Our 14th Annual

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7 UPDATE
Korean
Yards end
drought
• Rolls-
Royce’s
wavepiercer for offshore sector
• Harley Marine Services orders
ocean tank barge
• VTT surveys ship wastewater
nutrient discharge in the Baltic Sea
And much more...
14 INSIDE WASHINGTON
Arming ships: Washington responds
21 DECK MACHINERY SPOTLIGHT
28 TECH NEWS
29 NEWSMAKERS
32 CONTRACTS
34 EVENTS
35 ML BUYER’S GUIDE
Free product information
36 WEBSITE DIRECTORY
37 ML MARKETPLACE
40 MARINE SALVAGE
Communication is Key
By John A. Witte Jr.
Features
Piracy
Pirates Ahead: Are you
ready?
IMO’s Marine Safety Committee has just
released its revised guidance for dealing
with pirates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p. 15
Fuels & Lubes
Switching fuels: the
headaches
Complying with California’s new regula-
tions won’t be so easy . . . . . . . . . . . . . p.17
Coatings
CO
2
ATINGS & EMISSIONS
Hull coatings can play a critical role in
reducing your carbon footprint. . . . p. 19
Software
Using 3D Modeling to cut
lifecycle costs in RO/ROS
Shrink your newbuilding costs . . . p. 20A
www.marinelog.com JULY 2009 MARINE LOG 1
Contents J ULY 2009 VOL. 114, NO. 7
NEXT MONTH THE 5
TH
ANNUAL GREENISSUE • FINANCE • DIESEL TECHNOLOGY
Departments
2 EDITORIAL
Security directive on target
4 SECOND THOUGHTS
California rules are shape of things
to come
M
ARINE
L
OG
Members of a USS Gettysburg (CG 64) visit, board, search and seizure
(VBSS) team and U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment 409
prepare to board a suspected pirate mothership in the Gulf of Aden
U.S. Navy photo/Mass Communication Specialist First Class Eric L. Beauregard
p. 24
COMMUNICATIONS
SHOWCASE
PULLOUT
SUPPLEMENT
GULF COAST
HEADLINER
| p. 15
PRESIDENT
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CONTRIBUTING EDITOR
William B. Ebersold wbeber@comcast.net
MARKETING DIRECTOR
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CREATIVE DIRECTOR
Wendy Williams wwilliams@sbpub.com
ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR
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PRODUCTION DIRECTOR
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NATIONAL SALES DIRECTOR
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INTERNATIONAL SALES MANAGER
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ISSN 08970491 USPS 576-910
July 2009 Vol. 114 No. 7
John R. Snyder Publisher & Editor jsnyder@sbpub.com
2 MARINE LOG JULY 2009 www.marinelog.com
M
ARINE
L
OG
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editorial
A
mericans are often portrayed as
cowboys, quick to shoot and ask
questions later. When it comes to
piracy, however, the U.S. Coast Guard’s
Maritime Security Directive, is right on
the target. The directive is a well
thought out response to pirate attacks.
It requires, among other things, U.S.-
flag ship operators operating in high-
risk waters to adopt an anti-piracy plan
and to have armed or unarmed security
teams on board their ships, bolster
pirate watches and use non-lethal
means to thwart pirate attacks. The
measures are in-line with IMO’s recent
guidelines issues on piracy.
Despite the best efforts of a multi-
national maritime coalition force, piracy
off of the coast of Somalia is not going
away anytime soon. Somalia is one of
the poorest, most violent places on
earth. The deplorable living conditions
in Somalia and 20 years of civil conflict
have created the perfect incubator for
creating desperate gangs of young men.
Plagued by poverty, disease, dehydra-
tion and malnutrition, Somali children
have little chance of surviving to adult-
hood. Those that do survive to become
teenagers are often contravened into
the army. The long-term solution is a
stable Somali government. Right now,
anarchy reigns.
That’s why it is doubly important to
protect mariners and ships, such as the
Liberty Sun, which was bringing
humanitarian aid to Somalia. At a
House Subcommittee on Coast Guard
and Maritime Transportation meeting
in May, Philip J. Shapiro, president and
CEO of Liberty Maritime Corp., testi-
fied that the Liberty Sun was carrying
47,000 metric tons of U.S. government
food aid—enough to feed 250,000 people
for a year—when it was attacked. Dur-
ing the attack, the ship was hit by four
rocket-propelled grenades and automat-
ic weapons fire. A video of the incident
makes for very dramatic watching.
Those who say the Somali pirates have
no intention of harming a ship’s crew
should watch it and think again.
And those that say the cost of piracy
is just part of doing business should
reconsider as well.
At a hearing on international piracy
held by the Subcommittee on Coast
Guard and Maritime Transportation
this past February, Peter Chalk, a senior
policy analyst for the RAND Corpora-
tion testified that the annual cost of
piracy to the maritime industry was
estimated between $1 billion and $16
billion. This figure includes ransom pay-
ments, increased insurance rates,
increased training costs, costs associat-
ed with repairing vessels damaged by
pirate attacks, delays in cargo deliver-
ies, re-routing, the installation of anti-
piracy equipment and hardening meas-
ures.
MARINE LOG is sponsoring a one-
day conference called Countering
Pirates on Sept. 16 in Washington, D.C,
at which we plan to discuss many of the
practical solutions to the operational,
legal and financial challenges posed by
piracy.
Security directive on target
CIRCULATION & SUBSCRIPTIONS: Call toll free (800) 895-4389,
Monday-Friday 9 am—5 pm EST.
E
lsewhere in this issue we take a
look at the new California regula-
tion that mandates that ships
within 24 miles of the Calfornia coast
must burn low sulfur distillate fuel—
and keep extensive records on their
compliance.
While the words “fuel switching”
have a nice simple sound to them, the
actual practice of switching fuels on
board is far from simple. It involves
keeping bunkering additional grades of
fuel, storing them separately under the
conditions appropriate to each—and
then gradually switching from one fuel
to the other, balancing temperatures
and viscosities as this is done.
As is clear from an API working
paper that we quote extensively in the
feature, it’s just not that easy. And the
penalty for getting it wrong can be a
ship adrift without power, with all the
potential for disaster that implies.
The new rules are the California Air
Resources Board’s second attempt to
limit emissions from ships. An earlier
regulation would have set levels for
emissions of NOx, SOx and particulate
matter by ships. That rule was slung
out by the courts, but the just-imple-
mented measure dictating fuel grades
has thus far withstood legal challenges.
A TASTE OF THINGS TO COME?
In fact, the California rules can be seen
as offering a taste of things to come. In
the works is the North American ECA,
which will set emission limits out to
200 miles off the U.S. and Canadian
coastline. So fuel switching is going to
become a widespread practice—at least
until such time as all ships burn distil-
late fuel all the time. That was a solu-
tion advocated by Intertanko in the dis-
cussions that led to the most recent
MARPOL Annex VI amendments.
The North American ECA is being
requested within the framework of the
revised Annex VI.
NEW STANDARDS FOR ENGINES
Also within that framework, the U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency is
proposing to revise the Clean Air Act
engine program to include two addi-
tional tiers of NOx standards for new
Category 3 marine diesel engines
(above 30 liters per cylinder displace-
ment) installed in vessels registered in
the United States.
The proposed near-term Tier 2 stan-
dards for newly built engines would
apply beginning in 2011 and would
require more efficient use of current
engine technologies, including engine
timing, engine cooling, and advanced
computer controls. The Tier 2 stan-
dards would result in a 15 to 25% NOx
reduction below the current Tier 1 lev-
els, says EPA.
The proposed long-term Tier 3 stan-
dards would apply beginning in 2016
and would require the use of high effi-
ciency after treatment technology such
as selective catalytic reduction to
achieve NOx reductions 80% below the
current levels. In addition to the NOx
emission limits, EPA is proposing stan-
dards for emissions of HC and CO from
new Category 3 engines.
What’s not entirely clear from the
EPA is to what extent, if any, its pro-
posals exceed the new MARPOL
requirements, putting an additional
burden on U.S.-flag operators.
EPA is not proposing to set a stan-
dard for PM emissions for Category 3
engines. However, significant PM emis-
sions benefits will be achieved through
the ECA fuel sulfur requirements that
will apply to ships that operate in areas
that affect U.S. air quality. EPA is also
proposing to require engine manufac-
turers to measure and report PM emis-
sions. Finally, EPA is proposing a
change to the diesel fuel program that
would forbid the production and sale of
marine fuel oil above 1,000 ppm sulfur
for use in the waters within the pro-
posed U.S. ECA and internal U.S.
waters; and allow for the production
and sale of 1,000 ppm sulfur fuel for use
in Category 3 marine vessels.
EPA says the proposal is part of a
coordinated strategy to ensure that all
ships that affect U.S. air quality meet
stringent NOx and fuel sulfur require-
ments. When taken together, the ele-
ments of the coordinated strategy are
expected by EPA to result in significant
improvements in U.S. air quality and
public health.
ALL THE WORLD AN ECA?
All of these regulatory developments
have been predictable for long enough.
What seems equally predictable is that
more ECA’s will come into existence
and that the “non-ECA” areas of the
oceans will grow ever smaller. The qus-
tion really is “How long will it take
before they disappear completely?”
Nick Blenkey Senior Editorial Consultant nblenkey@sbpub.com
4 MARINE LOG JULY 2009 www.marinelog.com
California rules are shape of things to come
Second Thoughts
n a positive sign for the
shipbuilding sector, Korean
shipbuilders landed two
significant newbuilding
orders from European
shipowners last month, breaking
a drought that extended into
October of last year.
The Attica Group S.A.
recently signed a contract with
Korea’s Daewoo Shipbuilding &
Marine Engineering Ltd.
(DSME) to construct two
monohull fast car ferries.
The two fast car ferries will be
built at a cost of EURO 68.5
million ($100 million) apiece.
Each will have a length of
145.5m, with capacities of 2,400
passengers and 450 cars or 50
freight units and 150 cars. The
ferries will have a speed of 25.5
knots and be built for Greek
domestic waters.
DSME had previously built
the ferries Blue Star Paros, Blue
Star Naxos and Blue Star Ithaki
for Attica, which Attica CEO
Petros Vettas called the compa-
ny’s “most successful vessels.”
Meanwhile, on June 15, STX
Offshore & Shipbuilding said it
won orders for eight 50,400
DWT tankers (including four
options) worth $340 million
from a European shipowner.
Each tanker will be 183m x
32.2m x 19.1m, with a service
speed of 15.2 knots. The tankers
will be built at Jinhae shipyard.
STX has a healthy backlog.
With the new tankers, STX Off-
shore has 278 vessels on order
worth $18.3 billion (both in
Korea and in Dalian).
According to Clarksons, as of
April of this year, only 65 vessels
have been ordered worth $1.4
billion. Containerships, tankers
and bulk carriers account for
only 16 of the total.
DESPITE CURRENT OVER-
capacity and depressed shipping
rates, the world containership
fleet is expected to grow by 13%
in 2009 and a 9.3% annually
until 2013, bolstered by new
deliveries and new shipbuilding
orders. That is the conclusion of
the Shipbuilding Market Fore-
cast for Container and Roll-On
Roll-Off (Ro-Ro) Ships released
this month by Lloyd’s Register -
Fairplay (LRF) Research.
Faced with a global economic
recession, spot rates have been
quoted as low as $250 by some
lines to move a container from
Hong Kong to Rotterdam. That
compares with $1,400 a year
ago. Right now, there is a record
1 million TEU of capacity in dry
layup, and many others in wet
lay up.
Some have seen this as a busi-
ness opportunity. Wartsila, for
example, recently launched a
lay-up service for “hot” and
“cold” lay-ups.
The LRF Research report
expects an upturn in 2009
toward modest levels. The glob-
al containership fleet stands at
4,671 ships with a total capacity
of 12.4 million TEU. The fleet of
very large boxships of 8,000-
TEU capacity or greater is
expected to grow by an average
growth rate of 25% through
2013.
And, because the current box-
ship is relatively young, scrap-
ping will only remove 904,000
TEU of capacity from the fleet
over the next five years.
Despite low rates, boxship fleet to continue growth
Jumbo bolsters
heavy lift fleet
I NLAND • COASTAL
OFFSHORE • DEEPSEA
biz
Update
NOTES
Ashland Inc. , Covington, Ky.,
recently signed a definitive
agreement to sell specialty
chemicals and marine servic-
es company Drew Marine to
J. F. Lehman & Co. in a transac-
tion valued at some $120 mil-
lion before tax.
KOREAN YARDS
END DROUGHT
Jumbo Shipping recently bol-
stered its heavy lift fleet with
the addition of a fourth J1800-
class vessel, the Jumbo
Jubilee, from Damen Ship-
yards Galati in Romania. The
144.8m x 26.84m will be used
to carry oversized cargo such
as overweight power plant
equipment, offshore equip-
ment and floating cargo.
After leaving Galati, the
Jumbo Jubilee sailed to Huis-
man Equipment in Schiedam,
the Netherlands, for the
installation of two 900 metric
tonne mast cranes.
I
www.marinelog.com JULY 2009 MARINE LOG 7
J.F. Lehman buys
Drew Marine
The super post-Panamax box-
ship COSCO Long Beach
Previously, DSME built
the Blue Star Naxos for
Attica Group
In its annual report on port
state control, the Paris MoU
says that one in 20 ship
inspections resulted in a ves-
sel detention in 2008, with
ships 15 years of age or older
accounting for 75% of the
deficiencies.
The Paris MoU says one
troubling trend is the 34%
increase in the number of
deficiencies between 2005
and 2008, implying that the
average condition of ships is
deteriorating.
The United States flag was
recently moved from the
White to the Grey List with an
average performance.
One in 20 ships
detained
8 MARINE LOG JULY 2009 www.marinelog.com
S
ome 220 guests were on
hand for the christening
of the 93m, DP2 multi-
purpose offshore support ves-
sel Island Commander at the
Vippetangen Quay in Oslo
Harbor last month during
Nor-Shipping week in Oslo,
Norway.
The vessel, owned by Nor-
way’s Island Offshore Group,
will begin a three-year charter
this summer with Cono-
coPhillips in the North Sea.
As a platform supply vessel,
the 93m x 20m Island Com-
mander will be able to carry
general deck and pipe cargo on
its 1,030m
2
deck, as well as liq-
uid and bulk cargoes. The deck
can accommodate up to 3,110
tonnes.
Guests of the christening
were allowed to tour the ves-
sel’s well-appointed bridge.
The vessel is outfitted with a
Poscon independent joystick
system, which integrates all of
its maneuvering functions and
controls the CP propellers,
thrusters and rudders. The
joystick system has an inter-
face to the ship gyrocompass
for automatic heading and the
GPS system for indication of
ship’s speed and course.
Based on a Rolls-Royce UT
776 CD design and built by
STX Europe’s Brevik yard, the
Island Commander has a
diesel-electric propulsion sys-
tem. Each of the four main
generator sets is a complete
unit and consists of a medium-
speed Bergen Diesel
C25:3333L6A engine directly
coupled to a fresh water-
cooled, resiliently mounted
generator. Each engine pro-
duces 1,740 kW at 900
rev/min.
Propulsion is supplied by
two 2,500 kW Rolls-Royce
Marine Azipull CP 120
thrusters.
Island Offshore vessel christened
Island Commander
tied up for christening
ceremony in Oslo Harbor
A
ustralian designers popularized
the use of wave-piercing tech-
nology for high-speed multi-hull
passenger vessels. At Nor-Shipping 2009
in Oslo last month, Rolls-Royce
unveiled a new UT 790 CD anchor-han-
dling vessel design that incorporates
wave-piercing technology for the off-
shore sector.
Instead of riding on top of waves,
the hull pierces through the water, elimi-
nates slamming and allows the vessel to
maintain service speeds
regardless of the sea
state. This reduces
fuel consumption
and improves
crew
comfort.
For example, at speeds of 14 knots
and violent storm conditions (9 meter
significant high waves), tank tests have
shown no water above forecastle deck
level.
The vessel has a wider beam than a
traditional AHTS—23m as compared to
20m—making it a more stable platform.
The engine room is located astern to
reduce engine noise and create room for
winches at the front of the vessel. The
UT 790 CD has the same fiber
and rope capacity operating
with four secondary
winches as a traditional
anchor handler has
with six.
The vessel also has
triple-screw propul-
sion—two Azipull
thrusters with a CP propeller
in the middle—providing maximum
efficiency and flexibility.
I NLAND • COASTAL • OFFSHORE • DEEPSEA
Update
Chiquita Brands
International, Inc.
does not expect the
recent voluntary
Chapter 7 bankrupt-
cy filing by New York-based Eastwind
Maritime Inc. and certain of its affili-
ates to adversely affect service to Chiq-
uita’s customers and the delivery of its
bananas and other fresh fruit products.
“All of the 12 oceangoing ships that
the company sold in 2007 remain under
long-term charter to Chiquita, including
the four ships sold to Eastwind,” said
Chiquita.
