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OREGON STATEWIDE ASSESSMENT

SPECIFICATIONS

EL PA TEST
2-3

2012-2013

G RADE B AND

It is the policy of the State Board of Education and a priority of the Oregon Department of Education that there will be no discrimination or harassment on the grounds of race, color, sex, marital status, religion, national origin, age or handicap in any educational programs, activities, or employment. Persons having questions about equal opportunity and nondiscrimination should contact the State Superintendent of Public Instruction at the Oregon Department of Education. Developed by the Office of Assessment and Information Services Oregon Department of Education 255 Capitol Street NE Salem, Oregon 97310-0203 (503) 947-5600 Rob Saxton Deputy Superintendent of Public Instruction Doug Kosty Assistant Superintendent Steve Slater Manager, Scoring, Psychometrics and Validity Kathleen Vanderwall Manager, Test Design and Administration Holly Carter Assessment Operations and Policy Analyst Michelle McCoy ELPA and Assessment Implementation Specialist Ken Hermens Language Arts Assessment Specialist Rachel Aazzerah Science and Social Sciences Assessment Specialist James Leigh Mathematics Assessment Specialist Bradley J. Lenhardt Monitoring and Assessment Specialist Sheila Somerville Electronic Publishing Specialist Kathy Busby Project Manager

All or any part of this document may be photocopied for educational purposes without permission from the Oregon Department of Education and distributed for the cost of reproduction.

TABLE of CONTENTS
Introduction ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 1 Background ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 1 Electronic Administration .................................................................................................................................................................................... 2 Item Specifications................................................................................................................................................................................................ 3 Test Blueprint ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 6 Scoring and reporting categories .......................................................................................................................................................................... 7 Forms and Functions ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 14 Achievement Standards ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 27 Performance Level Descriptors .......................................................................................................................................................................... 28 ELPA Rubrics for Hand-Scored Items ................................................................................................................................................................. 31 Testing and Score Reporting Schedule Links ....................................................................................................................................................... 34

. OAKS provide critical data for Oregon’s accountability system. Test specifications provide guidelines for Oregon teachers on what content may be tested and on how writers develop items. and science are required assessments. Selected Response items are essentially multiple-choice. e. Stakeholders in these committees are involved in each phase of the development of the test specifications to ensure that the specifications accurately and clearly explain the overall design of the test and describe the specific content that might appear on the test to measure knowledge and skills described in the content standards.g. They lead to a “test blueprint” that lays out for the test item writers the item format and the number of questions to be written in each score reporting category. the English Language Proficiency Assessment (ELPA) is required for nonEnglish speaking students until they acquire enough skills in English to exit the program. The Test Specifications and Blueprints document is an important resource.3 ELPA Test Specifications Introduction The primary purpose of Oregon’s Test Specifications and Blueprints is to provide the consistency necessary for the development and administration of the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS). All students in grades 5 and 8 are required to take the science assessment. writing. reading. Extended Response and Elicited Imitation items). OAKS is also one way for students to demonstrate proficiency in the Essential Skills of reading. with each item having either a single correct answer and three incorrect answers (Selected Response items). a single answer correct or a verbal/written answer scored on a rubric (Short Answer. mathematics.ELPA Grades 2 . In addition. which will be necessary for earning a high school diploma beginning with graduating seniors in 2011-2012. Social Sciences is an optional assessment. a word. and mathematics. In high school. which meets Peer Review Requirements of No Child Left Behind. Background This document explains the Oregon Department of Education’s statewide assessment program by providing schools with the specifications used when the state tests are designed. Test specifications such as these are used to establish the guidelines by which test content may be selected and test items written. Oregon educators contribute to the test development and alignment process by serving on advisory committees called Content and Assessment Panels. Oregon’s ELPA (English Language Proficiency Assessment) test questions use multiple formats. writing. to get credit for SA-1 items. but also for educators administering OAKS as well as anyone who is interested in understanding the content and format of test items. whereas a student has to produce language at more ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 1 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services . All students in grades 3 through 8 are required to take the reading and mathematics assessments. There are two types of Short Answer (SA) items: a student has to produce a small unit of language. These specifications lead to test blueprints that outline test design and the number of questions tested in each Score Reporting Category (SRC). not only for item writers and reviewers.

Short Answer-2 (SA-2) and Extended Response (ER) items are scored on item-specific rubrics. the accuracy of the student responses to items determines the next items the student will see. SA-2 and ER prompts are short tasks of variable difficulty. A more specific prompt. Students are not penalized for guessing. The raw score is converted to a scale score called a Rasch Unit or RIT score. Consequently. Short Answer-1 (SA-1) are more common in testing at early grades. “Tell what’s happening in the picture. such as. Thus. Scoring guides may follow a common template. a student has to repeat verbatim a sentence he or she has heard. These three different elements of eligible content may influence the rubric and the score the student receives. A given rubric score should not be presumed to correspond to a given level of proficiency absent information about the respondent’s overall score. They are scaled for difficulty so that the rated response becomes part of a set of responses that generates the student’s overall test score.ELPA Grades 2 . In Elicited Imitation (EI). the criteria for earning full credit on one item may differ from the criteria on another item according to the complexity of responses obtained or the unique language features elicited by the item. “Tell about what is in the picture. Unlike stand-alone performance assessment prompts. Rubrics generally address both functional and grammatical elements. items may have several acceptable responses. but they contain itemspecific information needed to inform the rating process. each item has its own scoring guide describing the specific performance needed to earn each rating. These test specifications reflect the skill expectations outlined in the English Language Proficiency Content Standards adopted by the State Board of Education for implementation during the 2006-2007 school year.” will not necessarily evoke a specific tense or word ending and will be scored on overall content and grammatical form. Rubrics may take into account communicative effectiveness (illocutionary competency). and appropriateness of vocabulary. there is one opportunity to participate per school year. Students receive a scale score based on the number of questions answered correctly compared to the total number of questions on the form—taking into account the difficulty of the questions. correctness of syntax. A general prompt. but do not require specific language unless identified in the directions. Word builder items are a type of Short Answer 1.3 or less the sentence level to get credit for SA-2 items. Electronic Administration On the ELPA. Extended Response (ER) items require that the student produce language consisting of several sentences to convey a message. The student responses to test items are scored against the answer key to produce a raw score. In this adaptive computer-based format. such as. The actual psychometric value of responses to different items lies not in the assigned score but according to the overall ELPA scores of respondents who obtained given item scores.” will evoke a specific tense. ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 2 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services . which are listed in a look-up table. Students earn credit for any suitable response.

