www.smdailyjournal.

com
Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 72
650. 588. 0388
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA 94066
Mon.-Sat. 10am-7pm
Sun. Noon t o 6pm
GETTING A BOOST
STATE PAGE 5
‘FREE BIRDS’FUN
BUT FALLS FLAT
WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 19
DOW JONES HITS
ANOTHER HIGH
BUSINESS PAGE 10
CALIFORNIA WORKERS GET $516 MILLION IN BONUS PAY
By Don Thompson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — A university
study released Friday showing how
California counties are spending
$4.4 billion to implement Gov.
Jerry Brown’s prison realignment
law found that nearly 20 percent
have fundamentally changed how
they approach criminal justice.
The subsidies to counties are
guaranteed as part of the 2-year-old
law that is sending lower-level
offenders to county jails instead of
state prisons. The law also leaves
it to county probation depart-
ments, instead of state parole
agents, to supervise those released
from prison.
In passing the law, state law-
makers urged
county officials to
increase rehabili-
tation and treat-
ment programs
that could keep
more criminals
out of prisons and
jails, although the local govern-
ments were given broad discretion
in spending the grants.
The study by the Stanford
Criminal Justice Center compared,
among other indicators, incarcera-
tion rates, county budgets and
first-year plans for spending the
$4.4 billion allocated to local
governments by the state expected
through the 2016-17 fiscal year. It
offers the first statistical analysis
Stanford study: San Mateo a ‘poster
county’for ‘more punitive approach’
Approach for
prison reform
varies by area
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A new website is officially
launching this Veterans Day to
engage the public with veterans’
stories, including one of a San
Mateo resident.
Scott Castle, who graduated
from San Mateo High School in
2002 and currently lives in San
Mateo, served three tours of duty
with the Marine Corps in Iraq and
was one of the first to participate
in the nonprofit Veteran
Documentary Corps’ veterans film
projects. His seven-minute film
documents how he turned to
weightlifting to help cope with
post-traumatic stress disorder.
“We all come back with a little
something,” Castle said. “Ever
since I exited the military I had a
close relationship with the
Veterans Association. We all
struggle with it daily, but it’s
something I am getting treatment
for. ”
Run by Daniel Bernardi, director
and professor in the Cinema
Department at San Francisco State
University and a veteran of the Iraq
war, the site was born out of the
idea that most people seemed
uninterested in the wars the United
States was engaging in for a
decade. Filming for Castle’s video
took place last year.
“I came to the conclusion that
we were eroding our democracy by
New website tells war vets’ stories
San Mateo resident and Iraq War veteran participants in project
SILVIA TURCHIN
Iraq War veteran Scott Castle of San Mateo participated in a film project
about coping with post-traumatic stress disorder. He lifts weights.
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Terra Nova’s Jaylend Jones leaps high for a first-quarter touchdown during the Tigers’ 29-15 win over Sacred
Heart Prep, which clinched Terra Nova’s fifth-straight PAL Bay Division championship. SEE PAGE 11
TERRA NOVA TAKES IT
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Redwood City is holding two workshops
to let the public see firsthand how the devel-
opment plan for Pete’s Harbor has signifi-
cantly changed between its first controver-
sial submission and the latest design call-
ing for 411 units and a commercial marina
at the former floating community.
The current proposal, submitted in July
2013, includes the residential units and
associated parking, some open space and
amenities including a spur of the Bay Trail
and a commercial marina accommodating up
to 65 boats.
Developer Paul Powers had planned to
maintain an outer marina of about 150 slips
but the revised design calls for 65 available
Input sought on updated Pete’s Harbor plan
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Election Day results which showed
Ricardo Ortiz with 10 more votes than Russ
Cohen for the third and final slot on the
Burlingame City Council have been updated
and now show Cohen with 17 more votes
than Ortiz.
Meanwhile, another close race, for the
third and final slot on the Belmont-Redwood
Shores Elementary School District Board of
Burlingame council results flip
Russ Cohen now ahead of Ricardo Ortiz for third open
seat, provisional ballot counts not final until next week
See ELECTION, Page 23
See STUDY, Page 31
See PLAN, Page 31
See WEBSITE, Page 23
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
See opinion
page 9
Inside
Fix obvious
flaws in prison
realignment
FOR THE RECORD 2 Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Rapper Pepa is 44.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1938
Nazis looted and burned synagogues
as well as Jewish-owned stores and
houses in Germany and Austria in a
pogrom that became known as
“Kristallnacht.”
“All life is an experiment.”
— Oliver Wendell Holmes Junior,
U.S. Supreme Court justice (1841-1935)
Actor Lou Ferrigno
is 62.
Singer Nick Lachey
is 40.
Birthdays
REUTERS
AS Monaco's Lucas Ocampos (R) fights for the ball with Evian Thonon Gaillard's Youssouf Sabaly during their French Ligue
1 soccer match at Louis stadium in Monaco.
Saturday: Partly cloudy in the morning
then becoming sunny. Highs in the lower
60s. South winds 5 to 15 mph.
Saturday night: Mostly clear in the
evening then becoming partly cloudy.
Patchy fog. Lows in the upper 40s. South
winds 5 to 15 mph.
Sunday: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog in
the morning. Highs in the upper 50s. South winds 5 to 10
mph.
Sunday night: Mostly cloudy. Lows in the upper 40s.
South winds 5 to 10 mph.
Veterans Day: Mostly cloudy. Highs in the upper 50s.
Monday night and tuesday...Mostly cloudy. Lows in the
upper 40s. Highs around 60.
Tuesday night and Wednesday: Partly cloudy.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1620, the passengers and crew of the Mayflower sight-
ed Cape Cod.
I n 1872, fire destroyed nearly 800 buildings in Boston.
I n 1918, it was announced that Germany’s Kaiser Wilhelm
II would abdicate. He then fled to the Netherlands.
I n 1952, Chaim Weizmann, the first president of Israel,
died.
I n 1953, Welsh author-poet Dylan Thomas died in New
York at age 39.
I n 1961, U.S. Air Force Maj. Robert M. White became the
first pilot to fly an X-15 rocket plane at six times the speed
of sound. The Beatles’ future manager, Brian Epstein, first
saw the group perform at The Cavern Club in Liverpool,
England.
I n 1963, twin disasters struck Japan as some 450 miners
were killed in a coal-dust explosion, and about 160 people
died in a train crash.
I n 1965, the great Northeast blackout occurred as a series
of power failures lasting up to 13 1/2 hours left 30 million
people in seven states and part of Canada without electrici-
t y.
I n 1967, a Saturn V rocket carrying an unmanned Apollo
spacecraft blasted off from Cape Kennedy on a successful
test flight.
I n 1970, former French President Charles de Gaulle died at
age 79.
I n 1976, the U.N. General Assembly approved resolutions
condemning apartheid in South Africa, including one char-
acterizing the white-ruled government as “illegitimate.”
I n 1989, communist East Germany threw open its borders,
allowing citizens to travel freely to the West; joyous
Germans danced atop the Berlin Wall. C
innamon, chili powder and sea-
soned salt are the seasonings
most frequently found in
American homes.
***
The actual length of a year is 365.242
days. That’s why leap years are neces-
sary. Leap years occur every four
years, in years that are evenly divisi-
ble by four.
***
It takes about one minute for the blood
to complete its journey through the
body.
***
One out of three people can’t snap
their fingers.
***
The word sewer means seaward. The
word literally comes from the old prac-
tice of open ditches in London leading
to the River Thames, and then into the
sea.
***
The only real people ever to be depicted
as Pez dispensers have been Betsy Ross
(1752-1836), Daniel Boone (1734-
1820) and Paul Revere (1735-1818).
***
The names of some cities in the United
States are the names of other U.S.
states. There is Nevada in Missouri,
Wyoming in Ohio, Oregon in
Wisconsin, Kansas in Oklahoma,
Michigan in North Dakota.
***
Can you name the presidents on
Mount Rushmore? Do you know what
state the monument is in? See answer
at end.
***
“Popeye the Sailor” debuted in 1933.
Spinach consumption increased 33
percent that year.
***
The San Francisco cable cars are the
only mobile national monuments.
***
Subbookkeeper is the only word with
four pairs of double letters in a row.
***
The number of U.S. residents who are
of Irish ancestry is 33.7 million. This
number is almost nine times the popu-
lation of Ireland itself, which is 3.8
million.
***
At birth, a panda is smaller than a
mouse and weighs about 4 ounces.
***
Ababy bat is called a pup.
***
Hawaii is made up of 137 islands, only
seven of which are inhabited.
***
Kraft introduced Cheez Whiz, an all-
purpose cheese sauce, in 1952.
***
Jules Leotard (1842-1870) invented
the flying trapeze in 1859. He also
invented the close-fitting costume that
still bears his name.
***
The raising of silkworms is called ser-
iculture and began in China about
2000 B.C. China produces 70 percent
of the world’s silk supply.
***
There are at least two words that con-
tain all the vowels in order: facetious
and abstemious. There are at least four
words that contain all the vowels in
reverse order: uncomplimentary,
unproprietary, unoriental and subcon-
tinental.
***
Agatha Christie’s (1890-1976) char-
acter Miss Marple is one of the most
famous and copied detectives of all
time. Miss Marple’s first name is Jane.
The last Miss Marple book was
“Sleeping Murder,” published in
1976.
***
Answer: The presidents carved into
Mount Rushmore are George
Washington (1732-1799), Abraham
Lincoln (1809-1865), Theodore
Roosevelt (1858-1919) and Thomas
Jefferson (1743-1826). Mount
Rushmore is in South Dakota and is
often called “The Shrine of
Democracy.”
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall(at)smdailyjournal.com or
(Answers Monday)
OMEGA TRICK ACQUIT HANGAR
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The cooks at the new breakfast restaurant
were ready to — GET CRACKING
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
CINME
BOHYB
VILHAS
BUSDAR
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
J
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in
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s

a
v
a
ila
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a
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p
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-
Print your
answer here:
Baseball Hall of Famer Whitey Herzog is 82. Baseball Hall
of Famer Bob Gibson is 78. Actor Charlie Robinson is 68.
Movie director Bille August is 65. Actor Robert David Hall is
65. Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, is 61. Gospel singer Donnie
McClurkin is 54. Rock musician Dee Plakas (L7) is 53.
Actress Ion Overman is 44. Rapper Scarface (Geto Boys) is
43. Blues singer Susan Tedeschi is 43. Actor Jason Antoon is
42. Actor Eric Dane is 41. Country singer Corey Smith is 34.
Actress Nikki Blonsky is 25. Actress-model Analeigh Tipton
is 25.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Luck Charms,
No. 12, in first place; Whirl Win, No. 6, in second
place; and Lucky Star, No. 2, in third place. The
race time was clocked at 1:49.53.
5 4 0
2 11 42 64 74 2
Mega number
Nov. 5 Mega Millions
1 5 10 15 49 22
Powerball
Nov. 6 Powerball
18 21 24 25 38
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
9 6 5 8
Daily Four
1 2 3
Daily three evening
3 4 8 13 43 6
Mega number
Nov. 6 Super Lotto Plus
3
Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
SAN MATEO
Burglary. Two people attempted to burglar-
ize the CVS/pharmacy on the 4200 block of
South El Camino real before 8:48 p.m. on
Wednesday, Nov. 6.
Acci dent. No major injuries were reported
after a person was hit by a vehicle on East
40th Avenue before 5:05 p.m. on
Wednesday, Nov. 6.
Vehi cl e t hef t . A red Prius was stolen on
Second Avenue before 12:49 p.m. on
Wednesday, Nov. 6.
Burglary. A person broke into a white
Mercedes and threatened the car owner on the
500 block of Santa Inez Avenue before 7:16
p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 4.
Burlingame
Suspi ci ous acti vi ty. A man reportedly
punched a hole in the wall of a bar on
Burlingame Avenue and El Camino Real
before 11:44 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 31.
Lost chi l d. Police helped to reunite a lost
child with her parents on Broadway and
Cabrillo Avenue before 7:15 p.m. on
Thursday, Oct. 31.
Fire. Police responded to reports of fire and
discovered that it was theatrical smoke
being used for Halloween on the 1500 block
of Cypress Avenue before 5:24 p.m. on
Thursday, Oct. 31.
Police reports
Until the fat lady sang
A complaint was reported about loud
opera singing on the 1400 block of
Floribunda Avenue in Burlingame
before 10:44 a.m. on Wednesday, Oct.
30.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The intoxicated driver accused of killing a
Menlo Park couple walking their dog and
crashing into a car of teenagers before hit-
ting a tree is back in the hospital herself
which is delaying a plea in the fatal crash.
Marjorie Ann Reitzell, 54, was due back
in court a second time on Thursday but did
not appear. On Friday, District Attorney
Steve Wagstaffe said the Redwood City
woman was not medically cleared for that
day’s afternoon appearance. It was not
immediately clear if Reitzell was being
treated for reported chest pains which is the
reason she was not arraigned for several
days after the crash. Her family has also said
publicly she has pneumonia. She finally
appeared on Tuesday but did not enter a plea
to two counts of gross vehicular manslaugh-
ter and two felony counts of driving while
under the influence caus-
ing injury.
Prosecutors are reserv-
ing the right to increase
the charges to murder if
they feel it warranted.
Reitzell has a long histo-
ry of criminal convic-
tions, including several
drug-related, and a prior
misdemeanor conviction
of driving while under the
influence from last November. She was on
probation for that crime when she allegedly
caused the death of Balbir and Kamal Singh,
50 and 45 respectively, just before 7 p.m.
Oct. 24 as they walked their dog on Chilco
Street. Reitzell, who is on probation for a
2012 DUI conviction, reportedly struck the
couple from behind as they walked on the
paved shoulder before going over a center
divider and hitting the second car head-on
then coming to rest against a tree. The cou-
ple died at the scene and their Chihuahua was
injured but survived. The four teenagers in
the second car had minor injuries.
Prosecutors have not released a specific
blood alcohol level for Reitzell but
Wagstaffe it was “significantly more than
twice the legal limit” and she had been
drinking heavily all day before climbing
behind the wheel.
Defense attorney Richard Keyes did not
return a call for comment on his client’s
case and medical condition.
Meanwhile, Menlo Park police are search-
ing for a white man driving a white Ford
Explorer that night who may have wit-
nessed the incident.
Anyone with information is asked to con-
tact Sgt. Sharon Kaufman at 330-6343.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Alleged double-fatal DUI driver back in hospital
Marjorie
Reitzell
By Juliet Williams
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Attorneys for the
California High-Speed Rail Authority
argued Friday that Central Valley residents
who sued the state over its bullet train plan
have no grounds to stop the project, despite
a judge’s ruling that the state violated the
promises made to voters in a 2008 ballot
proposition.
Instead, it would be up to the state
Legislature to step in if lawmakers believed
the $68 billion funding plan does not com-
ply with Proposition 1A, which authorized
$10 billion in high-speed rail bonds,
Deputy Attorney General Michele Inan said.
“The taxpayers are represented through
the legislative process,” Inan told
Sacramento County Superior Court Judge
Michael Kenny.
Kenny ruled in August that the rail author-
ity “abused its discretion by approving a
funding plan that did not comply with the
requirements of the law.” He further said it
had failed to identify “sources of funds that
were more than merely theoretically possi-
ble.”
Still, Inan argued that since the
Legislature approved spending the money
to get started on high-speed rail, only the
Legislature can undo it or ask for an updated
funding plan.
The 2008 proposition required the rail
authority to specify the source of the fund-
ing for the first operable segment of the
high-speed rail line and have all the neces-
sary environmental clearances in place.
Kenny said in his previous ruling that the
agency did not comply with either of those
mandates, but Proposition 1A appears to
leave it up to lawmakers to decide whether
the plan is sufficient to warrant funding.
Friday’s hearing was held for the judge to
consider what penalty, if any, he should
impose for the rail authority’s failure to
comply with the ballot initiative in its ini-
tial funding plan. The rail authority argues
that the judge’s ruling was based on an old
funding plan that has since been revised.
Attorneys for affected landowners who are
suing the state have asked Kenny to rescind
construction contracts, including a $1 bil-
lion deal signed this fall, or prevent the
state from spending any more of the voter-
approved bonds.
Judge weighs penalty for $68B high-speed rail plan
4
Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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Jean Marguerite Mathews
Jean Marguerite Mathews died at her home
in Lincoln, Nov. 6, 2013, surrounded by fam-
ily.
Born Oct. 10, 1936,
Jean graduated Star of the
Sea High School S.F. in
1954, and started work at
the Sailors’ Union of the
Pacific, where she retired
in 1995 after 41 years.
Jean married Wm.
Mathews of Oakland in
1958 and settled in the
East Bay. Jeanie never met a person she didn’t
like. She loved to walk, spend time with fam-
ily and friends, and the company of her dog
Andre. Preceded in death by her mother Jane
B. Lechner. She is survived by her husband of
55 years Wm. Mathews, sisters Shirley
Beattie (Bill Simmons) and Bernadette
McAllister (Douglas), brothers-in-law Jon
Krieg (Donna) and Douglas Dutra (Marilyn,
deceased), and many nieces and nephews.
Services will be held at Crippen & Flynn
Carlmont Chapel in Belmont. Visitation 6
p.m.-8 p.m., Friday, Nov. 15, funeral servic-
es noon Saturday, Nov. 16. Interment imme-
diately following at Skylawn Memorial Park.
Donations to the American Cancer Society.
Sign the guest book at
www.crippenflynn.com.
George Masafumi Ikeda
George Masafumi Ikeda, born April 29,
1959, died Nov. 4, 2013.
He was a resident of Foster City.