Before the roof fell in, Eastwind
operated about 60 reefers, 18 bulkers,
17 product tankers and 18 boxships.
The bankruptcy followed news that
lender Nordea had foreclosed on 13 of
Eastwind’s ships and had sold them to
Draften, a company controlled by Israeli
shipowner Sammy Ofer.
Eastwind has also been facing a slew
of lawsuits.
BANANA DELIVERIES
WON’T SLIP
Rolls-Royce’s wavepiercer
for offshore sector
Gladding-Hearn Shipbuilding, Somerset,
Mass., delivered its first high-speed patrol
boat to the U.S. Government.
The all aluminum 64 ft escort vessel will
be operat-
ed by the
U.S. Coast
Guard and
will secure
high value
Navy
assets.
Fitted with two MTU diesel engines that
are connected to Hamilton waterjets, the
escort vessel can reach speeds of up to 30
knots. It features a C. Raymond-Hunt-
designed deep-V hull and a CPI Marine
fender system.
The foredeck features a gun mount
while the forecastle is equipped with a
head, galley, berths and lockers. The inte-
rior is fitted with Shockwave heavy-duty
suspension seats and shock-absorbing
floor matting.
T
he Yachts of
Seabourn debuted
its first new luxury
vessel in six years, the
32,000-ton, ultra-luxury
yacht Seabourn Odyssey
in Venice, Italy last month.
Built by T. Mariotti of
Genoa, Italy, the Seabourn
Odyssey can accommodate
450 guests in 225 suites.
The yacht features 11
decks, which include, just
to name a few, a nine-hole
golf course, an 11,400 ft
2
Spa, two outdoor swim-
ming pools, four Five-star
restaurants and six out-
door whirlpools.
The Seabourn Odyssey’s
maiden year will be spent
sailing the Mediterranean
during the summer and
early fall, the vessel will
then travel the Carribbean
until it departs on the com-
pany’s first world cruise in
early January 2010.
Seabourn Odyssey is the
first in a series of three
newbuilds. The Seabourn
Sojourn will launch next
June, with the third, as-
yet-unnamed, vessel to
follow in 2011.
Seabourn launches first luxury
vessel in six years
www.marinelog.com JULY 2009 MARINE LOG 9
OSG tank barge sold
to Nigerian buyers
OSG Ship Management has sold OSG 300, a
38,860 dwt double hulled tank barge, to
Nigerian buyers, who have renamed the
barge Bamidele, and will use the barge for
clean fuel storage and coastwise service.
The 588 ft barge cost $15.5 million to
build in 1979, when Galveston Shipbuild-
ing Co., Galveston, Tex., constructed the
vessel for the Miami Belcher Oil Company.
Classed as an ABS +A1 tank barge,
unrestricted service, the barge can work in
ATB configuration. It was retired last Octo-
ber in preperation for its sale.
Marcon International Inc. was the sole
broker in selling the barge to its new own-
ers.
Gladding Hearn delivers
its first high-speed vessel
to U.S. Government
U
.S. Barge, Portland,
Ore., signed a con-
tract with Harley
Marine Services, Seattle,
Wash., to build an 83,000
barrel double hull barge.
The 422 ft long barge
will be OPA 90 compliant
and is classed as an ABS
Classed Maltese A-1 and
loadline Un-Manned
Ocean Services.
The barge will feature a
full vapor processing unit
and an electronic cargo
tank monitoring system.
Its 12 cargo tanks will
be coiled with a heating
unit that will keep temper-
ature stable and within a
certain range. U . S .
Barge will undertake all
the outfitting work.
Harley Marine Services
director of Barge Opera-
tions Keith Barnes, said,
“We are happy to partner
with U.S. Barge to achieve
our accelerated OPA 90
compliance plan. Indus-
try-wide, the deadline is
2015. Harley Marine Ser-
vices has committed to
achieving compliance by
2012.”
The new barge will be
delivered in the spring of
2010, and will be placed
into service to support
Harley Marine Services’
West Coast Wide opera-
tions.
L-3 Offshore, Coventry, U.K., signed
a teaming agreement with STX
Engine, a subsidiary of South Korea’s
STX Group, to collaborate in the
marketing and supply of integrated
power, electric propulsion, dynamic
propulsion and automation systems
for the Korean offshore market.
Under the agreement STX Engine
will offer full testing support services.
In addition, STXwill design, produce
and supply electronic and electrical
systems for offshore plants.
L-3’s Marine and Power Systems
group will consolidate its offshore
access to local markets for shipbuild-
ing and operating equipment.
L-3 Offshore and STX
sign teaming agreement
Harley Marine Services orders
ocean tank barge
Update
10 MARINE LOG JULY 2009 www.marinelog.com
VTT surveys ship wastewater
nutrient discharge in the Baltic Sea
F
inland-based VTT Technical Research
conducted a survey to investigate the
scope of ship wastewater nutrient
inputs in the Baltic Sea.
The information was obtained from port
facilities and shipping companies, with the
sole focus being on passenger ships, cruise
ships and cargo vessels.
Although nitrogen released in ship emis-
sions is far more servere, it is important to
note that the environmental impact of ship
wastewater is significant.
The survey found that ship wastewater
discharges resulted in 0.04% (356 tons) of
nitrogen and 0.3% (119 tons) of phosphorus.
Most of the wastewater nutrients—contain-
ing nitrogen, phosphorus, pathogens, heavy
metals and organic compounds harmful to
aquatic organisms—enter the Baltic Sea in
the summer, where the unprocessed and
untreated wastewater from the ships increase
the growth of algae.
However, the largest perpetuator of the
nitrogen and phosphorus discharge in the
Baltic Sea is, ironically, nature herself. The
nutrients enter the sea in the watershed and
through untreated municipal wastewater.
According to the survey, the nitrogen fallout
from sources such as rivers and the coast is a
total of 744,900 (74%) tons of nitrogen each
year, while 264,000 tons of nitrogen(26%)
are from aerial fallout. Almost 99% of the
34,5000 tons of phosphorus in the Baltic Sea
was caused by run off water.
With that said, it is important to note that
the treatment of wastewater is easier to con-
trol than mother nature herself.
While maritime regulations prohibit the
discharge of sewage into the sea, ships are
allowed to discharge sewage if it is commin-
uted or disinfected. Ships using an approved
system that disinfects or reduces the sewage
can discharge the wastewater more than
three nautical miles from the nearest land. If
the sewage has not been treated then it
would have to be discharged at a moderate
rate more than 12 nautical miles offshore.
Not all vessels have purification systems
onboard. The alternative for these shipping
companies would be for ports to provide
wastewater reception facilities for ships.
According to the Port of Helsinki, most
wastewater from vessels is pumped into the
sewage system in port, and then directed to
wastewater purification plants for treatment.
I NLAND • COASTAL • OFFSHORE • DEEPSEA
The Port of Helsinki says that all passenger
ships calling regularly pumped wastewater
into the sewage system in the port in 2008
www.marinelog.com JULY 2009 MARINE LOG 11
conference & expo
M
ARINE
L
OG
S
hipping needs to shrink its carbon foot print. The
U.S. and Canada have jointly proposed creating
what would be the world’s largest Emissions Control
Area. This has broad implications for the shipping indus-
try, since more than 93,000 ships call at U.S. and Canadian
ports annually.
What are the best solutions for compliance? Scrubbers?
Ultra-low sulfur fuel? Are your ships being fitted with
cold iron technology for when you are in port?
Beyond emissions, there are a whole host of environmen-
tal compliance and regulatory issues for ship operators,
including waste stream management,
ballast water management and ship recycling. What can
ship operators do now to cut their fuel and energy con-
sumption and reduce their greenhouse gas emissions?
These and other environmental topics will be discussed
during a series of panels and presentations over two days
at Marine Log’s Global Greenship 2009 Conference &
Expo. Well-known experts will discuss current policy, regu-
lations and technologies during a lively agenda. There
will be ample time built into the conference and expo for
discussion, debate and the exchange of ideas. There will
also be substantial time for networking during coffee and
energy breaks, luncheons and the cocktail reception.
The conference
The registration fee is $825 per person. This includes all
conference sessions, the expo, and all social functions, as
well as online access to the conference proceedings.
The expo
A key component of the event is a tabletop expo, with
green technologies and services on display from major
suppliers. Contact Jane Poterala, Conference Director, at
(212) 620-7209, jpoterala@sbpub.com for details on exhib-
it opportunities.
Hotel & venue
Ahe Washington Marriott Hotel has set aside a block of
rooms at $269 single/double for conference attendees.
These rooms will be held until 30 days prior to the confer-
ence; those reserving after that date will rely upon room
availability. We suggest that you contact the hotel direct-
ly at (202) 872-1500 for room reservations. In order to
receive the group rate, please mention group code
Marine Log when arranging your accommodations. You
will receive room confirmation directly from the
Washington Marriott.
For more information
If you have any questions regarding registration, please
contact Michelle M. Zolkos, Conference Coordinator, at
(212) 620-7208, mzolkos@sbpub.com.
To inquire about sponsorship opportunities or to become
an exhibitor at our expo, please contact Jane Poterala,
Conference Director at (212) 620-7209,
jpoterala@sbpub.com.jpoterala@sbpub.com for
details.
Corporate Sponsor Supporting Organizations
For program updates, tabletop and
sponsorship forms, please visit us
online at www.marinelog.com.
Sept. 17 & 18, 2009
Washington, D.C.
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Please register me for Marine Log’s GLOBAL GREENSHIP 2009 Conference & Expo in Washington, D.C., September 17 & 18, 2009.
Registration fee is $825 per participant, payable in advance.
Please send completed form with your payment to: Jane Poterala, Conference Director, Simmons-Boardman Conferences,
345 Hudson St., 12
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flr., New York, NY 10014 | Tel.: (212) 620-7209 | Fax: (212) 633-1165 | conferences@sbpub.com
37-002-2350
September 17, 2009
Registration
Continental breakfast sponsored by ABS | Expo open
Keynote address: Environmental stewardship
The latest developments at IMO
An operator’s perspective on responsible ship recycling
Bob Bowers, Sr. Dir., Maritime Technical Services,
Maersk Line Limited
Coffee break (sponsorship available) | Expo open
What new regulations may emerge under the Clean
Water Act?
Larry Kiern, Esq., Partner, Winston & Strawn LLP
Eliminating stern tube oil pollution
Craig Carter, Dir., Marketing & Customer Service,
Thordon Bearings Inc.
Luncheon (sponsorship available) | Expo open
Advances in marine coatings: Saving owners time and
money while protecting the environment
Mark Schultz, Business Development Mgr.–Marine,
Sherwin-Williams
Ballast water management: The latest developments
Rick Ferraro, External training manager, Lloyd’s Register
Americas
Energy break (sponsorship available) | Expo open
Panel presentations: Energy efficiency
Shipboard energy conservation
Mike Gaffney, Executive VP, Engineering, CEM, Alaris
Companies LLC
Hull preparation, coatings and emissions reduction
Speaker from International Paint
Developing a marine LEED certification
John Waterhouse, President, Elliott Bay Design Group
Cocktail reception (sponsorship available) | Expo open
September 18, 2009
Continental breakfast sponsored by ABS | Expo open
Proposed North American Emissions Control Area
Marine exhaust gas scrubbing
Chris Leigh-Jones, Managing Dir., Krystallon
The impact of operating two-stroke diesel engines on
ultra low sulfur fuel
Les Gingell, VP Marine Sales North America, MAN Diesel
Coffee break (sponsorship available) | Expo open
Environmental crimes: Prosecutor’s point of view
Environmental crimes: Regulator’s point of view
Luncheon (sponsorship available) | Expo open
Luncheon address: Being carbon neutral
Inland barge transport’s smaller carbon footprint:
A greenhouse gas study
Andrew Riester, VP, Waterways Council, Inc.
Hydrogen power for fuel cells as a cold ironing concept
Thomas J. Ingram, P.E., Mgr. Government Programs, ABS
Emissions and OPEX reduction with LNG vessels
John Hatley, P.E., Americas VP Ship Power, Wärtsilä North
America Inc.
What are the major environmental challenges ahead?
Delegate favors & lanyards sponsored by Lloyd’s Register
Program subject to change/augmentation
Registration Form
Moderator: Jon Waldron, Esq., Partner, Blank Rome LLP Conference Program
14 MARINE LOG JULY 2009 www.marinelog.com
O
n this page last month,
we reported on U.S.-flag
shipowners’ testimony on the
obstacles they faced in arming
ships against pirate attacks. A
fairly high proportion of the
oceangoing U.S.-flag fleet is at
risk, since it is engaged in car-
rying preference cargoes, such
as humanitarian food aid, that
must be transported through
dangerous waters.
Washington seems to have
heard the shipowners’ pleas.
Rep. Frank LoBiondo (R-
NJ) has introduced legislation
in the House to provide
immunity to U.S. merchant
mariners who wound or kill
pirates while responding to a
pirate attack. “The United
States Mariner and Vessel Pro-
tection Act (H.R. 2984)”
directs the Coast Guard to
establish standards for when a
merchant mariner on a U.S.-
flag merchant vessel can use
force against an attacker. Any
mariner using force within
those standards, and the
owner, operator or master of
any vessels would be exempt
from liability in U.S. courts as
a result of that use of force.
In fact, his bill may not be
necessary. Last month the
Coast Guard published three
Port Security Advisories that
spell out what’s involved in
putting arms on board ship,
what the rules are for hiring
armed security details and
when it is appropriate to use
deadly force. The advisories
are accessible at:
http://homeport.uscg.mil.
Port Security Advisory 3-09:
is intended to provide guid-
ance to U.S. flagged commer-
cial vessels and embarked per-
sonnel, including contract
security personnel, not entitled
to sovereign immunity and
operating in High Risk Waters
(HRW), for employment of
force in self-defense or defense
of others, as well as defense of
the vessel. Though the docu-
ment only restates existing law
in this area, that law appears
to give ships ample latitude to
use deadly force in self-
defense.
Port Security Advisory 4-09
(rev 1): provides guidance on
obtaining a Temporary Export
License in order to placing
firearms on board vessels to
arm private security personnel
or vessel crews. The Coast
Guard has worked closely
with the Department of State's
Directorate of Defense Trade
Controls (DDTC), which
implements defense trade con-
trols under the ITAR program,
as well as the Department of
Homeland Security’s Customs
and Border Protection (CBP),
which is authorized to enforce
U.S. export control laws.
Port Security Advisory 5-09:
spells out the standards that
must be met or exceeded by
contracted security services
supplementing ship’s crew to
demonstrate competency and
adequacy to perform the
assigned task for U.S. vessels
subject to 33 CFR Part 104
and MARSEC Directive 104-6.
Meanwhile, outside the
U.S., INTERTANKO thinks
security guards should prefer-
ably be provided by flag
states—which is a hilarious
notion given some of the flags
preferred by INTERTANKO
members!
Arming ships: Washington responds
INSIDEWASHINGTON
www.marinelog.com JULY 2009 MARINE LOG 15
D
espite the best efforts of a multi-
national naval force, IMO and a
growing vigilence in the shipping
industry, pirate attacks and hijackings
off the coast of Somalia and in the Gulf of
Aden aren’t going away anytime soon.
And piracy shouldn’t be written off as
just a nominal expense of doing business.
Testimony before the U.S. House
Transportation and Infrastructure Com-
mittee, Subcommittee on Coast Guard
and Maritime Transportation this past
February estimated the annual cost of
piracy between $1 billion and $16 billion.
This figure includes ransom payments,
increaed insurance rates, increased
training costs, costs associated with the
installation of anti-piracy equipment and
vessel hardening measures, costs associ-
ated with repairing vessels damaged by
pirate attacks, and delays cargo deliver-
ies due to rerouting. War risk insurance
premiums for some ships transiting the
Horn of Africa have risen as much as
$20,000 per ship, according to the U.S.
Maritime Administration.
Beyond the financial cost is the human
cost. There were 306 acts of piracy and
armed robbery against ships reported to
IMO in 2008 up from 282 in 2007, repre-
senting an increase of 8.5%. In the first
four months of 2009, 157 incidents were
reported to IMO.
According to the International Mar-
itime Bureau, 478 crew members were
taken hostage in pirate hijackings from
Jan. 1 to May 12, 2009 as compared to
815 for all of 2008.
REVISED GUIDANCE FROM IMO
IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee
recently took up the issue of piracy in
London at its 86th session from May 27
to June 5. The result of the session was
the issuance of revised guidance on com-
bating piracy and armed robbery against
ships. The committee also agreed on spe-
cific guidance relating to the continued
attacks on ships off the coast of Somalia
and in the Gulf of Aden.
One of the hard choices that ship oper-
ators will have to make when entering
pirate hot spots is whether to allow
armed or unarmed professional security
teams onboard or even to allow the crew
to carry arms themselves.
IMO’s Marine Safety Committee
agreed that flag states should “strongly
discourage” the carrying and use of
firearms by seafarers for personal protec-
tion or for the protection of a ship. Sea-
farers, it was agreed, are civilians and
the use of firearms requires special train-
ing and aptitudes and the risk of acci-
dents with firearms carried on board
ship is great.