ethnic. ensure each domain will have items with a range of difficulty and complexity levels. interests. ensure each test item will measure only one domain. and experience. religious. Each student is presented with a unique set of items.  Graphics use for computer scored constructed response items are displayed within a grid space and allow students to manipulate answer graphics and answer choices (word and sentence scramble items). provide clear and complete instructions to students.3 The 2012-2013 ELPA uses an adaptive algorithm based on items that are machine scored. reading level. whereas speaking items and the writing extended response items are hand-scored by human raters on a monthly basis. shape or dimensions clear. The adaptive algorithm is based on reading. and not solely for artistic effect. to help the student be prepared in advance of taking their single operational test opportunity. socioeconomic. and those writing items that are machine-scored. Students can take the practice test multiple times. ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 3 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services . Some graphics contain information that is necessary for answering the question. Machine-scored items include all reading. gender. as will the level of difficulty of each item presented. be appropriate for students in terms of grade-level difficulty.  Graphic displays. listening. while other graphics illustrate or support the context of the question. Graphics Criteria Graphics are used in the ELPA to provide both necessary and supplemental information. cognitive complexity. This means that a student’s raw score will vary from student to student. A practice test is available online for students to ensure that each student is familiar with the testing format. various types of items.  Shading and color will be minimized. or disability stereotypes or bias. be free of age. It will be used to make a figure’s size.ELPA Grades 2 . and most writing items. Item Specifications Test items must      Adaptive testing allows for more precision in measurement and less frustration for students. their corresponding items and answer choices will appear together on the same screen. and the technological skills needed. all listening.

Plural forms should be used whenever possible to avoid gender-specific pronouns (For example. Each item will have four answer choices. Test items aligned to forms and functions may contain extraneous information but only to enhance the students’ understanding of the question ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 4 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services .”). . or in two columns (i. Answer choices will be arranged one of three ways beneath the test item: vertically. Test items aligned to forms and functions may contain extraneous information.. but this structure will be used rarely and only when it offers substantial advantages for the item construction. Neither “None of the above” nor “All of the above” will be used as one of the four an answer choices.. Students will be told in the test directions to choose the best answer from among the choices. Masculine pronouns should NOT be used to refer to both sexes.” it is best to use “The students will make changes so that they. least.3 Item Style and Format Criteria for Multiple Choice Items          Test items will be in the form of questions or sentences that require completion.e. An equal balance of male and female names should be used including names representing different ethnic groups. such as “always” and “never.. Answer choices will be arranged below the question at the bottom of the grid.. Letters and sentence parts do not disappear from the left word/sentence part bank when used. A and B in the left column. except) printed in small caps for emphasis.. Test items may be worded in the negative (“Which of these is NOT …”).g. horizontally. Each item will have only one correct answer choice.” and have qualifying words (e. There shall be the same amount of words/sentence part to match the answer. C and D in the right column). An equal balance of male and female names should be used including names representing different ethnic groups. most.ELPA Grades 2 . Items should be free of absolute wording.. instead of “The student will make changes so that he . Item Style and Format Criteria for Computer Scored Constructed Response (CSCR)       Test items will be in the form of a statement (“Choose the word…”) for at least one word or sentence to be matched to an existing picture.

respond with detail in compound and complex sentences. rhythms and patterns of English. which include a subject and predicate. Eligible Content Item Type Selected Response SA-1 SA-2 CSCR Intermediate (Level 3) Students demonstrate good comprehension of general meaning and increased comprehension of specific meaning.) Early Advanced (Level 4) Manipulative X X Syntax X Morphology X X Vocabulary X X X X Ideational X X X X X X X X Students demonstrate consistent comprehension of general meaning and good understanding of implied meaning. They use routine expressions independently and respond using phrases and simple sentences. brown) Early Intermediate (Level 2) Students demonstrate increased comprehension of general meaning and some specific meaning. Students show basic errors in speech. which may include subject or a predicate. including idiomatic and figurative language. (The bear is brown. (Can bears live in the forest if they find food there?) Students comprehend general and implied meaning. Proficiency in the English language is no longer a barrier to the acquisition of the content as described by the English Language Arts standards or other standards.) The following table shows the kind of eligible content that an item type may potentially assess. (The brown bear lived with his family in the forest. varied grammatical structures and vocabulary. They respond in complex sentences with more detail using newly acquired vocabulary to experiment and form messages. Early stages show no verbal responses while in later stages one or two word responses are expected. Students respond in single words and phrases. Students initiate and negotiate using appropriate discourse. He is eating. (bear. use conventions for formal and informal language. actively participate using extensive vocabulary. gain familiarity with the sounds. Many speech errors exist. use standard grammar with few random errors.3 The following table shows which item types are used to assess each of the four tested domains: Domain Item Type Selected Response SA-1 SA-2 CSCR Extended Response (ER) Elicited Imitation ( EI) Reading X Writing X X X X X X X Speaking X X Listening X English Language Proficiency Level Beginning (Level 1) Students demonstrate minimal comprehension of general meaning.ELPA Grades 2 . They sustain conversation. (Would you like me to bring pictures of the bear that I saw last summer?) Advanced (Level 5) Extended Response (ER) Elicited Imitation (EI) X X X X ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 5 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services .

