AIRISH MERICEL D PUNELAS N33 ASSIGNMENT IN PE03

MR.LAUREANO TIU MONDAY/1-3PM

History of Basketball in the Philippines
Early period In 1900, the United States’ Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) introduced the sport of Basketball to the Philippines. Prior to this period, football (soccer) was the most popular sport in the Philippine Islands due to its history as a Spanish colony, during the Far Eastern Games. Basketball, and other sports such as baseball eventually supplanted football (soccer). According to Philippine historian, and journalist Nick Joaquín, basketball was first introduced to Filipinos within the historic walls of Intramuros, Manila. From the 1910s to the early 1930s, the Philippines dominated the Far Eastern Games basketball tournament winning 9 of 10 basketball championships. In 1936, the Philippines played in the Berlin Olympic Games basketball tournament, the first time basketball played as an official sport. The Philippines started the tournament winning two in a row beating Mexico, and Estonia but lost to the United States in the quarterfinals. The Philippines went on to beat Italy, and Uruguay to finished fifth in the tournament with a 4-1 record. The 5th place finish was the best finish by an Asian country in the Olympic Games men’s basketball tournament. If not for controversial rulings, the Philippines could have won silver or bronze medal. The Manila Industrial and Commercial Athletic Association (MICAA) was formed in 1938, and dominated Philippine basketball for almost 40 years. Golden era In the 1950s, the Philippine team was among the best basketball teams in the world after winning two consecutive Asian Games basketball gold medals (1951, 1954). Despite missing the first FIBA World Championship (1950) in Argentina, the Philippines participated in the 1954 FIBA World Championship held at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The Philippines finished with a 5-2 win-loss record in the Final Round games, and captured the bronze medal. The third place-finish is still currently the best finish by an Asian country in the World Championships. Carlos Loyzaga finished as the world tournament’s third leading scorer (148 points/16.4 points per game) and was named in the FIBA World Mythical Five Selection. Before the end of the decade, the country retained the Asian Games basketball gold medal in 1958. During this period, the Philippines had also consistently played, in the Olympic Games basketball tournament since 1936. In the 1960s, the first FIBA Asia Championship was won by the Philippines with Carlos Badion as the tournament’s Most Valuable Player. In 1962, the Philippines won its fourth consecutive Asian Games gold medal and retained the Asian championship in 1963. Meanwhile, the Philippines won the right to host the third FIBA World Championship but were suspended after then President Diosdado Macapagal, father of current President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, refused to issue visa to players from communist countries (notably basketball powerhouse Yugoslavia and the Soviet Union). In the Asian Games, after Carlos Loyzaga’s retirement, the Philippines' dominance declined but the country continued to play competitively in the Asian, and World Championships. While in the Olympic Games, the Philippines played poorly, unable to reach the top 10. The professional era