However, the committee left the deci-
sion regarding the use of unarmed secu-
rity personnel up to individual shipown-
ers and operators. Further, the carriage
of armed security personnel, or the use of
military or law-enforcement officers
(duly authorized by the government of
the flag state to carry firearms for the
security of the ship) should be subject to
flag state legislation and policies and is a
matter for the flag state to authorize, in
S
hipowners should be using special
war insurance policies when transit-
ing high-risk pirate hot spots such
as the Gulf of Aden and off the coast of
Somalia, according to a recent study
released by leading marine insurer
Allianz Global Corporate & Specialty
(AGCS).
Furthermore, the Allianz study,“Pira-
cy: An ancient risk with modern faces,”
also outlines several measures crews
should be taking when entering known
pirate waters.
“There are several practical steps you
can take if you are transiting a piracy
area,” says Allianz Global Corporate &
Specialty spokesman Richard Manson.
Manson points to several effective meth-
ods outlined in the study for deterring
pirate attacks. “These methods include
increasing speed when transiting known
high-risk waters, additional lookouts
including dummies, slippery foam on the
hull, and stowing boarding ladders. In
any case, crews should be made aware of
looking for and reporting any skiffs in
the water. We are,” adds Manson, “very
cautious about arming ship’s crew.”
In addition, the study says technolo-
gies such as Long Range Acoustic
Devices or L-RADs, which project a
painful wall of highly focused sound at a
target can be effective. Other measures
include electric fences and barbed wire
to make it more difficult for pirates to
STUDY DETAILS HOW
YOU CAN RESPOND
TO PIRACY RISK
PIRACY
PIRATES AHEAD:
ARE YOU READY?
Last month, securityteams
from the Royal Navy Type 23
Frigate HMS Portland (F 79)
boarded two suspicious
skiffs in the Gulf of Aden
16 MARINE LOG JULY 2009 www.marinelog.com
I C E C L A S S T A N K E R S
PIRACY
try to board. There are also satellite
tracking devices, such as Ship LOC, that
can help pinpoint a boat’s position if
radio contact is cut. However, putting
firearms aboard a ship, even in the hands
of trained professional security services,
is usually a step too far. “Weapons will
only escalate the problem,” says Ralf
Zibell, Allianz senior risk consultant,
marine. “Although the pirates are armed,
attacks are generally not violent, but
that situation would certainly change if
they were counterattacked with weapons.
Furthermore, insurers
would be very wary of
insuring any vessel
that carried arms or
armed guards on
board. A potential lia-
bility claim for shoot-
ing a pirate—or caus-
ing a crew member’s
death—could be very
costly, as could the
resulting damage to
the hull.”
Therefore, Allianz
works with clients and
discuss both their
awareness and their
preparedness. “If they
have to navigate the
area, we discuss what
means of protection they can employ,”
says Allianz senior marine underwriter
Danny McCarthy.
“In addition, of course, you discuss
their insurance solutions,” explains
French marine claims head Frédéric Dene-
fle. “You need the right combination of
coverage, including considering war and
kidnap and ransom cover. At the same
time, this information needs to be kept
very confidential in the same way you
don't announce to pirates what kind of
treasure a ship is carrying.”
Currently many vessels are insured for
piracy as part of their standard hull and
machinery insurance policies, which are
not specifically designed to address secu-
rity-related risks such as piracy. This
means that some shipowners are paying
for piracy coverage when they do not
need it because they are not sailing
through piracy zones. So-called war
insurance provides special cover for ships
exposed to piracy risks on a “per transit”
basis, meaning that it can be specifically
underwritten to handle various exposures
besides damage to the vessel and there-
fore can be priced more flexibly.
consultation with ship owners, compa-
nies and ship operators.
In the wake of the attacks on the U.S.-
flagged vessels Maersk Alabama and
Liberty Sun in April 2009, the U.S. Coast
Guard issued Maritime Security Direc-
tive 104-6 (rev. 2) on May 11 under the
Maritime Transportation Security Act of
2004 that provides U.S.-flag ship opera-
tors with specific, risk-based measures to
take to deter, detect or disrupt piracy.
Much of the measures are common
sense. For example, prior to entering
high-risk waters, U.S.-flagged vessels
should establish an anti-piracy plan that
includes the “hardening” measures to
prevent attacks and subsequent board-
ing. Ships should also use established
transit lanes, evasive maneuvers,
increased speed and cooperate with
naval forces patrolling the area. When in
known pirate waters, ships should main-
tain a vigilant anti-piracy watch and
ensure all shipboard anti-piracy precau-
tions are in force.
The Vessel Security Plan for a U.S.-flag
ship operator that operates in pirate hot
spots must have security protocols for
terrorism, piracy, and armed robbery
against ships that meet the performance
standards in the directive. An annex to
the directive provides further specific
measures required for vessels transiting
in the Horn of Africa and Gulf of Aden
high-risk waters. All vessel security
plans must be approved by the U.S.
Coast Guard.
Additionally, the directive requires
vessels to “supplement ship’s crew with
armed or unarmed security based on a
piracy specific vessel threat assessment
conducted by the operator and approved
by the Coast Guard.”
PIRACY LEGISLATON HEATS UP
Of course, the threat of piracy has not
been lost on the radar screen of Con-
gress. In a vote of 389 to 22 late last
month, the U.S. House of Representa-
tives overwhelmingly passed the Nation-
al Defense Authorization Act, H.R. 2647,
which contained an amendment that
would require the Department of
Defense to protect U.S.-flagged ships at
risk of being boarded by pirates. The
amendment was put forth by Congress-
man Elijah E. Cum-
mings (D-Md.),
Chairman of the
House Subcommit-
tee on Coast Guard
and Maritime
Transportation.
“We would never
leave the U.S. home-
land unguarded if it
were at risk of an
attack, and we
should apply this
same standard to
our ships instead of
leaving them to fend
for themselves,”
Congressman Cum-
mings said. “We
anticipate that
embarking military
security personnel
on these vessels will require far less
manpower than patrolling the region
with multiple Navy vessels and be much
more efficient and effective in keeping
our mariners safe.”
According to U.S. Maritime Adminis-
tration estimates, 54 U.S. flag vessels
transit the Horn of Africa region in one
year.
One of those companies is Liberty
Maritime Corporation. In testimony
before the subcommittee on May 11, Lib-
erty Maritime president and CEO Philip
J. Shapiro said his company has “one of
our vessels is almost always near the
danger area at any given time.” Shapiro
said the company has adopted stringent
vessel security plans and adopted meas-
ures recommended by international
organizations to make its vessels difficult
piracy targets.
Shapiro strongly urged the U.S. Gov-
ernment to consider “small embarked
security teams” on U.S.-flag ships that
transit high-risk areas, saying that they
would be “a more effective deterrent than
patrolling large ocean areas with ves-
sels.” ML
Allianz graphic showing possible piracy countermeasures
A
s of the first of this month, all
ocean-going vessels within 24 nau-
tical miles of California’s coastline
are required to use cleaner burning
diesel fuel in order to comply with a new
state regulation aimed at reducing the
emissions of oxides of sulfur and nitro-
gen and diesel particulate matter, a
known carcinogen.
While this is great news for human
lungs, it is not necessarily good news for
diesel engines that have been designed
to cope with burning bunker fuels. And
while “fuel switching” is easy enough to
say, it is actually another time-consum-
ing task for already over-worked crews.
The new Californian regulation can
be viewed as a sort of warming-up exer-
cise for what is to come. The proposed
North American ECA will extend 200
nautical miles of the U.S. and Canadian
coast.
Specifically, as of July 1, the Californ-
ian regulation sets fuel requirements for
ocean-going vessel main (propulsion)
diesel engines, auxiliary diesel engines,
and auxiliary boilers. They are required
to burn marine gas oil (DMA) at or below
1.5% sulfur; or marine diesel oil (DMB)
at or below 0.5% sulfur. From January 1,
2012, the requirement is that the fuels
be marine gas oil (DMA) or marine diesel
oil (DMB) at or below 0.1% sulfur.
The U.S. Coast Guard expects that
ships will switch fuel oil from residual
fuels to distillate fuels more frequently
to comply with new emission reduction
regulations, such as those now in force
off California.
When switching fuel oil, notes the
Coast Guard, some ships have experi-
enced propulsion losses linked to proce-
dural errors or fuel oil incompatibility.
The California regulation also impos-
es a requirement to retain and maintain
records in English for at least three
years recording such things as the date,
local time, and position (longitude and
latitude) of the vessel for each entry into
and departure from regulated California
waters, the date, local time, and position
(longitude and latitude) of the vessel at
the initiation and completion of any fuel
switching procedures, the type of fuel
used in each auxiliary engine, main
engine, and auxiliary boiler operated in
regulated California waters; and the
types, amounts, and the actual percent
by weight sulfur content of all fuels pur-
chased for use on the vessel, as reported
by the fuel supplier or a fuel testing firm.
An API working group has developed
a paper titled “Technical Considerations
of Fuel Switching Practices” that dis-
cusses problems that lead to propulsion
loss while switching fuel. It is available
(under the heading "Safety Reports") at
http://marineinvestigations.us.
The following is by no means a com-
plete summary of the paper, but should
serve to show that fuel switching is a
procedure that requires some consider-
able advanced planning.
The API working group found that
an unscheduled shut down of the main
or auxiliary engine(s) could occur as a
result of one or more of the following:
• Fuel temperature during change over
causing sticking/scuffing of high pres-
sure fuel injection components as a
result of thermal shock and reduced
fuel oil viscosity and lubricity at the
high pressure fuel pump inlet.
• Prolonged service with mismatched
crankcase or cylinder lubricating oil
resulting in accelerated piston ring
liner wear.
• The incompatibility of the fuels being
switched causing sticking/scuffing of
high pressure fuel injection compo-
nents, or complete fuel pump seizure.
• Liner lacquering resulting in difficul-
ties maintaining a sufficient oil film
thickness
Incidents caused by temperature,
mismatched lubricating oils and liner
lacquering can be avoided or controlled
onboard by understanding and mitigat-
ing the risk using defined and proven
change over procedures. Fuel incompati-
bility issues are more difficult to identify.
The API guidance notes deal with
vessels with main diesels normally run-
ning on residual fuel oil that need to
change over to low sulfur distillate to
meet regulatory requirements. When
available, applicable engine manufactur-
er’s instructions should be followed.
To make the changeover simpler and
more secure, the use of an automatic con-
trol system is preferable. Since not all
vessels are fitted with such a system, the
API guidance provides generic change-
over procedures.
BASE
In addition to providing mechanical
lubrication, the cylinder oil of slow speed
engines and crankcase oil of medium
speed engines contains base (also called
alkalinity) which neutralizes any acid
formed. The base consists primarily of
calcium carbonate and is measured by
the base number (BN). After reaction
with acid, calcium sulfate (gypsum) is
formed.
In the slow-speed engine unreacted
base can form a very hard deposit on the
piston crown. If excess deposit is formed,
the lubricant film can be disrupted and
scuffing or sudden severe wear may take
place.
Some engine designers, notes the API
guidance, believe that a degree of corro-
sion is not entirely bad for an engine. A
BY NI CK BLENKEY
FUEL &LUBES
www.marinelog.com JULY 2009 MARINE LOG 17
SWITCHING FUELS:
THE HEADACHES
California regulation goes into effect
18 MARINE LOG JULY 2009 www.marinelog.com
FUEL & LUBES
limited degree of corrosion keeps the
metal micro-structure of the cylinder
liner surface open which enables the
lubricating oil to better adhere to the
surface ensuring a good oil film.
It is important that a proper balance
is maintained between the base coming
from the lube oil and the fuel sulfur level
in order to avoid excessive deposit and to
keep the cylinder liner metal structure
open.
With engines that do not operate per-
manently on distillate fuel oil, the lube
oil should be selected on the basis of the
highest sulfur content of the fuels used
(this is normally BN70).
Continuous operation with residual
fuel oil is recommended for engines and
plants designed for running such fuel oil
and changing to distillate is only recom-
mended when absolutely necessary.
THE SWITCHOVER
When switching from residual to dis-
tillate fuel, changing the fuel tempera-
ture too quickly or uneven temperature
changes may cause thermal shock caus-
ing uncontrolled clearance adaptation
which can result in sticking/scuffing of
the fuel valves, fuel pump plungers and
suction valves.
To protect the injection equipment
against rapid temperature changes
the changeover from residual to dis-
tillate must be carried out slowly to
allow the temperature of the fuel
pumps to decrease from up to 150° C
in residual fuel operation to a maxi-
mum 50° C (MGO) to 60°C (MDO) in
distillate fuel operation. This is
essential in order to avoid pump
seizure due to the low viscosity of the
diesel fuel and thermal shock.
Engine manufacturers indicate that
the temperature should not change by
more than 2O°C/min resulting in a
change over time of about 50 minutes.
This needs to be factored into voyage
planning to ensure that the engine
department is not rushed to meet a
change-over requirement before entering
regulated waters.
There is risk that with prolonged
operation on distillate fuel oil the maxi-
mum admissible fuel temperature may
be exceeded due to the system heating
the fuel and the hot fuel being re-circu-
lated into the mixing tank. An elevated
distillate/residual mix may result in the
distillate vaporizing and “gassing-up” the
booster pumps causing the engine to
stop. In this instance the shut-off valves
in the return pipe may have to be
switched so that the distillate fuel oil is
returned to the service tank instead of
the mixing tank. To avoid possible incom-
patibility issues returning distillate to
the residual fuel service tank should be
kept to a minimum.
For engines designed to operate
predominantly on residual fuel, injec-
tion valve cooling in operation is com-
mon. In order to prevent over-cooling
when operating on distillate fuel
exceeding 72 hrs the engine manufac-
ture may recommend that nozzle cool-
ing is to be switched off and the supply
line closed, however, the return pipe is
to remain open. At all times, whether
operated on distillate or residual, the
engine and its components are to be
maintained at normal service temper-
ature. Care should be taken that the
residual fuel oil service and settling
tanks are maintained at their normal
temperature, i.e. tank heating and oil
purification must be monitored. ML
U.S. SHIPBUILDING
CO
2
ATINGS & EMISSIONS
COATINGS
C
onsider it a sign of the times:
Jotun has developed a new
antifouling for ships that are
going into lay-up.
Newbuilds that normally went
straight into trade are now faced with
going straight into lay-up for long peri-
ods, and more and more vessels enter
lay-up for shorter or longer periods
directly from dry-docking.
Called SeaQuantum Static, the new
antifouling is formulated with a higher
film erosion rate and biocide package.
Jotun says the SeaQuantum Static
should be applied as a last coat on top of
the antifouling system designed for
trading.
According to the DNV Interim Guide-
line on Lay-Up of Ships, all ships will
experience fouling during lay-up. The
extent of the fouling is dependent on
time, location and duration among other
factors. Hence, there can be a need to
clean the hull prior to recommissioning.
The most common in-water cleaning
methods are rotating brushes or flush-
ing. Brushing is mainly used on conven-
tional antifouling coatings and hard
coatings. Rotating brushes can damage
and remove some of the antifouling
coating. Depending on the local environ-
mental legislation, one may be required
to get a permit to carry out this kind of
work as coating fragments are released
into the environment. DNV recom-
mends contacting the coatings supplier
for the best cleaning procedures.
Jotun says SeaQuantum Static
enables ships that are laid up to re-
enter operation without costly and time
consuming dry-dockings and is a good
solution for certain particularly
demanding conditions for example high
fouling-intensive and warm waters com-
bined with idle periods.
SeaQuantum Static dries with a hard
finish and provides additional protec-
tion for 24 months, says Jotun.
It is well suited for a ship going into
lay-up for a long period of time and for
owners who need to prepare the vessel
for rapid re-entry into the market.
In addition, it is applicable for ships
with a trading scheme and pattern that
is on the extreme side, both on low voy-
age factor and on fouling intensity.
SeaQuantum Static prevents transmi-
gration of non-indigenous species in
areas such as sea chests, bow and stern
thrusters.
SeaQuantum Static is based on Silyl
Acrylate polymers, true hydrolyzing and
an optimized biocide combination. It is
self-smoothing and self-polishing, has a
low build-up of each layer and good
mechanical properties.
www.marinelog.com JULY 2009 MARINE LOG 19
NEW ANTIFOULING FOR SHIP LAY-UP
W
aterborne trans-
portation is the most
energy efficient
mode of freight transport, sur-
passing air, rail and trucking.
This efficiency has been
increasing with the introduc-
tion of ever-larger ships. How-
ever, there is increasing pres-
sure on reducing the environ-
mental impact of shipping
and waterborne transport.
As of a consensus estimate
for 2007, carbon dioxide (CO
2
)
emissions just from interna-
tional shipping amounted to
843 million tones or 2.7% of
the global CO
2
emissions as
compared to the 1.8% esti-
mate in 2000 by an IMO
study.