ELPA Grades 2 .3 ELPA OPERATIONAL TEST BLUEPRINT FOR 2012-2013 There will also be field test items in all domains. K-1 Points Subject Reading Item Type Total Multiple Choice or Picture Click Total Multiple Choice or Picture Click Total Multiple Choice Word Builder Extended Response Speaking Total Descriptive Short Answer Extended Response (4-point) Elicited Imitation Test Length (min items) min 10 max 15 2-3 Points Available Items 48 min 10 max 15 4-5 Points Available Items 41 min 14 max 20 6-8 Points Available Items 52 min 14 max 20 9-12 Points Available Items 45 min 14 max 20 Items min 10 max 15 Items min 10 max 15 Items min 14 max 20 Items min 14 max 20 Items min 14 max 20 Available Items 50 1 10 10 15 15 10 10 15 15 48 33 10 10 15 15 10 10 15 15 41 47 14 14 20 20 14 14 20 20 52 41 14 14 20 20 14 14 20 20 45 49 14 14 20 20 14 14 20 20 50 51 Listening 1 10 14 15 19 9 10 14 8 15 19 9 33 46 11 10 23 15 15 32 20 10 23 15 15 32 20 47 34 15 14 24 8 20 26 10 14 12 8 20 14 10 41 50 12 14 24 8 20 26 10 14 12 8 20 14 10 49 48 18 14 24 8 20 26 10 14 12 8 20 14 10 51 50 18 Writing 1 1 4 8 6 10 6 10 40 8 12 8 12 23 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 0 14 0 8 0 8 14 0 12 0 12 0 6 0 6 16 16 12 16 12 4 3 4 3 4 11 16 12 16 12 4 3 4 3 4 14 16 12 16 12 4 3 4 3 4 14 4 8 8 2 2 3 4 4 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 6 0 6 0 6 0 6 11 4 4 4 4 1 4 1 4 6 12 8 0 8 0 2 0 2 0 2 8 12 0 12 0 3 0 3 0 3 10 12 0 12 0 3 0 3 0 3 11 Total ELPA 42 49 43 43 43 ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 6 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services .

As reading proficiency increases. The reading test is based on the premise that reading proficiency is the ability to extract information from written texts for a particular purpose. the text used at the lower levels represents immediate personal needs. readers will be limited to understanding learned words or phrases. and sentences to longer texts. The reading materials range from individual words. a wider variety of texts are used. At lower levels of proficiency.3 READING Score Reporting Category 1 Reading The reading domain is designed to evaluate a student’s ability to scan written passages for understanding and to extract detailed information. ITEM ATTRIBUTES Oregon Code: Domain: Grade: Academic Context: Assessment Point: Language Function: Item Format: Sound Cue: Tutorial: Answer Key: Item Point Role: 2R-MC-LA6138bb Reading 2-3 Language Arts Illocutionary Competence-Ideational Summarizing Multiple Choice Choose Answer Reading Multiple Choice A 1 Practice ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 7 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services . such as reading signs or journal entries. timetables. Therefore. and short notes.ELPA Grades 2 . All the reading passages are written to mimic authentic reading tasks. phrases. the ability to read signs. The reading test acknowledges the interaction between the proficiency of the reader and the difficulty of a text.

Professional human raters will evaluate any extended written responses according to a rubric based on the Oregon English Language Proficiency Standards.ELPA Grades 2 . ITEM ATTRIBUTES Oregon Code: Domain: Grade: Academic Context: Assessment Point: 2W-WB-NA7014 Writing 2-3 Supplementary Vocabulary Competence/Vocabulary Language Function: Describing people. and things Item Format: Word Builder Sound Cue: Fill in the box Tutorial: Writing Word Builder Answer Key: WB Item Point 1 Response type: Keyboard Alphabetical Cloze answers: hand. Students respond to the tasks by clicking on the correct answer.3 WRITING Score Reporting Category 2 Writing The writing domain tests the student’s writing ability in the English language in terms of organization. Multiple Choice items will be electronically scored.han.heand Role: Practice ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 8 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services . mechanics and grammatical competence. selecting letter(s) from the onscreen keyboard or keyboarding directly. depending on the tasks. places.hande.hant.

3 LISTENING Score Reporting Category 3 Listening The listening domain evaluates a student’s competency in understanding the English language in its spoken form. while global processes refer to comprehending information across clauses. monologues. The length of each dialogue. we saw lots of animals Answer Key: Item Point 1 but my favorites were the seals. The questions assess a test-taker’s ability to understand the meaning of the passage as well as extract detailed information. Generally. This story is about a trip to: Oregon Code: Domain: Grade: Academic Context: Assessment Point: ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 9 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services . Local processes refer to detecting information within a clause. or statements. monologue. Proficient listening requires the use of both these processes in complementary fashion. There was a show and the seals did tricks with the Role: Practice zoo trainers. The passages and questions are performed by native speakers of English and are delivered at an appropriate speed ITEM ATTRIBUTES E055038 Listening 2-3. two types of comprehension processes are assumed: local and global. The listening domain consists of a series of passages such as dialogues. statement or word is set up to 30 seconds.ELPA Grades 2 . 4-5 Language Arts Grammatical CompetenceMorphology Language Function: Asking Clarifying Questions Item Format: Multiple Choice Sound Cue: Listen Choose Answer Tutorial: Listening Multiple Choice A Audio Script: This spring my class took a fieldtrip to the zoo.

The speaking tasks are non-interactive (i. drama. ITEM ATTRIBUTES Domain: Grade: Academic Context: Speaking 2-3 Art. Responses are graded by professional raters according to a rubric based on the Oregon English Language Proficiency Standards.3 SPEAKING Score Reporting Category 4 Speaking The speaking domain evaluates the student’s competency to understand the English language and to produce the language orally.ELPA Grades 2 . Test-takers record their responses directly into the computer using a headset. recess. sports.e. not an interview or conversation). library. cafeteria Assessment Point: Illocutionary CompetenceIdeational Language Function: Describing actions Item Format: Speaking Short Response Sound Cue: Listen Respond Tutorial: Speaking Short Response – Describe Answer Key: SSR Item Point 4 Response type: Microphone Role: Practice ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 10 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services . music.

3 COMPREHENSION Score Reporting Category 5 Comprehension in English The Comprehension in English score reporting category is an aggregate of the Reading (Score Reporting Category 1) and Listening (Score Reporting Category 3) Domains.ELPA Grades 2 . ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 11 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services .