Husband of Yumiko Ikeda, father of Laura
Ikeda and Rachel Ikeda. Brother of Steven
Ikeda and Shingo Kohara. Son of Taeko
Kohara and Naohiro Kohara.
He received a bachelor’s of arts from Golden
Gate University. He was a supervisor at
Alameda County Social Services and a
English tutor for 25 years. “He loved junk-
food, sports and learning. He was a caring
father, husband and friend. You will always be
in our hearts and will never be forgotten. We
love you!”
The funeral service is 3 p.m. Nov. 16 at the
San Mateo Buddhist Temple, 2 S. Claremont
St. San Mateo, CA 94401.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A 40 year-old Half Moon Bay man
accused of smashing a car window with a
golf club because he thought another man
groped his wife’s backside pleaded no con-
test to misdemeanor vandalism in return for
time served.
Fernando Alvarado Sanchez changed his
plea Friday in return for the dismissal of
other charges and 32 days jail with the
same amount of credit. He received no pro-
bation.
Prosecutors say the Oct. 23 confronta-
tion started when another 40-year-old man
accidentally bumped the purse of a woman
at the Mercado Mi Familia Market in Half
Moon Bay. The next day, he was in his car
in the parking lot of the
99 Cent Store when
Sanchez reportedly
approached him scream-
ing threats.
The man locked him-
self in his car and
Sanchez reportedly
struck the side and win-
dow of the car several
times with the golf club.
Sheriff’s deputies
arrived and arrested Sanchez.
Sanchez claimed the victim had grabbed
his wife’s buttocks and denied the threats
and hits. Deputies found a golf club in his
car.
He had been in custody on $10,000 bail.
Vandalism plea deal
for grocery store run-in
Obituaries
Fernando
Sanchez
5
Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE/NATION
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A doctor who allegedly vandalized and
torched his San Carlos electronic cigarette
business multiple times after a mental
breakdown in December was insane at the
time, according to court-appointed doctors.
The conclusion doesn’t stop the prosecu-
tion of Dr. Noah Mark Minskoff, 34, of Palo
Alto, but could help determine if he is hos-
pitalized rather than incarcerated if convict-
ed.
Minskoff is charged with arson, vandal-
ism, resisting arrest, possessing metal
knuckles and committing a new offense
while out of custody for the earlier case. His
twin pleas of not guilty and not guilty by
reason of insanity mean a jury will first
determine if he is guilty and, if so, then
have a secondary trial on his mental state at
the time.
On Friday, jury trial was also scheduled for
Feb. 24 following a Jan. 21 pretrial confer-
ence.
Minskoff, who is also an ex-Army ranger,
is co-owner of Thermo Essence
Technologies in San Carlos. Thermo
Essence Technologies is billed on its web-
site as providing “the most advanced
portable convection vaporizer system
available.” Minskoff holds a patent for per-
sonal vaporizer inhalers.
Minskoff was in the midst of a divorce and
had a court order pro-
hibiting him from hav-
ing weapons. However,
in December, deputies
removed weapons from
the scenes of two sepa-
rate incidents at the San
Carlos business. On Dec.
15, deputies reported
finding $10,000 worth of
vandalism to the build-
ing and the property burned. Deputies took
Minskoff into custody for his bizarre behav-
ior and confiscated a loaded gun.
Two days later, according to prosecutors,
deputies again responded to the business
and found it ransacked with the floor burned
and Minskoff, who was at the scene, asked
them if they were there seeking employ-
ment. They took him once more into psy-
chiatric custody and searched the business
with the co-owner. Inside, they reported
finding four assault weapons and high-
capacity ammunition magazines. They also
reported finding a pair of brass knuckles in
his car.
Defense attorney Geoff Carr was not
immediately available to comment on the
insanity conclusion but has previously said
his client has some diagnosed psychiatric
issues. Minskoff has also been in a locked
psychiatric facility since his arrest. As long
as he remains there, he is free on a
$150,000 bail bond.
Doctor in office arson found insane
Noah Minskoff
By Christopher S. Rugaber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The U.S. economy may
be sturdier than many had assumed.
Employers added a surprisingly strong
204,000 jobs in October despite the 16-day
government shutdown, the Labor
Department said Friday. And they did a lot
more hiring in August and September than
previously thought.
Not only that, but activity at service com-
panies and factories accelerated last month.
Unemployment rose to 7.3 percent from
7.2 percent in September. But that was prob-
ably because furloughed federal workers were
temporarily counted as unemployed.
“It’s amazing how resilient the economy
has been in the face of numerous shocks,”
said Joe LaVorgna, chief U.S. economist at
Deutsche Bank.
Analysts say the economy might be able
to sustain its improvement.
They note that job gains of recent
months, combined with modest increases in
pay, could encourage more spending in
coming months. Growing demand for
homes should support construction. Auto
sales are likely to stay strong because many
Americans are buying cars after putting off
big purchases since the recession struck
nearly six years ago.
And with the nationwide average for
gasoline at $3.21 — the lowest since
December 2011 — consumers have a little
more money to spend.
Job growth is a major factor for the
Federal Reserve in deciding when to reduce
its economic stimulus. The Fed has been
buying bonds to keep long-term interest
rates low and encourage borrowing and
spending.
The Dow Jones industrial average surged
167 points to close at a record high Friday
after the jobs report came out.
But the yield on the 10-year Treasury note
climbed to 2.75 percent from 2.60 percent
late Thursday, indicating some investors are
worried the Fed might pull back on its bond-
buying soon.
U.S. businesses boost hiring despite the shutdown
REUTERS
Barack Obama shakes hands before he talks about the importance of growing the economy
while at the Port of New Orleans in Louisiana.
By Juliet WIlliams
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Many California state
employees received a boost this year after
complaining of furloughs and salary cuts dur-
ing the recession, with some of the largest
bargaining units agreeing to raises of 2 to 3
percent annually over the next few years.
But even as their unions were criticizing
the unpaid days off, thousands of state work-
ers continued to collect hundreds of millions
of dollars a year in contractually negotiated
bonuses and other types of extra payments,
on top of overtime and regular pay raises,
according to a review by the Associated
Press.
The add-ons have been part of the
st at e’s compensat i on syst em for
decades, and the costs have been rising
steadily in the last five years.
The total cost reached $516 million in
2012, up from $373 million in 2008. The
money was distributed among 95,705
employees who took on special duties or
skills affiliated with their jobs, according to
five years of California pay records for
250,000 state employees requested by the
AP. The costs have gone up in part because of
dozens of new categories the state was
required to add by federal court receivers over-
seeing the state’s troubled prison system.
The average payout in 2012 was $5,382
per employee for those who received extra
pay, a 17 percent increase over the previous
year and a 39 percent increase from five years
earlier. The most extra pay received by one
worker was nearly $531,000 for a senior psy-
chiatrist at a state mental hospital, nearly
double his annual salary.
State workers get $516M in bonus pay
6
Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE/NATION
* Frescriptians & Bame
MeJicaI 5uppIies 0eIivereJ
* 3 Fharmacists an 0uty
{650} 349-1373
29 west 257B Ave.
{ßear EI 0amina}
5an Matea
By Kevin Freking
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — It’s final: Health insur-
ance companies must cover mental illness
and substance abuse just as they cover phys-
ical diseases.
The Obama administration issued new reg-
ulations Friday that spell out how a 5-year-
old mental health parity law will be admin-
istered.
Health and Human Services Secretary
Kathleen Sebelius said the rule should put an
end to discrimination faced by some mental
health patients through higher out-of-pock-
et costs or stricter limits on hospital stays
or visits to the doctor.
The law, signed by President George W.
Bush, was designed to prevent that. But
mental health advocates said health insurers
at times sidestepped lawmakers’ intentions
by delaying requests for care and putting in
place other bureaucratic hurdles. They
described the new Obama administration
rule as necessary to ensure patients get ben-
efits they are entitled to receive.
The administration had pledged to issue a
final mental health parity rule as part of an
effort to reduce gun violence. Officials said
they have now completed or made signifi-
cant progress on 23 executive actions that
were part of a plan announced in response to
the school massacre in Newtown, Conn.,
last December.
The 2008 mental health parity law affects
large group plans. It does not require they
offer mental health coverage, but if they do,
that coverage must be equal to what is pro-
vided for patients with physical illnesses.
Meanwhile, the Affordable Care Act extends
the parity protections for those participat-
ing in individual and small group health
insurance plans.
New rule demands parity
for mental health coverage
By Don Thompson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — A union representing
health care workers is seeking to put two
initiatives on next year’s November ballot
that would restrict salaries at nonprofit hos-
pitals and limit how much those hospitals
can charge patients.
The proposed petitions were filed Friday
with the state attorney general’s office.
One would prohibit hospitals from charg-
ing more than 25 percent above their cost of
providing patient care. The union, SEIU-
United Healthcare Workers West, says state
hospitals charge an average of 320 percent
more than their actual cost, driving up costs
throughout the health care system.
The second initiative would cap annual
salaries for nonprofit hospital executives at
$450,000, the amount paid to the president
of the United States. The union says the
annual pay for the 10 highest paid nonprof-
it hospital executives in California aver-
aged $2.6 million in 2011, with one execu-
tive drawing more than $7.8 million.
D
uring Cancer Awareness Day at
Roy Cloud Elementary
Sc hool in Redwood City, there
were 19 hair donations and $1,400 raised
for The American
Cancer Soci et y. At the
event a Tongan mother
and daughter cut their
hair together. In Tongan
culture the women do not
cut their hair until their
father is deceased. The
daughters of the deceased
will cut their hair for
their father which is a
sign of love and respect to be handed over
to the highest aunt. She in turn will weave
them into belts to be worn for special occa-
sions. Luseane, an eighth grader, was
inspired to cut her hair in honor of her
aunt, who is battling cancer. After speak-
ing to her parents, they agreed to allow her
to join in Hair for Hope and her mother
joined her as well.
***
The Leyla Beban Young Authors
Foundation is now accepting submis-
sions to the ‘ $1, 000 f or 1 , 0 0 0 Words’
fiction-writing contest. The competition,
open to all current students in grades 6-12,
is looking for outstanding pieces of short
fiction consisting of exactly 1,000 words.
Class notes is a column dedicated to school news.
It is compiled by education reporter Angela
Swartz. You can contact her at (650) 344-5200,
ext. 105 or at angela@smdailyjournal.com.
Health care union seeks
nonprofit hospital limits
Ernesto Saldaña, vice president of s trategic p artnerships for Early Edge California, speaks to
a group of participants in the Family Engagement: A Partnership Among Families, Schools
and Communities workshop. On Tuesday, Nov. 5, Early Edge California and the San Mateo
County Office of Education hosted the Northern California Transitional Kindergarten
Conference.This was an opportunity for transitional kindergarten teachers,coaches,principals
and administrators to learn innovative transitional kindergarten practices from education
leaders and transitional kindergarten experts across California.
Luseane
NATION/WORLD 7
Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Rickets making a comeback in the U.K., doctors say
LONDON — Rickets, the childhood disease that once
caused an epidemic of bowed legs and curved spines during
the Victorian era, is making a shocking comeback in 21st-
century Britain.
Rickets results from a severe deficiency of vitamin D,
which helps the body absorb calcium. Rickets was histori-
cally considered to be a disease of poverty among children
who toiled in factories during the Industrial Revolution, and
some experts have hypothesized it afflicted literary charac-
ters like Tiny Tim in Charles Dickens’ “AChristmas Carol.”
Last month, Britain’s chief medical officer, Dr. Sally
Davies, described the return of rickets as “appalling.” She
proposed the country give free vitamins to all children under
5 and asked the country’s independent health watchdog to
study if that would be worthwhile.
Most people get vitamin D from the sun, oily fish, eggs or
dairy products. Rickets largely disappeared from Britain in
the 1950s, when the country embarked on mass programs to
give children cod liver oil. But in the last 15 years, the num-
ber of reported cases of rickets in hospitalized children has
increased fourfold — from 183 cases in 1995 to 762 cases in
2011. Experts said the actual number is probably even high-
er since there’s no official surveillance system and it’s
unknown whether the disease has peaked.
Pentagon report shows
spike in Afghan troop deaths
WASHINGTON — The number of Afghan national security
troops killed in combat shot up almost 80 percent during
this summer’s fighting season, compared with the same time
in 2012, as Afghans take the lead in the fight across the
country.
A Pentagon report says that U.S. and coalition deaths,
meanwhile, dropped by almost 60 percent during the same
six-month period. The Defense Department refused to release
numbers to explain the percentages, but U.S. military lead-
ers have said that the number of Afghans killed each week
had spiked to more than 100 earlier this year.
The high number of casualties and the Afghans’ limited
ability to evacuate their wounded, “adversely affects morale,
retention and recruiting,” according to the report, which the
Defense Department released Friday.
Spain: U.S. ambassador says NSA acts legally
MADRID — Spain says the U.S. ambassador has given
his assurances that the U.S. National Security Agency’s
activities in the country are carried out in conjunction with
Spain’s intelligence agency and in accordance with Spanish
law.
In a statement, the Foreign Ministry said U.S. Ambassador
James Costos told Foreign Minister Jose Manuel Garcia-
Margallo on Friday that NSAspying in Spain is always done
for security reasons like combatting terrorism. It said
Costos said the spying was never for economic reasons.
Around the world
By Jason Keyser
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO — Rising from the ashes
of 9/11, the new World Trade Center
tower has punched above the New York
skyline to reach its powerfully sym-
bolic height of 1,776 feet and become
the tallest building in the country. Or
has it?
A committee of architects recog-
nized as the arbiters on world building
heights was meeting Friday to decide
whether a design change affecting the
skyscraper’s 408-foot needle disquali-
fies it from being counted.
Disqualification would deny the tower
the title as the nation’s tallest.
But there’s more than bragging
rights at stake; 1 World Trade Center
stands as a monument to those killed
in the terrorist attacks, and the ruling
could dim the echo of America’s found-
ing year in the structure’s height.
Without the needle, the building meas-
ures 1,368 feet, a number that also
holds symbolic weight as the height
of the original World Trade Center.
What’s more, the decision is being
made by an organization based in
Chicago, whose cultural and architec-
tural history is embodied by the Willis
— formerly Sears — Tower that would
be knocked into second place by a vote
in favor of the New York structure.
“Most of the time these decisions are
not so controversial,” said Daniel
Safarik, an architect and spokesman
for the nonprofit Council on Tall
Buildings and Urban Habitat. The 30
members of its Height Committee are
meeting to render a judgment behind
closed doors in Chicago, where the
world’s first skyscraper appeared in
1884.
The committee, comprising industry
professionals from all over the world,
will announce its decision next week.
The question over 1 World Trade
Center, which remains under construc-
tion and is expected to open next year,
arose because of a change to the design
of its tower-topping needle. Under the
council’s current criteria, spires that
are an integral part of a building’s aes-
thetic design count; broadcast anten-
nas that can be added and removed do
not .
The designers of 1 World Trade
Center had intended to enclose the
mast’s communications gear in decora-
tive cladding made of fiberglass and
steel.
Height of 1 World Trade
Center debated in Chicago
REUTERS
A view of the Manhattan skyline is seen from the 57th floor of the soon to be opened 4 World Trade Center tower in New York.
By Donna Cassata
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The third-ranking
House Republican told immigration
advocates that lawmakers won’t vote
this year on the issue, confirming what
many had long assumed.
California Rep. Kevin McCarthy,
the majority whip, said in a meeting
with immigration proponents that
there weren’t enough days left for the
House to act and he was committed to
addressing overhaul of the nation’s
immigration system next year. The
congressman’s office confirmed what
he said.
Angelica Salas, the board chair-
woman for the Coalition for Humane
Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles,
described her conversation with
McCarthy in a conference call with
reporters on Friday and a subsequent
interview with the Associated Press.
“What he said was, there’s 13 days
left, it’s very hard to do anything in 13
days,” Salas said of McCarthy.
The House returns next week after a
weeklong break, but only has a few
legislative days remaining.
The Senate passed a comprehensive
bill in June that would provide a path
to citizenship for the 11 million immi-
grants in the country illegally and
tighten border security, but piecemeal
bills in the House have languished
since the summer.
Salas and about a dozen women occu-
pied McCarthy’s Bakersfield office on
Thursday to increase the pressure on
the Republican to move ahead on
immigration legislation.
McCarthy: No House votes on immigration this year
WORLD 8
Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Winter Holiday Promotions
Beauty & Skin Care
- Slgnature lydratlng laclal $38/90min (Reg:$68)
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A FAMILY SHARING HOPE IN CHRIST
HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman
Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM
Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.
Call (650) 349-0100
HopeLutheranSanMateo.org
Baptist
PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor
(650) 343-5415
217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services 8 & 11 am
Sunday School 9:30 am
Wednesday Worship 7pm
www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
4:30 a.m.at 5:30 PM
Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo Shinshu Buddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo
(650) 342-2541
Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Henry Adams
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org
Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and 2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
Clases de Biblicas Y Servicio de
Adoracion
En Espanol, Si UD. Lo Solicita
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm
Congregational
• THE •
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
OF SAN MATEO - UCC
225 Tilton Ave. & San Mateo Dr.
(650) 343-3694
Worship and Church School
Every Sunday at 10:30 AM
Coffee Hour at 11:45 AM
Nursery Care Available
www.ccsm-ucc.org
Lutheran
GLORIA DEI LUTHERAN
CHURCH AND SCHOOL
(WELS)
2600 Ralston Ave., Belmont,
(650) 593-3361
Sunday Schedule: Sunday
School / Adult Bible Class,
9:15am; Worship, 10:30am
Non-Denominational
REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...
To know Christ and make him known.