Future CO
2
emissions from
international shipping could
increase by a factor of 2.4 to
3.0 by 2050 based on global
developments outlined by the
Intergovernmental Panel on
Climate Change and in the
absence of future regulations
on CO
2
emissions from ships.
One surefire way to reduce
CO
2
emissions is to reduce
fuel consumption. For
decades, ship operators have
used anti-fouling technology
to prevent organisms such as
barnacles and weeds from
building up on their ships’
bottoms. The use of anti-foul-
ing improves the ship’s per-
Taiwan’s Yang Ming Marine Transport
recently coated the 8,240 TEU boxship YM
Utility with Intersleek 900
20 MARINE LOG JULY 2009 www.marinelog.com
formance, increasing its speed and energy efficiency.
Concerns about tributyl tin (TBT) and its persistence in the
environment and its effects on marine life, led to the develop-
ment and introduction of biocide-free, silicone-based foul
release technology.
“With our Sher-Release product, we guarantee a fuel savings
of 3% annually,” says Michael Bentkjaer, Sherwin-Williams
Protective Marine Coatings Market Director, Marine & Off-
shore .
Sherwin Williams’ Sher-Release Silicone Fouling Release
Coating System is a U.S. Navy patented solution and can be
applied to a wide range of ships to help prevent fouling. The
system’s foulant release technology combines an epoxy anti-cor-
rosive system and a tough, protective silicone surface coat
interlocked by a unique elastomeric formula. Estimates show
that Sher-Release can reduce fuel consumption by six to ten
percent thereby reducing CO2 emission significantly.
Bentkjaer says Sher-Release contains no heavy metals,
including copper. It is effective at speeds as low as 10 knots and
offers effective service for 60 months dry-dock interval.
Another environmental advantage of Sher-Release is its low
level of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). It is easily
applied by airless spray equipment and significantly reduces
the maintenance and downtime of vessels.
FLUOROPOLYMER FOUL RELEASE SYSTEM
Three years ago, International Paint released its next gener-
ation fouling release system based on fluoropolymer chemistry.
Back in March 2006, Sydney-based Inco Ships Pty Ltd. was the
first ship operator to apply the fluoropolymer foul release coat-
ing, Intersleek 900, to its self-discharging bulk cargo vessel
Ikuna during a routine maintenance drydocking at Singapore’s
Sembawang shipyard.
Previously coated with a standard, biocidal SPC (Self Polish-
ing Copolymer) antifouling, the typical speed of the self-dis-
charging bulk carrier was around 10.5 knots. After fully blast-
ing the underwater hull and applying Intersleek 900, Inco
Ships found that the average speed of the Ikuna had increased
by 1 knot. This 10% increase in speed has been achieved with-
out an increase in fuel consumption and effectively means one
free trip for every ten trips undertaken.
International Paint says that Intersleek 900 provides
unprecedented low levels of Average Hull Roughness with
excellent foul release properties and good resistance to mechan-
ical damage.
Speaking following a routine dive inspection of the Ikuna
after 37 months in-service, Andrew Dally, managing director
of Inco Ships Pty Ltd., says, “We are very pleased with the
Intersleek 900 system. The vessel is definitely doing 1 knot
faster which was not achievable any time leading up to the
docking but without the associated fuel consumption
required for this higher speed. This increase in available
speed and vessel efficiency is a significant benefit to us com-
mercially”.
Commenting upon the antifouling performance of Intersleek
900 after three years trading in Australasian waters, Dally
says, “The hull was clear of any animal or weed fouling growth
with the exception of the sacrificial anodes which were covered
with marine organisms thereby indicating the high level of
fouling faced by the vessel.”
Since using Intersleek 900 on the Ikuna, Inco Ships Pty Ltd.
has also coated the 15,539 dwt cement carrier M/V Goliath and
the 4,649 dwt livestock carrier M/V Torrens. ML
COATINGS
E
xploitation of the 3D modeling tech-
nique as part of a product lifecycle
has been proved to be especially
successful in Deltamarin’s contracting
services division, a department set up to
manage a complete project from start to
finish. Particular success has been
enjoyed in the Ropax and RO/RO freight
ship sector, although Deltamarin has, of
course, already employed 3D modeling
with positive results in the cruise and
offshore industries.
A key factor of such modeling is the
significant potential to shrink the costs
of a newbuilding project early on—at the
outline and tender stage, as well as on
into basic design, and later at the detail
design and engineering tasks. The tool is
especially valuable in providing a one-
stop service in managing complex ton-
nage (such as the latest Ropax and
freight RO/RO designs) right through to
entering service, when the model can
again be employed for crew training,
decision support tasks and general lifecy-
cle support.
Now, it is possible for an owner to
choose a more economic yard to build
complicated RO/RO ships—but only if an
expert design and superintendent con-
sultancy that has mastered the design
and engineering complexities involved.
FIRST CONTRACTING SUCCESS
A classic example was Ville de Bor-
deaux, a 21,513gt RO/RO ship designed
to carry parts for Airbus aircraft and
completed in 2004 by Jinling Shipyard in
China. This was one of Deltamarin’s first
contracting successes, although it had
already been involved in Finncarriers’
Finnmaster series of RO/RO freight
ships at Jinling, the first of which was
completed in 2000. Ville de Bordeaux is
owned by a joint venture between Louis
Dreyfus and Leif Höegh.
This venture, in turn, led to additional
project contract work for Deltamarin
from Höegh Autoliners. Under its first
full contracting service package, the con-
sultancy was selected to handle Höegh
Autoliners’ brand new series of Horizon-
class 7,000-unit pure car/truck carriers.
These are currently under construction
at the Vietnamese yard, Nam Trieu Ship-
building Industry Corp, a member of the
state Vinashin group and located in Hai
Phong City.
Here, Deltamarin has carried out busi-
ness consulting, preparation of the out-
line and tender project, project develop-
ment contract work and completion of
the basic design; it also arranged model
testing, and carried out detail design and
engineering work. A 3D bridge design
was also prepared and studies made of
FP/CP propeller alternatives, the possi-
bility of adding fin stabilizers, and an
examination of the ship’s squat effect.
Most importantly, the consultancy also
carried out a material cost estimate and
provided technical support during con-
tract negotiations. The shipyard was also
carefully evaluated, together with its
new upgraded equipment, its project
management proposals, building strate-
gy, logistics and material management
and construction schedule.
For Nam Trieu, Deltamarin also
assisted with detail and production engi-
neering and documentation, as well as
managing the transfer of data—includ-
ing evolution of a complete material digi-
tal database, since no material catalog
www.marinelog.com JULY 2009 MARINE LOG 20A
USING 3D MODELING TO CUT
LIFECYCLE COSTS IN RO/ROS
SOFTWARE
3D model of a car
deck on board a Roll-
on/Roll-Off vessel
20B MARINE LOG JULY 2009 www.marinelog.com
was available at the yard. Deltamarin further organized a pro-
curement training course for the yard purchasing team.
Consultancy engineers and technicians further assisted the
yard with supervision and well as printing and delivery of pro-
duction documentation. A Delta-Doris project portal was uti-
lized to communicate all contract aspects to various involved
parties around the world. This same portal has been used suc-
cessfully by Deltamarin on another car carrier project—at the
Nantong Mingde yard in China for Gram Car Carriers (the
first of these eight 4,300-car ships is expected to be delivered
this year).
Overall, the complete package for the project in Vietnam
launched a new outlook at Höegh, while Nam Trieu has taken
key steps towards a technical level that will help it compete.
Deltamarin’s design for Höegh Autoliners’ new ships include
an emphasis on environment and safety features, with an aero-
dynamic bow section to reduce wind resistance, an optimized
hull form for reduced fuel consumption,
and a higher cargo capacity than com-
peting vessels of the same dimen-
sions.
A further new venture where
Deltamarin has been commis-
sioned to carry out early project
work concerns the 95.1m long pas-
senger/vehicle/container carrier
being built at the Kraljevica yard in
Croatia for the Canadian company, Trans-
port Desgagnés. Here, Deltamarin determined the main dimen-
sions, hull form and general arrangement (in cooperation with
Navtech), and carried out weight and stability calculations. The
consultancy also coordinated model tests, which included ice
navigation capabilities and CFD hull optimization. Deltamarin
is continuing with basic and detail design packages for Kralje-
vica shipyard.
OPTIMISTIC OUTLOOK FOR REPLACEMENT FERRY TONNAGE
On a different front and notwithstanding the current eco-
nomic recession, this Finnish consultancy forecasts some posi-
tive times ahead for the Ropax sector. This optimism is based
on the belief that many smaller ferries (100m-150m lengths), in
countries such as Scotland, Italy, Canada and Greece, are now
elderly and will need replacing in the near future; a require-
ment for around 100 new ships seems likely.
A recent lack of investment can be attributed not only to the
economic climate but also to the fact that new ship prices, in
owners’ eyes, have risen far too high. A 20% price contraction
could well stimulate some new projects to proceed, believes
Deltamarin. Here, the 3D parametric project tool could prove
especially beneficial in driving down capital costs.
The 3D tool is especially useful for cost engineering a new
ship, providing exact information and helping to avoid situa-
tions where hull/superstructure volumes for the same proposed
ropax ship have shown significant variations when tenders
have been received from different yards. With 3D modeling, it
should be possible to achieve optimum steel weights, machinery
spaces and interior volumes to yield an efficient and cost effec-
tive ferry.
In addition, the same tool can be used to evaluate—with the
help of computation fluid dynamics (CFD) and simulation—
maneuvering in high winds, ramp design and vehicle handling
times. The latter can be particularly critical in the constricted
forward part of a ferry where cars and trucks are arriving on
the main deck from upper or lower levels via ramps.
For a leading European ferry company, Deltamarin recently
carried out a detailed vehicle loading and discharge analysis for
planned new tonnage on a busy route. This yielded results
which has enabled the operator to shrink turnround time and
introduce a new configuration with higher capacity, improve
efficiency.
Mooring arrangements and fendering can likewise be exam-
ined in detail.
In addition, critical emergency evacuation procedures (as will
be required next year for ships of more than 120m length by
IMO’s Safe Return to Port rules) can be planned, and the 3D
tool can also be positively used for analyzing, optimizing and
improving a ship’s subdivision for damage stability, according
to the latest SOLAS criteria. This last task is considered espe-
cially important, as statistics seem to indicate that nearly one
in every three ferries that is involved in a collision will capsize.
On one new major ferry project, Deltamarin has assisted the
owner to design an innovative lifesaving arrangement where
the ships, although sailing on an international route, will dis-
pense with lifeboats and instead use vertical escape chutes
with liferafts. Approval has already been secured from the
national authority.
As with all 3D modeling work, it should be emphasized that
results can be achieved in weeks instead of months. This can
contribute to highly attractive cost savings prior to contract
definition and can help to shrink associated financial risks.
ML
3D design of a parametric bridge
The 21,513-gt RO/RO Ville de Bordeaux was speciallly designed to
carry aircraft parts for Airbus
AS MANY AS
100
NEW ROPAX
Seattle-based Smith Berg-
er Marine, Inc. delivered a
towing pin stern rollerset
to Baydelta Maritime.
The towing pins are
designed for use with 2-
1/2 inch wire rope and
are the fourth set deliv-
ered to Baydelta for the
vessel class. The tow pins and hold down
hook are hydraulically raised and lowered
by a dedicated hydraulic power unit locat-
ed below deck.
The pins will be installed on Baydelta’s 94
ton bollard pull tug Delta Cathryn. The
100ft tug is currently
undergoing construction
at Nichols Brothers Boat-
builders, Freeland, Wash.
Additionally, Smith Berg-
er is currently completing
a two-year project furnish-
ing 15 stern rollers for
Remontowa Shipyard in
Gdansk, Poland.
The long stern rollers are designed for a
SWL of 450MT and are furnished with bear-
ing blocks, bronze bearings and an auto-
matic grease lubrication system.
www.marinelog.com JULY 2009 MARINE LOG 21
Reflex Marine, United King-
dom, recently launched its
TORO personnel transfer
device for the U.S. market.
The latest evolution in crane
assisted personnel transfer
devices for Reflex Marine, the
TORO provides protection
from impacts, collisions and
immersion.
It carries up to four passen-
gers keeping them safe from
side impacts and heavy land-
ings. Its open design allows
for fast entry and exit to the
device when needed. ABS
approved and certified with
CE marking, the TOROis buoy-
ant and self-righting.
Its foam seat cushions,
foam headrest and EVA foam
feet are designed to be shock
absorbant. The device is also
MedEvac ready—with space
to carry a stretcher along with
two passengers in the event of
a medical emergency—provid-
ing an alternative for emer-
gency transfers when helicop-
ters are unavailable.
The TORO has a life-span of
5 to 7 years. Its small footprint
allows it to land in small
spaces and makes it easy to
store on the vessel deck.
www.torotransfer.com
DECK MACHINERY
Spotlight
SMITH BERGER PROVIDES
TOWING SOLUTIONS TO BAYDELTA
REFLEXMARINE LAUNCHES TOROTRANSFER DEVICE INU.S.
Don’t let its size fool you.
Reflex Marine’s TORO transfer
device may have a small foot-
print, but it can transfer four
passengers quickly and safely
Ultratug Santiago’s new LNG
tug, the Horcon, was recently
delivered from ASENAV ship-
yard, Santiago, Chile.
The 32.5 m tug features a Jon-
Rie Series 250 LNGEscort
Winch. The winch has a 75
tonne line pull and features a
line date chart recorder, scope
indicator and three tension
meters and a foot control for
the winch.
The tug will be stationed at a
new LNG terminal in Quintero,
Chile.
Markey Machinery, Seattle,
Wash., along with the help of
Griffin Associates, has intro-
duced its new Dynamic Vec-
tor (DV) control technology.
The system uses real time
data to coordinate control of
the winch and the vessel’s
propulsion system to opti-
mize the towline tension,
towline length, and bollard
pull of the vessel.
The system features both
hardware and software com-
ponents.
The DV control console pro-
vides the vessel's operator
with the option of automati-
cally controlling the winch
and main engine and propul-
sion system so that the vessel
stays within a predefined
hawser force and towline
length.
Markey currently has two
prototype systems in opera-
tion on existing vessels and is
in discussions with several
customers about deployment
of the system in a variety of
applications including tow-
ing, escort and assist work,
oceanographic research,
mooring, salvage and con-
struction, and other offshore
service applications.
MARKEY MACHINERY INTRODUCES DV CONTROL TECHNOLOGY
www.smithberger.com
www.markeymachinery.com
JONRIE WINCH ON
NEW LNG TUG
www.marinewinch.com
24 MARINE LOG JULY 2009 www.marinelog.com
SHOWCASE
Inmarsat recently
launched its new Fleet
Broadband 150 (FB150)
service. The FB150 is the
world’s smallest, lightest
and fastest global mar-
itime service.
Developed for the
leisure, fishing, coastal
merchant and small
defense vessel markets,
the FB150 is a simple cost-
effective way to stay con-
nected via phone, SMS or
e-mail. The users in the
fishing markets will be
able to access the same
online weather updates
and fishing resources as
their larger competitors.
According to Piers Cun-
ningham, Maritime Busi-
ness Director for Inmarsat,
“Our long-term develop-
ment plan for FleetBroad-
band [150] was to take all
the benefits of our proven
network and construct a
low-cost package targeting
small maritime vessels and
boats. For the first time,
FB150 brings large vessel-
connectivity to smaller
boats.” Cunningham con-
tinued, “at sea, users can
now access the same
email, Internet browsing
or online services that
they're familiar with.”
The service will be avail-
able through Inmarsat’s
distribution partners and
service providers.
T
he formation of
ExactEarth, a wholly
owned subsidiary of Com
Dev, was announced at a
press conference at Nor-
Shipping in Oslo last month.
ExactEarth will provide a
service that will allow
authorized users a global
view of ship traffic. One of
the features of the Global
AIS Solution is the ability to
tract a ship’s whereabouts
from where it originated to
any port calls along its
route. To do this, the
ExactEarth global system
will use Automated Identifi-
cation System (AIS) data. AIS
is normally used for local
traffic—and is already
deployed on over 70,000 ves-
sels worldwide.
In order to pick up all of
the AIS signals around the
world, ExactEarth plans to
launch up to six spacecraft
micro-satellites with the
first satellite expected to be
launched in India this com-
ing December. The space-
craft can detect AIS signals
in a 5,000 km swath with the
possibility of 8,000 signals
(ships) in the path.
ExactEarth is investing
some $40 million in its Glob-
al AIS solution. Initial service
will be available in early
2010, while the full constel-
lation will be completed by
2013.
The system secures infor-
mation through encryption
and can also archive the
data history. It will require
no changes to existing on-
board vessel equipment or
procedures.
EXACTEARTH LAUNCHES
GLOBAL AIS SOLUTION
INMARSAT
LAUNCHES
FLEET
BROADBAND 150
I
ridium’s OpenPort has
completed its sea tri-
als on a number of ves-
sels, including an ocean-
going tug for the Argen-
tine Navy, and it’s
expected to be commer-
cially available soon.