For 2012-13. Scores for the extended response items range from zero to six. Refer to the specific hand scored item rubrics in this document for additional details. This scale also measures the amount of description. for example if the prompt asks for three activities to be described. the student must provide description for all three activities in order to receive full points. Responses that do not address the prompt or simply describe a picture score a zero on the illocutionary section of the rubric. Illocutionary responses address what is happening in the prompt. Other examples would measure the degree to which the student provides an elaborated description relevant to the prompt. the Illocutionary Score Reporting category for the 2-3 grade band is scored from the speaking short response and the speaking extended response items. with up to two points for illocution and up to two points for grammatical. ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 12 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services .ELPA Grades 2 . with up to three points for illocution and up to three points for grammatical.3 ILLOCUTIONARY Score Reporting Categories 6 The illocutionary category measures the context of the response. Scores for the speaking short response items range from zero to four.

with up to three points for illocution and up to three points for grammatical. the use of multiple complete sentences. In this category.3 GRAMMATICAL Score Reporting Categories 7 The grammatical category measures the framework of the English language in a student’s responses. for example: o Types of sentences used: incomplete sentences. with up to two points for illocution and up to two points for grammatical. ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 13 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services . however frequent errors will not score the maximum points. the Grammatical Score Reporting category for the 2-3 grade band is scored from the speaking short response and the speaking extended response items. For 2012-13. and/or complex sentences o Minor grammatical errors that do not interfere with meaning Grammatical responses do not have to be error free. compound sentences. Responses that score a zero in the grammatical category include: o In a language other than English o Undecipherable o Isolated words or phrases Scores for the speaking short response items range from zero to four. Scores for the speaking extended response items range from zero to six.ELPA Grades 2 . including complex sentences with subordinate and relative clauses are measured. Refer to the specific hand scored item rubrics in this document for additional details. simple sentences. Grammatical components of items measure.

In speech.ode. The relationship between boy and boys. These include:    describing processes comparing or contrasting things or ideas.or. and sequencing events ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 14 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services . They may be taught to ELLs at all grade levels. and asking informational questions In academic writing. and the relationship (irregular) between man and men would be forms of a language. The ELP Standards are designed to supplement the English Language Arts (ELA) content standards to ensure that students develop proficiency in both the English language and the concepts and skills contained in the ELA content standards. and as the need and context arises.3 FORMS AND FUNCTIONS The English Language Proficiency Standards are written as pathways to the Oregon English Language Arts standards. A language function refers to the purpose for which speech or writing is being used. these include:    expressing needs and likes expressing and supporting opinions. Forms of a language deal with the internal grammatical structure of words.state.ELPA Grades 2 . for example. we use a range of specific functions in order to communicate ideas clearly. These language functions and forms need to be explicitly taught to English Language Learners (ELLs). Forms and functions serve as the basis for the ELPA assessment.us/teachlearn/standards/elp/files/all. They are located on the web at: http://www.doc This section contains language functions and forms that native English speakers mostly acquire before entering school or naturally at home.

D. They allow us to express or interpret meaning based on our experience of reality and to express and exchange information about ideas. knowledge or feelings. Forms and functions in language: Morphology. (2004). If doctors studied only a limited portion of the human system. physicians must understand the purposes of the human body and the relationships between organs.3 The contrast between form and function in language can be illustrated through a simple medical analogy.docstoc. ELLs need to understand both the form (structure) and the function (purpose) of the English language in order to reach higher levels of proficiency.ELPA Grades 2 . cells. Found at http://www. they would be unable to adequately address their patient’s needs. syntax . Pozzi. places and things Describing spatial and temporal relations Describing actions Retelling/relating past events Finding information Asking informational questions Asking Clarifying questions Using information Expressing and supporting opinions Explaining Persuading Arranging information Comparing Contrasting Sequencing Creating information Literary Analysis Cause and Effect Drawing Conclusions Defining Evaluating Making Predictions Hypothesizing and Speculating (From Bachman 1990) Presenting information Generalizing Interpreting Summarizing ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 15 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services . To fully treat their patients. 2004). such as anatomical form.C. Similarly. Conveying information Expressing needs and likes Describing people. and genes (Pozzi.com/docs/21864104/LANGUAGE-FUNCTIONS-andFORMS Ideational or Representational functions: These language functions are concerned with the notion that language is a means of information exchange.

Instrumental Giving instructions on tasks Regulatory Requesting others to do something Inviting others to do something Suggesting a course of action Advising others to do something Warning Interactional Greeting Introducing Meeting Leave taking (From Bachman 1990) ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 16 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services . to control other’s behavior and used to form. They can be used to get things done.3 Manipulative functions: These language functions are concerned with the notion of how to affect the world around us.ELPA Grades 2 . maintain or change interpersonal relationships.

Instrumental Opening a story Closing a story Recognizing poetry or verse Reciting and enjoying poetry (From Bachman 1990) ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 17 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services .3 Heuristic functions: These language functions involve the use of language to learn about the world. In terms of the language of the classroom. the heuristic function involves the learner becoming aware of formal and functional properties of language.ELPA Grades 2 . Heuristic Finding the meaning of words Finding out how to say something Using a dictionary to look up a word Using a thesaurus (From Bachman 1990) Imaginative functions: These language functions deal with the use of language to create an imaginary world of humorous or esthetic purposes. It also involves the use of language creatively in order to exploit the potential of language for the enjoyment of speakers and listeners.

verbs. subordinate conjunctions Modals (would. adverbs of manner Abstract nouns. conditional mode Verbs and verb phrases in questions Questions with increasing specificity Sentence structure.3 LANGUAGE FUNCTIONS AND EXAMPLES OF FORMS Language Functions Expressing needs and likes Describing people. modals (will. and adjectives Verb forms. could. verb forms. complex sentences. subject/ verb agreement. pronouns Nouns. and things Describing spatial and temporal relations Describing actions Retelling/relating past events Making predictions Asking Informational Questions Asking Clarifying Questions Expressing and Supporting Opinions Comparing Contrasting Summarizing Persuading Literary Analysis Cause and Effect Drawing Conclusions Defining Explaining Generalizing Evaluating Interpreting Sequencing Hypothesizing and speculating Examples of Language Forms Indirect/ direct object. compound tenses (would have been) ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 18 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services . adjectives Prepositional phrases Present progressive. pronouns. pronouns. shall) Adjectives and conjunctions. and adjectives Language of propaganda. specific vocabulary Verb forms Comparative adjective Nouns. perfect aspect (present and past) Verbs: future tense. superlatives. relative clauses. nominalizations Complex sentences. might). adverbs Comparative adjectives Increasingly complex sentences with increasingly specific vocabulary Verb forms Sentence structure. nominalizations Adverbs of time. complex sentences. may.ELPA Grades 2 . increasing specificity of nouns. places. comparatives. adverbs Past tense verbs. can. declarative sentences.