901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223
Sunday services:
9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org
Non-Denominational
Church of the
Highlands
“A community of caring Christians”
1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor
By Oliver Teves and Teresa Cerojano
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MANILA, Philippines — One of the
strongest storms on record slammed into
the central Philippines, killing at least
four people, forcing hundreds of thousands
from their homes and knocking out power
and communications in several provinces.
But the nation appeared to avoid a major
disaster because the rapidly moving
typhoon blew away before wreaking more
damage, officials said.
Typhoon Haiyan left the Philippines
early Saturday on a path toward Southeast
Asia, the U.S. National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration tweeted.
Forecasters said the storm was expected to
pick up renewed strength over the South
China Sea on its way toward Vietnam.
Nearly 750,000 people in the
Philippines were forced to flee their homes.
Weather officials said Haiyan had sus-
tained winds of 235 kph (147 mph) with
gusts of 275 kph (170 mph) when it made
landfall. By those measurements, Haiyan
would be comparable to a strong Category
4 hurricane in the U.S., nearly in the top
category, a 5.
Hurricanes, cyclones and typhoons are
the same thing. They are just called differ-
ent names in different parts of the world.
Because of cut-off communications in the
Philippines, it was impossible to know the
full extent of casualties and damage. At
least two people were electrocuted in
storm-related accidents, one person was
killed by a fallen tree and another was
struck by lightning, official reports said.
Southern Leyte Gov. Roger Mercado said
the typhoon ripped roofs off houses and
triggered landslides that blocked roads.
The dense clouds and heavy rains made
the day seem almost as dark as night, he
said.
“When you’re faced with such a scenario,
you can only pray, and pray and pray, ”
Mercado told the Associated Press by tele-
phone, adding that mayors in the province
had not called in to report any major dam-
age.
“I hope that means they were spared and
not the other way around,” he said. “My
worst fear is there will be massive loss of
lives and property.”
Eduardo del Rosario, head of the disaster
response agency, said the speed at which
the typhoon sliced through the central
islands — 40 kph (25 mph) — helped pre-
vent its 600-kilometer (375-mile) band of
rain clouds from dumping enough of their
load to overflow waterways. Flooding from
heavy rains is often the main cause of
deaths from typhoons.
“It has helped that the typhoon blew very
fast in terms of preventing lots of casual-
ties,” regional military commander Lt.
Gen. Roy Deveraturda said. He said the mas-
sive evacuation of villagers before the
storm also saved many lives.
The Philippines, which is hit by about
20 typhoons and storms a year, has in
recent years become more serious about
preparations to reduce deaths. Public serv-
ice announcements are frequent, as are
warnings by the president and high-rank-
ing officials that are regularly carried on
radio and TV and social networking sites.
One of world’s strongest storms lashes Philippines
By George Jahn and John Heilprin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
GENEVA — With a boost from Russia and
China, Secretary of State John Kerry
mounted a major diplomatic push Friday to
reach an interim nuclear deal with Iran,
despite fierce opposition from Israel and
uncertainty in Congress.
But day-long talks, including a five-hour
meeting that brought together Kerry and
Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad
Zarif, failed to resolve differences. Iran’s
chief nuclear negotiator, Deputy Foreign
Minister Abbas Araghchi, described the
late-night session as “productive” but
added, without elaboration, that “we still
have lots of work to do” and talks would
continue Saturday.
A senior State
Department official said
“over the course of the
evening we continued to
make progress” but
“there is more work to
do.” He spoke on condi-
tion of anonymity
because he was not
authorized to character-
ize the talks.
Kerry and his counterparts from Britain,
France and Germany arrived in Geneva with
the talks at a critical stage following a full
day of negotiations Thursday and said some
obstacles remained in the way of any agree-
ment offering sanctions reductions for
nuclear concessions.
Word that Russian Foreign Minister
Sergey Lavrov and a Chinese deputy foreign
minister also were headed to the talks pro-
vided fresh hope for at least an interim deal,
perhaps on Saturday.
But Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin
Netanyahu insisted any agreement in the
making was a “bad deal” that gave Iran a
pass by offering to lift sanctions for cos-
metic concessions that Netanyahu said left
intact Tehran’s nuclear weapons-making
ability.
Asked about Netanyahu’s criticism, White
House spokesman Josh Earnest said “any
critique of the deal is premature” because an
agreement has not been reached.
The White House later said President
Barack Obama called Netanyahu to update
him on the ongoing talks and said Obama
affirmed he’s still committed to preventing
Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. The
White House said Obama and Netanyahu
will stay in close contact.
Kerry tempered reports of progress, warn-
ing of “important gaps” that must be over-
come in the elusive deal that would offer
limited sanctions relief if Iran starts cap-
ping programs that could make atomic
weapons.
Lavrov also was joining the talks,
Russia’s RIA Novosti news agency report-
ed. His deputy, Sergei Ryabov, was quoted
as saying that Moscow expects them to pro-
duce a “lasting result expected by the inter-
national community. ”
Kerry mounts diplomatic push on Iran nuclear talks
John Kerry
REUTERS
A man walks past a tree uprooted by strong winds brought by super Typhoon Haiyan that hit
Cebu city, central Philippines.
OPINION 9
Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Veterans Day
Editor,
Ninety-four years ago, President
Woodrow Wilson proclaimed Nov. 11
Armistice Day to remember the end of
World War I and the veterans who
served our country. While the holiday
is now recognized as Veterans Day,
the day’s purpose remains the same:
to celebrate and commemorate the
bravery and sacrifice of all U.S. veter-
ans — both past and present.
So while you and your family enjoy
a day off, do not forget the real reason
you are able to relax. Please take a
moment to stop and thank a veteran
for their willingness to serve and sac-
rifice for the freedoms we all enjoy or
contact your local Veterans of
Foreign Wars Post for ways to make a
difference in veterans’ lives on
Veterans Day and throughout the year.
Ed Ford
State commander, Veterans of Foreign
Wars of the United States
Insurance costs
Editor,
On Oct. 28, 2013, the Daily
Journal reported that the San Mateo
Union High School District will
spend $2.3 million a year extra to
cover Employee Health Care insur-
ance cost (“Teachers get 5 percent
raise” in the Oct. 28 edition of the
Daily Journal).
“The premiums go up by double
digits,” Elizabeth McManus, deputy
superintendent, said. “These are huge
changes that will cost employees
more money. It’s very cost prohibi-
tive getting health benefits.” Around
the Bay Area, employees at Palo Alto
Unified School District, as reported
by Palo Alto Weekly on Nov. 4, and
the AC Transit District also face much
higher insurance rates. Health care
cost also played a role in the BART
strike. Same issues face other dis-
tricts from Monterrey, to Westport,
Conn., to Arkansas, and to Pinellas,
Fla. Teachers will be forced to swal-
low an effective pay cut. Or taxpay-
ers, especially homeowners, will
eventually cover these increased costs
to our school districts. Or both.
Could the Daily Journal ask the deep-
er question of what is causing this
sudden jump in insurance cost locally
and throughout the country?
George Yang
Menlo Park
Two separate issues
Editor,
Patricia Gray linked two issues that
need to be considered separately (let-
ter to the editor, “Israel and food
stamps” in the Nov. 5 edition of the
Daily Journal).
Congress needs to compromise:
both raise taxes and decrease spend-
ing. The U.S. government should
monitor the eligibility for food
stamps, instead of cutting the amount
of aid. The military aid to Israel is
mostly spent in the United States.
Israel is the only democratic, depend-
able ally of the United States in the
Middle East and needs help to defend
itself against its enemies. Israel’s
expertise benefits the United States
and the world: medical and communi-
cations technology, agriculture, water
resources, defense against terrorism
and disaster relief. U.S. aid to Israel is
a bargain, considering the benefits.
Norman Licht
San Carlos
Letters to the editor
The Press-Enterprise
C
alifornia’s ambitious restruc-
turing of the criminal justice
system should not merely
push state prison ills onto county
government. The Legislature needs to
make adjustments to the realignment
program, including changes to jail
sentences and parole violations, to
ease the burdens on overstressed
counties.
Anew report by the Stanford
Criminal Justice Center at Stanford
University, just released, finds both
potential for success and substantial
challenges in the state’s realignment
plans. The Legislature in 2011 gave
counties responsibility for so-called
“low-risk” felons and parolees, in an
attempt to trim state spending and
ease state prison crowding.
The premise was that counties could
handle low-level felons and parolees
more effectively and at less cost than
could the state. But the Legislature
threw the realignment plan together
in a rush, without careful planning or
preparation. While the report notes
that not enough time has passed to be
able to judge the success of the pro-
gram, some flaws in the plan are now
obvious — and need fixing. Otherwise
realignment could easily become just
another California corrections failure.
Legislators, for example, should
limit the length of time convicts can
serve in county jails to no more than
three years. County jails were not
designed for long-term stays, with the
health care, education and other serv-
ices such confinement requires. Yet
jails now have inmates serving sen-
tences of five to 10 years or more.
That mismatch risks the same sort
of court battles that hit state prisons
over the past two decades. Already,
several counties — including
Riverside County — face lawsuits
alleging inadequate mental and physi-
cal health care. Requiring convicts to
serve sentences longer than three
years in state prison would ease the
strain on county jail services and jail
capacity.
The Legislature should also mandate
prison time for repeat parole viola-
tions. Before realignment, parole
violators faced a return to prison, but
now violations only result in county
jail time. But given the lack of space
in many county jails, those under
supervision often face only minor
consequences for bad behavior.
Criminal justice policy should com-
pel good conduct upon release —
which does not happen without credi-
ble enforcement for breaking the
rules.
The report also recommends creat-
ing a statewide database of released
offenders supervised by counties,
similar to how the state records
parolees. That would help law
enforcement keep track of ex-con-
victs under supervision. And the state
parole system should oversee
parolees with histories of serious,
violent crimes, instead of ceding
supervision to county systems not
equipped to handle hard-core crimi-
nals.
Such changes would complicate
efforts to cut the state prison popula-
tion, by sending some convicts back
to state custody. But California hardly
benefits by replicating the state’s
prison crisis at the county level.
The goal should be improved public
safety, not merely offloading state
responsibilities. Realignment can
work — if legislators are willing to
fix the program’s flaws.
Fix obvious flaws in prison realignment
Obamacare, we
hardly knew ye
T
he Washington Post recently published an article,
“The memoir that could have saved Obamacare,” by
Amy Goldstein and Juliet Eilperin. It states that in
May 2010 David Cutler, a health adviser to Obama’s 2008
campaign, sent a memo to Larry Summers, director of the
White House’s National Economic Council. In it, Cutler
expressed concern about how the administration was
implementing the new legislation. Summers and Peter
Orszag, head of the Office of Management and Budget,
agreed. They and Zeke Emanuel, Obama health care adviser,
asked Obama to appoint a health
reform “czar” expert in business,
insurance and technology to
oversee construction of the
exchange being set up to handle
Obamacare.
But the health policy team, led
by Nancy-Ann Deparle, said they
could handle it. They couldn’t. In
a nutshell, they didn’t hire the
right talent and they worked in a
climate openly hostile to the
Republicans, trying to keep them
in the dark. Somewhere along the
way, Deparle was promoted and
exited the project. Then the
White House decided the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid
Services would implement it. They botched it.
The Obama administration claims it brought in the best
experts from Silicon Valley. Actually only one of the peo-
ple working on this problem lives within a thousand miles
of Silicon Valley. CGI Group, the major contractor work-
ing on the problem, is a Canadian company. Most of its
workforce appears to be located in Bangalore, India.
My friends in Silicon Valley say this kind of site is not
complex and should have not cost more than a million dol-
lars. CGI has billed the U.S. government — actually us,
the taxpayers — $600 million so far and the final cost is
expected to approach a billion dollars.
But the website isn’t the only problem with Obamacare.
In fact, it is the least of all our concerns about Obamacare.
Now we learn that you cannot keep your present health
insurance policy if you like it even though the president
promised us over and over again that we could. An opinion
piece in the Wall Street Journal made that perfectly clear.
Edie Littlefield Sundby of San Diego has stage-4 gall-
bladder cancer. That particular cancer has a five-year sur-
vival rate of less than 2 percent. She has fought it for
almost seven years and survived, thanks to her United
Health Care insurance policy and the doctors and health
teams at U.C. San Diego Moores Cancer Center, Stanford
University Cancer Institute and the M.D. Anderson Cancer
Center in Houston.
Then she received a notice that her medical insurance
policy will be canceled Dec. 31, and she had to replace it
with a policy offered by Obamacare. She contacted Covered
California, the Obamacare exchange in California. Under
the new insurance, U.C. San Diego agreed to accept only
one Covered California plan, a very restrictive Anthem
EPO Plan that has a small network of doctors and facilities
and no out-of-network coverage except for emergencies.
Stanford accepts an Anthem PPO plan but it is not avail-
able in San Diego. Before the Affordable Care Act, health
insurance policies could not be sold across state lines; now
policies cannot be offered across county lines. Her only
other choice is to for insurance outside the exchange. She
said the quotes she is receiving average 40 percent to 50
percent more, which she cannot afford.
One would have thought the administration would remain
quiet regarding this matter, or perhaps show a little sympa-
thy. But they didn’t, on both counts. Instead, they attacked
Ms. Sundby. Dan Pfeiffer, the head communication strate-
gist, used his official White House Twitter account to send a
message to Think Progress, a far left blog run by a former
Clinton White House chief of staff, to get the word out that
UHC abandoned Ms. Sundby and pulled out of the insurance
market for financial reasons. It didn’t work. The nation
flocked to her side and shouted a collective, “Shame on
you, White House.”
Do you recall the official name for Obamacare? It is the
Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Was Ms.
Sundby protected by Obamacare? Did it offer her the pro-
tection she needed? No and No. Obamacare has effectively
given her a death sentence.
According to Covered California, 1.9 million people
buy their insurance on the open market and 570,000
should be eligible for subsidies that will reduce their pre-
miums.
To date, nationwide, 3.6 million people have been
kicked off their “lousy” health care plans. The Office of
Management and Budget predicts this number will reach 30
million.
So, everybody keep dialing. Eventually you will get
through. You can fix a website, but you can’t fix a lie.
Chuck McDougald served as statewide volunteer chair for
Carly Fiorina’s campaign for the U.S. Senate. He lives in
South San Francisco with his wife and two kids.
Other voices
ChuckMcDougald
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BUSINESS 10
Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 15,761.78 +167.80 10-Yr Bond 2.75 +0.133
Nasdaq 3,919.23 +61.90 Oil (per barrel) 94.35
S&P 500 1,770.61 +23.46 Gold 1,288.20
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Friday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Cablevison Systems Corp., down 55 cents to $15.08
The cable provider returned to a third-quarter profit, free of last year’s
charges related to the refinancing of its debt. But it lost customers.
PulteGroup Inc., down 66 cents to $16.85
Shares in homebuilders stumbled as strong U.S. economic reports lead
many investors to believe mortgage rates will rise.
Tremor Video Inc., down $4.54 to $4.72
The online video advertising company posted a wider loss than expected
and one analyst says it is facing increasing competition as money flows
into TV ads.
Nasdaq
Amarin Corp. PLC, up 16 cents to $1.57
Citigroup raised its rating to a ’buy,’seeing potential for the broader use
of the biotech company’s prescription fish oil drug.
Universal Display Corp., up $7.46 to $36.61
The LED technology company swung to a profit for its third quarter on
improved sales and issued a strong revenue forecast.
Santarus Inc., up $8.73 to $31.95
The pharmaceutical company is being acquired by Salix for $2.12 billion
as it expands its treatments for gastrointestinal disorders.
Tesla Motors Inc., down $1.82 to $137.95
For the third time, a pricey Model S electric vehicle catches fire, this time
after striking road debris in Tennessee.
Sequenom Inc., up 41 cents to $2.11
More success in collecting bills and fewer uncompensated Medicaid
tests trimmed losses for the genetic analysis company.
Big movers
By Ken Sweet and Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — An unexpectedly
strong jobs report gave stocks a lift
on Friday, pushing the Dow Jones
industrial average back to an all-time
high.
The gains were led by banks, such as
Bank of America and JPMorgan
Chase, which stand to benefit from a
pickup in lending as the economy
strengthens. Consumer-focused
stocks such as Priceline.com and
Disney also rose after reporting high-
er profit s.
Losers included housing stocks and
Twitter, which dropped 7 percent the
day after its initial public offering.
Friday’s jobs report left investors
grappling with how to interpret this
week’s good economic news and what
it means for the Federal Reserve’s
stimulus program. That program has
helped power this year’s stock rally.
“We’re walking a tight wire with the
Fed,” said Rob Lutts, Chief
Investment Officer at Cabot Money
Management. He said the jobs report
was positive because it showed the
economy was improving, but perhaps
not strongly enough to assure that the
Fed will pull back on its bond-buying
program before the end of year.
The Dow gained 167.80 points, or
1.1 percent, to 15,761.78. It also
closed at a record high on Wednesday.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index
ended 23.46 higher, or 1.3 percent, at
1,770.61, just a point below its
record. The Nasdaq composite rose
61.90 points, or 1.6 percent, to
3, 919. 23.
Both the Dow and S&P 500 recov-
ered all of their losses from Thursday,
when concern about the Fed withdraw-
ing its stimulus outweighed optimism
about faster economic growth.
The reaction to the jobs news was
more pronounced in the Treasurys mar-
ket. The yield on the 10-year Treasury
note jumped to its highest level in six
weeks as investors sold Treasurys,
anticipating less demand if the Fed
slows its purchases. Rising interest
rates are a sign that investors are more
confident in the economy. They are a
boon to banks because it means that
they can lend money at higher rates.