OpenPort’s appeal is
in its cost effectiveness. It provides cus-
tomers with an easy-to-use and less
expensive alternative to other broadband
satellite systems. Its low-profile, light-
weight antenna array
does not require a stabi-
lized pedestal and is
therefore less costly to
purchase, install and
maintain.
Iridium OpenPort pro-
vides 100% global cover-
age. Its three independ-
ent phone lines and a separate scalable
data circuit supports speeds of 9.6 to 128
kilobytes per second.
IRIDIUM OPENPORT TO HIT COMMERCIAL MARKET SOON
www.inmarsat.com
ExactEarth Global AIS solution can track vessels worldwide
COMMUNICATIONS
www.exactearth.com
www.iridiumopenport.com
www.marinelog.com JULY 2009 MARINE LOG 25
M
arlink has acquired the recently launched Telesat satellite,
Telestar T11N.
The Telestar T11N is the first satellite to provide Ku-band cov-
erage of the Atlantic Ocean stretching from the Arctic to the
equator. And it uses 39 high powered Ku-band transponders to
support a wide range of video and data applications in North
America, Europe, and Africa and across the Atlantic Ocean.
According to Marlink’s CEO, Tore Morten Olsen,“The launch of
the Telstar T11N satellite will enable us to significantly enhance
our WaveCall VSAT services to provide seamless Ku-band cover-
age across the Atlantic Ocean. In addition, the T11N capacity will
also be used to benefit customers of our Sealink customized
solutions. We currently provide Sealink Ku-band services to a
significant number of vessels operating in the North Sea that
will now be able to take advantage of the increased coverage
provided by the T11N.”
MARLINK ACQUIRES TELESTAR T11N
B
roadpoint, Houston, Tex.,
has signed a multi-year
agreement with Internation-
al Construction Group (ICG)
LLC, —a subsidiary of Inter-
national Offshore Services,
Larose, La.—which owns
and operates barges along
the Gulf Coast.
Broadpoint will provide
ICGwith a VSAT communica-
tions system that will com-
plement its existing cellular
service.
Broadpoint is the only cel-
lular provider in the Gulf of
Mexico. It recently added a
number of offshore satel-
lites to enhance coverage
areas and expand into new
deepwater territories.
www.marlink.com
BROADPOINT
EXTENDS
CONTRACT WITH ICG
www.broadpointinc.com
D
avid Clark’s Marine Inter-
com Systems are designed
and built to withstand harsh
marine environments while
providing dependable opera-
tion for rescue personnel.
The Series 9500 Marine
Intercom System is specially
designed to be water and cor-
rosion resistant. Master sta-
tion and belt stations feature
watertight RFI shielded enclo-
sures for increased reliability.
Noise-attenuating headsets
are equipped with corrosion-
resistant stainless steel hard-
ware, waterproof connectors
and water-resistant,
noise-cancelling
microphones to ensure clear
transmission. Series 9500
accommodates up to eight
crewmembers. All crewmem-
bers have the optional ability
to transmit and receive on up
to three radios.
The voice activated, 9800
system consists of behind-the-
head and/or over-the-head
noise-attenuating headsets, a
master station that’s compati-
ble with most mobile VHF,
UHF and marine band radios,
multi-function LCD remote
panel display and push-to-talk
body switch.
DAVID CLARK’S
MARINE INTERCOMSYSTEMS
www.davidclark.com/marine
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6
Registration / Continental breakfast sponsored by
Donjon Marine Co. Inc. / Expo open
Opening Remarks
John Witte, Jr., President, American Salvage Association;
Executive VP, Donjon Marine Co., Inc.*
CAPT Patrick Keenan, Supervisor of Salvage and Diving,
U.S. Navy

OPA 90 Salvage & Firefighting
Moderator: John Witte, Jr., Donjon Marine Co., Inc.*
Jonathan Waldron, Esq., Partner, Blank Rome LLP
Coffee break (sponsorship available) / Expo open
OPA 90 Salvage & Firefighting (continued)
Mauricio Garrido, VP, Salvage & Emergency Response,
Bisso Marine Co. Inc.*
CAPT Anthony Lloyd, Office of Incident Management
Preparedness, U.S. Coast Guard
Luncheon (sponsorship available)
Luncheon Address
RADM Brian Salerno, Marine Safety, Security
& Stewardship, U.S. Coast Guard (Invited)
Break / Expo open
Environmental Salvage
Moderator: Tim Beaver, CEO, Global Diving & Salvage, Inc.*
J. Arnold Witte, International Salvage Union (ISU);
President & CEO, Donjon Marine Co., Inc.
Archie Bishop, Counsel to International Salvage Union
Energy break (sponsorship available) / Expo open

Environmental Salvage (continued)
Dr. Dagmar Schmidt Etkin, President, Environmental
Research Consulting*
Cocktail reception to Recognize Congressman Elijah
E. Cummings, Chairman, House Subcommittee on
Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7
Continental breakfast (sponsorship available) / Expo open
Opening Remarks
John Witte, Jr., Donjon Marine Co., Inc.*
Media Relations
Moderator: Debra Colbert, President, Colbert
Communications*
Carleen Lyden-Kluss, North American Marine Environmental
Protection Association
John Snyder, Publisher & Editor, Marine Log
Don Phillips, Transportation Journalist
Coffee break sponsored by Resolve Marine Group / Expo open
Media Relations (continued)
James Lawrence, Chairman, International Marketing
Strategies, Inc.
Luncheon (sponsorship available)
Luncheon Address
David Westerholm, Dir., NOAA Office of Response &
Restoration
Break / Expo open
Port Operations and Salvage
Moderator: George Wittich, VP & GM, American Marine
Corp.*
CAPT Michael Herb, USN (Ret.), Dir. of Salvage & Diving,
SUPSALV, U.S. Navy
Energy break (sponsorship available) / Expo open
Port Operations and Salvage (continued)
Rick Chianelli, Operations Manager, T&T Bisso Response LLC*
Closing Remarks
Mauricio Garrido, VP, American Salvage Association; Bisso
Marine Co. Inc.*
*denotes speaker is a member of the American Salvage Association
Additional speakers to be announced.
Visit www.marinelog.com for conference updates.
OCT. 6-8, 2009 | KEY BRIDGE MARRIOTT HOTEL | ARLINGTON, VA
THE AMERICAN SALVAGE ASSOCIATION AND MARINE LOG PRESENT RENOWNED EXPERTS FROM THE U.S. NAVY, COAST
GUARD AND SHIPPING, SALVAGE AND INSURANCE ORGANIZATIONS TO DISCUSS AND DEBATE HOT INDUSTRY TOPICS.
JOIN US FOR THE MOST IMPORTANT INDUSTRY EVENT OF THE YEAR!
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8
TRAINING SEMINAR
Registration / Continental breakfast (sponsorship available)
Opening Remarks
Mauricio Garrido, VP, American Salvage Association;
VP, Salvage & Emergency Response, Bisso Marine Co. Inc.*
The Casualty Scenario – Setting the Scene for Today’s
Training Proceedings
Moderator: David DeVilbiss, Marine Salvage & Special
Project Mgr., Global Diving & Salvage, Inc.*
Marine Salvage Operations
• Technical Assessment of Casualty
Todd Schauer, Project Manager, Resolve Marine Group*
• Commercial Assessment of Casualty
Mauricio Garrido, Bisso Marine Co. Inc.*
• Mobilizing Firefighting Capability
Ted Hosking, Salvage Master, Firefighting, T&T Marine
Salvage, Inc.*

Coffee break (sponsorship available)
Marine Salvage Training (continued)
• Protecting the Environment
J. Arnold Witte, International Salvage Union (ISU);
President & CEO, Donjon Marine Co., Inc.
• Completing the Operation
Gage Parrot, Dir. Americas, Titan Salvage*
• Getting Paid
Doug Martin, GM, SMIT Salvage Americas Inc.*
Luncheon (sponsorship available)
Luncheon Address
Capt. Jim Shirley, JTS Marine
Salvage Contracting
Moderator: Richard Buckingham, Salvage Committee
Maritime Law Association
• Open Form Contracts: Lloyd’s Open Form, MARSALV
(US Open Form)
Jon Waldron, Esq., Blank Rome, LLP
Energy break (sponsorship available)
Salvage Contracting (continued)
• BIMCO Contracts (Towcon, Towhire, Salvcon,
Salvhire, Wreckfixed, Wreckhire)
John Driscoll, Esq., Marlinespike Marine
Andrew Chamberlain, Partner, Holmen Fenwick Willan
Arbitration
Open Forum Discussion: Salvors – The True
Environmentalists
John Driscoll, Esq., Marlinspike Marine
Closing Remarks
Mauricio Garrido, VP, American Salvage Association;
Bisso Marine Co. Inc.*
Additional speakers to be announced.
Visit www.marinelog.com for conference updates.
[ ] Check enclosed (Payable in advance to Marine Log)
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Please send this completed form with payment to Jane Poterala, Confer-
ence Director, Marine Log, 345 Hudson St., 12th FL, New York, NY 10014;
Tel: (212) 620-7209; Fax: (212) 633-1165; e-mail: jpoterala@sbpub.com.
All cancellations must be made in writing. Cancellations made within
two weeks prior to the event are subject to a fee of $200. No refunds for
no-shows.
CONFERENCE REGISTRATION
Register me for the National Maritime Salvage Conference & Expo Oct. 6 & 7, as well as the Training Seminar on Oct.
8 for a fee of $1125, payable in advance.
Register me for the National Maritime Salvage Conference & Expo only on Oct. 6 & 7, for a fee of $775, payable in
advance.
Program subject to change and/or augmentation
*denotes speaker is a member of the American Salvage Association
ASA Member Supporters Supporting Organization
SPONSORSHIPS & TABLETOP EXHIBITS ARE AVAILABLE
CONTACT JANE POTERALA, CONFERENCE DIR.
T: 212.620.7209, E: JPOTERALA@SBPUB.COM
28 MARINE LOG JULY 2009 www.marinelog.com
Technews
Berg Propulsion signed a contract with Dubai
Shipbuilding and Engineering LLC to deliver
the first two production units of Berg Propul-
sion Azimuth Thrusters (BAT) in early 2010.
Designed for high performance and heavy
duty operations, the BAT is available in two
versions—the controllable-pitch propeller
and fixed-pitched propeller.
The first two designs—the BAT 626—will be
controllable-pitch propeller types and are
designed to be diesel engine driven.
Prior to the delivery of the units , Berg
installed a prototype of the BAT into a 63.5 m
offshore supply vessel, LRS Class with DP2,
Fire Fighting vessel Class 1 in Sweden. This
will allow the company to evaluate the
design, manufacturing and installation
process.
Berg Propulsion to deliver
first BAT units to Dubai
www.bergpropulsion.com
ABS Nautical Systems’ NS5 fleet man-
agement software has been selected
by Egypt’s Advanced Energy Systems
(ADES) to manage its self-propelled,
self-elevating jack-up barge operating
in the Red Sea
and Mediter-
ranean region.
Accordi ng
to ADES’ gen-
eral manager,
Nader Khames
Abdelaziz, the
NS5 software
is cost effec-
tive and can
be customized to manage its preven-
tive maintenance. “We anticipate
many benefits, including improved
communications between our main
office and offshore units, a stream-
lined work cycle with less delay and
reduced operating expenses,” he
added.
The current NS5 suite features
extended business intelligence tools
such as drydocking, a hull inspection
program, an on-demand reporting tool
and a web-based drawings manage-
ment.
ADES may expand the use of the
softward to the crewing and quality
departments within the next year.
www.abs-ns.com
ABS Nautical Systems’
software to manage
Egyptian jack-up rig
During last month’s Nor-Shipping, ABB
announced that it had secured $60 mil-
lion in orders during the first five
months of 2009.
The orders come from the strong off-
shore market. Since 2005, ABB has sup-
plied more than half of the global deep
water drilling rig projects with its sys-
tems. The company will further supply
150 OSV’s with its electrical propulsion
systems from ABB Marine—due for
delivery in 2010.
ABBsecures $60 million
in orders
www.abb.com
www.marinelog.com JULY 2009 MARINE LOG 29
NEWS-
THE U.S. COAST GUARD HAS NAMED
Rear Adm. Ronald J. Rábago its new
Assistant Commandant for Acquisi-
tion. In addition, he has been named
the U.S.C.G’s Chief Acquisition Officer
and has been promoted to Rear Admi-
ral Upper Half.
Colleen Becker has joined Washing-
ton-based life saving solutions
provider Mustang Survival’s sales
team. Becker is the regional sales
manager for the mid-continental U.S.
Houston-based T&T Bisso Response
Network has added DeeAnn McMillen
to its OPA 90 management team.
McMillen is a 19-year industry veteran
with nine years of focus on vessel
emergency response services, OPA 90
and state regulatory compliance.
Chairman and CEOof ABS, Robert D.
Somerville, has been named the
Massachusetts Maritime Academy,
Buzzard Bay, Mass., 2009 Maritime Per-
son of the Year. The MMA will present
Somerville with the Captain Emery
Rice medal during its Annual Admi-
ral’s Ball on Nov. 6.
Headquartered in Houston, Tex., glob-
al satellite communications provider
CapRock Communications appointed
Pal Jensen president of its Maritime
Division.
Rear Adm. Rábago
USCG
DeeAnn McMillen
T&T BISSO
Robert D. Somerville
ABS
Newsmakers
SEAMEN’S CHURCHAWARDS
COURAGE AND INSPIRATION
The Seamen’s Church Institute recognized a
number of individuals at its 32nd annual Silver
Bell awards last month. Among the recepients
were Alberto Alemán Zubieta, CEO of the
Panama Canal Authority; Captain Richard
Phillips of the Maersk Alabama; and the men
and women operating NY Waterway ferries
who rescued passengers from the Hudson River
after US Airways Flight 1549 crash-landed in
mid-January.
MAERSK ALABAMA CAPTAIN
RECEIVES LEADERSHIP AWARD
Captain Richard Phillips was awarded the
Admiral Arleigh Burke leadership award by the
Navy League of the United States. Captain
Phillips was the
master of the MV
Maersk Alabama
when it was
hijacked by
pirates in April.
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• On-line Buyers’ Guide
• Previews of future features
• U.S. Shipbuilding Contracts
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. . . and much more!
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November 3 & 4, 2009
Seattle, Washington
This year, you'll see some dynamic changes at
Marine Log's FERRIES Conference & Expo, which
will not only address some new and exciting top-
ics, but will also be held in a new location—
Seattle. Our new location in the heart of down-
town Seattle will put you smack in the middle of
some of the most exciting regional ferry develop-
ments in North America.
Prestigious speakers, panelists and well-known
experts in ferry design, construction and opera-
tions will examine ferry development internation-
ally and nationally, with emphasis on Washington
State, California, Alaska and British Columbia.
The agenda will also include analysis of current
and pending environmental and operational
regulations, as well as what's being kicked around
in Congress.
As always, you'll also have an opportunity to
examine some of the latest technology and equip-
ment at the accompanying expo, as well as net-
work with your fellow executives during social
functions.
We'll also have some added twists that we'll
be announcing in the coming weeks. We
hope you'll be able to join us in Seattle.
F
ERRIES
North America’s largest annual ferry conference & expo
M
ARINE
L
OG
2
0
0
9
WHAT'S ON THE AGENDA?
Here's just a taste of what we will be talking
about in Seattle:
S Expanding public transit
S New car ferry designs
S Federal grants for ferries
S What's the real impact of new tonnage
rules
S Cleaning up diesel emissions
S Using biodiesel in ferries
S Financing for ferries in a troubled economy
Visit us online for event updates
www.marinelog.com
Supporting Organization
CONFERENCE
The Ferries 2009 Expo is focused exclusively on ferry &
high-speed vessel operations, design & technology.
WHO SHOULD EXHIBIT AT THE EXPO?
Showcase your products and services and maximize your visibility by
securing your exhibit space now.
For more information on attending,
sponsoring or becoming an exhibitor,
contact: Jane Poterala, Conference Director,
T: (212) 620-7209, E: jpoterala@sbpub.com
Tabletops at FERRIES 2009 are $1450. This includes the tabletop exhibit on November 3 & 4, 2009 and one full conference
registration (giving the exhibit manager admission to all conference sessions, luncheons, & the reception). To reserve a
tabletop, submit the form below. You will be billed via e-mail. NOTE: Tabletop reservation is not final until payment is
received.
Each draped table is 6’ X 30”. Exhibits are limited to the table top. Electricity is not included. Additional attendees from your
company must register as delegates at the regular conference rate of $750. All payments must be received by Marine Log no
later than October 2, 2009.
Company Name ______________________________________________________________________________________________
Street Address _______________________________________________________________________________________________
City ________________________________________ State _________ Zip_____________ Country__________________________
Contact _____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Title ________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Phone ________________________________________________ Fax __________________________________________________
E-mail ______________________________________________________________________________________________________
Number of tables needed_______________________
My exhibit will require electricity: yes no
Signature ___________________________________________________ Date _________________________________________
Fax or e-mail this form to Jane Poterala at 212-633-1165 / jpoterala@sbpub.com. Your application will be confirmed by e-
mail. E-mail a description (25 to 50 words) of your products/services to conferences@sbpub.com.