(Can bears live in the forest if they find food there?) ADVANCED Students’ comprehension of general and implied meaning. with more detail using newly acquired vocabulary to experiment and form messages. increased comprehension of specific meaning.. use routine expressions independently and respond using phrases and simple sentences.) INTERMEDIATE Students demonstrate good comprehension of general meaning. rhythms and patterns of English. Language Function: Expressing Needs and Likes BEGINNING Students demonstrate minimal comprehension of general meaning. ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 19 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services . (e. Students respond in single words and phrases.” Elaborated sentences with subject/verb/object Sentences with subject/verb/object and dependent clause Sentence Structure: The basic sentence structures that we use to express needs and likes are foundations to the more complex sentence structure we use for academic purposes. He is eating. use standard grammar with few random errors. apples. (The bear is brown. (Would you like me to bring pictures of the bear that I saw last summer?) Complex sentences. Early stages show no verbal responses while in later stages one or two word responses are expected. Students initiate and negotiate using appropriate discourse. sustain conversation. varied grammatical structures and vocabulary. which include a subject and predicate.3 1. including idiomatic and figurative language. gain familiarity with the sounds. respond with detail in compound and complex sentences. Many speech errors are observed. use of conventions for formal and informal use. (bear.” I need a /some — (object)—. or tree) Simple sentences with subject/verb/object. good understanding of implied meaning.ELPA Grades 2 . Students show basic errors in speech. brown) EARLY INTERMEDIATE Students demonstrate increased comprehension of general meaning and some specific meaning. actively participate using more extensive vocabulary. two.) EARLY ADVANCED Students demonstrate consistent comprehension of general meaning. which may include subject or a predicate. responds in more complex sentences. “I like/don’t like—(object)— . (The brown bear lived with his family in the forest.g. perhaps with tags or embedded questions TARGET FORMS: One or two-word answers (nouns or yes/no) to questions about preferences.

TARGET FORMS Present Progressive. Language Function: Describing Location BEGINNING Demonstrated comprehension of total physical response commands. off.. outside) EARLY INTERMEDIATE Simple sentences with prepositional phrases (e. in front of. on the left/right. pronouns and adjectives. 3. behind. A (it) has/have _________. Places and Things BEGINNING Common nouns and adjectives EARLY INTERMEDIATE Simple sentences with the verb to be. within) ADVANCED Complex sentences with phrases using prepositions (e.. Language Function: Describing Action BEGINNING Demonstrate comprehension (perform or describe actions) EARLY INTERMEDIATE Present progressive INTERMEDIATE Variety of verb tenses and descriptive adverbs EARLY ADVANCED Adverb clauses telling how. including prepositions (e..g. 4.3 2. Adverbs: Students learn to understand and generate oral and written language skills with present progressive and adverbs. in front of. adjectives) TARGET FORMS Nouns Pronouns and Adjectives: Students learn to understand and generate oral and written language with nouns. under) INTERMEDIATE May include two prepositional phrases with more difficult prepositions (e.ELPA Grades 2 . beneath. beside. next to. in. ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 20 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services . using common nouns and adjectives.g. in back of. within) TARGET FORMS Prepositional Phrases: Students learn to understand and generate oral and written language with prepositional phrases.g. on. out. where. inside. INTERMEDIATE Elaborated sentences has/have/had or is/are/were with nouns and adjectives EARLY ADVANCED Compound sentences with more specific vocabulary (nouns.g. Language Function: Describing People. below. The (my. above. between. beneath.. in the middle of. or when ADVANCED Adverb clauses telling how. adjectives) ADVANCED Complex sentences with more specific vocabulary (nouns. where.g.. next to) EARLY ADVANCED Complex sentences with phrases using prepositions (e. her) ______ is/are _______. or when. behind.

what. Language Function: Asking Informal Questions BEGINNING Simple questions about familiar or concrete subjects EARLY INTERMEDIATE Present or present progressive tense questions with to be INTERMEDIATE Who. 7.ELPA Grades 2 . and so on. may respond by circling. EARLY ADVANCED Conditional (could. TARGET FORMS Past Tense Verbs: Students learn to understand and generate oral and written language with past tense verbs. might) mood in complex sentences TARGET FORMS Verbs: Future Tense. pointing. might) mood in complex sentences ADVANCED Conditional (could. Finally EARLY ADVANCED Compound sentences using past tense and adverb ADVANCED Present progressive/past perfect tense with specialized prepositions _____ have/has been ____-ing since/for ____.” First ___ and then __ . INTERMEDIATE Simple sentences with regular and irregular past tense verbs “Yesterday/Last ____/On ___day (pronoun) ____ -ed (prep. 6. where. ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 21 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services . where. or answer with one or two words EARLY INTERMEDIATE The _____ is/are going to ______.3 5. phrase or other direct object). why questions with do or did EARLY ADVANCED Detailed questions with who. when. what. why and how ADVANCED Detailed questions with expanded verb phrase TARGET FORMS Verbs and Verb Phrases in Questions: Students learn to understand and generate oral and written language with verbs and verb phrases in questions. Language Function: Retelling/Relating Past Events (Kinder – General Understanding) BEGINNING Single words in response to past tense question EARLY INTERMEDIATE Simple sentences with past progressive __ (pronoun) ___ was/were _____-ing. Conditional Mood: Students learn to understand and generate oral and written language with future tense verbs and conditional mood. INTERMEDIATE The ________ will ________. Language Function: Making Predictions BEGINNING In response to questions.

