10,000 or more to
meet the changing needs
of the University.
“The generous gifts
from members of the
1885 Society allow us to
leverage our resources to
reward faculty members
during these challenging
times,” says UA President
Robert N. Shelton. “Dr.
Fasel is precisely the type
of faculty member who
embodies The University
of Arizona’s reputation
as a world-class research
institution.”
Shelton appointed Fasel
to the rotating chair this spring.
Fasel will receive $40,000 annually
for the length of his appointment.
“I see this as an investment in
new ideas that I would like to pur-
sue,” Fasel says. “I plan to apply
my experience and knowledge in
aeronautical engineering to re-
search in solar tower power plants,
Investing in Ideas
A UA professor who
helps create planes that
are safer and more fuel-
efficient is the first 1885
Society Presidential Chair.
wind turbines, and cardiovascular
medicine.”
Fasel heads the Computational
Fluid Dynamics Laboratory
at the department of aerospace
and mechanical engineering. The
lab uses the world’s fastest super-
computers to conduct scientifc
research for various agencies – in-
cluding the U.S. Department of De-
fense and NASA – and industry.
Since 2002, he has secured doz-
ens of research grants and current-
ly has active grants totaling more
than $6 million. He leads a team
of graduate and undergraduate
students in research areas includ-
ing laminar-turbulent transition,
fow control, aerodynamics, and
dynamically scaled fight-testing
of aircraft. His efforts are helping
on problems that are important to
society and he has a great ability to
show how things are interrelated.
He has high standards for himself
and his colleagues, which is why
he is so well-respected around the
world.”
Lisa Lucas, UA Foundation
to create airplanes that are safer,
more fuel-effcient, and have less
impact on the environment.
“Hermann is an outstanding Col-
lege of Engineering faculty member
in all phases of the job – teaching,
research and service,” says Jef-
fery Goldberg, interim dean of the
College of Engineering. “He works
38
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
for more information
Dr. Martha P.L. Whitaker
mplw@hwr.arizona.edu
(520) 621-9715
for more information
Dr. Martha P.L. Whitaker
mplw@hwr.arizona.edu
(520) 621-9715
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Cross streets are University and Euclid two blocks outside UA main gates
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39
UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
Aug. 24
Fall Semester
Classes Begin
Sept. 7
Labor Day
University Holiday
Nov. 11
Veterans Day
University Holiday
Nov. 26-29
Thanksgiving Break
Dec. 9
Last Day of Classes
Dec. 19
Winter
Commencement
Dec. 21
Winter Session
Classes Begin
Dec. 24-25
Christmas
University Holiday
Jan. 1
New Year’s Day
University Holiday
Jan. 12
Last Day
of Winter Session
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THE UNIVERSITY
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Lactation Rooms
Child Play-Area
Diaper Changing
Tables in Restrooms
(most changing tables are located on the ground
floor or main auditorium areas)
High-Chairs
Available
- Student Union - rm. 404
- UMC (employees only)
- Architecture
- Campus Health
- Communication Bldg
- Ctr for Creative Photography
- College of Law
- Drama
- Education Bldg
- Gould-Simpson
- Harvill Bldg
- Integrated Learning Ctr
- Main Library
- McClelland
- McKale Center
- Modern Languages
- Physics-Atmos. Sciences
- Science Lirbary
- Social Sciences
- Space Sciences
- Steward Observatory
- Student Union Memorial Ctr
- Veterinary Science & Microbio.
- Family & Commuter Lounge
Student Union Memorial Center
4th Floor (above BookStore)
For a complete list of services
for UA parents visit online at
http://lifework.arizona.edu
- WildCat Food Court
Student Union Memorial Center
Vending Machines
- Wilbur's Underground
Student Union Memorial Center
- Education/Steward Observatory
- Integrated Learning Center
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41
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
www.arizona.edu
520.325.3366
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Remarkable lodging choices for the discerning traveler.
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Spacious Floor Plans
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Recessed Lighting
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Cable Ready
Pets Welcome
Lighted Parking
Walk/Bike to UA
Garbage Disposal
Mirrored Closet Doors
Distinctive Locations
Washer/Dryer in Every Unit
Lush Maintained Landscaping
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www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
Great Beds. Great Food.
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6 Blocks West of Campus
High Speed Wireless Internet
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The real world
starts here.