QUESTIONS? Contact Jane Poterala, Conference Director, Marine Log, 345 Hudson Street, New York, N.Y. 10014
Ph: 212-620-7209 | Fx: 212-633-1165 | E-mail: jpoterala@sbpub.com | web: www.marinelog.com
Tabletop Registration
EXPO
S Shipyards
S Propulsion specialists
S Engine manufacturers
S Communications firms
S Navigation specialists
S Naval architects
S Security firms
S Interior designers/consultants
S And any other suppliers with a
stake in the ferries industry
32 MARINE LOG JULY 2009 www.marinelog.com
SHIPYARD LOCATION QTY TYPE PARTICULARS OWNER EST. VALUE $ MIL EST. DEL.
While every care has been taken to present the most accurate information, our survey gathering system is far from
perfect. We welcome your input. Please fax any changes to Marine Log at (212) 633-1165 or send e-mail to:
marinelog@sbpub.com. Some contract values and contract completion dates are estimated. Please contact the shipyard
directly for the most accurate information. Information based on data as of about June 1, 2009. An “R” after a vessel
type indicates a repower. Additional commercial and government contracts are listed on www.marinelog.com via
Maritime Business Strategies. The entire contract value may be reported for a contract in progress. Some contract
prices may also include the value of owner-furnished equipment. Shipyard Contracts Awarded
Contracts
AWARDS
Austal USA Mobile, AL 2 JHSVs (-2 and -3) Long lead time material U.S. Navy $99.6 JUL13
Northrop Grumman Pascagoula, MS 1 amphibious ship LPD-26 long lead material U.S. Navy $213.8 DEC13
U.S. Barge Portland, OR 1 ocean tank barge 83,000 bbl, 422ft Harley Marine Services sp/2010
DELIVERIES
Aker Philadelphia Philadelphia, PA 1 product tanker 600 ft American Shipping JUN09
GD-NASSCO San Diego, CA 1 product tanker 600 ft, 331,000 bbl USS Products Investor JUN09
VT Halter Marine Pascagoula, MS 1 survey vessel 208 ft NOAA JUN09
VT Halter Marine Pascagoula, MS 1 ATB 185,000 bbl Crowley Maritime JUN09
PENDING CONTRACTS
Eastern Shipbuilding Panama City, FL 2 PSV’s 284 ft x 62 ft Aries Marine letter of intent
Jeffboat Jeffersonville, IN 1 tank barge 50,000 bbl Andrie Inc. $15.0 option
Kvichak Marine Seattle, WA 2 fast ferries 199 pax, 25 knot SFBAWTA
NASSCO San Diego, CA 5 product tankers U.S. Shipping Partners $555.0 option
TBD 1 fast ferry 499 pax Golden Gate Bridge $12.0 planned
TBD 1 car ferry 12 cars New Brunswick DOT RFP/delivery 2011
TBD 1 car ferry 101 cars New Brunswick DOT RFP/delivery 2009
TBD 2 car ferries 300 pax/50 cars NCDOT 2009 enter service
TBD 1 car ferry 28 vehicles Texas Dept. of Trans. ready for bid
TBD 1 car ferry 110 ft, 23 cars Wahkiakum Cty. In design phase
34 MARINE LOG JULY 2009 www.marinelog.com
MARSIM 09
August 17-20
Panama City, Panama
Tel: (507) 210-9200
www.pancanal.com/marsim09/ind
ex.html
September 17-18
Washington, D.C.
Tel: (212) 620-7209
Fax: (212) 633-1165
conferences@sbpub.com
www.marinelog.com
BALTIC SEA FREIGHT MARKET
AND PORTS 2009
September 16-18
St. Petersburg, Russia
Contact: Anna Sydorenko
Tel: +38 (0562) 31-39-19
Fax: + 7 (495) 775-60-55
a.sidorenko@b-forum.ru
www.b-forum.ru
October 6-8
Arlington, Va.
Tel: (212) 620-7209
conferences@sbpub.com
www.marinelog.com
INTERFERRY
October 14-16
Istanbul, Turkey
Tel: (250) 743-5944
Fax: (250) 743-5942
cindy.kuwert@interferry.com
http://interferry.com/confweb-
site/confindex.html
KORMARINE 2009
October 21-24
Busan, Korea
Tel: +82-2-555-7153
ykshin@kfairs.com
www.kormarine.net
Events
NEVA 2009
September 22-25
St. Petersburg, Russia
info@neva2009.com
www.neva2009.com
The NEVA exhibition will bring
together Russia’s maritime
industry and its counterparts—
the international shipping, ship-
building, ports and offshore
energy sectors. They’ll meet in
hopes of creating a state-of-the
art shipbuilding sector capable
of delivering some 1,400 vessels
of various types through to 2020,
as well as massive upgrade of its
port infrastructure.
READER REFERRAL SERVICE
This section has been created solely for the convenience of our readers to
facilitate immediate contact with the MARINE LOG advertisers in this issue.
Index of
Advertisers
ABB Turbocharging 2
ABS Americas Division G16
ABS Nautical Systems G4
Advanced Polymer Coatings C2
Bisso Marine G8, G9
Bludworth Cook Marine Inc G15
Bollinger Shipyards Inc G6
Centa G5
Coastal Marine Equipment G7
Conrad Industries Inc G3
Great American Insurance Group 11
Intergraph Process, Power & Marine 34
Jon Rie InterTech LLC G10
Jotun Paints 20
Kobelt Manufacturing Company Limited 22,23
Marine Innovations 25
Neva C3
Noxudol 18
OmniThruster 34
SAFARILAND 5
Schuyler Rubber Company 29
SeaArk G5
Senesco Marine 10
Sherwin-Williams Co 6
Signal International G2
Smith Berger Marine 32
Strategic Marine Pty Ltd 28
Superior Lidgerwood Mundy 18
Tampa Ship C4
Tideslide Mooring Products & Systems G7
Tim Colton 33
Talleres Navales Del Golfo S A G11
VT Halter Marine Inc 3
Warwick Mills Inc 14
World Wide Metric Inc 11
Company Page #
www.marinelog.com JULY 2009 MARINE LOG 35
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ONLINE
GET FREE INFORMATION ON MARINE
EQUIPMENT, PRODUCTS & SERVICES
www.marinelog.com/infodirect
BILGE WATER
Hermont Marine Inc.
www.hermont.com
Total Marine Solutions
www.totalmarinesolutions.com
BOW/STERN-
THRUSTERS
Omnithruster Inc.
www.omnithruster.com
CABLE & PIPE
PENETRATION SEALS
CSD Sealing Systems-N.Amer
www.csdsealingsystems.com
COATINGS
Hempel
www.hempel.com
Sherwin Williams
www.sherwin-williams.com
Sigma Coatings USA
www.sigmacoatings.com
COMPRESSORS
Atlas Copco
www.atlascopco.com
CONCEPT,
CLASSIFICATION,
CONSTRUCTION
DC Maritime
Technologies Inc.
www.dcmt.bc.ca
CONSTRUCTION &
SURVEY
ABS/American Bureau of
Shipping
www.eagle.org
DECK MACHINERY
Quanzhou Baiyuan Shipping
www.by-marine.com
DESIGN &
ENGINEERING
ACL Industries Inc.
www.aclindustries.com
DIESEL ACCESSORIES
General Thermodynamics Corp
www.generalthermo.com
DIESEL ENGINES
MAN B&W Diesel
www.manbw.com
DIGITAL SOFTWARE
Delmia
www.delmia.com
DIVING
Donjon Marine Co., Inc
www.donjon.com
DOORS & WINDOWS
Joiner Systems
www.joinersystems.com
DRIVELINES
Driveline Service of Portland
www.driveshafts.com
ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS-
DESIGN ENG &
INTEGRATION
DC Maritime
Technologies Inc.
www.dcmt.eng.pro
ELECTRICAL SERVICES
Shipboard Electrical & Air Inc.
www.shipboardelectricalandair.com
EQUIPMENT AND
TRAINING
Honeywell Hermetic
www.hermeticinc.com
FINANCIAL SERVICES
CAT Financial
www.cat.com/catmarinefinance
Siemens
www.usa.siemens.com/financial
FIXED BALLAST
/INSTALLATION
Ballast Technologies Inc
www.ballasttech.com
GARBAGE HANDLING
EQUIPMENT
Total Marine Solutions
www.totalmarinesolutions.com
HEATERS &
AIR CONDITIONERS
Air-Specialty, Inc.
www.air-specialty.com
HVAC
QCI Marine Offshore LLC
www.qcimarine.com
INSURANCE
POLLUTION LIABILITY
WQIS
www.wqis.com
INTERIORS
Joiner Systems
www.joinersystems.com
QCI Marine Offshore LLC.
www.qcimarine.com
Thermax-Panel Specialists Inc
www.thermaxmarine.com
LUBRICANTS
Exxon Mobil Marine Lubricants
www.exxonmobil.com/
MARINE EQUIPMENT
Bollfilter Corp
www.bollfilter.com
Skookum
www.ulvencompanies.com
Smith Berger Marine Inc.
www.smithberger.com
MARINE SALVAGE
Donjon Marine Co., Inc.
www.donjon.com
Titan Maritime
www.titansalvage.com
MARINE SANITATION
Evac Environmental Solutions
www.evac.com
Owens Kleen Tank
www.owenskleentank.com
MARINE SIGNAGE
Maritime Associates Inc.
www.marinesigns.com
MARINE CONTRAC-
TORS/HULL GAUGING
AAC Marine Surveyors Inc
www.aacmarinesurveyor.com
MARINE SURVEYORS
NAVAL ARCHITECTS
& CLASSIFICATION
SOCIETIES
C.R. Cushing & Co., Inc.
www.crcco.com
Lloyd’s Register Americas Inc
www.lr.org
MINERAL AND SYN-
THETIC LUBRICANTS
Exxon Mobil Marine Lubricants
www.exxonmobil.com
PAINT
Sherwin Williams
www.sherwin-williams.com
PROFESSIONAL
SERVICES
SPAR Associates Inc.
www.sparusa.com
PROFESSIONAL
SOCIETIES
Society of Marine Port
Engineers
www.smpe.org
Society of Port Engineers of
Puget Sound
www.sope-ps.org
PROPULSION
Omnithruster Inc.
www.omnithruster.com
Schottel Inc.
www.schottel.de
PROPULSION
CONTROLS/
HYDRAULIC STEERING
Kobelt Manufacturing Co. Ltd.
www.kobelt.com
REFRIGERATION &
FREEZERS
Air-Specialty, Inc.
www.air-specialty.com
SAFETY & SECURITY
Securewest Int’l
www.securewest.com
SATELLITE DATA COM-
MUNICATION
Boatracs by Air IQ
www.boatracs.com
SCAFFOLDING/
STAGING
Safway Services Inc.
www.safway.com
SHIPBUILDING &
REPAIR
Atlantic Marine
www.atlanticmarine.com
Bludworth Cook Marine Inc
www.vesselrepair.com
Austal
www.austal.com
Bollingers Shipyards
www.bollingershipyards.com
Derecktor Shipyards
www.derecktor.com
Detyens Shipyard
www.detyens.com
National Steel & Shipbuilding
www.nassco.com
R & R Marine Fabrication &
Drydock
www.rrmarine.com
SOFTWARE
Albacore Research Ltd.
www.shipconstructor.com
Marine Software Solutions
www.msslighthouse.com
Sener Ingenieria Y Sistemas
www.foran.es
SPAR Associates Inc.
www.sparusa.com
STEERING SYSTEMS
Wagner Steering
www.wagnersteering.com
TANK GAUGING
MMC International Corp
www.mmcintl.com
TOOLS
Hayata
www.hayata-na.com
TRAINING &
EDUCATION
Fremont Maritime Services
www.sea-safety.com
Global Maritime and
Transportation School
www.gmats.usmma.edu/
Marine Safety International
www.marinesafety.com
Mitags
www.mitags.org
Pacific Maritime Institute
www.mates.org
VENTILATION
SYSTEMS
Delta “T” Systems, Inc
www.deltatsystems.com
WATER PURIFICATION
Reverse Osmosis of South
Florida Inc.
www.reverse-osmosis.net
WIRE ROPE
Loos & Co., Inc.
www.loosco.com
List your
website on
this page.
Contact
Shirley
Del Valle
Assistant
Editor
at
t:212-620-7246
or
email:
sdelvalle@
sbpub.com
website directory hot links available at www.marinelog.com
M
ARINE
L
OG
Website Directory
36 MARINE LOG JULY 2009 www.marinelog.com
ML Marketplace
CONTACT: Diane Okon
Phone: 312/683-5022 • Fax: 312/683-0131
Email: dokon@sbpub-chicago.com
All Major Credit Cards Accepted
r r s TM
PRODUCTS & SERVICES
PANEL SPECIALISTS, INC.
www.panelspec.com
B-15, C, A-60 INTERIOR JOINER PANEL SYSTEMS
CERTIFIED by SOLAS, IMO, FTP CODE, EU MED, USCG, TRANSPORT CANADA
THERMAX PANELS
Non-combustible, Non-Toxic
Sales & Production
3115 Range Road
Temple, TX 76504
Tel: (254) 774-9800
www.TermaxMarine.com
Sales
Toll Free: (800) 540-5503
Tel: (813) 340-3940
Fax: (813) 264-2507
sales@ThermaxMarine.com
FINANCIAL ENGINEERS
MARAD TITLE XI
MARKET RESEARCH
FINANCING AND LEASING
GOVERNMENT PROGRAMS
BUSINESS & FINANCIAL PLANS
SYNERGISTIC DYNAMICS, INC.
888-897-4764 www.sdi-savannah.com
www.marinelog.com JULY 2009 MARINE LOG 37
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38 MARINE LOG JULY 2009 www.marinelog.com
ENGINEERS & ARCHITECTS
350 Lincoln St.
Suite 2501
Hingham, MA
02043
Telephone:
781 740-8193
Facsimile:
781 740-8197
E-mail address:
inbox@jwgainc.com
JOHN W. GILBERT
ASSOCIATES, INC.
Naval Architects and
Marine Engineers
NAVAL ARCHITECTS & MARINE ENGINEERS
QUALITY TECHNICAL SERVICES
2021 Dauphine Street • New Orleans, LA 70116
(800) 823-1324 (504) 945-8917
KEEL DESI GN CORPORATI ON
Website
www.jwgainc.com
M.A.C.E. Inc.
FT. LAUDERDALE - USA - WORLDWIDE
PHONE: (954) 563-7071 FAX (954) 493-9559
Thickness - hardness - crack determination
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Field balancing
Torque - torsional vibration analysis
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IR - thermography measurements
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MARINE HVAC ENGINEERING
MARINE ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
345 Old Plantation Dr., St. Augustine, FL 32086
TEL 904-797-4785 FAX 904-797-4785
Marine Log
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ShipmoPC
Seakeeping Predictions Software
Advanced ship motion analysis
and comprehensive reporting
1 613 592-2830 fleet@fleetech.com www.fleetech.com
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email: dokon@sbpub-chicago.com.
HIGH SPEED FERRY FOR SALE OR CHARTER
The Provincetown III is available from October 2008 through May 2009
Please Contact Michael Glasfeld 617.748.1410
or email mglasfeld@baystatecruises.com
This nearly brand-new high speed catamaran, launched in
July of 2004, has a top speed of 31 knots. Economical to
run, the Provincetown III requires only a captain plus two
crew and burns less than 130 gph at full power. Full air
conditioning/heat, carpeted decks, modern and luxurious
Beurteaux seating, full bar, reliable Cummins engines, built
by Gladding-Hearn. The vessel currently operates on a 50
mile route that routinely experiences seas of 5’.
SALE CHARTER
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targeted circulation for advertisers.
Reach more than 30,000 marine executives worldwide.
www.marinelog.com JULY 2009 MARINE LOG 39
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ARINE
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ARINE
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MarineSalvage
July 2009 Vol. 114 No. 7
W
ithin the marine community we
have begun to fully digest the
revisions to OPA-90 and there
have been interesting questions and con-
cerns raised about the specific steps that
must be taken to properly fulfill these new
modifications. Based upon the American
Salvage Association’s (ASA) discussions
with public and private sector representa-
tives, some of the more common “big tick-
et” concerns are as follows:
1) What contract form is acceptable to
the U.S. Coast Guard when contracting for
salvage services in response to the revised
requirements of OPA 90?
2) What is the role of the Qualified Indi-
vidual (Q.I.) when involved in a salvage
response?
3) How, if at all, do public firefighting
organizations fit into the present OPA 90
response framework?
4) Does an owner/operator require the
services of multiple service
providers to fulfill his/her obli-
gations under OPA 90 or will
one service provider to cover all
suffice?
5) In the event of a casualty
where a secondary or unnamed
salvage service provider is in
the best position—what is the
role of the primary service
provider versus a secondary or
back-up service provider?