The 1970s and 1980s witnessed the birth of two new leagues: the Philippine Basketball Association (PBA), founded in April 1975, and the Philippine Amateur Basketball League (PABL) in 1983; both leagues replaced the 34 year old MICAA. In 1978, the Philippines hosted the FIBA World Championship and finished 8th in the tournament, despite losing all its games. The event was the first World Basketball Championship ever to be held in Asian soil. 1980s In the 1980s, Northern Consolidated Cement, a team composed of the country's national basketball training pool, won the FIBA Asia Club Championship (1984), and earned the right to play in the World Cup for Champion Clubs (1). The team also captured the William Jones Cup championship. In 1986, the Philippines won its fifth FIBA Asia Championship and earned the right to play in the 1986 FIBA World Championship held at Madrid, Spain. The team failed to play in the world championships due to political crisis, and the eventual coming of the Philippines' People Power Revolution. Later in 1986, the Philippines captured the bronze medal in the Asian Games after a controversial semi-final loss to South Korea. 1990s In 1990’s, the Philippines sent all-professional national teams in the Asian Games basketball tournaments. The PBA was given the task to reclaim basketball supremacy in Asia but was limited by the national association, the Basketball Association of the Philippines (BAP), to play just in the Asian Games. The first Philippines Dream Team was formed in 1990, coached by Robert Jaworski, and the team produced a number of PBA superstars such as Alvin Patrimonio, Avelino “Samboy” Lim, and 1990 PBA Most Valuable Player Allan Caidic. The team finished second, and captured the silver medal after losing to China in the finals. Avelino Lim was named in the Asian Games basketball all-star mythical five selection. In 1994, San Miguel Beermen, which captured the PBA All-Filipino Cup title, and earned the right to represent the Philippines in the Asian Games. The team also included loaned PBA players, and amateur standouts. The PBA-San Miguel Philippines team finished fourth place after losing to China, and Japan in the play-offs. Allan Caidic, Asia’s most feared Filipino player, finished as the Asian Games’ leading scorer, and was named in the Asian Games All-Star Mythical Five Selection. In 1998, the PBA formed the celebrated Philippine Centennial Team which captured the 21st William Jones Cup championship and the bronze medal in the Asian Games held at Bangkok, Thailand. The centennial celebrations also witnessed the birth of the Metropolitan Basketball Association (MBA), the Philippines second professional league. 2000s In 2000, the Philippine Basketball Association (PBA) celebrated its 25th anniversary and named the “PBA's 25th Anniversary All-Time Team”, the top 25 were – Johnny Abarrientos, William "Bogs" Adornado, Ato Agustin, Francis Arnaiz, Lim Eng Beng, Ricardo Brown, Allan Caidic, Hector Calma, Philip Cezar, Atoy Co, Jerry Codiñera, Kenneth Duremdes, Bernard Fabiosa, Luigi Ochoa, Danny Florencio, Alberto Guidaben, Freddie Hubalde, Robert Jaworski, Jojo Lastimosa, Samboy Lim, Ronnie Magsanoc, Vergel Meneses, Manny Paner, Benjie Paras, and Alvin Patrimonio. Later, the PBA All-Star Selection beat the FIBA Asia All-Star Selection, which was led by Filipino and MBA superstar Rommel Adducul. 2008 - The Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas announced the formation of three new basketball leagues: the Filipina Basketball League for women, the Philippine Collegiate Championship, and the community-based, LGU-supported, commercially sponsored Liga Pilipinas, which was formed through the merger of the National Basketball Conference, the Mindanao Visayas Basketball Association, and Third Force, Inc. - On September 5, 2008, 6'1" and 18 year old high school basketball player Keith Agovida of the JRU Light Bombers etched his name in Philippine basketball history when he unleashed a record-setting shooting binge, scoring 82 points in 37 minutes in a 127-49 rout of the Malayan Red Robins in the juniors division second round of the Philippines' National Collegiate Athletic Association. Agovida's previous high was a 57-point performance against the same squad in the first round. His feat (23, 13, 20, and 26 points in each quarter, respectively) at the Cuneta Astrodome, surpassed the old mark of 71 points set by Letran Squire Erwin Bola-Bola in the 1970s.[1][2]

- The Philippine Basketball League, and the Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas announced the revival of the Women's Philippine Basketball League, which first held its tournaments from 1998 to 1999.

6 Different fundamental skill of Basketball
Dribbling Dribbling the basketball is done to move the ball around only when a passing isn't a better option and a lane isn't available. Ask any collage or professional basketball coach - they will all tell you the same thing. Dribbling should be done when the player (you) have some purpose to forfill. Dribbling while looking for an offensive option is a good way to lose the ball. When you are looking for that option, take the ball in a firm grip and put your body between you and the defender. Regardless of how good you are at dribbling, the defense will always have a greater chance for a steal if you are dribbling the ball instead of gripping it in both hands. Passing Passing is the number 1 option for moving the ball around the court on offense. Passing is quicker than dribbling and so it is a deadly offensive tool for reaching that open man so they can have the shot. Good passes are the hallmark of good teams because most offensive plays are set up by good passes. Shooting Shooting is probably the most practiced skill for new and experienced players. Yet so many people still practice it wrong. In practice all drills should be done at game speed and done as you would under pressure. Players are usually too lazy to do this and instead of practicing the sweet jump shot that they are constantly doing in the game they lazy-it-down to a hop-shot. Instead of jumping to give power they use their arms for the power and the legs give the rest. Practicing the wrong way to shoot is something that players do all the time yet they do not understand why they miss all their jump shots during the game... Rebounding Rebounding can come in two forms - offensive and defensive. Lots of newer player look at rebounding and immediately think that it is a big mans area. Yet this is not so. Rebounding is more than just being big. It even surpasses just jumping ability. To be good at rebounding you need skill and dedication. Skill is mainly the ability to position yourself and read the shots - something that comes quickly with practice. Dedication is probably the most important factor in rebounding. The person who gets the ball is the one with the most hunger for the ball and who is willing to do whatever it takes to get it. Offense Offense is a fundamental which encompasses all aspects of the offensive court. Shooting has already been covered (and is covered more in the basketball website listed below). Yet moving off the ball to give offensive options to the player with the ball is another thing that is essential for good offense. Supporting your team mates with screens and being able to locate the best offensive option and get the ball to them are also essential things on offense. These skills are often overlooked. Defense The best defensive teams in the NBA are often the ones that make it into the playoffs. This is seen year after year so a simple conclusion can be made here defense is key to victory. Defense is not only about getting the steal or block but also about intimidation of the opponents.

Facilities and Equipment
The only essential equipment in basketball is the basketball and the court: a flat, rectangular surface with baskets at opposite ends. Competitive levels require the use of more equipment such as clocks, score sheets, scoreboard(s), alternating possession arrows, and whistle-operated stop-clock systems.