specific questions clarifying procedures or content TARGET FORMS Questions with Increasing Specificity 9. Language Function: Expressing and Supporting Opinions BEGINNING I like/don’t like ______ (concrete topics). whereas. INTERMEDIATE I think/agree with (don’t) ____ because _____. rules and routines EARLY ADVANCED A variety of fairly specific questions clarifying procedures or content ADVANCED Varied.. and in contrast) TARGET FORMS Comparative Adjectives ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 22 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services .g. EARLY INTERMEDIATE I think/agree with (don’t) ______. both subject/verb. EARLY ADVANCED In my opinion ____ should ____ because/so ______. Adjective with –er or – est EARLY ADVANCED Varied sentence structures with specific comparative adjectives and phrases ADVANCED Complex sentence structure with specific comparative language TARGET FORMS Adjectives and Conjunctions 11. Language Function: Asking Clarifying Questions BEGINNING EARLY INTERMEDIATE Formula questions clarifying classroom procedures. but _____.ELPA Grades 2 . rules and routines INTERMEDIATE Formula questions clarifying classroom procedures. Language Function: Contrasting BEGINNING EARLY INTERMEDIATE Sentences with subject/verb/adjective showing similarities and differences INTERMEDIATE Subject/verb/adjective like ____ but subject/verb/adjective EARLY ADVANCED Subject/verb/adjective. but ADVANCED Approximately used idiomatic phrases and contrasting words (e. Language Function: Comparing BEGINNING Single words or phrases in response to concrete comparison questions EARLY INTERMEDIATE Sentences with subject/verb/adjective showing similarities and differences INTERMEDIATE Subject/verb/adjective. ADVANCED Complex sentences using modals and clauses TARGET FORMS Sentence Structure 10.3 8.

adjectives. in short) ADVANCED Conjunctions that summarize (indeed. after EARLY ADVANCED Descriptive language in more complex sentences ADVANCED Specific descriptive language in complex sentences TARGET FORMS Sentence Structure and Specific Vocabulary 15.3 12. Language Function: Literary Analysis BEGINNING Single words for character and setting EARLY INTERMEDIATE Simple sentences (subject/verb/adjective) (subject/verb/object) INTERMEDIATE Compound sentences with and. _____ would/wouldn’t have _____. Language Function: Persuading BEGINNING EARLY INTERMEDIATE INTERMEDIATE Imperative verb forms EARLY ADVANCED Complex sentences with future and conditional ADVANCED Complex sentences with varied verb forms and tag questions.ELPA Grades 2 . indeed. in summary. because. before. Language Function: Cause and Effect Relationship BEGINNING EARLY INTERMEDIATE Answer cause and effect question with a simple response INTERMEDIATE Descriptive sentences with past tense verbs EARLY ADVANCED Complex sentences with past tense verbs ADVANCED Conditional: If ___ had/hadn’t _____. Language Function: Summarizing BEGINNING EARLY INTERMEDIATE Simple sentences with key nouns. idiomatic expressions or embedded clauses TARGET FORMS Verb Forms 14. consequently) TARGET FORMS Increasingly Complex Sentences with Increasingly Specific Vocabulary 13. TARGET FORMS Verb Forms ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 23 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services . and verbs INTERMEDIATE Compound sentences with and/but EARLY ADVANCED Conjunctions that summarize (to conclude. therefore.

straightforward information of immediate relevance. because. personal pronouns. adverbs of manner and compound-complex sentences. compound and complex sentences. and adjectives 18. present tense. personal and possessive pronouns and adjectives ADVANCED Clear. ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 24 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services . but those who came late had none. regular and irregular verb forms Complex: As I came home. but those who didn’t sing had none. personal. showing controlled use of nouns. aspects of concrete and familiar objects. Pronouns. that ADVANCED Comparative adjectives with idiomatic phrases and passive voice TARGET FORMS Comparative Adjectives 17. Abstract Nouns. Adjectives: Students learn to define concrete and abstract objects/concepts with correct nouns. declarative and complex sentences and adverbs of manner.) INTERMEDIATE Explain simple.ELPA Grades 2 . EARLY INTERMEDIATE Simple terms. possessive pronouns and adjectives with some irregular past tense verbs EARLY ADVANCED Concrete and abstract topics using irregular nouns. using regular verbs and adverbs of manner in declarative sentences and compound sentences (Maria planted the petunia seeds carefully. Complex Sentences. I stopped at the store. pronouns. Declarative Sentences. regular nouns singular and plural. singular and plural.) EARLY ADVANCED Get across important points using declarative.3 16. well-structured. Language Function: Defining BEGINNING Patterned responses: A table is furniture/ A boy is a person. Compound: The children who came in early had refreshments. Language Function: Draw Conclusions BEGINNING EARLY INTERMEDIATE INTERMEDIATE Comparative adjectives with past tense verbs in simple sentences EARLY ADVANCED Comparative adjectives with conjunctions such as although. adjectives TARGET FORMS Nouns. Adverbs of Manner: Students learn to develop and use explanations using appropriate verb forms.Indicative verb (makes a statement of fact). Adverbs of manner: The children who sang loudly got a cookie. detailed language on complex subjects. ADVANCED Get across which point he/she feels is most important using regular and irregular verb forms. simple sentences INTERMEDIATE Connected text including irregular nouns. pronouns. Language Function: Explaining BEGINNING EARLY INTERMEDIATE Main points in familiar idea or problem with some precision using simple indicative verb forms in simple declarative sentences (Large oaks grew in the park/ The length of the room is 40 feet. TARGET FORMS Verb Forms.

ELPA Grades 2 . Correlative Conjunctions: Students learn to understand and use complex sentences using very specific nouns. and Adjectives.) EARLY ADVANCED Qualify opinions and statements precisely in relation to degrees of certainty/uncertainty. Verb Forms: Students learn to develop and use generalizations using abstract nouns. etc. as a unit. Increasing Specificity of Nouns. the members of a group (herd. love).) TARGET FORMS Nouns – Common. comfort. class. with reasonable accuracy. Correlative conjunctions are used in pairs: both – and. clauses expressing limitations (This is a school van.). EARLY ADVANCED Indicative mode: makes a statement of fact (The temperature is low. but it is only used for sports. congregation). belief/doubt. ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 25 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services . ADVANCED Convey finer. those toys.) Abstract nouns: name things or ideas that people cannot touch or handle (beauty. honesty. Verbs. the third time. ADVANCED Subjunctive mode: expressing a condition contrary to fact or expressing a doubt (If only he were here. verbs and adjectives. a wide range of qualifying devices. such as adverbs that express degree (This class is too hard. verb forms and nominalizations. jury. Stay there. each person.3 19. Language Function: Generalizing BEGINNING EARLY INTERMEDIATE INTERMEDIATE Imperative mode: expresses command (Take me home. little rain) Number adjectives: (two men.) Collective nouns name. every girl) EARLY INTERMEDIATE Adjectives used to limit: (few horses. the ninth boy) INTERMEDIATE Evaluate simple direct exchange of limited information on familiar and routine matters using simple verbs and adjectives. much snow. Language Function: Evaluating BEGINNING Adjectives that point out particular objects (that wagon. Collective and Abstract Nouns. likelihood. ten ships. 20. not only – but also (Neither the teacher nor the students could solve the problem. and complex sentences TARGET FORMS Complex Sentences.). precise shades of meaning by using.