Based upon proximity to the casualty,
equipment availability or other factor
leading to a quicker more effective
response, what is the role of the named
primary salvage service provider, if any?
6) Who is responsible in the event a
named primary salvage service provider
does not perform as required by OPA 90?
Is it the owner/operator, the salvor, the
Q.I.?
These as well as other more specific,
legitimate questions require answers
and/or clarification for an owner/operator
to properly prepare for mid-2010 when the
revisions go into full effect. These ques-
tions and others will be answered or clari-
fied by the USCG as part of a NVIC to be
issued by the Commandant’s office. Once
this document is provided, it will be up to
each owner/operator to implement the
changes necessary to his/her
Vessel Response Plan (VRP) so
that plan can be approved prior
to the effective date required by
the USCG to be in compliance
with the updated OPA 90.
While final implementation is
almost a year away, the time is
now to understand all of the
revised requirements, to
update your Vessel
Response=2 0Plan (VRP), and
to submit any questions you
may have to either the USCG
directly or through your trade
organization such as AWO,
Chamber of Shipping, API or
even the ASA.
In addition to these points of access to
the USCG, the ASA, in partnership with
MARINE LOG will sponsor the National
Maritime Salvage Conference October 6-8,
2009 in Arlington, Va. (visit www.marinel-
og.com). Marine professionals involved in
all aspects of marine salvage response will
gather to discuss issues critical to the
marine salvage community, primary
among them the revised requirements of
OPA-90.
While the revisions to OPA-90 may not be
universally accepted for one reason or
another, there is no question that they will
help to better protect our environment and
our marine community now and into the
future. While these revisions may not be
exactly what we all want, they are certain-
ly what we, as a nation, need. ML
BY JOHN A. WITTE JR. , PRESIDENT, AMERICAN SALVAGE ASSOCIATION
www.americansalvage.org
COMMUNICATION IS KEY
THE NATIONAL MARITIME
SALVAGE CONFERENCE
OCTOBER 6-8, 2009
ARLINGTON, VA
For more information on Sponsorship
and exhibiting opportunities contact:
Jane Poterala, T: 212-620-7209,
e: jpoterala@sbpub.com
For delegate information and general
inquiries contact: Michelle Zolkos
T:212-620-7208, e:mzolkos@sbpub.com
Headliner
GULF COAST
M
ARINE
L
OG
a special supplement to
BEEMAR
GETS
BUSY
GULF
IN THE
www.marinelog.com JULY 2009 MARINE LOG G3
GULF COAST
BEEMAR
NEW PLAYER
IN THE GULF
T
here’s a new player in the U.S. Gulf
of Mexico offshore support vessel
market. Former Sea Mar President
and one-time Tidewater Marine execu-
tive Van C. DeWitt announced details
last month about the newly formed
marine transportation company,
BEEMAR LLC. De Witt will serve as
President and CEO of the Houston-based
marine transportation company, which
will have a fleet of eight newly built DP2
Platform Supply Vessels.
The first two vessels, M/V Busy Bee
and M/V Worker Bee, were expected to
be delivered late last month for service in
the Gulf of Mexico, with a sister ship
being delivered every 60 days thereafter.
These vessels are currently under con-
struction at the Lockport, La., shipyard
of Bollinger Shipyards, Inc.
The Busy Bee and the Worker Bee will
be the first two of five DP2, ABS-classed
210 ft x 56 ft x 18 ft PSV’s that will have
the capacity of carry 2,700 long tons of
cargo, a clear deck measuring 150 ft x 47
ft, 6,300 barrels of liquid mud and 6,000
ft3 of dry bulk capacity. The vessels are
rated at 4,000 bhp.
In addition to the three 210 footers,
the BEEMAR fleet will include five 234
HEADLINER
BEEMAR’s fleet will have
five 210 ft DP2 Platform
Supply Vessels, including
the Busy Bee
GULF COAST
HEADLINER
Conrad Industries is readying a 264 ft ferry
for delivery in the second half of this year to
the Texas Department of Transportation
(TDOT).
According to Houston-based naval archi-
tectural and marine engineering firm Alan C.
McClure Associates (ACMA), the first dry dock
for a ferry has been completed at Conrad
Deepwater in Amelia, La. ACMA and Schuller
& Allen provided engineering and design for
the new 264-ft vessel, and ACMA is now pro-
viding owner’s representation during the con-
struction period until vessel delivery.
According to ACMA vice president Darrel
Harvey, “The ferry’s first dry dock went very
smoothly. The vessel received her new pro-
peller shafts, propellers and rudders, along
with a fresh coat of bottom paint. Now she’ll
be given the final top side colors that she’ll
proudly wear during her tour of duty. Over
the next few months, ACMA will be oversee-
ing alignment of the propulsion system, elec-
trical equipment integration and termina-
tion, and equipment start-up, as well as dock
trails and sea trials.”
Bruce Johnson, President of Schuller &
Allan, a naval architecture and marine engi-
neering firm with extensive ferry experience,
including every Texas State ferry, comment-
ed, “Collaborating with ACMA on this project,
as well as many others over the course of the
last 30 years, underscores the value and effi-
ciency of combining the unique strengths
and expertise of each firm. We’re looking for-
ward to working with the ACMA team as we
coordinate additional marine projects in the
near future.”
Texas ferry under construction
at Conrad Industries
ft x 56 ft x 18 ft PSVs, with a cargo
capacity of 3,000 long tons. The first of
these vessels is scheduled for delivery
in March 2010, with two additional ves-
sels to be delivered within the third
quarter of 2010. The clear deck on this
class of vessel will be 175 ft X 47 ft,
with 9,000 barrels of liquid mud and
6,000 ft
3
of dry bulk capacity.
All of the PSVs will each be
outfitted with two Cummins
QSK60 main engines, that
will each generate 2,000
bhp at 1,800 rev/min.
The main engines will
drive NiBrAl pro-
pellers via Twin Disc
marine gearing. The maximum speed
will be 11.5 knots.
Two Cummins QSK19 diesel engines
will drive two 750-bhp controllable-
pitch Schottel bow thrusters and one
350 bhp Schottel stern drive thruster
will be driven by a variable speed elec-
tric drive.
The Dynamic Positioning controls
will be Beier Radio IVCS 2002.
The vessels will be ABS Class +A1,
+AMS, Ocean Service, +DPS 2, Circle
E. They will be built to SOLAS and
USCG Subchapter L OSV.
The BEEMAR fleet will be equally at
home supporting deepwater oil drilling
and production, deep shelf exploration
and production operations, offshore and
sub-sea construction, in addition to pro-
viding geophysical/seismic, and special
well service support.
In a statement, DeWitt
said, “The technical
design, station keeping
and cargo capabilities of the
new BEEMAR fleet are
responsive to the demanding
service requirements here in the
Gulf of Mexico and in the global
marketplace.”
BEEMAR’s corporate headquarters
will be in Houston, Tex., and operations
office in the Lafayette, La. area.
Bollinger is an investor in the company.
Besides DeWitt, the other members
of the management team include Dar-
rel Plaisance as Vice President and
Chief Operating Officer, Chris Gilmore,
Operations Manager, Lou Dupre, Per-
sonnel Manager, and Shannon Trahan
as maintenance manager.
G4 MARINE LOG JULY 2009 www.marinelog.com
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www.marinelog.com JULY 2009 MARINE LOG G5
GULF COAST
HEADLINER
T
he swine flu outbreak will slightly
delay the delivery of two 52m off-
shore support vessels for Arren-
dadora Ocean Mexicana (Bluewater
Marine) from Strategic Marine’s ship-
yard in Mazatlan, Mexico.
The shipyard was set up last year
through a partnership between Aus-
tralia-based Strategic Marine and
Mazatlan-based Servicios Navales E
Industriales (SENI). The joint venture
then secured an $11.89 million order to
build the two aluminum crewboats for
Bluewater Marine.
Strategic Marine’s Mexican yard
expects to deliver the first two 52m crew-
boats in mid-September.
Blue Marine intends to use the ves-
sels to service its Pemex supply contract
in the Gulf of Mexico, and the company’s
owners visited the yard recently for a
pre-inspection of the vessels, along with
Pemex officials.
Strategic Marine’s Mexico General
Manager Keith Rickman said although
the business was closed for only five
days, additional production time was lost
due to the domino effect of staff traveling
internationally.
“The Swine flu has caused a slight
delay in the delivery of the vessels, with
specialists being unavailable for work.
However, the clients have been very
understanding and willing to negotiate,”
said Rickman.
With a top speed of 20 knots, the
crewboats will have four Cummins
KTA50-M2 1,800 bhp main engines and
a 223 m2 aft clear deck.
Swine flu delays delivery
of crewboats from Mexican yard
Earlier this year, C&G Boat Works
Inc., Mobile, Ala., launched the Gulf
Princess for owner Graham Gulf.
Originally conceived as a 175 ft x 34
ft vessel, the Gulf Princess was
lengthened by adding a 10 ft exten-
sion during construction to 185 feet.
The original power package was
retained. This included four1800-hp
Cummins KTA50-M main engines
turning 48-inch propellers through ZF
4650 gears with 2.5:1 reduction. A
Cummins 6CTA8.3DM engine powers
the Thrustmaster TH250RT
retractable bow thruster. Two Cum-
mins 85 KW 6BTA5.9DM/Newage
generator sets supply the vessel’s
electrical requirements.
The Gulf Princess is DP-1 rated
with a system supplied by Kongsberg.
A sister vessel, to be named the Sybil
Graham, will be delivered in the third
quarter of 2009. The Sybil Graham
will be classed DP-2.
C&G Boat Works delivers
crewboat to Graham
G6 MARINE LOG JULY 2009 www.marinelog.com
www.marinelog.com JULY 2009 MARINE LOG G7
Harvey Gulf International
Marine, LLC, Harvey, La., says
that it will commit $200 mil-
lion for the construction of
new vessels and acquisition of
existing vessels with the sup-
port of its majority owner, The
Jordan Company, L.P. Jordan is
a New York-based private equi-
ty firm with over $5 billion of
capital under managemen. This
capital will be used to support
its worldwide expansion of
services for Harvey Gulf's deep-
water operations.
According to Shane J.
Guidry, CEO of Harvey Gulf,
“We partnered with Jordan to
ensure that Harvey Gulf has
the resources to continue to
provide the vessels and servic-
es that meet the requirements
of our customers as they
evolve. With Jordan's support,
Harvey Gulf can now explore
opportunities worldwide that
would not have otherwise
been feasible.”
Privately owned Harvey Gulf
specializes in towing drilling
rigs and providing offshore
supply and multi-purpose dive
support vessels for deepwater
water operations in the U.S.
Gulf of Mexico.
Back in August 2008, the
Guidry Family and Jordan Com-
pany L.P. completed the $500
million purchase price of Har-
vey Gulf International Marine.
Harvey Gulf International is
currently constructing the
8,000 hp DP2 offshore supply
vessel Harvey Carrier at Eastern
Shipbuilding, Panama City, Fla.
The 295 ft x 60 ft x 24 ft ves-
sel will have a clear deck area
of 13,475 ft
2
with a capacity
to carry 14,000 ft
3
of dry bulk,
17,500 bbls of liquid mud and
2,500 bbls of methanol.
Harvey Gulf plans to build new OSVs
in $200 million expansion
Vessel name Type HP
Harvey Commander Ocean towing vessel 9,000
Harvey Gladiator Ocean towing vessel 9,000
Harvey Invader Ocean towing vessel 10,000
Harvey Viking Ocean towing vessel 10,500
Harvey Warrior Ocean towing vessel 10,500
Harvey Thunder AHT vessel 13,500
Harvey Intruder AHT vessel 13,500
Harvey War Horse II/DP AHT vessel 16,500
Harvey War Horse AHT vessel 16,500
Harvey Provider Offshore supply vessel 4,520
Harvey Explorer Offshore supply vessel 4,520
Harvey Spirit Offshore supply vessel 6,000
Harvey Supplier Offshore supply vessel 6,000
Harvey Carrier Offshore supply vessel 8,000
Harvey Discovery MP Dive support vessel 4,750
CURRENT HARVEY GULF INTERNATIONAL MARINE FLEET
G8 MARINE LOG JULY 2009 www.marinelog.com
GULF COAST
HEADLINER
Austal USA, Mobile, Ala., employs 970
shipbuilders, engineers and support staff.
The shipyard is currently building two
Littoral Combat Ships and will begin
construction on the first Joint High
Speed Vessel (JHSV) starting this
November.
The U.S. Navy has exercised contract
options funding Austal’s acquisition of
long lead-time material associated with
the construction of two additional 103m
JHSVs.
Austal was awarded the initial con-
tract to design and build the first 103m
JHSV in November 2008. The contract
included options for nine additional ves-
sels to be awarded between FY09 and
FY13.
Each JHSV is valued at about A$225
million, with the potential 10-vessel pro-
gram valued at A$2.3 billion.
Austal USA President and COO, Joe
Rella said, “Due to on-time performance
and high quality results during our
design reviews with the Navy, and the
efficiency of our material procurement to
date, we have earned the confidence of
the Navy to make this award. This is a
testament to the quality products of our
Program, Design, Production Control and
Procurement teams.”
Long lead-time material for the addi-
tional vessels will include diesel engines,
water jets and reduction gears.
Similar to the Austal-built “WestPac
Express” operated by the US Marines for
the past seven years, the JHSV will be
capable of transporting troops and their
equipment, supporting humanitarian
relief efforts, operating in shallow waters
and reaching speeds in excess of 35 knots
fully loaded. The vessels will be a joint-
use platform operated by both the United
States Army and Navy.
Austal’s current contracted backlog
stretches until the end of 2011, but if
options are exercised, the shipyard’s
workload will extend into 2015.
Austal USA is in the midst of an
extensive capital investment and expan-
sion. The shipyard is building a new 17-
acre under-roof facility to build ship mod-
ules for erection in assembly bays, a
paved parking lot for 2,400 employees, a
new 75,000 ft
2
drive-through warehouse,
a new 80,000 ft
2
office building, a new
600 ft bulkhead for ship mooring, a new
60,000 ft
2
x 120 ft tall assembly bay, fill-
ing two waterfront acres and the erection
of a 7,500 ft
2
employee break room build-
ing.
AUSTAL USA GEARS UP FOR JHSV PROGRAM
At top, the Navy's first trimaran Littoral Combat
Ship, the future USS Independence (LCS 2), began
Builder's Sea Trials in the Gulf of Mexico July 2; At
right, Alabama Governor Bob Riley (middle) tours
Austal's Western Australian facilities with Austal
COO Peter Hogan (left) and Austal Managing Director
Bob Browning (right). Austal USA has grown to
become the largest aluminum shipyard in the world
www.marinelog.com JULY 2009 MARINE LOG G9
“T
he price of oil is not
affecting our cus-
tomers as much as
the credit and finance mar-
kets,” says Boysie Bollinger,
chairman, Bollinger Ship-
yards, Inc., Lockport, La.
“Once that settles down, we
feel that our customers will
again move towards newbuild
programs. Even those compa-
nies with credit or capital
available are taking a ‘wait-
and-see’ attitude.”
With a workforce of roughly
2,500, Bollinger Shipyards
has 40 drydocks at 13 ship-
yards across the U.S. Gulf of
Mexico from South Louisiana
to Texas. The company’s new
construction backlog of Plat-
form Supply Vessels for
BEEMAR stretches until late
2010. It has delivered or is
near completion of ocean tank
barges of 35,000, 55,000 and
60,000 bbl. If the U.S. Coast
Guard exercises all of the
options for the Fast Response
Cutter program—up to 34
Sentinel Class boats—
Bollinger’s backlog will
stretch well into the future.
The program could last 10 years.
The Bollinger FRC meas-
ures 153 ft 5 in. x 25 ft 5 in. x
8 ft 5 in. and is powered by
two (2) Tier II diesel engines
rated at 5,760 bhp. The vessel
will accommodate a crew of
twenty-two for up to five days
at sea. The cutter’s missions
will include search and res-
cue, drug and illegal migrant
interdiction, homeland securi-
ty and maritime defense. It
will have a top speed over 28
knots. Operational capabili-
ties and crew comfort are fea-
tures that have been designed
into the cutter. It has an
extensive electronics suite to
provide command and control
along with sophisticated com-
munications systems.
Bollinger also began the
process of reshaping itself
after Katrina, adding new
dry-docks, expanding facilities
and making upgrades and
improvements. “Over the last
five years, we’ ve invested
nearly $200 million in
upgrading our shipyards,”
says Bollinger. “By the end of
this year, we should be near
the completion of that effort.”
Bollinger would also like to
see the continuance of the
Small Shipyard Assistance
Program, which is adminis-
tered by the U.S. Maritime
Administration and received
$100 million in funding
through the Stimulus pack-
age.