A regulation basketball court in international games is 28 by 15 meters (approx. 92 by 49 ft) and in the NBA is 94 by 50 feet (29 by 15 m). Most courts are made of wood. A steel basket with net and backboard hang over each end of the court. At almost all levels of competition, the top of the rim is exactly 10 feet (3.05 m) above the court and 4 feet (1.2 m) inside the baseline. While variation is possible in the dimensions of the court and backboard, it is considered important for the basket to be of the correct height; a rim that is off by but a few inches can have an adverse effect on shooting. There are also regulations on the size a basketball should be. If women are playing, the official basketball size is 28.5" in circumference (size 6) and a weight of 20 oz. For men, the official ball is 29.5" in circumference (size 7) and weighs 22 oz. THE BALL The ball is round and the outer casing should be either leather, rubber or other suitable synthetic material. Its circumference should be between 75 and 78cm (29.5 and 30.25 in) and its weight between 600 and 650gm (20 and 22oz). It should be inflated to a pressure so that when it is dropped from a height of 1.8m (6ft) (measured from the floor to the bottom of the ball) on to the playing surface, it will rebound to a height of between 1.2 and 1.4m (4ft and 4ft 7in), (measured to the top of the ball). CLOTHING Players of each team should wear the same outfits which must not clash with the opposing team. Each player should wear a numbered shirt and no two players in the same team should wear the same number. Players are numbered between 4 and 15. Loose-fitting shorts for mobility, and sleeveless vests are the standard attire. Basketball shoes should be rubber-soled and with protected ankle supports, although these are not necessary. Most important of all, make sure your clothing is comfortable. It is important to wear towelled socks; and it is not a bad idea to buy a pair of shoes a little too big to enable you to wear two pairs of socks which will reduce the risk of blistering. The only essential equipment in basketball is the basketball and the court: a flat, rectangular surface with baskets at opposite ends. Competitive levels require the use of more equipment such as clocks, scoresheets, scoreboard(s), alternating possession arrows, and whistle-operated stop-clock systems. An outdoor basketball net. A regulation basketball court in international games is 28 by 15 meters (approx. 92 by 49 ft) and in the NBA is 94 by 50 feet (29 by 15 m). Most courts are made of wood, usually maple.[23] A steel basket with net and backboard hang over each end of the court. At almost all levels of competition, the top of the rim is exactly 10 feet (3.05 m) above the court and 4 feet (1.2 m) inside the baseline. While variation is possible in the dimensions of the court and backboard, it is considered important for the basket to be of the correct height; a rim that is off by but a few inches can have an adverse effect on shooting. There are also regulations on the size a basketball should be. If women are playing, the official basketball size is 28.5" in circumference (size 6) and a weight of 20 oz. For men, the official ball is 29.5" in circumference (size 7) and weighs 22 oz.

RULES AND REGULATIONS
13 Rules of Basketball - Written by James Naismith 1. 2. The ball may be thrown in any direction with one or both hands. The ball may be batted in any direction with one or both hands, but never with the fist.

3. 4. 5.

A player cannot run with the ball. The player must throw it from the spot on which he catches it, allowance to be made for a man running at good speed. The ball must be held by the hands. The arms or body must not be used for holding it. No shouldering, holding, pushing, striking or tripping in any way of an opponent. The first infringement of this rule by any person shall count as a foul; the second shall disqualify him until the next goal is made or, if there was evident intent to injure the person, for the whole of the game. No substitution shall be allowed. A foul is striking at the ball with the fist, violations of Rules 3 and 4 and such as described in Rule 5. If either side makes three consecutive fouls it shall count as a goal for the opponents (consecutive means without the opponents in the meantime making a foul). A goal shall be made when the ball is thrown or batted from the grounds into the basket and stays there, providing those defending the goal do no touch or disturb the goal. If the ball rests on the edges, and the opponent moves the basket, it shall count as a goal. When the ball goes out of bounds, it shall be thrown into the field and played by the first person touching it. In case of dispute the umpire shall throw it straight into the field. The thrower-in is allowed five seconds. If he holds it longer, it shall go to the opponent. If any side persists in delaying the game, the umpire shall call a foul on them.

6. 7. 8. 9.

10. The umpire shall be the judge of the men and shall note the fouls and notify the referee when three consecutive fouls have been made. He shall have power to disqualify men according to Rule 5. 11. The referee shall be judge of the ball and shall decide when the ball is in play, in bounds, to which side it belongs, and shall keep the time. He shall decide when a goal has been made and keep account of the goals, with any other duties that are usually performed by a referee. 12. The time shall be two fifteen-minute halves, with five minutes rest between. 13. The side making the most goals in that time shall be declared the winner.