Campus Housing
APPLY NOW!
www.life.arizona.edu
520-621-6501
Living on campus will provide
you with the academic environ-
ment you need and the social
environment you want. Our
caring, supportive staff is here
for you 24/7 to help make your
college experience a great one.
43
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
Live like
Royalty
when visiting
your Wildcat
Rent for a
day, week
or month
Fully
equipped
from
kitchen
to bath
Castle Apts.
are within
walking
distance
of the UA
The
Castle
Property Management
www.thecastleproperties.com
Yearly leasing available
$30.00 DISCOUNT WITH 2 NIGHT RESERVATION
Center for Creative
Photography
The center’s
gallery exhibits
work by new
photographers
and renowned
artists such as
Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Garry
Winogrand and Harry Callahan.
Hours Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Saturday-Sunday 1 p.m.-4 p.m.
Admission Call for prices. Free for UA
students and employees.
Location Fine Arts Complex, 1030 N.
Olive Road
Parking Park Avenue Garage. Pedes-
trian underpass gives direct access.
Parking directly behind center (off
Second Street) is free on weekends and
after 5 p.m. on weekdays.
Contact 621-7968,
oncenter@ccp.library.arizona.edu,
www.creativephotography.org
Joseph Gross Art Gallery
For 30 years, the gallery has exhibited
the work of student, faculty and profes-
sional artists in a broad range of media
and concepts. The gallery also hosts
visiting artists and scholars for public
lectures.
Hours Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Saturday-Sunday 12 p.m.-4 p.m.
Admission Free
Location Corner of Park Avenue and
Speedway Boulevard, between the Cen-
ter for Creative Photography and the UA
Museum of Art
Parking Park Avenue Garage. Pedes-
trian underpass gives direct access.
Parking directly behind center (off
Second Street) is free on weekends and
after 5 p.m. weekdays.
Contact 626-4215,
brookeg@email.arizona.edu
Lionel Rombach Gallery
Established in 1977, the gallery (then
called the 830 Gallery) was the frst
student gallery in the UA art depart-
ment. Today, the gallery is an exhibi-
tion space for students to realize their
artistic visions and learn about gallery
management under the guidance of
faculty and the gallery curator.
Hours Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Saturday-Sunday 12 p.m.-4 p.m.
Admission Free
Location Corner of Park Avenue and
Speedway Boulevard, between the Cen-
ter for Creative Photography and the
UA Museum of Art, inside the Joseph
Gross Gallery building
Parking Park Avenue Garage. Pedes-
trian underpass gives direct access.
Parking directly behind center (off
Second Street) is free on weekends and
weekdays after 5 p.m.
Contact 626-4215,
brookeg@email.arizona.edu
Union Gallery
The Union Gallery
offers a unique
collection that
features a variety
of media, which is
on display year-round. The gallery has
served the community since 1973 by
exposing visitors to original art by re-
gional and nationally prominent artists.
Hours Monday-Friday 10 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Saturday 12 p.m.-3 p.m., and by ap-
pointment
Admission Free
Location Inside the Student Union Me-
morial Center, 1303 E. University Blvd.
Parking Second Street Garage
Contact 621-6142,
brownhb@email.arizona.edu
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ARCHITECTURE
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ARCHITECTURE
JOSEPH GROSS
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DRAMA
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CAMPUS MALL
The University of Arizona
STEWARD OBSERVATORY
Mirror Lab Tours
Come see
how these
giant eyes
on the sky
are made!
Finished mirrors allow telescopes on
mountaintop observatories to share
ultra-sharp images of the distant edges of
our universe. See firsthand the making of
molds, spin casting, grinding, and
polishing of those giant eyes on the
sky! Experience how the world’s
largest telescope mirrors are
created. Celebrate the IYA2009.
Steward Observatory Mirror Laboratory
Reservations Required
520-626-8792
MirrorLab@as.arizona.edu
Giant Magellan Telescope
46
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
We Specialize in Extended Stays
•Hot Breakfast Buffet
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•Fully-equipped Kitchen in Every Suite
•High-speed Wireless Internet
•Business Center & Fitness Center
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6477 E. Speedway Blvd.
Tucson, AZ 85710
(Fax) (520) 290-8323
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Ask About our Special UA Rate!