The yield on the 10-year note
jumped from 2.60 percent on Thursday
to 2.75 percent Friday, the highest
level since Sept. 20. JPMorgan Chase
rose $2.31, or 4.5 percent, to $53.96.
Bank of America gained 52 cents, or
3.8 percent, to $14.32.
Housing stocks were among the
biggest decliners on Friday.
Rising Treasury yields lead to high-
er mortgage rates, and that can hurt
demand for homes. Lennar fell $1.45,
or 4.2 percent, to $32.79. PulteGroup
dropped 66 cents, or 3.8 percent, to
$16.85.
The government reported that U.S.
employers added 204,000 jobs in
October, an unexpected burst of hiring
during a month in which the federal
government was partially shut down
for 16 days. The job additions were far
greater than the 130,000 economists
were expecting, according to FactSet,
a financial data provider.
The jobs report was the second piece
of robust economic news that Wall
Street received in the past two days.
The Commerce Department said
Thursday that the U.S. economy grew
at an annual rate of 2.8 percent in the
third quarter, better than the 2.5 per-
cent economists expected.
The Fed has been buying $85 bil-
lion worth of bonds each month since
last December to keep long-term
interest rates low and encourage hir-
ing and borrowing. The program has
also helped drive up stock prices by
making bonds look expensive by
comparison.
Some analysts say the Fed’s role in
the stock market surge has been over-
stated, compared with factors such as
rising corporate earnings. Removing
the stimulus would likely benefit the
economy by eliminating one of the
uncertainties facing U.S. businesses,
said Liz Ann Sonders, chief invest-
ment strategist at Charles Schwab.
Dow hits another high on hiring surge
By Barbara Ortutay
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Twitter’s stock slid more
than 7 percent on its second trading day
Friday, after the popular short messaging
service saw a huge first-day pop in what
turned out to be a smooth public debut.
Such volatile trading is common for
freshly public stocks as investors make
decisions with limited insight into how
well companies will do in the long run.
Although there are a few outliers, most
analysts believe the appropriate price
range for Twitter’s stock is in the $30s and
low $40s. The mean target price analysts
have set for the stock, according to
FactSet, is $40, with targets ranging from
$29 to $54.
Wedbush analyst Michael Pachter
arrived at his $37 price target by assuming
Twitter will double its 230 million month-
ly users to 460 million over the next five
years while increasing the number of
times users look at Twitter every day.
Pachter estimates Twitter will deliver $3.5
billion in EBITDA — earnings before
interest, taxes, depreciation, and amorti-
zation — by 2018.
“Twitter is likely in the early innings of
its growth,” Pachter wrote in a note to
investors. “We believe that the majority
of the world’s 2.4 billion Internet users
have great potential to find something or
someone on Twitter that they are interest-
ed in.”
San Francisco-based Twitter’s stock fell
$3.25, or 7 percent, to $41.65 in trading
on Friday despite an uptick in the broader
market.
The shares are still up 60 percent from
the $26 IPO price Twitter and the IPO’s
underwriting bankers set Wednesday
night. Twitter made $1.8 billion in the
offering. On Thursday, the company’s
stock jumped 73 percent in its first day of
trading, creating hordes of new million-
aires — and even a few billionaires.
Twitter stock slides on second trading day
By Tom Krisher
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT — Investors in the Tesla
electric car company stemmed the bleed-
ing a bit Friday. But it was still an
abysmal few days, marred by another
fire in a Model S and earnings results
that many found disappointing.
Tesla’s shares dropped a total of $37
on Wednesday and Thursday and were
down another $7 by noon Friday before
recovering to finish with a loss of
$1.82. Twenty-two million shares trad-
ed Friday, almost double the average
daily volume.
In three days, Tesla shareholders lost
$4.7 billion, or nearly 22 percent of
their investment. Billionaire CEO Elon
Musk, who held about 28 million shares
as of May 30, or a nearly a quarter of the
stock, lost more than $1 billion as Tesla
stock plunged from $176.81 at the
close Tuesday to $137.95 on Friday.
Tesla could face more challenges next
week. The National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration, the U.S. govern-
ment’s auto safety watchdog, said Friday
it is in close contact with Tennessee
officials, gathering information before
deciding if a full investigation is need-
ed.
However, by late Friday afternoon,
NHTSAhad not spoken with the trooper
investigating the fire, said Tennessee
Highway Patrol spokeswoman Dayla
Qualls in an email to the Associated
Press.
For most of the year, Tesla Motors
Inc. was a Wall Street darling as the
Model S received a top safety rating
from the NHTSA and accolades from
Consumer Reports and other magazines.
Tesla, which is based in Palo Alto post-
ed its first quarterly profit in the second
quarter. Tesla’s stock rose more than
470 percent from Jan. 1 through Sept.
30. The next day came the first fire in a
Model S, outside of Seattle.
This week, a similar incident involv-
ing road debris occurred near Smyrna,
Tenn. Before pictures of the fire
appeared online, investors were already
concerned by the company’s earnings
report and a statement from Musk about
Tesla needing more lithium-ion batter-
ies to keep up with demand.
The Tennessee blaze appeared to be
similar to one on Oct. 1 in Kent, Wash.
In that fire, a curved piece of metal punc-
tured a shield and the battery, which is
mounted under the passenger compart-
ment in the Model S.
Tesla stems bleeding after bad few days
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Google plans
to include a dozen or so massive sails
on its four-story barge under construc-
tion in the heart of the San Francisco
Bay, creating a floating artistic struc-
ture the Internet giant promises will
“stand out,” a newspaper reported
Friday.
After weeks of speculation that
barge would be “a party boat,” a data
storage center and a store to sell its
Internet-connected glasses, Google on
Wednesday revealed that it plans to use
the vessel as an “interactive space
where people can learn about new tech-
nology. ”
The San Francisco Chronicle report-
ed that it obtained planning documents
for the vessel from the Port of San
Francisco through a public records
request. The documents shed more
light on a project shrouded in mystery.
Google has been tight-lipped about
the barge and has managed to conceal
much of its purpose by constructing it
on docked barges instead of on land,
where city building permits and public
plans are mandatory.
The Chronicle reported that the sails
shaped like fish fins are meant to
instill in visitors a sense of seaworthi-
ness while aboard the boxy 50-foot-
tall, 250-foot-long structure made of
recycled shipping containers. The doc-
uments submitted to the port boast the
completed project will be an “unprece-
dented artistic structure” and promises
the “structure will stand out.”
Report: Google’s barge to hoist sails
Findus on
Facebook at www.facebook.com/FishLineApp
Oyster Point Marina
95 Harbor Master Road #1
South San Francisco, CA
94080
Pillar Point Harbor
1 Johnson Pier
Half Moon Bay, CA
94019
It doesn’t get
any fresher!
Just caught seafood for
sale right at the docks
at Pillar Point Harbor.
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sale right at the docks
at Pillar Point Harbor.
<< Page 12, Warriors
fall in San Antonio — again Weekend, Nov. 9-10, 2013
PLENTY OF NEW FACES: THE CSM WOMEN’S BASKETBALL TEAM OPENS SEASON WITH A FULL ROSTER FOR A CHANGE >> PAGE 12
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
It took about a quarter for the Sacred Heart
Prep football team’s defense to figure out
Terra Nova’s spread offensive attack.
When they did, The Gators actually
outscored the Tigers 15-9 over the final
three quarters of the game.
Unfortunately for Sacred Heart Prep, the
game, it turns out, was decided in the open-
ing 12 minutes. Terra Nova scored three
touchdowns in the first quarter and then held
on to post a 29-15 win over Sacred Heart
Prep.
The win gives Terra Nova (5-0 PALBay, 9-
0 overall) its fifth-straight Peninsula
Athletic League Bay Division crown.
“Sacred Heart Prep is the heir apparent to
all this (the PAL’s Bay Division),” said Terra
Nova coach Bill Gray. “But not yet.”
For the second time in three weeks, it was
the play of the Tigers’ defense that paved the
way for a major Terra Nova win. On Oct. 25,
it was the Tigers’ defense shutting down
Menlo School’s vaunted aerial attack.
Friday, it handcuffed the Gators’ ground
assault. They limited Sacred Heart Prep to
140 yards on the ground.
“Our defense is the best in CCS,” said
Jaylend Jones, Terra Nova’s star receiver and
team captain. “They’ve carried us the last
couple of weeks. I’m happy we (the Terra
Nova offense) doesn’t have to play against
them.”
The Tigers’ defense limited Sacred Heart
Prep (3-1, 8-1) to “just” 317 yards of total
offense, but also held the Gators to 23
points below their season average of 38
points per game. Terra Nova also forced four
Sacred Heart Prep turnovers, which the
Tigers turned into nine points — and more
importantly, kept the Gators out of the end
zone.
“We scored when we needed to and played
Tigers Bay champs again
Terra Nova tops Sacred Heart Prep for fifth straight division title
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Terra Nova’s Jordan Genato leaps into the end zone for a nine-yard score during the Tigers’
29-15 win over Sacred Heart Prep.
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
There is winning a Peninsula Athletic
League Lake Division title — and there’s
doing what the Hillsdale Knights did Friday
afternoon.
From the opening kickoff to the sound of
the buzzer at the end of the game, Hillsdale
was not simply content with capturing its
first division championship since 2009 and
only its third since 1991. No, Hillsdale
pinned its ears back and came after it like it
was their birthright, like the Knights had
been starving for the division crown since
they first got together for workouts last
spring.
After scoring seven first-half touchdowns
in what was a complete blitz of King’s
Academy on offense and defense, Hillsdale
is going to the Central Coast Section play-
offs as Lake Division champions after a 66-
14 win — completing their run through the
division at a perfect 5-0.
“I love these kids,” said Hillsdale head
coach Mike Parodi as he fought back some
tears. “They, as a group — players, coaches,
parents, all the support — have worked our
butts off to get to this point. These kids
have fought through some adversity these
past years and they made the conscious
choice to get better. And they did every-
thing we, as coaches, asked them to do.
Today was just a great culmination in the
league to show that we’re a pretty darn good
program.”
“I’ve never been a champion. So it feels
amazing,” said Hillsdale quarterback Cole
Carrithers. “We’ve been working too hard
not to take it. We came out knowing that we
had to come out fast because we knew their
defense wasn’t going to be able to keep up
with us once we got going faster and faster.
We knew that if they were going to play the
defense they were, that we were going to be
able to take deep shots.”
Hillsdale is king of the PAL’s Lake Division
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
With a huge “yes” that muffled a roaring
Caltrain making it’s way north right outside
the campus stadium, Burlingame head coach
John Philipopoulos made it official: The
Panthers’ 11-year championship drought is
now over.
For the first time since the 2003 season,
Burlingame football can print out those
“Division Champion” T-shirts by virtue of
their 48-17 shelling of Woodside High School
Friday night. The win, coupled with an Aragon
victory over San Mateo, gives the Panthers
the Peninsula Athletic League Ocean Division
title and stamps their ticket to the Central
Coast Section playoffs.
“It’s been a long time,” Philipopoulos said.
“All the credit in the world goes to the kids.
They’ve wanted it. They earned it. They
responded with a great week of practice. We’ve
had an outstanding season to this point but we
know our work is not done. We still have a lot
of work to go. We have to keep getting better.
I feel like we probably played our best game of
the season tonight and the timing couldn’t
have been any better.”
Indeed it couldn’t have. In Woodside, the
Panthers faced arguably their stiffest competi-
tion of the season. With the athletes the
Wildcats can throw at you, plus their 3-1
record heading into this game, a lot was on the
line Friday night. AWoodside win and things
would have been much more interesting and
heartbreaking for the Panthers.
Burlingame’s
title drought
comes to end
Panthers’ win and
SanMateo loss gives
title to Burlingame
See BAY, Page 18
See LAKE, Page 16
See OCEAN, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
College of San Mateo guard Amanda Lee
and her head coach Michelle Warner shared a
laugh during a press conference earlier in
the week retelling a moment that pretty
much sums up the Bulldogs’ newest “prob-
lem.”
When practice kicked off and all the
potential Bulldogs gathered in the locker
room, the women found themselves having
to share lockers.
“I was used to having seven, maybe eight
players in there at time,” Lee said. “We had
like 22 or 23 in there. It was crowded — a
lot of new faces.”
“I remember the first practice, we didn’t
have enough baskets when we partnered
them all up,” Warner said, laughing a bit. “I
don’t think I’ve ever had that problem. So,
it’s a good problem to have. We’re down to
a good 15. They all can play. So it just
depends on who we’re going against. The
versatility is exciting and making the deci-
sion of what’s going to be the most effec-
tive each game. I’m excited to have a lot of
bodies this year.”
For Warner, it’s nice because the now 17-
year head coach of the Bulldogs can go back
to doing what she does best — coach,
instead of monitoring injuries and head into
games with a bench of one of two healthy
substitutes like she did last season and the
season before that.
And so it’s with that renewed sense of
health and power in numbers that the
College of San Mateo women’s basketball
team heads into the new season. Their first
tip off of the year is scheduled for 3 p.m.
Saturday at American River College. The
Bulldogs aren’t 100 percent healthy — of
the 15 players listed on the roster, 12 are
available for the opener. Still, it’s a far cry
from last season and it’s actually a complete
180 if you consider that practice started
with 23 potential players.
Yes, Warner and her staff had the luxury of
making cuts and making sure the women
wearing the blue and white this season are
indeed the college’s best.
“It’s nice to know that, if someone is
injured, we’re not down to six or seven
(players),” Warner said. “And while I’d like
to have all of them (this weekend), it’s an
opportunity for some of them to step up and
get more time.”
Despite the added roster size, some of
those players are of the “please, don’t get
hurt or we’re in trouble” kind — mainly, her
three-guard attack of all sophomores.
Unlike last year, Warner has six sopho-
mores on this year’s team (as opposed to
just two). Of those, Lee, Vanessa Siega and
Kay Cooper will be looked upon to carry the
leadership load in 2013. Siega said she’s
looking forward to be a face on the team.
“I just want to finish my sophomore year
strong and have no regrets,” she said. “I
guess this year I’m more into improving
myself more than I was last year. The adjust-
ment from being a freshman to a sopho-
more, I have to learn leadership in a way.
That’s what really pushed me to improve
myself. I’m still in the process of trying to
be comfortable with being a leader. I’m just
trying to get there.”
“Vanessa isn’t a local leader,” Warner
said, “but the other players definitely look
to her for leadership on and off the court.”
Lee echoed a running theme amongst all
three guards as they head into the new sea-
son.
“I’ve been told by other sophomores to
take advantage of the season because it
might be your last season,” Lee said. “So, I
want to take that to heart and do what I can
and see what happens.”
“To have these ladies handling the ball
and understanding what we want to do makes
a big difference,” Warner said. “They’ve
been really good about it, last year they
understand that it’s hard to get it done with
eight people. And they know that these six
had each other’s backs last season and built
the foundation to go through. So, they real-
ly have that good chemistry. They trust each
other. They know each other is committed
and really there for each other. That really
permeates through the team. They set good
examples. It’s a huge advantage to have.”
By the sound of things, Warner would pre-
fer to be an up and down team and try to wear
down other teams with Bulldog speed and
depth. While guard play will be huge there,
CSM’s inside presence — mainly rebound-
ing and starting the offensive machine up
— will be big. Warner has four players 5-10
and taller at her disposal — all of them
freshman who need to start picking up valu-
able playing time to gain experience.
“I’m hoping that it’s like we had a couple
of years ago when we have six in double dig-
its (scoring),” Warner said. “They definitely
have the ability to do that. I think it’s
going to depend on who’s in (the lineup)
and who we’re playing. We have shooters
from the outside, girls that can penetrate.
Their confidence is really going to help us
this year. ”
CSM’s strength is in the numbers
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN ANTONIO — The previous time the
Spurs and Golden State Warriors squared off, it
was all about sharp shooting from both
teams. That was in the second round of the
Western Conference playoffs last season,
which San Antonio won in six games.
On Friday night, defense took over, partic-
ularly in the final 2:23, when the two teams
were a combined 0 for 8 from the field.
Tony Parker provided a late surge for the
second consecutive game by scoring 18
points, including the last seven for the Spurs
as they held off the Warriors 76-74.
“Again, Tony made some huge buckets to
keep the lead when we were dry,” Spurs guard
Manu Ginobili said.
Parker, who scored 15 of the Spurs’ final 16
points in a victory over Phoenix two nights
earlier, left the AT&T Center immediately
after the win and was not available to the
media.
Golden State star guard Stephan Curry did
not play after bruising his left ankle
Wednesday night against Minnesota. Minus
him, the Spurs won their 30th straight regu-
lar-season home game against the Warriors.
But they still had a chance to end the streak
after Parker missed two free throws with 16.4
seconds remaining. Andre Iguodala drove to
the basket and tried a layup that rolled off the
rim at the buzzer.
“I got a decent shot off,” Iguodala said.
“Tim (Duncan) did a good job of making me
alter the shot a little bit.”
After Golden State’s David Lee hit two free
throws with 2:23 left, both teams failed to
find the basket.
“We’re two teams that lay a solid founda-
tion of solid defensive principles,” Warriors
coach Mark Jackson said. “It was a grind out
there. It was tough to score on both sides.”
Golden State entered the night ranked sec-
ond in the league in field goal percentage at
slightly over 50 percent. But a stout San
Antonio defense held the Warriors to 40 per-
cent.
“Overall, they’re a hard team to guard, so I
thought the defense was some of the better
defense we’ve played this year,” Spurs coach
Gregg Popovich said. “(We) did a lot of one-
on-one on the post and one-on-one on the
perimeter. We certainly couldn’t put it in the
basket, so the defense was really important
for us tonight.”
Kawhi Leonard added 13 points for the
Spurs, who improved to a conference-best 5-
1.