or highly colloquial nonliterary writings TARGET FORMS Language of Propaganda. picking up familiar names. might. he did not finish his homework.) INTERMEDIATE Prepositional object (I found the book that John was talking about.) TARGET FORMS Adverbs of time. simple texts on familiar matters of a concrete type.) Natural sequencing (I hit him and he fell over. relative clauses and subordinate conjunctions.) EARLY INTERMEDIATE Direct object (The story that I read was long. could. might).) Indirect object (The man to who[m] I gave the present was absent. Compound tenses (would have been): Students learn to hypothesize and speculate using modals and compound tenses. which may express possibility: may. could. Language Function: Interpreting BEGINNING Interpret a single phrase at a time.) Subordinate conjunctionsused to join two grammatical parts of equal rank (Although he worked hard. 22. Complex Sentences: Students learn to identify and interpret the language of propaganda and use complex sentences.) EARLY INTERMEDIATE Interpret short. Language Function: Sequencing BEGINNING Subject (The girl who was sick went home. words. appreciating subtle distinctions of style and implicit as well as explicit meaning ADVANCED Interpret critically virtually all forms of the written language including abstract. Relative clauses.) EARLY ADVANCED Possessive (I know the woman whose father is visiting.ELPA Grades 2 . structurally complex. 23. which consist of high frequency everyday or schoolrelated language EARLY ADVANCED Interpret a wide range of long and complex texts. Language Function: Hypothesizing and Speculating BEGINNING EARLY INTERMEDIATE INTERMEDIATE Auxiliary verbs that indicate futurity: will and shall EARLY ADVANCED Auxiliary verb indicating desire or intent: would ADVANCED Auxiliary verbs include modal verbs. ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 26 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services . TARGET FORMS Modals (would. can.) ADVANCED Object of comparison (The person whom Susan is taller than is Mary. simple texts containing the highest frequency vocabulary INTERMEDIATE Interpret short. Subordinate conjunctions: Students learn sequencing using adverbs of time. and basic phrases (D’Onofrio chocolates are the best.3 21.

2008 Grade Level K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Early Intermediate 482 492 495 501 497 497 497 497 499 491 493 494 498 Intermediate 492 507 508 514 508 508 506 507 508 501 501 501 504 Early Advanced 498 514 514 521 514 516 515 517 518 515 516 515 516 Advanced (Proficient) 507 523 523 529 521 523 522 524 526 526 527 528 530 ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 27 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services .ELPA Grades 2 .3 ACHIEVEMENT STANDARDS Achievement Standards (Cut Scores) for the English Language Proficiency Standards Adopted March 13.

3 PERFORMANCE LEVEL DESCRIPTORS Performance level descriptors describe what students know and can do based on their performance on the ELPA. Performance Level Descriptors for ELPA are the results of the work of Oregon educators. These statements give a general description of what most students know and can do within a particular band of performance and are presented in the order of the way they are reported rather than by importance or test emphasis. CTB McGraw Hill and state officials to establish the minimum scores required for each proficiency level. ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 28 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services . The Performance Level Descriptors are based on a sampling of a larger set of testable content outlined in the forms and functions.ELPA Grades 2 . Results for individual students are only one indicator of student language ability as measured at the time of testing. These may be used by educators to target instruction and inform parents and students of the expectations for students to be considered proficient at a particular grade level. Students who score at or within a particular level of performance possess the bulk of the abilities described at that level and generally have mastered the skills described in the preceding performance levels.

On the ELPA. Beginner Students at the Beginning level are able to read and demonstrate comprehension of basic information with very limited fluency. use context clues to increase their comprehension and incorporate a very limited range of academic vocabulary. may use gestures to communicate meaning. read below grade-level and highly contextualized gradelevel text by analyzing and recognizing words with a limited degree of fluency and demonstrate a literal understanding of text with reduced language complexity. Intermediate Students at the Intermediate level are able to read and demonstrate comprehension of key grade-level information with some fluency. They are able to speak and write using simple language with limited accuracy and fluency. They are able to speak and write using some complex language with some accuracy and fluency.ELPA Grades 2 . use a limited range of simple language and writing conventions with limited accuracy in grammar and syntax to express ideas across the subject areas in a limited number of modes and organize written information in sentences using simple language. Writing Speaking repeat and mimic English language but do not demonstrate comprehension of the words. and simple inferences to perform a task. On the ELPA. comprehend picture referenced and highly contextualized words or very simple phrases decode and accurately identify letter-sound correspondence with a very limited degree of comprehension and use context clues to increase understanding. On the ELPA. listen to. ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 29 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services . and respond to basic grade-level information in highly contextembedded school-based social situations. Early Intermediate Students at the Early Intermediate level are able to read and demonstrate comprehension of simple or highly contextualized grade-level information with limited fluency. orally express ideas and interact with others on a limited basis and with frequent grammatical and syntactical errors. they use context clues to increase their comprehension and incorporate a very limited range of academic vocabulary. and organize written information in clear sentences. organize written information using memorized vocabulary and simple phrases that include multiple grammatical and syntactical errors orally express basic personal information and interact with others on a very limited basis and with multiple grammatical and syntactical errors. Listening demonstrate minimal English language proficiency. they use a very limited range of simple language and basic language conventions with very limited accuracy across the subject areas. they use a range of simple language and writing conventions with increasing accuracy in grammar and syntax to express ideas across the subject areas in a limited number of modes. listen to and demonstrate comprehension of some information across a range of social situations and subject areas in school. contextual clues.3 Grade 2-3 Pre-production Level Students at the Pre-production level have minimal English language proficiency. although they do so with some grammatical and syntactical errors. listen to and demonstrate comprehension of simple information across a limited variety of social situations and subject areas in school–based situations.based situations incorporating some academic vocabulary. orally express ideas and interact with others by emulating others or using prescribed samples. use a very limited range of simple language and basic language conventions with very limited accuracy across the subject areas. They are able to speak and write using basic language with very limited accuracy and fluency. On the ELPA. read grade-level text with limited comprehension of key information on a variety of topics and locate information using complex language. they Reading demonstrate minimal English language proficiency. demonstrate comprehension of.