Bollinger invests $200 million
to upgrade its shipyards
KG Marine’s AHTS Kevin Gros in the new 5,000-ton dry dock at
Bollinger Morgan City. The dry dock was built by Bollinger Marine
Fabricators
Located in the Port of Fourchon, Bollinger Fourchon, with a new
5,000 ton dry-dock and facility expansion, can handle “quick up and
downs,” as well as project load-outs and laydown areas for project
management programs
GULF COAST
HEADLINER
G10 MARINE LOG JULY 2009 www.marinelog.com
T&T Marine Salvage, a unit of T&T Marine, headquartered in
Galveston, Tex.,a leading provider of maritime support services,
successfully performed a tandem lift of two 690-ton offshore
modules at the Port of Houston in Houston, Tex.
T&T Marine Salvage’s 600-ton capacity 182 ft D/B BIG-T
was mobilized from Galve-
ston to Houston to join
forces with the 500-ton
capacity D/B BIG JOHN,
owned by Big John Marine,
to lift the two offshore mod-
ules from the dock and onto
a deck barge for
TurboFab/Solar Turbines.
The tandem lift was per-
formed with rigging that
included four 440-ton
CHART-UR-BAR spreader
bar systems provided by
Carol Crane Rigging & Lifting Technology Inc. Due to the dock
structure, lift was applied by the BIG-T and BIG-JOHN to
reduce the ground reaction as the modules were moved closer
to the bulkhead.
The BIG-T is 182 ft x 68 ft, with a depth of 13 ft 6 inches. It
has a minimum operating draft of 4 ft.
“Both lifts were performed in one day,” said Kevin Teichman,
vice president of T&T Marine Salvage. “The process provided a
safe and cost-effective solution for the load-out of these mod-
ules.”
W
ith its six shipyards on the Gulf
Coast, Signal International, LLC,
has built its reputation on quality
rig construction, repair, modernizations
and upgrades and service support for the
offshore energy market. Last month, Signal
International, LLC, Pascagoula, Miss.,
announced it will build a 300 ft x 100 ft
ocean deck barge for Signet Maritime Cor-
poration, Houston, Tex. The barge will be
built at Signal’s Orange, Tex., shipyard,
with delivery scheduled for the first quarter
2010.
In line with Signal’s marketing plan,
large deck barges will be a continued prod-
uct line for Orange, with multiple designs
currently being offered.
Signal has made major capital invest-
ments at the Orange shipyard. The primary
focus has been on improving the workflow
within the nearly 500,000 ft
2
covered man-
ufacturing area and increasing automation.
Under a continuous flow manufacturing ini-
tiative developed by Signal’s Industrial
Engineering Department, along with Engi-
neering, Planning, Procurement, and Pro-
duction, costs and schedule have been dra-
matically reduced with no sacrifice in qual-
ity or safety. By example, Signal has
worked almost 700,000 hours through May
without a recordable safety incident. Dur-
ing this same period the welding reject
rate was less than one-half percent.
Signal CEO and president Dick Marler
said, “Signal’s expansion into the large
deck barge market is a natural for our oper-
ations in Orange. The Orange yard has built
barges in the past and we still have experi-
enced production and management person-
nel who were part of that effort.” He
added, “We have challenged our workforce
to develop new methods and tools to be
successful in a competitive market. With
low steel prices and our vastly improved
productivity now is the time for potential
customers to take a hard look at expanding
their fleets with a Signal product.”
Signet Maritime president Barry Snyder,
said that, “Signet is optimistic about our
market for ocean-going deck barges. Joint-
ly, Signal and Signet have developed a
superior extra heavy deck strength design
to minimize the customer’s need for load
equalization that will be in high demand to
work in the offshore market. Our design
features a 5,000-pound per square foot
deck strength for large loads and a radial
bow, reducing residual resistance for effi-
cient towing. This will not be the last
barge of this type that we will order.”
Signet Maritime is a diverse marine
transportation and logistics company, pro-
viding everything from harbor tug services
to rig transport and movement services.
Signal International expands into ocean deck barges
T&T Marine performs tandem lift
at the Port of Houston
HEADLINER
www.marinelog.com JULY 2009 MARINE LOG G11
Bludworth Marine LLC, builds, services
and repairs inland, offshore and deep-
draft vessels from its facilities in
Houston/Channelview, Galveston and
Orange, Tex. It currently has workforce
of 150, down from 165 in March 2009.
The shipyard recently delivered a 260
ft x 52 ft x 14 ft inland acid barge,
launched a 200 ft x 85 ft, 3,000-ton
dry dock and is building two 40 ft x 60
ft deck/spud barges.
Bludworth Marine
delivers acid barge
Crowley Maritime Corporation recently
christened the sixth of 10 new 185,000
bbl Articulated Tug-Barge (ATB) tank
vessels that the company will add to its
fleet by the end of 2010. To date, Crow-
ley' s existing ATB fleet has carried
approximately 193,432,788 barrels with-
out a spill.
During ceremonies held at Pier D,
Paula Taylor, wife of Bill Taylor, Crowley
vice president, bulk petroleum and chem-
ical transportation, christened the 9,280
hp tug Commitment, while Brenda
Lawrence, wife of Bill Lawrence, Char-
tering Specialist for BP Shipping USA,
christened barge 650-6.
VT Halter Marine delivers
another ATB to Crowley
The vessels were designed and built by
Crowley's technical services group at VT
Halter Marine, Pascagoula, Miss., and is
being operated by Crowley's petroleum
services group. Crowley already has
nine ATBs in operation and has
announced plans to build three larger
750-series (330,000-barrel capacity)
ATBs, the Legacy, Legend and Liberty,
with VT Halter Marine for delivery by
the middle of 2012. Once all vessels are
received, the fleet will stand at 17.
Crowley plans to add all its 185,000
bbl ATBs by the end of 2010.
ABS
Safety, Service, Solutions. ABS is one of the world’s leading
classification societies. Since 1862, it has been setting safety
standards for the marine and offshore industries. ABS estab-
lishes and applies technical standards, known as Rules, for
the design, construction and operational maintenance of
ships and other marine structures. From its world headquar-
ters in Houston, ABS delivers services and solutions to a
worldwide client list through a network of more than 150
offices in 70 countries. It is the goal of ABS to provide the most
responsive service to our clients - global reach, local response.
ABS Americas
Division Headquarters
16855 Northchase Drive
Houston, TX 77060 USA
Ph: (281) 877-6000
Fax: (281) 877-6001
absamer@eagle.org
www.eagle.org
SEAARK MARINE
SeaArk Marine designs and builds boats in a variety of mod-
els and sizes to best suit the customer’s application and mis-
sion requirements. Specializing in military, governmental
and commercial areas including patrol, security, fire and
search and rescue, SeaArk has earned and maintained its rep-
utation as the premier builder of small and midsize all-weld-
ed aluminum boats.
SeaArk Marine Inc.
P.O. Box 210
Monticello, AR 71657
Ph: (870)367-9755
Fax: (870)367-2120
sales@seaark.com
www.seaark.com
TAMPA SHIP
Tampa Ship specializes in conversions, general repair and
overhaul, as well as lengthening and repowering of a wide
range of vessels, including product tankers, container ships,
cargo vessels, drill ships and rigs, offshore supply vessels,
bulk carriers, passenger/cruise ships, megayachts, LPG and
LNG carriers and reefer ships. The facility is equipped with
four large graving dry docks and extensive crane facilities.
Tampa Ship
1130 McCloskey Blvd.
Tampa, FL 33605, USA
Ph: (813) 248-7250
Fax: (813)247-7341
info@tampaship.com
www.tampaship.com
CONRAD INDUSTRIES
Conrad Industries, Inc., established in 1948 and headquar-
tered in Morgan City, Louisiana, designs, builds and over-
hauls tugboats, ferries, lift boats, barges, offshore supply
vessels and other steel and aluminum products for both the
commercial and government markets. The company pro-
vides both repair and new construction services at its four
shipyards located in southern Louisiana and Texas.
Conrad Industries
1501 Front Street
Morgan City, LA 70381
Ph: (985) 384-3060
Fax: (985) 385-4090
www.conradindustries.com
BISSO MARINE CO., INC.
Since 1890, BISSO Marine has been continuously servicing
the marine, offshore and fabrication industries. Headquar-
tered in Houston, Tex., with an operations base in New
Orleans, La., BISSO Marine provides a wide range of services
including: Salvage, Wreck Removal, Diving, Underwater HAZ-
MAT Lightering, Offshore Construction, Pipeylay, Marine
Transportation, Technical and Specialty Lifts and Project
Management.
Bisso Marine Co., Inc.
11311 Neeshaw Dr.
Houston, TX 77065
Ph: (281) 897-1500
Fax: (281) 897-1501
info@bissomarine.com
www.bissomarine.com
G12 MARINE LOG JULY 2009 www.marinelog.com
COASTAL MARINE EQUIPMENT, INC
Formed in 2001, Coastal Marine Equipment, Inc. has quickly
established a reputation for supplying THE BEST VALUE IN
DECK MACHINERY. With over 100 years of combined marine
industry experience the key personnel of Coastal Marine
Equipment along with the expert craftsmen offer a com-
plete line of marine deck machinery as well as general fabri-
cation, machining
services, installa-
tion, maintenance
and repair.
Coastal Marine
Equipment, Inc.
Ph: (228)-832-7655
sales@coastalmarineequipment.com
www.coastalmarineequipment.com
www.marinelog.com JULY 2009 MARINE LOG G13
MARKETPLACE
GULF COAST
ABS NAUTICAL SYSTEMS LLC
ABS Nautical Systems (NS), a division of ABS offers leading
fleet management software solutions to maritime and off-
shore operators. Its fully-integrated, modular approach
manages the principal operational expenses associated
with a vessel, boat or offshore rig. NS has 25 years of expe-
rience in delivering solutions that help operators efficient-
ly keep their assets maintained, supplied and staffed. With
15 offices around the world, NS works closely with their
clients to consistently deliver the software and services
that work for them.
ABS Nautical Systems
16855 Northchase Drive
Houston, TX 77060 USA
Ph: (281) 877-5700
Fax: (281) 877-5701
ns-info@abs-ns.com
www.abs-ns.com
JOTUN PAINTS INC.
Jotun Paints, Inc., located in Belle Chasse, Louisiana, is the
North American affiliate and subsidiary of the Jotun Group,
one of the world's leading manufacturers of paints, coat-
ings and powder coatings. The Jotun group has 71 compa-
nies and 40 production facilities on all continents and Jotun
is represented in 80 countries. Jotun Paints, Inc. is a sup-
plier of coatings products to the following market seg-
ments: Foreign and domestic Marine and shipping, Off-
shore, HPI, and the military.
Jotun Paints, Inc.
P.O. Box 159
Belle Chasse, LA 70037
Ph: (800) 229-3538
Fax: (504) 394-3726
www.jotun.com
GREAT AMERICAN INSURANCE
Great American Insurance is a premier multi-line provider
of hull, pollution and marine liabilities, offering more
than 30 different marine product lines. Great American
offers the unique opportunity to package marine and
property/casualty coverage with the same underwriter
providing seamless cover.
Great American Insurance
Group
65 Broadway
New York, NY 10004
Ph: (212) 510-0135
Fax: (212) 422-1063
ewilmot@galc.com
www.GreatAmericanInsurance.com
JONRIE INTERTECH LLC
JonRie InterTech LLC is custom design Deck Equipment
company serving the Tug and Barge industry. JonRie is also
engaged in the design of equipment for the Military and
Dredging industries. JonRie is know for its dependable LNG
Escort Winches, Tug Assist Winches, Towing Winches, Cap-
stans and Mooring Winches. JonRie has an in house design
team to provide turn key designs form HPUs to winch con-
trol systems. Our service group provides stat up assistance
on every installation and after
market assistance.
Contact us today!
JonRie InterTech LLC
982 Whispering Oak Cir.
Manahawkin, NJ 08050
Ph: (609) 978-2523
Fax: (609) 978-4959
www.marinewinch.com
BOLLINGER SHIPYARDS
Bollinger Shipyards, Inc., Lockport, La., provides marine
repair, conversion and new construction services to the
energy, commercial and government marine markets in the
U.S. Gulf of Mexico region. Family owned and operated
since 1946, Bollinger consists of 12 ISO 9001 certified ship-
yards and 32 dry docks for small to medium-sized shallow
and deepwater vessels and rigs. Bollinger has a premier
reputation for superior quality and timely services for its
customers.
Bollinger Shipyards, Inc.
P.O. Box 250
8365 Hwy. 308 South
Lockport, La. 70374
Ph: (985) 532-2554
Fx: (985) 532-7225
sales@bollingershipyards.com
www.bollingershipyards.com
ADVANCED POLYMER COATINGS
Advanced Polymer Coatings, Ltd., Avon, Ohio, is the manu-
facturer of the patented high-performance coating
MarineLine, which is used to line and protect the tanks of
chemical and product tankers. More than 350 tankers use
MarineLine to carry thousands of different types of
aggressive chemicals including the full range of IMO
chemicals.
Advanced Polymer Coatings
951 Jaycox Road, P.O. Box 269
Avon, Ohio 44011
Ph: (440) 937-6218
Fax: (440) 937-5046
apc@adv-polymer.com
www.adv-polymer.com
G14 MARINE LOG JULY 2009 www.marinelog.com
CENTA
CENTA is a global leader in the innovation of flexible cou-
pling solutions for diesel engine driven equipment. From
Torsional Couplings which dampen harmful vibrations, to
complete Carbon Fiber Shafting systems, CENTA is a drive
component leader you can trust. Over 25 styles of flexible
coupling and shafting products available; CENTA has the
solution for all your drive systems.
CENTA Corporation
2570 Beverly Drive #128
Aurora, Il 60502
Ph: (630)-236-3500
Fax: (630) 236-3565
info@centacorp.com
www.centa.info
BLUDWORTH
Bludworth Marine offers solutions, not problems. We spe-
cialize in commercial marine vessel repair & new construc-
tion. Mobile topside and multiple shipyard locations pro-
vide flexibility in meeting customer repairs. We service the
inland and offshore markets and make repairs daily on
tugs, barges, and ships. Our docking capabilities have
increased from an 800-ton & a new 3,000-ton dock and a
100’ x 300’ graving dock. Make the call.
Bludworth Marine, LLC
Ph: (713) 644-1595
Ph: (409) 744-5720
www.vesselrepair.com
VT HALTER MARINE
VT Halter Marine is a modern and progressive shipbuild-
ing subsidiary of VT Systems that combines leading-edge
technologies with over 50 years of tradition in designing
and building the world's highest quality maritime prod-
ucts. It specializes in the shipbuilding, design, construc-
tion, and repair and offers comprehensive packages cover-
ing projects from blueprint to blue water.
VT Halter Marine
900 Bayou Casotte Parkway
Pascagoula, MS 39581
Ph: (228) 696-6888
Fax: (228) 696-6899
www.vthaltermarine.com
MARKETPLACE
GULF COAST
TALLERES NAVALES DEL GOLFO
TNG shipyard is a global company which began its opera-
tions in 1995, based in the Port of Veracruz and situated
within close proximity to offshore oil and gas facilities, busy
trade lanes as well as to the most important routes of com-
munication that interconnect South East USA, the Caribbean
and México. TNG through its professional staff, experience,
infrastructure and state-of-the-art equipment provides a
plethora of top quality services, including: Ship Repair, Off-
shore structures fabrication and Conversions. TNG operates
under an excellent quality system enabling it to satisfy spe-
cific client needs supported by Classification Societies and
third parties; it is an ISO-9001-2000 certified company.
Talleres Navales del Golfo
91800 Veracruz Ver, México
Ph:+(52)229-989-2500/2514/2535
Fax:+(52)229-989-2525/2510
tng@tnghph.com.mx
www.tnghph.com.mx
SIGNAL INTERNATIONAL
Signal International is a leading provider of marine and
fabrication services to the offshore drilling, military and
marine industries. We specialize in rig construction,
repair, conversion, and heavy fabrication services for large
deck barges. Signal’s six yards span the GoM with drydock-
ing and world-class fabrication facilities; four in Texas and
two in Mississippi delivering quality workmanship to max-
imize customers’ uptime.
Signal International
RSA Battle House Tower
11 North Water Street, Suite 16250
Mobile, AL 36602
Ph: (251) 544-2620
Ph: (228) 762-0010
marketing@signalint.com
www.signalint.com
Solutions, Not Problems
Bludworth Marine LLC Locations
Houston Main Office, Engineering, and Fabrication
Galveston 300 x 100 Graving Dock and
Deep Water Topside Repair
Channelview Inland Tug and Barge Topside Repair
Orange 800t dock 3,000t dock.
Deep Water & Topside Repair ,
New Barge and Dry Dock Construction
Bludworth Cook
Marine Inc
Contact:
Richard Bludworth
Bludworth Marine LLC
3502 Broadway Houston, Texas 77017
713 644 1595
www.vesselrepair.com
Bludworth 3,000 ton dry dock
New Bludworth Marine shipyard
in Orange Texas
Bludworth Cook Marine Inc
ATB Flexible Ocean Tug
Barge Connection
BLUDWORTH MARINE LLC
ATB ‘s Flexible Ocean Tug Barge
Connection Systems