Toney Douglas came off the bench to lead
Golden State with 20 points. Lee added 13 and
Clay Thompson had 11.
The Spurs shot 39.2 percent from the field,
marking the fifth time in six games this sea-
son that Golden State held its opponent to
under 40 percent from the field.
San Antonio jumped out to an early double-
digit lead, but struggled in the second quarter,
hitting just two field goals in the first seven
minutes. Still, the Spurs managed to maintain
the lead by plugging their big men in the mid-
dle and forcing Golden State to take outside
jumpers.
NOTES: With the win, Duncan and Parker
are now No. 4 all-time in league history for
victories by teammates with 597. ... Harrison
Barnes, who missed the Warriors’ first four
games of the season with left toe inflamma-
tion, made his first start of the season, filling
in for Curry. Barnes scored five points.
Without Curry, Warriors fall to Spurs
SOOBUM IM/USA TODAY SPORTS
Golden State’s Toney Douglas launches a
3-pointer during the Warriors’ 76-74 loss to
SanAntonio Friday night.
Minnesota prep
star chooses Stanford
MINNEAPOLIS — Minnesota high school
star forward Reid Travis has chosen Stanford
over his hometown Golden Gophers.
The senior made the announcement at
DeLaSalle High School on Friday. The 6-foot-
8 Travis scored 27 points per game to lead the
Islanders to the state championship last year
and is widely considered one of the top 30
players in this year’s class.
The decision was an ominous sign for
Minnesota and new coach Richard Pitino. The
state is home to three of the top high school
players in the country, including Apple Valley
point guard Tyus Jones and forward Rashad
Vaughn, who haven’t announced their deci-
sions.
Landing Travis was a big score for Stanford
coach Johnny Dawkins, who hasn’t led the
Cardinal to the NCAAtournament in five sea-
sons.
Bobcats coach Clifford
needs heart procedure
CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Charlotte Bobcats
head coach Steve Clifford will need a procedure
to have two stents placed in his heart and will
not coach Friday night’s game against the New
York Knicks.
Bobcats president of basketball operations
Rod Higgins said Friday in release that Clifford
checked himself into the hospital Thursday
night because he was suffering from chest
pains. Higgins said Clifford is “resting com-
fortably” in the hospital but it’s too early to
know when he’ll return.
Patrick Ewing will serve as Charlotte’s act-
ing head coach Friday against his former team.
Basketball briefs
SPORTS 13
Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — It could be the Colin
Kaepernick show in San Francisco. Or, per-
haps, Cam Newton’s big day for Carolina at
Candlestick Park.
Or both.
You name it, there’s no debating that two
of the NFL’s top young, strong-armed quar-
terbacks — with their speedy legs and run-
ning ability to boot — will be on display
Sunday, each trying to keep his team on a
nice roll.
The football world is watching this one
with high interest.
Kaepernick could easily stand in for
Newton on the 49ers’ scout team this week.
“That’s a very good idea, because they are
so similar,” coach Jim Harbaugh said. “My
son, Jack Harbaugh, who’s now a little over
14 months old, I mean, on the (growth)
curve he’s above the 100th percentile now.
He’s big, growing very well. Cam Newton
would be further outside the graph. He’s in a
world by himself. He’s tremendously talent-
ed.”
Yes, these mobile quarterbacks present an
awful lot of similarities. They are a key rea-
son their teams are riding long winning
streaks at the season’s halfway point, too.
The 49ers (6-2) have won five straight
games since dropping two in a row in Weeks
2 and 3, scoring 31 or more points in each
of those victories. Newton’s Panthers (5-3)
are unbeaten in their last four games and
have scored 30 or more
points in their five wins.
Both teams are in sec-
ond place in their divi-
sions and trying to make
a run.
In a 34-10 win against
Atlanta last week,
Newton threw for 249
yards and ran for a touch-
down.
Sound a little familiar,
San Francisco?
“We have similar
attributes but we’re both
two different players,”
Kaepernick said.
Kaepernick and Newton
were roommates at the
scouting combine in
2011, then Newton was
drafted No. 1 overall out
of Auburn and Kaepernick
dropped to the 49ers in the second round as
the sixth quarterback selected at 36th.
“He’s an explosive player and a dominant
player and I’ve kept up with him ever
since,” Newton said. “I have respect for him
and I think he does for me.”
Panthers wide receiver Ted Ginn Jr. knows
his share about both QBs. He played for the
49ers last season when Kaepernick took
over as the starter in November from Alex
Smith.
“They both have something a lot people
don’t have, and they use it: speed,” Ginn
said.
Here are five things to know about the
Panthers-49ers matchup, The Associated
Press Game of the Week:
The Reinforcements
The 49ers are expected to have some key
faces returning on both sides of the ball.
Not only is linebacker Aldon Smith back
following a five-game absence to undergo
treatment for substance abuse, wide receiver
Mario Manningham could make his season
debut nearly 11 months after a serious left
knee injury that required surgery. Yet
Harbaugh isn’t playing his hand premature-
l y. “I’d like our opponent to think of all
those options being open,” Harbaugh said.
Consistency from Newton
Newton cannot afford mistakes against
this opportunistic defense. He completed
23 of 37 passes for 249 yards in last week’s
win against Atlanta with a touchdown, two
interceptions and a sack. The 49ers have
forced 13 turnovers during their winning
streak and have scored off each of those
takeaways, getting nine touchdowns and
four field goals. Still, the 6-foot-5, 245-
pound Newton presents challenges. He has
passed for 200-plus yards in all but the sea-
son opener against Seattle, and has one
300-yard game. “They’ve got a big quarter-
back. I didn’t know he was that big,” 49ers
linebacker Ahmad Brooks said. “He’s
strong, he’s athletic, he’s fast.”
Ginn Jr. gets his chance
Ginn is getting some chances with Carolina
that he had hoped for during his three-year
tenure with the 49ers through last season’s
Super Bowl run. Last year: Two total catches
for 1 yard. This season: 21 receptions for 367
yards and two touchdowns. “My goal is to go
out, whoever I’m with, to have a feature Ted
Ginn,” he said. “I play it, I enjoy it, I wanted a
better opportunity.”
Gore’s groove
Frank Gore has scored two touchdowns in
each of his last two games, the first time in
his career he has done so. So much for the
questions about Gore having tired legs at
age 30. “I play hard,” Gore said. “I’m glad
we as a team have gotten on a run, a winning
streak. We’re looking good as a team. I try
to be successful and do whatever it takes to
help my team be successful.”
Keeping the momentum
After a road trip to Tennessee and on to
London from there, the 49ers earned a week of
rest for their bye last week. But everybody is
determined to keep the momentum from this
impressive winning streak. “We’ve got a lot
of guys coming back, so that’s a plus for us,
on top of what we’ve already been doing,”
Brooks said. “People probably thought we
couldn’t be one of the premier defenses in the
NFL with Aldon being out, because he’s that
good of an athlete, but we’ve done a very good
job.”
Newton, Kaepernick take center stage
Colin
Kaepernick
CamNewton
SPORTS 14
Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
E V E RY T HI NG MARKE D DOWN!
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But Burlingame responded in
emphatic fashion. Offensively, they
buried the Wildcats to the tune of 311
yards in the first half and 540 for the
game. Defensively, they only surren-
dered two big plays — which were
distributed inconsequently between
the first and fourth quarters — and
they all but shut down the big-play
capabilities of Josh Holman and
David Teu. They were also all over
quarterback Robert Wang the entire
night — ultimately forcing him out
of the game in the fourth quarter.
“I’m really proud of the way the
kids responded,” Philipopoulos said.
“This was all them. We watched a lot
of film. We basically played a nickel
(defensive secondary). We had five
defensive backs on the field. They’re
pretty athletic. We had five athletes
on the field flying around. The kids
made plays. But our kids limited the
big plays. They (Woodside) made one
or two. But we can recover from that.
It’s when they start putting five or six
together and get in a groove that it
gives defenses problems. Our defense
has been our backbone all season
long though.”
The Burlingame offense spotted the
defense a 7-0 advantage early when,
two plays into their initial drive,
Robbie Baumgarten broke off a 44-
yard touchdown run with 10:15 left in
the first quarter.
Woodside came back and it
appeared PAL fans were in for a dog-
fight. Nine plays into the Wildcats’
second drive, Wang hooked up with
Mitchell Cockrum on a 37-yard
touchdown to make it 7-6.
But the Burlingame offense turned
on the jets and did not let up. Keone
Keahi took a handoff up the gut and
broke through the Woodside defense.
No one caught him until 51 yards
later and by then he was handing the
ball to the referee and increasing the
Panthers lead.
Then, after Woodside botched a
punt attempt and gave Burlingame
the ball 20 yards from goal, Manase
Palu got in on the fun with a 19-yard
touchdown run to make it 21-6.
“Fundamentals,” Palu said when
asked what the key was to Friday’s
offensive explosion. “Fundamentals
and practice. I really depend on my
‘O’ line a lot. I can’t thank them
enough for all the hard work they’ve
been putting forth. It gets really dirty
in the trenches and they still come up
with some holes for me to cut into and
Robby and Keone, they do a great
job. They block for me, I block for
them.”
The Burlingame offense kept click-
ing and, as a team, they were handed a
big break when a Holman 82-yard
punt return for touchdown was nulli-
fied by a personal foul penalty — that
took seven big points off the board.
Burlingame turned that momentum
into six of its own after a 2-yard
touchdown run by Griffin Intrieri.
Woodside added a field goal to make
it 27-9, but the Panthers responded
one more time on an 80-yard drive
before the half was done that ended
with Baumgarten hauling in a 31-yard
touchdown catch to increase the lead
34-9.
“They’ve been outstanding all year
long,” Philipopoulos said. “Even
going back to February, when they
hit the weight room getting ready for
the season. They knew they had a
goal in mind early on and we accom-
plished one of our goals. We still
have some games we want to go get.
We know it’s going to be an uphill
battle to do it. But our kids are ready
for the challenge.”
Woodside didn’t pose much of a
challenge in the second half, espe-
cially not after Burlingame took the
ball 72 yards on the first drive of the
period and Baumgarten scored again
to make it 41-9.
Touchdowns by Chi Li Ting (69
yards) and Teu capped off the night’s
scoring.
“It feels great,” Palu said. “We
started from the bottom and look
where we are now. You know what I’m
saying? We’re league champions.
Today, I told them we have to win
every play, every down. And we won
every play, every down and we got the
outcome.
“I can’t really describe it too much
— the effort and desire that we had.
We know we haven’t won a league
championship in 11 years and we
came out, we had that mindset. It was
a big night for us seniors and our jun-
iors, sophomores our coaches, they
all stepped up this week. We did what
we could and we came out with a vic-
tory.”
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Burlingame’s Manase Palu, left, celebrates with Robby Baumgarten
following Baumgarten’s touchdown during the Panthers’ 48-17 win over
Woodside. The win, coupled with SanMateo’s 33-20 loss to Aragon, give
Burlingame the PAL OceanDivision title — the Panthers’ first in 11 years.
Continued from page 11
OCEAN
SPORTS 15
Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Tom Canavan
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. —
While the record certainly doesn’t
show it, the New York Giants are
stopping the run this season.
Adrian Peterson, LeSean
McCoy, Jamaal Charles and Matt
Forte have all tested the Giants’
front seven and come up with no
more than 67 yards. Peterson had
it the toughest, being limited to
28.
The one group that has given the
defense a little trouble has been
the athletic quarterbacks —
Michael Vick, Cam Newton and
Alex Smith.
That’s what will make this week
tough when the re-energized
Giants (2-6) look for their third
straight win and kick off a three-
game homestand with a contest
against the Oakland Raiders (3-5)
on Sunday at MetLife Stadium.
The Raiders have the NFL’s
fastest quarterback in Terrelle
Pryor and the AFC’s top rushing
game, averaging 147.8 yards with
Darren McFadden leading the way.
Pryor is the wild card, the one
who creates unexpected problems.
He has run for 485 yards and needs
45 yards to break Rich Gannon’s
single-season team record of 529
yards set in 2000.
“He is a freak athlete,” Giants
middle linebacker Jon Beason said
of the 6-foot-4, 233-pound Pryor.
“To be that big and that fast, that
is a tough tackle. You really have
to gang tackle.”
What makes Pryor so dangerous
is his ability to improvise when a
pass play falls apart.
“He’s not going to stay there
long,” defensive end Justin Tuck
said. “He understands how gifted
he is as an athlete and considering
that most people chasing him are
nowhere near as fast as him, he has
an advantage. He’s used it to pret-
ty good success. I don’t know if
he’s necessarily looking for it but
when the opportunity’s there he’s
not hesitating.”
Pryor isn’t looking to run.
“If it happens,” he said.
“They’ve got a very good, deep
front seven. If something happens
where I have to get out and make a
play . but I want to sit back and see
if I can find some guys downfield
and get some explosive gains in
the passing game. “
The Giants, who have won two
in a row after losing the first six,
will be well rested after a bye
week. The Raiders are regrouping
after an embarrassing 49-20 loss
to the Eagles, the team New York
beat 15-7 before the bye.
“Those things happen in the
NFL,” Raiders coach Dennis Allen
said of the loss. “I don’t think
there’s anybody that’s been in the
National Football League that has-
n’t been through one of those
days. We happened to go through
it last week, but we’ve got to learn
from it, we’ve got to put it behind
us, we’ve got to move on and we
recognize that we have a tough
challenge this week.”
The Giants have limited the
opposition to 102. 3 yards rush-
ing, with most of the big numbers
coming early in the season. Ayear
ago, opponents averaged 129.1
yards as the team missed the play-
offs for the third time in four
years.
The bad start has almost put the
Giants in a must-win scenario for
the remainder of the season.
Here are five things to look for
in the Raiders’ first game against
the Giants in four years:
East Coast woes
The Raiders have lost 11
straight games in the Eastern time
zone since beating Pittsburgh in
December 2009. They have been
outscored 353-178 in those
games. That margin does not
include a 44-7 loss to the Giants in
’09 before the skid began. New
York tight end Brandon Myers,
who played for Oakland last sea-
son, said the problem for players
is that getting up at 7:30 a.m. for
a 1 p.m. game on Sunday still feels
like 4:30 a.m. for those on Pacific
time.
Running Giants
This will be the deepest New
York has been at running back in
weeks. Andre Brown, who was sup-
posed to be the backup to David
Wilson, is expected to make his
season debut after breaking his
left leg in the preseason finale. In-
season signees Brandon Jacobs
and Peyton Hillis also are ready.
Wilson is out with a neck injury.
Run game should decide the Raiders-Giants game
See RAIDERS, Page 18
16
Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
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The first half played out exactly
like Carrithers expected. Hillsdale
racked up 280 yards in that first
period alone behind the vintage
big play that has come to define
the Parodi Era of football. Seven
plays into the first possession,
Giancarlo Boscacci took the ball
off left guard, bounced it to the out-
side and 33 yards later fired the first
championship game salvo of the
afternoon.
Then it was Carrithers’ turn to
flaunt what he’s capable of from
the quarterback position. First, he
hooked up with Brandon Butcher
on a 45-yard touchdown pass that
featured a perfectly ran wheel pat-
tern by No. 7.
Less than three minutes later,
Carrithers was at it again. This
time, he found Shawn Charan on a
post pattern to make it 21-0.
The Hillsdale defense made its
first big appearance of the after-
noon on King’s next drive when
John Paran intercepted the first of
five Dominic Sabel passes in the
game Hillsdale quickly turned that
into points when Boscacci culmi-
nated a 33-yard drive with a 9-yard
run — good for his second of the
afternoon and a rout-starting
touchdown.
“Cole was just on fire,” Parodi
said. “He did a great job of finding
the opening. There is going to be
an open guy, the way we look at it.
Someone is going to be open. He
found him and did a great job.
We’re so greedy. We want them all.
Today, we got them all early on. It
was an awesome first half for sure.”
Hillsdale stayed with its foot
planted on that throttle. It added a
fifth touchdown with 7:02 left in
the second quarter. Boscacci scored
his third touchdown, this time on a
23-yard screen pass.
After the teams traded intercep-
tions, King’s Academy finally
broke through on a nice read-
option pitch executed by Sabel for
a 41-yard touchdown.
But just like it did the entire
afternoon, Hillsdale was chalk-full
of big-time answers. On this occa-
sion, it was Carrithers once again,
dropping back, locking eyes
downfield and finding Charan all
alone for a 56-yard touchdown.
Carrithers would add a fifth on the
half exactly 12 seconds later after
Salvador Hernandez intercepted a
pass to give Hillsdale the ball
right back. Another wheel route,
once again to Butcher, was execut-
ed for a 44-yard strike and although
TKA did add another score in the
first half on an 80-yard pass play,
Hillsdale was well on its way to
victory with a 49-14 lead.
“I came in calm and collective,”
Carrithers said. “I knew I couldn’t
get too ahead of myself and I just
did me. It worked out.”
“We looked out there. We saw
what they wanted to do and we took
what they gave us,” Parodi said.
“We don’t care of it’s passing, run-
ning, backwards, forwards passes.
Defensively, our boys played their
butts off. They’ve worked hard and
they deserve the things they’ve
received. I’m so proud of them.”
The second half was a mere for-
mality. The running clock would
not start until the fourth quarter,
but by then, Hillsdale added two
more scores to its advantage. A.J.
Bernal got in on the scoring fun,
putting the stamp on a five-play
drive with a two-yard run. Hillsdale
went to Bernal a lot in the second
half to ice that game. Abig 45-yard
run midway through the third quar-
ter set up Hillsdale for its next
score. This time, Hernandez boot-
ed a 38-yard field with 26 seconds
left in the quarter to make it 59-14.