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47
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
Syd Clark-Yawitz is an energetic
and exuberant 5-year-old who
loves to play basketball, swim, read
books and listen to classical music.
Adopted by his parents through
foster care, Syd was born with neu-
rological issues that have resulted
in behavioral problems.
Syd is just one of the millions of
children in the U.S. struggling with
a neurological disorder. Complex
and often diffcult to treat, neuro-
logical problems in children can
be very frustrating for families.
Typically, the children need to be
seen by a variety of specialists and
therapists. Care is often diffcult to
fnd, challenging to coordinate and
incredibly wearisome to parents
already overwhelmed by the issues
confronting the child.
“When we moved to Tucson, it
was very diffcult to get an appoint-
ment with a specialist,” says Den-
nis Yawitz, Syd’s father. “Having a
child who desperately needs help
quickly, and not being able to get
it, is horrible – you feel like you are
letting your child down.”
Hope is on the horizon. As a
result of the fundraising efforts of
The University of Arizona’s Steele
Children’s Research Center volun-
teer group PANDA (People Acting
Now Discover Answers), Tucson
will soon have an outpatient pe-
diatric center devoted to helping
children with neurologi-
cal problems. Currently,
no such facility exists in
Southern Arizona. Nearly
$1million was raised from
this year’s annual PANDA
“Children Helping Chil-
dren,” fashion show in
Phoenix. Approximately
$2 million more will be raised to
complete the facility, which will be
located within University Medical
Center.
Scheduled to be completed in
about a year, the new facility – the
PANDA Children’s Neurological
Center – will treat children suffer-
ing from neurological conditions
such as traumatic brain injury,
stroke, cerebral palsy, epilepsy and
autism, to name a few.
The center will employ multi-
disciplinary teams of pediatric
specialists and therapists work-
ing together to evaluate, diagnose
and develop specialized treatment
plans for each patient. Specialists
include neurologists, developmen-
tal pediatricians, psychologists,
psychiatrists, neonatologists, epi-
leptologist (doctors who specialize
in the treatment of epilepsy), and
speech, occupational and physical
therapists.
“Right now, countless children
in Tucson and Southern Arizona
with neurological problems are not
receiving many of the subspecialty
services they need, because we
don’t have centers to provide this
coordinated care,” says Syd’s pedi-
atric developmental physician, Dr.
Coordinated Care for Kids
The PANDA
Children’s
Neurological Center
will be the only
outpatient
pediatric center in
Southern Arizona
dedicated to
helping children
with neurological
problems.
Syd Clark-Yawitz, 5, is one of the millions of children in the U.S. struggling with a neurological disorder.
P
h
o
t
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Continued on page 49
48
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
L
ibraries
Steward Observatory
Since 1924, Steward Observatory has
been hosting public astronomy lectures.
Following each lecture, participants can
view the night sky (weather permitting)
through the obser-
vatory’s 21-inch
Raymond E. White Jr.
Refector telescope.
Time 7:30 p.m.
Admission Free
Location Steward
Observatory, Room N210, 933 N. Cherry
Ave.
Contact Thomas Fleming, 621-5049,
taf@as.arizona.edu, www.as.arizona.edu
Lecture Dates Jan. 26, Feb. 16, March 2
and 23, April 6 and 22
Sept. 14
“A Study in Scarlet: The Spitzer Space
Telescope View of the Triangulum
Galaxy,” by Joannah Hinz, Steward
Observatory
Sept. 28, Oct. 12, Oct. 26, Nov. 9, Nov. 23
TBA
Dec. 7
“A Nightwatchman’s Journey: My
Adventures as a Comet Discoverer and
Skywatcher,” by David Levy, Jarnac
Observatory
L
ecture series
UA MALL
FLANDRAU
STEWARD
OBSERVATORY
UA MALL
Sept. 5
Central Michigan (Tucson)
Sept. 12
Northern Arizona (Tucson)
Sept. 19
Iowa (Iowa City, Iowa)
Sept. 26
Oregon State (Corvallis, Ore.)
Oct. 10
Washington (Seattle)
Oct. 17
Stanford (Tucson)
Oct. 24
UCLA (Tucson)
Nov. 7
Washington State (Tucson)
Nov. 14
California (Berkeley, Calif.)
Nov. 21
Oregon (Tucson)
Nov. 28
Arizona State (Tempe, Ariz.)