Advanced Students at the Advanced (Proficient) level are able to consistently read and demonstrate comprehension of an extensive range of complex and abstract grade-level information. including idiomatic and figurative language. They are consistently able to speak and write using complex language with accuracy and fluency. ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 30 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services . organize written information in clear sentences making some connections and transitions with supporting details consistent with their grade level.ELPA Grades 2 . demonstrating comprehension of most information in a variety of topics. consistently use complex language and writing conventions accurately to express ideas across the subject areas in an extensive variety of modes. communicate orally with few grammatical and syntactical inaccuracies which do not interfere with cohesive and rhetorical functions. they Reading read grade-level text. Listening listen to and demonstrate comprehension of most gradelevel information across the subject areas and in schoolbased social settings. and evaluate purpose of text containing complex language. On the ELPA.3 Grade 2-3 Early Advanced Students at the Early Advanced level are able to read and demonstrate comprehension of most grade-level information with fluency. effectively and appropriately respond in written form in a variety of settings with a high level of grammatical and syntactical accuracy. listen to and consistently demonstrate comprehension of a range of key concepts and vocabulary across the subject areas and in school-based social settings across an extensive variety of topics. orally express and respond to ideas effectively in an extensive variety of settings for specific purposes in a cohesive manner with a high level of grammatical and syntactical accuracy resembling native speaker abilities. they read and comprehend grade–level text on a variety of topics and are able to locate information. and locate information and infer meaning most of the time. Speaking orally express ideas and interact successfully in most academic and school-based social settings. and evaluating the purpose of text. while also interpreting the meaning. On the ELPA. to express ideas across the subject areas in several modes. They are able to speak and write using an extensive range of complex language with a level of accuracy and fluency that resembles native English speakers. Writing use complex language and writing conventions with approximate grade-level accuracy. while learning a broad range of general academic vocabulary. organize written information in clear sentences making effective connections and transitions with supporting details appropriate to audience and purpose that is consistent with their grade level. comprehend general and inferred meaning.

1 Describes action(s) represented in the picture. These rubrics explain how student responses are scored. Illocutionary (Functions) 2 Clearly and completely describes the action(s) represented in the picture. isolated words or phrases. 0 Isolated words or phrases. 1 At least one complete sentence using a tense that is grammatically correct. unrelated to the prompt. but not the tense indicated in the stem. ELPA Speaking Short-Response Generic Rubric Grammatical (Forms) 2 At least one complete sentence with correct use of verb tense as indicated in the stem. 0 Non-English. Teachers may use these rubrics as instructional tools for their ELL students’ development of speaking and writing. Describes the picture. or repeats the prompt. Each student response is scored on both grammatical and illocutionary scales. Errors do not interfere with meaning. unintelligible. but the description of the action is incomplete OR ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 31 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services .ELPA Grades 2 .3 ELPA RUBRICS FOR HAND-SCORED ITEMS Background Generalized ELPA scoring rubrics for the extended writing and speaking portions of ELPA are provided for teacher use. Errors may interfere with meaning. no adverbs. Students may benefit from knowing how the writing and speaking portions of ELPA are scored. may use adverb(s). non-responsive.

1 The response uses complete simple sentences AND/OR errors in grammar or grammar usage are frequent.) AND/OR there are occasional errors in grammar or usage. unintelligible. ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 32 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services . 1 The response addresses one feature associated with the prompt. etc. is non-responsive. or so. 2 The response uses complete simple sentences or at least one compound sentence (coordinating conjunctions: and.ELPA Grades 2 .3 ELPA Speaking Extended-Response Generic Rubric Grammatical (Forms) 3 The response uses complete complex sentences (subordinate & relative clauses) and errors are rare and difficult to detect. isolated words or phrases. but. Illocutionary (Functions) 3 The response addresses all features associated with the prompt. or repeats the prompt. 0 The response fails to respond to any information that could be considered responsive to the prompt. 2 The response addresses most features associated with the prompt OR The response addresses all features but uses limited detail. 0 The response uses non-English words or phrases.

Verb tense is inconsistent.3 ELPA Writing Extended-Response Generic Rubric Grammatical (Forms) 3 The response includes multiple complete sentences with at least one complex (subordinate and relative clauses) sentence. Minor errors in grammar and usage are rare and do not interfere with the meaning. includes irrelevant vocabulary. Verb tense may be inconsistent. 2 The response includes complete simple sentences AND/OR at least one compound sentence(s). 1 The response addresses one feature related to the prompt. is undecipherable. ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 33 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services . 1 The response includes complete simple sentence(s). Errors in grammar and usage are occasional and may interfere with meaning 2 The response addresses most features related to the prompt OR The response addresses all features with limited detail. 0 The response does not address the prompt. Errors in grammar and usage may be frequent and may interfere with meaning. is a non-English response. or there is no response. 0 The response includes isolated words or phrases. Illocutionary (Functions) 3 The response includes elaborated details of all features related to the prompt.ELPA Grades 2 .

us/go/tam ELPA Data Delivery Schedule: Test Administration Manual 2012-13.or.or.state. Scroll to Appendix H for the 2012-13 Data Delivery Schedule http://www.state.ELPA Grades 2 .us/go/tam ELPA Test Specifications and Test Blueprints 34 Oregon Department of Education Office of Assessment and Information Services .3 TESTING AND SCORE REPORTING SCHEDULES ELPA Testing Schedule Link: Test Administration Manual 2012-13. Scroll to Appendix A for the 2012-13 Oregon Statewide Testing Schedule http://www.ode.ode.