Hillsdale added one more score in
the fourth quarter when Andre
Fontenot ran into the end zone dur-
ing running-clock time.
Continued from page 11
LAKE
JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL
Hillsdale’s James Hollon looks for some running room during the Knights’
66-14 win over King’s Academy Friday afternoon inSanMateo.
SPORTS 17
Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EXPIRES: November 30, 2013
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vs. Seattle
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/8
vs.Carolina
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/10
@Saints
1:25p.m.
FOX
11/17
@Redskins
5:40p.m.
ESPN
11/25
vs.Rams
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/1
@Dallas
1:30p.m.
CBS
11/28
@Giants
10a.m.
CBS
11/10
@Houston
10a.m.
CBS
11/17
vs.Titans
1:05p.m.
CBS
11/24
@Canucks
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/14
vs.Canucks
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/7
@Winnipeg
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/10
@Calgary
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/12
@Chicago
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/17
@Oilers
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
11/15
@Tampa
10a.m.
FOX
12/15
@Jets
10a.m.
CBS
12/8
vs. Chiefs
1:05p.m.
CBS
12/15
vs.Detroit
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/12
at Minnes.
5p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/6
at Spurs
5:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/8
@Memphis
5p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/9
vs.Utah
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
11/16
vs.Thunder
7:30p.m.
TNT
11/14
SATURDAY
Cross country
PAL championships at Crystal Springs Course, 10
a.m.
Football
Serra at Riordan, 1 p.m.
Boys’ water polo
WCAL tournament championship and third-place
match at Sacred Heart Prep, 4:30 and 7:30 p.m.
Girls’ water polo
WCAL tournament championship and third-place
match at Sacred Heart Prep,TBA
WHAT’S ON TAP
NBA
NBA — Suspended Dallas G-F Vince Carter one
gamethrowinganelbowandmakingcontact with
the head of Oklahoma City C Steven Adams during
Wednesday’s game.
NFL
NFL—Fined Washington LB London Fletcher and
Tennessee DT Jurell Casey $15,750 and Tennessee
S Bernard Pollard $10,000 for their actions during
last week’s game.
BUFFALOBILLS—Released WR Brad Smith from
injured reserve.
TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Placed RB Doug
Martin on injured reserve. Signed LB Ka’lial Glaud
from the practice squad.
NHL
ANAHEIMDUCKS—Assigned G Igor Bobkov and
D Stefan Wang from Norfolk (AHL) to Utah (ECHL).
DALLAS STARS —Recalled D Aaron Rome from
Texas(AHL).LoanedDKevinConnautontoTexasfor
a conditioning assignment.
DETROIT RED WINGS — Recalled C Luke Glen-
dening and D Xavier Ouellet from Grand Rapids
(AHL).Assigned D Adam Almquist to Grand Rapids.
EDMONTON OILERS — Traded D Ladislav Smid
and G Olivier Roy to the Calgary Flames for C
Roman Horak and G Laurent Brossoit.
FLORIDAPANTHERS—Fired coach Kevin Dineen
andassistant coachesGordMurphyandCraigRam-
sey.NamedPeter HorachekinterimcoachandBrian
Skrudland and John Madden assistant coaches.
MONTREALCANADIENS—Assigned D Greg Pa-
teryn to Hamilton (AHL).
OTTAWA SENATORS — Reassigned G Nathan
Lawson to Binghamton (AHL).
WASHINGTON CAPITALS — Signed LW Jason
Chimera to a two-year contract extension.
BASEBALL
National League
NEWYORKMETS—signed RHP Joel Carreno and
INF/OFAnthonySeratelli tominor leaguecontracts.
COLLEGE
NCAA—Suspended Rutgers men’s basketball F
Junior Etou six games for accepting impermissible
benefits from a third party from overseas.
CALIFORNIA—Announced sophomore G Kahlil
Johnson has left the men’s basketball team.
EASTERNMICHIGAN—Fired football coach Ron
English. Named Stan Parrish interim coach.
MINNESOTA—Suspended C Maurice Walker for
six games for a violation of university policy.
TRANSACTIONS
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 5 4 0 .556 257 209
Philadelphia 4 5 0 .444 225 231
Washington 3 6 0 .333 230 287
N.Y. Giants 2 6 0 .250 141 223
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 6 2 0 .750 216 146
Carolina 5 3 0 .625 204 106
Atlanta 2 6 0 .250 176 218
Tampa Bay 0 8 0 .000 124 190
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 5 3 0 .625 217 197
Chicago 5 3 0 .625 240 226
Green Bay 5 3 0 .625 232 185
Minnesota 2 7 0 .222 220 279
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 8 1 0 .889 232 149
San Francisco 6 2 0 .750 218 145
Arizona 4 4 0 .500 160 174
St. Louis 3 6 0 .333 186 226
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 7 2 0 .778 234 175
N.Y. Jets 5 4 0 .556 169 231
Miami 4 4 0 .500 174 187
Buffalo 3 6 0 .333 189 236
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 6 2 0 .750 214 155
Tennessee 4 4 0 .500 173 167
Houston 2 6 0 .250 146 221
Jacksonville 0 8 0 .000 86 264
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 6 3 0 .667 217 166
Cleveland 4 5 0 .444 172 197
Baltimore 3 5 0 .375 168 172
Pittsburgh 2 6 0 .250 156 208
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Kansas City 9 0 0 1.000 215 111
Denver 7 1 0 .875 343 218
San Diego 4 4 0 .500 192 174
Oakland 3 5 0 .375 146 199
Thursday’sGame
Minnesota 34,Washington 27
Sunday, Nov. 10
Detroit at Chicago, 10 a.m.
Philadelphia at Green Bay, 10 a.m.
Jacksonville at Tennessee, 10 a.m.
Cincinnati at Baltimore, 10 a.m.
St. Louis at Indianapolis, 10 a.m.
Seattle at Atlanta, 10 a.m.
Oakland at N.Y. Giants, 10 a.m.
Buffalo at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m.
Carolina at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m.
Denver at San Diego, 1:25 p.m.
Houston at Arizona, 1:25 p.m.
NFL GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 4 2 .667 —
New York 2 3 .400 1 1/2
Brooklyn 2 3 .400 1 1/2
Toronto 2 4 .333 2
Boston 2 4 .333 2
SOUTHEASTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Miami 4 2 .667 —
Charlotte 3 3 .500 1
Orlando 3 3 .500 1
Atlanta 2 3 .400 1 1/2
Washington 2 3 .400 1 1/2
CENTRALDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Indiana 6 0 1.000 —
Milwaukee 2 2 .500 3
Detroit 2 3 .400 3 1/2
Chicago 2 3 .400 3 1/2
Cleveland 2 4 .333 4
WESTERNCONFERENCE
SOUTWESTDIVISION
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 5 1 .833 —
Houston 4 2 .667 1
New Orleans 3 3 .500 2
Dallas 3 3 .500 2
Memphis 2 3 .400 2 1/2
NORTHWEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 4 1 .800 —
Minnesota 4 2 .667 1/2
Portland 3 2 .600 1
Denver 1 4 .200 3
Utah 0 6 .000 4 1/2
PACIFICDIVISION
W L Pct GB
Golden State 4 2 .667 —
Phoenix 4 2 .667 —
L.A. Clippers 3 3 .500 1
L.A. Lakers 3 4 .429 1 1/2
Sacramento 1 4 .200 2 1/2
Friday’sGames
Boston 91, Orlando 89
Philadelphia 94, Cleveland 79
Indiana 91,Toronto 84
Washington 112, Brooklyn 108, OT
New York 101, Charlotte 91
Oklahoma City 119, Detroit 110
Chicago 97, Utah 73
Minnesota 116, Dallas 108
New Orleans 96, L.A. Lakers 85
San Antonio 76, Golden State 74
Phoenix 114, Denver 103
Portland 104, Sacramento 91
Saturday’sGames
Utah at Toronto, 4 p.m.
Indiana at Brooklyn, 4:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Cleveland, 4:30 p.m.
Boston at Miami, 4:30 p.m.
Orlando at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m.
NBA GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Tampa Bay 15 11 4 0 22 51 37
Toronto 16 11 5 0 22 50 37
Detroit 17 9 5 3 21 43 45
Boston 15 9 5 1 19 42 29
Montreal 17 8 8 1 17 44 38
Ottawa 16 6 6 4 16 50 49
Florida 16 3 9 4 10 32 57
Buffalo 19 3 15 1 7 33 61
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 16 11 5 0 22 49 38
Washington 16 9 7 0 18 53 44
N.Y. Rangers 16 8 8 0 16 35 43
Carolina 16 6 7 3 15 30 45
N.Y. Islanders 16 6 7 3 15 47 51
New Jersey 16 4 7 5 13 30 44
Columbus 15 5 10 0 10 36 44
Philadelphia 15 4 10 1 9 22 42
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Colorado 15 13 2 0 26 50 27
Chicago 16 10 2 4 24 56 43
St. Louis 14 10 2 2 22 50 33
Minnesota 17 9 4 4 22 45 38
Nashville 16 8 6 2 18 37 49
Dallas 16 8 6 2 18 44 47
Winnipeg 18 7 9 2 16 45 51
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 18 14 3 1 29 63 44
San Jose 16 10 2 4 24 59 36
Phoenix 17 11 4 2 24 56 53
Vancouver 18 11 5 2 24 52 46
Los Angeles 16 10 6 0 20 45 40
Calgary 17 6 9 2 14 47 61
Edmonton 17 4 11 2 10 42 66
NOTE:Two points for a win,one point for overtime
loss.
Friday’sGames
Toronto 2, New Jersey 1, SO
Winnipeg 5, Nashville 0
Colorado 4, Calgary 2
Anaheim 6, Buffalo 2
Saturday’sGames
Edmonton at Philadelphia, 10 a.m.
Florida at Ottawa, 11 a.m.
Toronto at Boston, 4 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Detroit, 4 p.m.
Minnesota at Carolina, 4 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Columbus, 4 p.m.
Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 5 p.m.
Chicago at Dallas, 5 p.m.
Washington at Phoenix, 5 p.m.
Vancouver at Los Angeles, 7 p.m.
NHL GLANCE
New Mexico retires Urlacher’s No. 44 jersey
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — New Mexico retired former
Chicago Bears star Brian Urlacher’s No. 44 jersey at halftime
of the Lobos’ game against Air Force on Friday night.
The crowd of almost 22,000 people stood and cheered when
the red banner lifted and “44 Brian Urlacher” showed up on the
ring of honor at University Stadium. The Lobos also retired
his locker, enclosing it in glass with his uniform inside.
“It’s a big deal,” said Urlacher, from the small New Mexico
town of Lovington. “There’s a lot of people from my home-
town that came up here to watch this and be a part of it. So I’m
very excited and honored to have this chance to do this.
Urlacher was a standout defensive back from 1996-99 at New
Mexico, where he was a first-team All-America selection and a
Jim Thorpe Award finalist. He played linebacker for the Bears,
retiring after last season.
“I came a long ways form Lovington,” Urlacher said. “I got
to college at 195 pounds and I got to be 245 when I was done.
I started growing, getting bigger, faster and when I was a jun-
ior I started getting on the radar for the scouts.”
The game was his second at New Mexico since he left
school, and Friday night was the first time he had been back on
the field.
Sports brief
18
Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
The Department of Psychiatry is seeking
healthy, and psychiatric medication-free
depressed, and anxious participants between
55-110 years old who are right-handed and do
not have other major medical problems
(including thyroid problems) for an MRI study.
Participants will have 3 appointments at Stan-
ford University for a total of 8-10 hours.
Compensation: $150. Contact the Emotion
Aging Study at (650)-723-2795
For general information about oarticipants rights, contact 1-866-680-2906.
by
defense when we needed to,” Gray said.
Terra Nova’s offense was paced by quarter-
back Anthony Gordon, who completed 24
of 36 passes for 311 yards and a pair of
touchdowns. Sacred Heart Prep, however,
did a good job of shutting down the Tigers’
ground game, limiting them to just 38 yards
on 32 carries. The Gators sacked Gordon
three times for minus-44 yards.
Both teams got off to shaky starts to the
game, with Terra Nova taking the opening
kickoff, going three-and-out on its first
drive. Sacred Heart Prep started its first drive
at midfield, but could not mount much
offense.
That’s when Terra Nova got the first big
break of the game. The Gators lined up to
punt, but the snap sailed over Riley
Tinsley’s head. He scooped up the ball and
tried to run, but was tackled at his own 40 to
give the Tigers a short field.
Terra Nova capitalized immediately,
going 40 yards on four plays, with lineman
Paul Noa, who lined up in the “Wildcat” for-
mation, taking the snap and bulling his way
into the end zone from four yards out for a 6-
0 Terra Nova lead.
The Tigers doubled their lead to 12-0 just
over three minutes later when Noa — who
had the game of his life with two touch-
downs, a 2-point conversion and crucial
fumble recovery to keep the ball for the
Tigers — intercepted a pass at midfield on
the Gators’ next drive. This time, the Tigers
needed five plays to cover 45 yards, with
Jones making a leaping grab in the back of
the end zone for an 11-yard scoring pass.
The Tigers forced the Gators to punt on
their next possession and Terra Nova, once
again, drove for a touchdown. Starting from
the Gators’ 48, the Tigers needed just four
plays to find paydirt, with Jordan Genato
catching a nine-yard pass and bounding into
the end zone for the third score of the quarter
for the Tigers. Noa’s run for the 2-point
conversion gave the Tigers a 20-0 with 1:57
left in the first quarter.
“We felt we needed to stun them early, ”
Gray said. “And we did that.”
The Gators finally stabilized themselves
defensively, but still struggled offensively.
Twice they moved the ball deep into Terra
Nova territory — once getting to the
Tigers’ 12 and, on their final possession of
the first half, driving to the Terra Nova 26
— but each time came up empty.
“Our defense has been really good from
the 20-yard line in all year,” Gray said.
Down 20-0 to begin the third quarter,
Sacred Heart Prep finally found its rhythm
offensively. The Gators took the second-
half kickoff and promptly drove 76 yards on
eight plays — the key being a 27-yard run
from Ricky Grau and a 30-yard run from
Chris Lee. Quarterback Mason Randall
hooked up with Andrew Daschbach for a 5-
yard scoring toss to finally get the Gators
on the board.
Terra Nova responded, however, with its
best drive of the game. Starting from his
own 13, Gordon completed six consecutive
passes to guide the Tigers to a first-and-goal
at the Gators’ 9. Facing a fourth-and-goal
from the 3, Noa bulled his way into the end
zone to put Terra Nova up 26-7.
Nick Pierotti came up with an intercep-
tion for the Tigers on the Gators’ next pos-
session and after driving down to the 2-yard
line, Sacred Heart Prep stood firm, stopping
the Tigers on fourth-and-goal — only to
give the ball right back on a fumble. Again,
the Gators’ defense kept the Tigers out of the
end zone, who instead settled for a 30-yard
Carlos Grande field goal that put the Tigers
up 29-7.
Sacred Heart Prep, in desperation mode,
drove 82 yards on its next drive with Andrew
Segre scoring from a yard out. A 2-point
conversion cut the Gators’ deficit to 29-15.
The Tigers had to punt on their next pos-
session and the Gators were threatening to
score again, driving to the Terra Nova 9, but
on second-and-goal from the 16, Pierotti
made his second interception of the game —
this time at the goal line — with 6:08 to
play.
The Tigers then ran out the clock to sew
up another Bay Division championship.
“It’s surreal. Sacred Heart Prep is a great
team,” Jones said. “I’m so happy to win
this (Bay Division title) with my boys.”
Continued from page 11
BAY
Raiders rookie
With Tony Pashos and Matt McCants fight-
ing injuries, second-round draft pick Menelik
Watson could get his first career start at right
tackle. Watson has played just two years of
football before this year, one at a junior col-
lege and one at Florida State. He’s a former col-
lege basketball player at Marist.
Giants defense
Perry Fewell’s group has not given up a
touchdown in 10 quarters, dating to the second
quarter of a game against the Chicago Bears on
Oct. 10. The only TDs scored by opponents in
the past two games came on a punt return by
Minnesota and a bad snap on a punt that was
recovered in the end zone by Philadelphia.
Raiders’ ‘D’
Oakland has a lot of work to do in the sec-
ondary after giving up a league record-tying
seven touchdown passes against
Philadelphia’s Nick Foles last week. Foles
threw for 406 yards and the Eagles gained 542
yards in total offense.
Continued from page 15
RAIDERS
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
One push up at a time. Or a pull up at a
time. One chaturanga at a time — whatever
exercise it may, Bay Area native Shauna
Harrison is helping redefine what it means
to be beautiful.
If you’re a fitness buff who travels in these
types of circles, surely you’ve heard of
Harrison, who’s been making moves upon
moves throughout the Bay Area by bringing
exercise of all kinds to the masses for years
now. Locally, the Stanford alum has been
teaching her Muscle and Flow yoga in
Redwood City and most recently at
Dethrone Basecamp in Burlingame.
But today, Harrison is bringing Under
Armour’s message of “What’s Beautiful”
into the city of San Francisco when she
hosts a workout at the Union Square Macy’s
in the heart of downtown. It’s a three-city
mega event for the athletic apparel chain
that started sponsoring Harrison about a
year ago.
“It’s in the Bay. My home turf. It’s where
I teach,” Harrison said. “I love the Bay. So
being able to do an event here, it’s just extra
everything. People that I know can come,
people that take my classes, people that
might come my classes after this, so, I just
love the vibe of the Bay in general.
