1887.

THE

ANNALS

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Brother Joullin is wrestling with a cartoon, and we think he will throw it. Brothers Heyman, Stewart and Leach-the musical tri juncto in uno-(Mr. Chuck's latin) are preparing a flood of melody. A nd-There will be something to eat. Come, then! And shake hands all round; wishing ourselves a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. Affectionately, BEN]. R. SWAN,Sire.

The
Irish Cantata.

It was at this Jinks that the celebrated " Irish Cantata " was produced. The music of this operatic masterpiece was written by Dr. H. J. Stewart, and the legend by Peter Robertson. The pathetic and touching strength of home associations is simply but forcibly brought out in this little work wherein is also shown the beauty and power of true and unselfish love. The story relates in a simple manner that Dennis Mulhooly, leaving Ireland for England's sake, voyages to America, acquires great political influence and enormous wealth and finally becomes an Alderman of New York, which fact is set forth by the chorus in Greek fashion, in the opening number:
CHORUS.

Hail to Mulhooly!

32
1887

THE

ANNALS

OF

points out what is the use of a man's" running New York," if he cannot marry his daughter to an English peer. The chorus which, as has been said, is modeled after the genuine classical article that rebukes, protests, explains, praises, condemns, warns and advises all in the same breath, and after having meddled with everybody's affairs until they are in a hopeless tangle, sings an ode in praise of its own wisdom and foresight, the chorus counsels the maiden to accept the peer.
CHORUS.

Oh, Lucky Virgin! At thy feet he falls. Accept him, be a titled English lady. An English Peer's a man who never palls, No matter how his lineage may be shady. Oh, Lucky Virgin! Grab him ere he fly; If off he goes you'll never get another. Remember, too, it is revenge that's nigh; Your parent peeled potatoes for his mother. Oh, Lucky Virgin, don't you let him cool; Oh, Lucky Virgin, don't you be a fool.

But Norah, sweet, fond, foolish Norah, still sighs after her red-headed, freckle-faced, bog-trotting sweetheart, Patrick, who at this opportune moment emerges from Castle Garden newly arrived from Ireland with a bottle of that same old potheen that the hard-hearted father of his beloved used to know so intimately in the old days. Calling on his erstwhile friends at the brown

Mr. Frank L. Unger.

THE

BOHEMIAN

CLUB.

33
1887

stone mansion, he is incontinently thrown out by the Alderman and kicked down the steps in various musical numbers while the different members of the family sing their emotions as they watch his descent. But at this crisis (observe the dramatist's cunning) the bottle of potheen faIls from the bog-trotter's pocket.
MR. MULHOOLY.

Phwat's this he's dropped? Oh, swate Potheen! Swate chi!d of nature, hail! Your breath intoxicates me very sow!. Let me taste you! Hurroo! It's I've An' I've An' many's the night in the ould countree filled my skin quite full of ye, many's the morn before it was light riz in the dark without needin' my sight, taken another pull of ye. Potheen, ye divi!! Ah, them waz days! I'll never be free from care again, An' Biddy would cry with a ,tear in her eye, My Dennis is on a tear again!
MRS. MULHOOLY.

It's many's the time you've blacked my eye, Just out of pure love and divilry. An' many's the time I've broke your crown, An' many's the time myself's gone down In the hoight of fun an' rivilry. Potheen, ye divi!! etc.

BENJAMIN R. SWAN.

From the Paintin/: in the Club by Frederick Yates.

37

,Furthermore, the cantata was several years later by the Bosforth, the cartoon for this . ted by Amadee Joullin. 'ping in an easy chair by the "~"""ing of his Jinks while the ~,,year·thenames of several "L 1 the Club stand out 'e Bruton, Allan P. ing Bishop, the 2.rnsat this time s in the city, e he perarticles. to hold article and _~upstairs and A!lDdall over the 'chase till the hid:;fd'}i:

1887

Allan P. Kelly rivals Washington Irving Bishop
iH

"Mind

Reading."

ttlined that his power .ght at the Club while talents was being disargued, Kelly quietly as,uscle reading," that the ininvoluntary tendency toward

THE
1887

ANNALS

OF

the secreted object, and reluctance when going from it, that to a sensitive organization was a sufficient guide. The idea being combated, Kelly said that he could prove it by doing the thing himself. His assertion was promptly called, a committee took charge of him while another committee proceeded to conceal an article, a watch, which was placed in a coal bin in a remote closet. Kelly, blindfolded, then took the hand of one of the skeptics who had hidden the watch, holding it lightly, and hurried with him through the Club, sometimes away from the object, sometimes toward it, but ever circling nearer until finally he opened the closet and brought forth the watch.
Bruton
as a George

Mr. Bruton

was a talented

writer

and an excel-

nihilist.

lent actor. His imitation of a foreign nihilist making a vitriolic speech against law and order was capital. Rumpling his long hair and shaking it out of his eyes, he inveighed against society, puffing out dense volumes of smoke from his pipe and pounding the table with his beer glass, or with his long arms and claw-like fingers held aloft he called down anathemas in French, German, Russian and English on the heads of all representatives of authority, demanding that everybody claiming any rights whatsoever be knifed in the back or blown to perdition with a bomb.

39

. \Vas marked by the loss of an no way unusual or important extraordinary interest by s posted by the owner:

1887

The umbrella episode.

;ethis," (then followed a slim in body and with .er will please return it

THE
1887

ANNALS

OF

Before the final loss. Gentleman departing:
"Hall boy, is this my umbrella?" with me."

Hall Boy, "I don't know, sir; it's the one you left
human document grew with pictures, to the extent of several yards. So contribution to the literature and art of owner of the umbrella felt in a measure

And so the prose and verse unique was this the day that the

recompensed for his loss, when the Secretary presented the screed to him in lieu of his umbrella. But a newspaper man promptly borrowed the manuscript and that was the end of that, also, except for the foregoing scraps which indeed may serve to reconcile the reader to its disappearance.