Dec. 5
USC (Los Angeles)
Investment Strategies Seminars
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Visit us at
Arizona State Museum
1013 E. University Blvd. Monday-
Thursday 10 a.m.-3 p.m. and by
appointment; closed state and national
holidays. 621-4695.
www.statemuseum.arizona.edu/library
Arizona Health Sciences Library
1501 N. Campbell Ave. 7 a.m.-9:30 p.m.
Sunday-Thursday. 7 a.m.-7p.m. Friday-
Saturday. Open until midnight for UA
and UMC users. 626-6125.
Center for Creative Photography
1030 N. Olive Road Monday-Friday 11
a.m.-3 p.m. Closed weekends. 621-1331.
www.creativephotography.org/library
Fine Arts, Music Building
Room 233, 1017 N. Olive Road Monday-
Thursday 8 a.m.-10 p.m.; Friday 8 a.m.-
6 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sunday
1 p.m.-10 p.m. 621-7009.
www.library.arizona.edu/about/
libraries/fineartslibr.html
Law
1501 E. Speedway Blvd. Monday-
Thursday 7 a.m.-11:45 p.m.; Friday
7 a.m.-6 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m.-6
Sunday 12-11:45 p.m. 621-1413.
www.law.arizona.edu/library
Main
1510 E. University Blvd. Open Sunday at
11 a.m. until Friday at 9 p.m.; Saturday
9 a.m.-9 p.m. CatCard required 1 a.m.-
7 a.m. 621-6441.
www.library.arizona.edu
Science-Engineering
744 N. Highland Ave. Monday-Thursday
7:30 a.m.-1 a.m.; Friday 7:30 a.m.-6 p.m.;
Saturday 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday 11 a.m.-
1 a.m. 621-6384.
Arizona Football
www.library.arizona.edu/about/
libraries/scienglibr.html
Special Collections (Main Library),
1510 E. University Blvd. Monday-
Friday 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Closed weekends.
621-6423.
www.library.arizona.edu/speccoll
49
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
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Sydney Rice, assistant professor
of developmental and behavioral
pediatrics in the UA department of
pediatrics.
“Children with neurological con-
ditions have many complex issues,
so it will be enormously benefcial
to have all of the specialists in one
outpatient location, working as a
team to help these children,” Rice
says.
“Once Syd saw Dr. Rice, things
started getting better,” recalls
Yawitz. “She arranged for occupa-
tional therapy as well as a consul-
tation with a behavioral specialist,
who was fantastic. Everything is
looking up now, but if all of the
services had been available in one
location, it would have been much
less stressful.”
The center’s connection to the
Steele Center will make it unique
within Arizona, as well. “The Steele
Center’s ability to conduct re-
search allows us to discover new
treatments, and move into the clini-
cal arena with them,” says pediat-
ric intensivist Dr. Andreas Theodor-
Coordinated
Care for Kids
Continued from page 47
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ou, a professor of pediatrics. “This
will enable the Steele Center to
recruit those experts who provide
clinical care and conduct research
to provide this much needed care
for our patients.”
“Tucson desperately needs this
center, and the PANDAs are a bless-
ing for all the money they raised
for the UA Steele Center to make
the neurological facility a reality,”
Yawitz says. “It will be an asset to
the entire community.”
To learn more, visit www.steel-
ecenter.arizona.edu.