“I think it is one of my biggest events,”
she said. “ESPNW was a pretty big event
because of all the people that were actually
there, but in terms of public events ... this
is one of the bigger ones that I’ve done. And
it’s the first event that I’ve done in the Bay
Area. So for me personally, it’s a big deal.”
The What’s Beautiful series is part of an
online competition hosted by Under Armour
geared towards the athletically inclined
female. Since it began in October, the buzz
surrounding it has been great, Harrison said.
Thus, events like Saturday’s have been pop-
ping up in places like Los Angeles. On
Saturday, while Harrison teaches a class in
San Francisco, New York City and Chicago
will also partake in the day’s festivities.
Those looking to take part in the workout
and shopping experience are recommended
to arrive at 10 a.m. Harrison’s bootcamp
style workout begins at 11:30 a.m.
“To me the most amazing thing is when
people who are in my classes or people who
I train with discover new things about them-
selves and what their bodies can do,”
Harrison said. “That to me is amazing.
When you feel like you just ‘beasted’ your
workout ... or whatever else, and it’s some-
thing you thought you could never do,
pullups, or pushups, or whatever else it is —
showing people they can do more than what
their minds initially allowed them to do is
phenomenal. I love watching people do
that.”
‘What’s Beautiful’ arrives in the Bay
@SHAUNA_HARRISON
By Mari Andreatta
I
f it’s Saturday morning and you are
reading this as you think about the
busy days ahead, you might be feel-
ing a little stress. Have no fear — that is
completely normal.
There are a lot of things
going on during these
next couple of months.
Although fall creates the
image of cozying up on
the couch with a cup of
hot chocolate, there is
much to be done.
I, for one, knew it was
fall when girls began posting pictures on
Instagram of Pumpkin Spice Lattes and cap-
tioning them with cheesy quotes about how
the leaves are changing colors. If that had-
n’t been an indication, I would have figured
it out from the change in the weather. Not
only is it freezing at night, but it is getting
pretty chilly in the morning at home and in
the car on the way to school. Not to men-
tion that it gets dark at 5 p.m., thanks to
the time change. Other challenges arrive
with fall as well, such as midterms, spend-
ing oodles of time with relatives or out-of-
town guests, holiday shopping and finals.
Fall eventually turns into winter right
before Christmas, but unless you wait until
the last minute to do your Christmas shop-
ping, you’re probably beginning to feel
the stress and chaos right about now. In
doing some research on the respective fall
and upcoming holiday season and all that
they bring with them, I came across several
references to Chaos Never Dies Day (which
falls — a great verb choice — each year on
Nov. 9).
What I read from a website that sounded
the least chaotic on the subject: Chaos
Never Dies Day takes the stance that the
perfect, calm moment we’re striving for is
not likely to ever exist. There are a number
of days dedicated to stress relief, working
Chaos Never Dies
Travels,
tours + trips
Migration
of the Monarch
SEE PAGE 21
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Apolite effort by two couples to deal with
the aftermath of a playground fight between
their 11-year-old sons quickly goes down-
hill in “God of Carnage,” presented by Palo
Alto Players.
Running about 80 minutes without inter-
mission, Yasmina Reza’s hilarious, cutting
comedy won the 2009 Tony Award for Best
Play. It’s easy to see why in PAP’s finely
tuned production directed by Jeanie K.
Smith. The show gets a few extra laughs
because PAP sets it in Palo Alto with some
local references.
As the play opens, Michael and Veronica
Novak (Todd Wright and Betsy Kruse Craig)
are playing hosts to Alan and Annette
Raleigh (Scott Solomon and Melissa
O’Keefe), whom they hadn’t known previ-
ously.
Michael deals in wholesale products for
the home, and Veronica is an art historian
specializing in Africa. Alan is a lawyer, and
Annette is a wealth manager.
The Novaks are concerned because the
Raleighs’ son hit their son in the mouth
with a stick and broke two front teeth. At
the very least, the Novaks want the Raleigh
boy to apologize, but his parents don’t
know if he’s sorry.
Alan’s cellphone frequently interrupts the
conversation, much to everyone’s growing
annoyance. He’s worried about the possi-
bility of adverse publicity about a drug made
by one of his clients.
One thing leads to another with subtle
digs and sarcasms becoming less subtle and
more biting. Not only are the two couples
arguing with each other, but each couple
begins battling, dredging up long-held
resentments. Things only get worse when a
bottle of rum enters the picture.
Smith has directed this fine ensemble cast
to react with both words and actions, even if
it’s only a slight change of posture or a
look of dismay. Everyone is fully involved,
making the resulting mayhem credible.
Kuo-Hao Lo designed the comfortable liv-
Mayhem takes hold in ‘God of Carnage’
JOYCE GOLDSCHMID
From left Scott Solomon,Melissa O’Keefe,Betsy Kruse Craig,Todd Wright star in ‘God of Carnage.’
See CHAOS, Page 22
See CARNAGE, Page 22
By Jessica Herndon
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Every
year about this time, millions of
turkeys are fattened up so
American households can chow
them down. But in “Free Birds,”
two brave turkeys make it their
mission to travel back in time
and get their breed off the
Thanksgiving menu.
In this amusing but occasion-
ally distasteful animated feature
from visual effects studio Reel
FX, turkeys Reggie (Owen
Wilson) and Jake (Woody
Harrelson) strive for heroism
and bank some notably kooky
buddy comedy along the way.
We’re introduced to Reggie, a
rather astute turkey living on a
farm with his lackadaisical
flock. With Thanksgiving on the
way, he attempts to warn the
other birds, with whom he des-
perately wants to fit in, that
they’ll soon be dinner if they
don’t wise up. As a result, his
‘Free Birds’ fun, but flat
See BIRDS, Page 22
20
Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
CONGRATULATIONS
TO OUR PARTNER
JOSEPHW. COTCHETT
For Being Honored By
The San Francisco and Los Angeles Daily Journal
Legal Newspapers 2013
One of the Top 100
Attorneys in California.
An individual who cares about
our profession, our judiciary and those
who are underprivileged in our society.
COTCHETT, PITRE & McCARTHY, LLP
840 Malcolm Road Burlingame, CA 94010
(650) 697-6000 · www.cpmlegal.com
San Francisco Bay Area · Sacramento · Los Angeles
NewYork · Washington, D.C.
WEEKEND JOURNAL 21
Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
PISMO BEACH WELCOMES WIN-
TER VISITORS: ANNUAL MONARCH
BUTTERFLY MIGRATION PROVIDES
A FASCINATING AND COLORFUL
SHOW. The migration of the Monarch but-
terflies is one of nature’s most entrancing
mysteries. The easily recognizable orange
and black Monarch is famous for its south-
ward late summer and early autumn migra-
tion from the northern United States and
southern Canada to Mexico and coastal
California, and its northward return in the
spring. The Monarch is the only North
American butterfly that migrates both north
and south regularly, as birds do. No individ-
ual butterfly makes the entire round trip;
each leg of the migration is a first and only
for the butterflies who make the journey.
From November through February, tens of
thousands of these fascinating creatures
cluster in the Pismo Beach Monarch
Butterfly Grove, halfway between San
Francisco and Los Angeles.
WHY DO THEY GO WHERE THEY
GO? Pismo Beach Butterfly Grove
Coordinator Suzy Will, who also serves as a
California State Parks docent, said,
“Welcome to the ‘magic kingdom.’ This is a
very special place chosen by the monarchs
themselves to spend the winter in a type of
‘diapause,’ much like bears in winter. The
butterflies are very choosy and will spend
most of November deciding which ‘camp-
ground’ they want to winter in. They are not
on their way to Mexico (the most misunder-
stood fact). The monarchs east of the
Rockies travel to Mexico. The western
monarchs come to the Pacific coast between
San Francisco and San Diego. The site must
be within 2 miles of the ocean to prevent
freezing. Being cold blooded, they can’t fly
unless it is 55 degrees Fahrenheit. They can
fly at heights up to 10,000 feet and at speeds
up to 15 miles an hour. On a wing and a
prayer they travel to Pismo Beach to spend
the winter months!”
WHEN IS THE BEST TIME OF DAY
TO SEE THEM?Afternoon is the best time
to visit the grove, as the day warms up and
the butterflies start moving. Docent Will
said, “Until [it warms up], they stay up in
the trees, midway to the top of the canopy
in amazingly designed clusters. Once warm
enough, they launch away and soar through
the grove looking for food and water until
the temperature dips again in the late after-
noon.”
WHO COMES TO VIEW THE BUT-
TERFLIES? Pismo Beach is the most vis-
ited Monarch Butterfly Grove in the United
States. Docent Will said, “Our visitors
(which number far more than our butterflies)
come from all over the world. Yesterday I
talked with guests from New Jersey and from
Germany. Come on into the grove where
you can find answers to your questions. The
park is staffed by volunteers seven days a
week. We are citizen-scientists. The learn-
ing takes place every day and we are there to
share it with you, our newest guest.”
PISMO BEACH MONARCH BUT-
TERFLY GROVE PARTICULARS. The
Grove is located on Highway 1 in Pismo
Beach near the North Beach Campground. A
trailer in the parking lot serves as a visitor
center and offers butterfly related books and
gifts. Docents and volunteers staff the
Grove from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily from
November through February and give talks
at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Admission and park-
ing are free. monarchbutterfly.org or (800)
4443-7778.
GOOD EATS IN PISMO BEACH.
Giuseppe’s Cucina Italiana offers Pugliese-
inspired specialties, including tortellini
Giuseppe with pancetta, mushrooms, red
onion, tomato and peas. An extensive cellar
of local wines includes selections from
owner Giuseppe Difronzo’s DiFronzo
Vineyards. www.giuseppesrestaurant.com
or (805) 773-2870. 891 Price St. Pismo
Beach. Award-winning clam chowder in a
bread bowl is the specialty at Splash Café,
SUSAN COHN/DAILY JOURNAL
THE PISMO BEACH MONARCH BUTTERFLY GROVE IS READY FOR VISITORS.From left,California
State Park Docents Jan Jeffries, Heidi Boatman and Suzy Will prepare to explain the wonders
of the migration that brings tens of thousands of Monarch butterflies to Pismo Beach from
November to February annually.
See TRAVEL, Page 22
WEEKEND JOURNAL
22
Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
·
on the premise that we are too busy and need to take a break
for a little while. However, the world doesn’t work like that
— nothing is ever simple or quiet because we are all busy,
all the time. We need to make the most of now, chaos and
all, and embrace the moment.
I was taken aback by the premise of Chaos Never Dies
Day, but it made me think and rather easily conclude that its
proposition is much more right than off base. When this
semester ends, a new one starts. When one test is done,
another lurks in the shadows. Relationships are always
complicated, no matter what time of year it is. First it’s
holiday shopping, then it’s sports team practices, then it’s
mom’s birthday, then it’s Father’s Day, then it’s ... and so
on. All this while trying to hang out with your friends,
keep up with your favorite TVshows, read something other
than a textbook and spend quality time with your family.
Don’t get me wrong though, fall has its perks. Football
has grabbed our national attention, pumpkin pies are being
baked, scarves are coming off the shelf and tempting piles
of leaves are forming on the sidewalks.
These next couple of months should not create any addi-
tional stress in our lives — they are here to stay, like chaos
in general. Best to get used to and prepared for them (I real-
ly hope reading this didn’t cause anyone any added stress).
Mari Andreatta is a junior at Notre Dame High School in Belmont.
Student News appears in the weekend edition. You can email Student
News at news@smdailyjournal.com.
Continued from page 19
CHAOS
ing room set, complemented by Selina Young’s lighting and
Gordon Smith’s sound. The character-specific costumes are
by Shannon Maxham.
The program cover calls this play “a brilliant comedy of
manners ... without the manners.” Add “and with lots of
laughs,” and you have an apt description.
“God of Carnage” will continue at the Lucie Stern Theater,
1305 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto, through Nov. 17. For
tickets and information call (650) 329-0891 or visit
www.paplayers.org.
Continued from page 19
CARNAGE
flock deems him the “anti-corn.”
However, they soon discover Reggie is right, then toss
him out of the coop to be slaughtered. To his luck, he is
scooped up by a peppy little redhead who convinces her
father, the president of the United States (who sounds a lot
like a Bill Clinton), that Reggie will be the year’s “par-
doned turkey.”
Off in a helicopter to Camp David, Reggie begins to set-
tle into his new life filled with channel surfing and pizza
when he’s abruptly snatched by a fellow turkey, the buff and
buoyant Jake. Jake believes it’s their destiny to find a time
machine for a trip back to the first Thanksgiving to ensure
turkeys don’t become the main dish.
Their dynamic is instantly amusing: Jake lacks the
brains, but is equipped with the brawn, while the quick-wit-
ted Reggie approaches things logically. Still, Jake man-
ages to coax Reggie into a large, egg-shaped time machine.
But before they travel back through time, Jake leads Reggie
in a victory dance and the two lock feathers. The groove is
a bit homoerotic, which prompts Reggie to crassly brand
Jake “weird.”
Once in the time machine, appropriately voiced by “Star
Trek” vet George Takei, they’re off to Plymouth Colony,
November 1621, where they are welcomed by gun-toting
colonists looking to feast.
The two escape just in time, saved by Jenny (Amy
Poehler), a pretty young female turkey and the sassy daugh-
ter of the head of the local flock. The groundwork is thus laid
for Reggie and Jenny’s love story, with Jenny set up as a
strong female character for the little ladies in the audience.
After presenting their best arguments to rile up the local
flock and change the course of history, Reggie and Jake suc-
cessfully destroy the colonists’ weapons. During the battle
that follows, we are taken on another journey through time,
which results in a big cheer-raising climax.
The first feature film from Reel FX, “Free Birds” lacks the
dazzling visuals of DreamWorks, Pixar or Walt Disney ani-
mated films, and the use of 3-D may have given the budget a
boost but not the experience. Yet the turkeys in “Free
Birds,” with their immense eyes (especially those of the
cuddly baby birds), varying body types and distinct man-
nerisms are impressive.
Co-written and directed by Jimmy Hayward, whose credits
include “Horton Hears a Who!” and “Jonah Hex,” “Free
Birds” is a solid premiere effort that shows Reel FX’s poten-
tial to produce quality full-length animation. But the story-
line, with its hypothetical constituents, seems a little des-
perate at times, even for a kiddie film.
Yet children will get a kick out of the slap-stick humor —
the jubilant fast-talking daughter of the president is price-
less — and adults should appreciate nods to films about
time-travel from the 1980s, like “Bill & Ted’s Excellent
Adventure” and “Back to the Future.”
In the end, we are offered a junk food alternative to turkey
that will leave most kids satisfied. But it’s the film’s central
motifs that should stick to the ribs: Always believe in your-
self and never give up. Oh, and girls rock!
“Free Birds,” a Relativity Media release, is rated PG for
“some action/peril and rude humor.” Running time: 91 min-
utes. Two stars out of four.
Continued from page 19
BIRDS
which serves 20,000 gallons a year. Fresh salmon, ahi tuna
tacos, crispy hot fish and chips and fresh calamari are also
on the menu. Artist Lin Mercer’s ‘clam people’ murals
inside and outside the café are a delight. 197 Pomeroy Ave.
Pismo Beach. Splashcafe.com or (805) 773-4653.
STAY WHERE THE VIEW GOES FOREVER. The
AAAFour-Diamond all-suite Dolphin Bay Resort and Spa, a
member of the Preferred Boutique Resorts, is set in 5 acres
of lushly landscaped grounds atop a 40-foot bluff at the
north end of Pismo Beach. Direct beach access nearby. A
Saturday Kids’ Club for children ages 5 to 12 offers a trip to
tide pools, arts and crafts and a treasure hunt. Pet friendly
suites available. 2727 Shell Beach Road. Pismo Beach.
www.TheDolphinBay.com or (800) 516-0112.
AND REMEMBER: Travel is the frivolous part of seri-
ous lives, and the serious part of frivolous ones. — Anne
Sophie Swetchine.
Susan Cohn is a member of the North American Travel Journalists
Association, Bay Area Travel Writers, and the International Food,
Wine & Travel Writers Association. She may be reached at
susan@smdailyjournal.com.
Continued from page 21
TRAVEL
WEEKEND JOURNAL 23
Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SATURDAY, NOV. 9
Five Little Monkeys celebrates
Neighborhood Toy Store Day. Five
Little Monkeys, 1111 Burlingame
Ave., Burlingame. 20 percent off
entire store.
Master Gardener Winter Plant
Clinic. 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Gamble
Garden, 1431 Waverly St., Palo Alto. A
UC Master Gardener will be there to
answer gardening questions. For
more information go to www.gam-
blegarden.org.
Kaplan Test Prep free ACT practice
test. 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Registration starts Oct. 21.
For more information call the
Belmont Library at 591-8286.
Flu Shots. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Millbrae
Library, 1 Library Ave., Millbrae. Free.
For more information call 697-7607.
San Mateo Japanese American
Community Center Holiday Fair
and Bake Sale. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Gardeners’ Hall, Fifth and Claremont
streets, San Mateo. Annual fundraiser
featuring Asian goods and much,
much more. Free. For more informa-
tion call 343-2793.
AAUW San Carlos, Redwood City,
Belmont meeting. 10:30 a.m.
Redwood Shores Library, 399 Mariner
Parkway, Redwood City. American
Association of University Women San
Carlos Branch meeting. Open to the
public with no charge. For more
information call 592-5822 or email
sancarlos-aauw@earthlink.net.
Herbs and Natural Remedies for
Colds and Flus. 10:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. Common Ground Garden
Supply and Education Center, 559
College Ave., Palo Alto. Taste herbal
teas and tonics, identify the best
herbs for healing common ailments,
and take home lots of recipes. Taught
by Deva Luna. $31. To register go to
www.herbsandnaturalremediesfor-
coldsandflu.eventbrite.com.