Darci Slaten, Steele Children’s Re-
search Center
50
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
Our advertisers welcome you to Southern Arizona
1 Adobe Rose Inn, p. 10
2 AETNA Student Health, p. 51
3 Amtrak, p. 19
4 Arizona Bookstore, p. 16
5 Arizona Inn, p. 20
6 Best Western Royal Inn &
Suites, p. 25
7 Big Blue House Inn, p. 34
8 Castle Properties, p. 43
9 Catalina Park Inn, p. 42
10 Coldwell Banker, p. 48
11 Doubletree Hotel, p. 29
12 Fairfield Inn Marriott, p. 46
13 Four Points
by Sheraton, p. 25
14 Hotel Arizona, p. 21
15 Hotel Congress, p. 6
16 Hyatt Place, p. 34
17 Inn Suites – Tucson
Center, p. 28
18 Jay’s of Tucson, p. 24
19 Kiwi Knitting Company, p. 39
20 Lodge On The Desert, p. 41
21 Loews Ventana Canyon Resort, p. 11
22 Marriott at Starr Pass, p. 18
23 Marriott University Park, p. 7
24 NorthPointe Student
Apartments, p. 46
25 Peppertrees B & B Inn, p. 38
26 Quality Inn Flamingo, p. 51
27 QuatroVest, p. 41
28 Ramada Limited Tucson West, p. 17
29 Randolph Park Hotel, p. 49
30 Reserve at Starr Pass, p. 24
31 Residence Inn by Marriott, p. 46
32 Riverside Suites, p. 39
33 Rodeway Inn, p. 51
34 Sahara Apartments, inside
front cover
35 Sam Hughes Inn, p. 24
36 Suds Plus Laundromat, p. 35
37 Sun Tran, p. 39
38 Tohono Chul Park, p. 46
39 Tubac Chamber of
Commerce, p. 38
40 Tucson Airport
Authority, p. 42
41 * UA Airforce ROTC, p. 51
42 *UA Athletics, p. 14
43 UA Biosphere 2, p. 41
44 * UA Bookstores, Back Cover
45 * UA Campus Health, p. 25
46 * UA Center for English as a
Second Language, p. 24
47 * UA Disability Resources, p. 24
48 * UA Hydrology & Water
Resources, p. 38
49 * UA International Affairs –
Passport Application
Acceptance Facility, p. 34
50 * UA Libraries, p. 32
51 * UA Mt. Lemmon
SkyCenter, p. 29
52 * UA Navy ROTC, p. 17
53 * UA Parking &
Transportation
Svcs., p. 28
54 * UA Residence Life, p. 42
55 * UA Residence Life –
La Aldea
Apartments, p. 11
56 * UA Steward Observatory
Mirror Labs, p. 43
57 Varsity Clubs of
America, p. 28
58 Velo Med
Urgent Care, p. 10
59 Westward Look Resort
& Spa, p. 38
60 Windmill Inn at
St. Philip’s, p. 17
* Indicates campus location. See
main campus map (pages 26-27)
for building locations.
27
PIMA
31
18
57
5
35
19
39
ELM
38
23
4
26
21
22, 30
34
60
1
20
11
24
14
16
29
40
58
20 20
17
6
25
12
13
38
8
7
59
10
32
3
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51
www.arizona.edu UA VISITOR GUIDE FALL/WINTER 2009
1300 N. Stone Ave.
Tucson, AZ 85705 (520) 770-1910
Your home away from home
for your next getaway to Tucson
One mile from the UA and downtown
• newly remod-
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with microwave
and fridge
• free deluxe
continental
breakfast and
coffee
• free wireless
high speed
internet access
• free local calls
• outdoor pool &
hot tub
• banquet and
meeting rooms
available
Request
Special UA Rate
(520) 622-6446
1248 N. Stone Ave.
Tucson, AZ 85705
• Convenient Location
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For More Information Contact
Air Force ROTC Det 20
(520)626-3521
http://afrotc.arizona.edu
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Make sure you get the best coverage available for your dollar.
The Arizona Board of Regents is working with Aetna Student Health
to offer you a student-focused health insurance plan that protects
you at school, at home, and while traveling or studying abroad.
Compare the sponsored student health insurance plan with your
current coverage. Consider these factors to help you make your
decision: cost of premiums and deductibles, plan maximums,
exclusions and limitations, covered benefits, duration of coverage
and whether out-of-network care is covered.
Make an informed decision:
Visit www.aetnastudenthealth.com for detailed Plan information
including rates, benefits, health discounts and enrollment information.
Or call 866-376-7450. You can also visit www.health.arizona.edu for
more information
The Arizona Board of Regents Student Health Insurance Plan is underwritten by Aetna Life
Insurance Company (ALIC) and administered by Chickering Claims Administrators, Inc. Aetna
Student Health
SM
is the brand name for products and services provided by these companies and
their applicable affiliated companies. This material is for information only.
Health insurance plans contain exclusions and limitations. Information is
believed to be accurate as of the production date; however, it is subject to change.
15.12.316.1
With the changing economy, how can you afford
not to get the most from your student health insurance plan?
www.aetnastudenthealth.com
THE ARIZONA BOARD OF REGENTS
STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE PLAN