Dad and Me at the Library. 11 a.m.
Redwood City Public Library, 1044
Middlefield Road, Redwood City.
Free. For more information go to
www.fatherhoodcollaborative.org.
LaNebbia Winery Craft Faire. 11:30
a.m. to 4 p.m. LaNebbia Winery,
12341 San Mateo Road, Half Moon
Bay. Food, handmade jewelry, arts,
crafts, bocci ball and picnic tables.
Free. For more information call 483-
7840.
Buy One, Get One Free at the Book
Nook. Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage Lane,
Twin Pines Park, Belmont. Paperbacks
are six for $1, trade paperbacks are
two for $1, hardbacks are two for $2
and up and children’s books are two
for $0.25 and up. All proceeds benefit
the Belmont Library. For more infor-
mation call 593-5650.
‘Family Past Times.’ 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
San Mateo County History Museum,
2200 Broadway, Redwood City.
Children will participate in craft
activities related to old-time farming.
Free with price of admission to the
museum. For more information go to
www.historysmc.org.
Art — When East meets West. 2
p.m. to 4 p.m. NanHai Art, 510
Broadway, Millbrae, Suite 301. NanHai
Art is presenting a free seminar series
on art exchange between the East
and West on Nov. 2, Nov. 9 and Nov.
16. Free. For more information and to
RSVP visit
www.nanhaiart.com/news. For ques-
tions call 259-2100 or email art@nan-
hai.com.
Peninsula Youth Theater Presents
‘Peter Pan.’ 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.
Mountain View Center for the
Performing Arts, 500 Castro St.,
Mountain View. Additional show
times: 1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Nov. 10,
9:30 a.m. Nov. 14, 9:30 a.m. and 7:30
p.m. Nov. 15, 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Nov.
16 and 1p.m. Nov. 17. $20 for adults,
$16 for children and seniors. For tick-
ets call 903-6000.
BHS Musical — ‘Curtains.’ 7 p.m.
Burlingame High School Auditorium,
1 Mangini Way, Burlingame. $15 gen-
eral admission, $10 for students, sen-
iors and children. For more informa-
tion call 558-2854.
Dutch Uncle, Bundy Browne and
the Expresso Rhythm Section,
Justin Raffanti and CamilleMyla. 7
p.m. Nov. 9. Club Fox, 2209 Broadway,
Redwood City. $12. For more infor-
mation call (877) 435-9849 or visit
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
Pacifica Spindrift Players presents
‘Social Security,’ a comedy by
Andrew Bergman. 8 p.m. Muriel
Watkin Gallery, 1050 Crespi Drive,
Pacifica. Tickets are $25 for adults
and $20 for seniors and students.
Runs through Nov. 24. For tickets call
the reservation line at 359-8002.
Broadway by the Bay presents
‘Guys and Dolls.’ 8 p.m. Fox Theatre,
2215 Broadway, Redwood City.
Through Nov. 17. Tickets are $35 to
$55 per person plus ticket fees. For
more information call 579-5565.
Fall Chamber Music Concert. 8 p.m.
First Baptist Church, 305 N. California
Ave., Palo Alto. $20. For more infor-
mation call (408) 395-2911.
Mendelssohn’s Elijah. 8 p.m.
Woodside High School Performing
Arts Center, 199 Churchill Ave.,
Woodside. Adults $25, Students $10.
For more information or to purchase
tickets visit go to www.master-
works.org.
SUNDAY, NOV. 10
Windy Hill at the Top. 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. Windy Hill Open Space Preserve,
Portola Valley. Join docents Mary
Bernstein, Ellen Dupuy and Paul
Wineman to hike the upper trails of
this preserve on a moderately-paced
four mile hike. Bring binoculars and
meet at the Skyline Boulevard park-
ing area. Free. For more information
go to www.openspace.org/activities.
Sunday Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. San Mateo Avenue between
Jenevein and Sylvan avenues, San
Bruno. For more information go to
www.westcoastfarmersmarkets.org.
San Mateo Arboretum Society
presents Flower Arranging Clinic.
10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Kohl
Pumphouse in San Mateo Central
Park, enter at Ninth and Palm
avenues. Free. For more information
call 579-0536.
Buy One, Get One Free at the Book
Nook. Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage Lane,
Twin Pines Park, Belmont. Paperbacks
are six for $1, trade paperbacks are
two for $1, hardbacks are two for $2
and up and children’s books are two
for $0.25 and up. All proceeds benefit
the Belmont Library. For more infor-
mation call 593-5650.
Society of Western Artists small
work exhibit and artists’ recep-
tion. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. SWA Gallery,
2625 Broadway, Redwood City. Free.
For more information go to
www.societyofwesternartists.com.
Pacifica Spindrift Players presents
‘Social Security,’ a comedy by
Andrew Bergman. 2 p.m. Muriel
Watkin Gallery, 1050 Crespi Drive,
Pacifica. Tickets are $25 for adults
and $20 for seniors and students.
Runs through Nov. 24. For tickets call
the reservation line at 359-8002.
Broadway by the Bay presents
‘Guys and Dolls.’ 2 p.m. Fox Theatre,
2215 Broadway, Redwood City.
Continues through Nov. 17. Tickets
are $35 to $55 per person plus ticket
fees. For more information call 579-
5565.
California Youth Symphony Begins
62nd Season. 2:30 p.m. San Mateo
Performing Arts Center.The award-
winning California Youth Symphony,
under the direction of Maestro Leo
Eylar, kicks off its 62nd season in a
highly anticipated return to the
newly remodeled San Mateo
Performing Arts Center. $15 for
adults, $10 for students and seniors.
For more information go to
www.cys.org.
Bay Area Bigfoot Meeting. 3 p.m. to
6 p.m. Round Table Pizza, 61 43rd
Ave., San Mateo. Free. For more infor-
mation call 504-1782.
Mendelssohn’s ‘Elijah.’ 4 p.m.
Woodside High School Performing
Arts Center, 199 Churchill Ave.,
Woodside. Adults $25, Students $10.
For more information or to purchase
tickets visit go to www.master-
works.org.
The Bach Dancing and Dynamite
Society. 4:30 p.m. Douglas Beach
House, 307 Mirada Road, Half Moon
Bay. Doors open at 3 p.m. for claiming
seats and buffet, two one-hour sets
begin at 4:30 with intermission. $35
general admission. $30 for youth
under 21. For more information or to
purchase tickets go to
www.bachddsoc.org.
Alexander String Quartet with
Joyce Yang, piano. 7 p.m. Kohl
Mansion, Great Hall, 2750 Adeline
Drive, Burlingame. $48 for adults, $45
for seniors, $15 30 and under. For
more information call 762-1130.
MONDAY, NOV. 11
Veterans Day Observance. 10:30
a.m. Golden Gate National Cemetery,
1300 Sneath Lane, San Bruno. There
will be a program with speakers. For
more information call 355-5533.
Chamber Music Society of San
Francisco. 1 p.m. Burlingame
Woman’s Club, 241 Park Road,
Burlingame. Student musicians will
be present; Natasha Makhijani and
Jory Fankuchen, violins; Clio Tilton,
viola, Samsum Van Loon, cello. Free.
For more information go to
www.burlingamemusicclub.net.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
Trustees, seems to be solidifying with
Amy Koo up 59 votes over Herb
Neuman after Election Day results had
her up 21 votes.
The San Mateo County Elections
Office released updated numbers from
the Nov. 5 election 4:30 p.m. Friday.
Another update will be posted at 4:30
p.m. Tuesday.
The two races are the only ones that
may have their results change as the
remaining handful of provisional bal-
lots are counted. Ortiz and former
councilman Cohen, formerly had 15.6
percent of the vote with 1,644 votes
and Cohen taking 15.5 percent of the
vote with 1,634 votes, respectively.
Now, it’s flipped, with Cohen taking
15.6 percent of the vote with 1,966
and Ortiz with 15.5 percent of the vote
and 1,949 votes. Either candidate
would fill a third open seat, as two
other candidates already decisively
won. Mayor Ann Keighran got 23 per-
cent of the vote, while Councilman
Michael Brownrigg took 20.5 percent
of the vote.
Cohen said the numbers are still too
close for comfort for either candidate.
“It’s still too close to call,” said
Cohen, 54. “With 17 votes and provi-
sional ballots still out, we certainly
can’t say either of us are decisive mem-
bers of the council. Historically, we’ve
always had close races in Burlingame
and I expected that.”
Cohen is vice president of the
Burlingame Historical Society,
founder and chief curator at the
Burlingame History Museum and exec-
utive director of the Palo Alto Business
and Professional Association. He was
on the council from 2005-2007.
Ortiz, 50, is also waiting out the
results. He has lived in Burlingame for
20 years and is the Burlingame High
School Drama Boosters president and
is on the Peninsula Health Care
District long term planning commit-
tee.
“It keeps moving back and forth,”
Ortiz said. “I’m surprised it’s this
close. I will have to wait and see what
happens.”
In the Belmont-Redwood Shores
Elementary School District Board of
Trustees race, Koo received 13.6 of the
vote, with 1,805 votes and Neuman
received 13.5 percent of the vote, with
1,784 votes, according to the Tuesday
night count. Now the gap has widened
by 59 votes, with Koo taking 13.8
percent of the vote and 2,046 votes,
while Neuman has 13.4 percent of the
vote and 1,987 votes.
Neuman has yet to concede.
“It’s quite a thriller,” said Neuman.
“[Koo] worked very hard during the
election and in the end more people
voted for her than me. She’s going to
do a good job.”
Koo said she has increasing confi-
dence in her win because the gap has
widened.
Either candidate would fill the third
open seat on the board, as the other
two have already been decisively filled
by incumbent Charles Velschow and
Suvarna Bhopale, who received 22.8
percent and 17.8 percent of the vote,
respectively, according to the latest
results released today. Naomi
Nishimoto, Rakesh Hegde and Kelly
Redmon also ran. Incumbents Andy
Stulbarg and Brian Matthews did not
seek re-election.
In the Burlingame race, Nirmala
Bandrapalli, Steve Duncan, Alexander
England Kent, Andrew Peceimer and
Robert Schinagl also ran. Incumbent
Cathy Baylock opted not to run again.
The provisional ballot count hasn’t
been completed yet and Elections
Office doesn’t keep records of vote
counting subtotals, so it is unsure how
many votes are still left to count,
Elections Office officials said. All
absentee ballots have been counted.
Once the votes are counted, the
Elections Office will begin its 1 per-
cent manual tally Nov. 14 in anticipa-
tion of certifying the results in early
December. The tally confirms that the
election was properly conducted. More
information can be found at shapethe-
future.org
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
ELECTION
divorcing our professional military
from the people they signed up to pro-
tect,” he wrote in an email. “You cou-
ple this with the horrific number of sui-
cides and it seemed to me that were in a
state of collective unconscious. I had
access to film studios, a sound stage,
equipment and, most of all, an amaz-
ing cadre of filmmakers. So I married
professional filmmakers with coura-
geous vets in an effort to tell the veter-
an story.”
Castle, who served in a front line
unit from 2002-2006, is currently a
freelance grant writer and jumped onto
the film project soon after he graduated
from San Francisco State with a degree
in technical and professional writing.
“It was a good experience,” said
Castle, who began weightlifting dur-
ing his second tour in Iraq. “It was raw
and changing on the fly. I was glad to
participate in the project to just get
awareness out there for veterans. It was
very cathartic.”
Long term, Bernardi is hoping the
films will have a positive effect on
both the veterans who come home and
want to hear true stories and the public
they served. Bernardi agreed the
process seemed cathartic to the partic-
ipants.
“In the short term, though, I think
we’ve had a positive impact on the
vets that have had the courage to tell
their stories,” he wrote in an email.
“They want people to know the truth of
their service in all its pain, suffering
and honor. ”
The beta site launched several
months ago. This is a long-term proj-
ect supported by San Francisco State
University, specifically the
Documentary Film Institute. Bernardi
hopes to raise enough money in dona-
tions and grants to produce hundred of
these documentaries, along with docu-
mentaries on veterans from other
countries. They are currently making
one on an Iraqi veteran still in Iraq.
For more on the project and to view
the films, visit veterandocs.org .
Scott’s film was featured in the 2012
S.F. Veteran Film Festival. Veteran
Documentary Corps was founded in
2011.
The Avenue of Flags Committee is
presenting the annual Veterans Day
Observance Nov. 11 outdoors at the
Golden Gate National Cemetery, 1300
Sneath Lane in San Bruno. “A Tribute
to Veterans” is the theme of this year’s
program. A musical prelude by the U.S.
Naval Sea Cadet Corps Band of the
West starts at 10:30 a.m. and the pro-
gram begins at 11 a.m. with Kathy
McCall, cemetery director, serving as
master of ceremonies. Following the
event, the public is invited to a lunch-
eon at the American Legion Hall, 757
San Mateo Ave. at Huntington Avenue,
in San Bruno. The luncheon is $8.
Proceeds benefit the Avenue of Flags
Committee. To RSVP, call 355-5533
or email carolynlivengood@san-
brunocable.com.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
WEBSITE
COMICS/GAMES
11-9-13
FRIDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Jacques, in song
6 Ohio city
11 Oui and ja
12 Timid sort
13 Foment
15 Posers
16 Male goose
18 Pixel
19 RN helper
21 Wander (about)
22 Wild plum
23 Destroy
25 Likely to
28 Strong and tough
30 Moo goo — pan
31 Dory mover
32 Check fig.
33 Bonfire remains
35 Cocoon dweller
37 What — that?
38 Remote button
40 Wine glass feature
41 Dues payer, for short
42 Small fry
43 Unbar, in poetry
46 Getting closer
48 Radio noise
50 Kind of cracker
54 Place of safety
55 Boise’s state
56 Leading the pack
57 Tooth problem
DOWN
1 Memo abbr.
2 Cartoon Chihuahua
3 PC key
4 Held sway
5 Is, in Barcelona
6 Cupid
7 Down for the count
8 Felt remorse
9 Peace Prize city
10 Wren’s abode
14 MIT grad, often
15 TV, radio, etc.
17 Family member
19 Burro alternative
20 Ship destinations
22 Bernard — of CNN
24 Zilch
25 Ventricle neighbor
26 Put down asphalt
27 Monorail
29 Edible root
34 Singer Yma —
36 On a bicycle
39 Madame Bovary
43 Job safety org.
44 Egyptian god
45 Chalet feature
46 Flag waver?
47 Phillips University town
49 Earl Grey, e.g.
51 Raincoat
52 I knew it!
53 Myrna of old movies
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
CRANKY GIRL®
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®
GET FUZZY®
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2013
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Avoid any sort of
emotional entanglement that will cause others to
question you. Holding on to what you have will improve
your life and brighten your future.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Helping others
is fine, as long as your motives are genuine and you
don’t let anyone take advantage of you. Don’t expect
anything in return, and you won’t be disappointed.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Getting together
with people who share your concerns will bring good
results. A crucial relationship will develop that will alter
your personal life and overall direction.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Emotional issues will
surface, forcing you to deal with a problem that you’ve
been putting off. Face your dilemmas with honesty and
integrity, and you will come out on top.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Keep your money
matters a secret. You’ll need to listen carefully to
make a decision that can influence a financial or legal
concern. Base your ultimate choice on your gut feeling
and the facts at hand.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Restlessness should not
be allowed to dictate your words or actions. You are
likely to make a costly mistake. Stay calm and don’t go
overboard in any aspect of your life.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Don’t forget to play
today. Downtime will help you rejuvenate your spirits
and will give you a better view of what you may need
to do to improve an important relationship.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Speak from the heart
and ask questions that will give you a better idea of
what’s expected of you. Caution must be taken if you
want to avoid exhaustion or minor injury.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — You’ll be a good
influence on others if you share your ideas, thoughts
and intentions. Keep a close watch on an unpredictable
situation, as guidance will be required.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Proceed with caution.
Involving yourself in an emotional discussion will not
likely end in your favor. Listen carefully and retreat
until you have a rock-solid perspective and plan.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Make your move and do
it with finesse. You will attract positive attention and
meet people who are heading in a similar direction as
you. Romance is in the stars.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Look over your long-term
plans and consider your options regarding work and
money. Putting a budget in place by cutting your
overhead will help ease stress.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
24 Weekend • Nov. 9, 2013
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
TAXI & LIMO DRIVER, Wanted, full
time, paid weekly, between $500 and
$700 cash, (650)766-9878
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES +
SALES MGR- (jewelry exp req)
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
110 Employment
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Two positions available:
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Presser
Are you…..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have….Good English skills, a
desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
Immediate openings for customer
service/seamstress and presser
positions.
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: (650)342-6978
DISHWASHER WANTED
New San Carlos Restaurant, Johnston’s
Saltbox email Max@johnstonsaltbox.com
Call (512)653-1836
DRY CLEANERS / Laundry, part time,
Saturday 7am to 4pm. Counter, must
speak English Apply LaunderLand, 995
El Camino, Menlo Park.
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
110 Employment
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
SEWER AUTHORITY MID-COASTSIDE
Collection Maintenance
Worker I/II D.O.Q.
(Salary: $3947 -$4798/mo. for Collection
Maintenance Worker I D.O.Q.)
(Salary: $4930- $5992/mo. for Collection
Maintenance Worker II D.O.Q.)
Sewer Authority Mid-Coastside (SAM),
located in the City of Half Moon Bay,
is accepting applications for the posi-
tion of Collection Maintenance Worker
I or II (depending on qualifications).
The Collection Maintenance Worker I is
an entry level maintenance position.The
Collection Maintenance Worker II is a
journey level maintenance position.
MININUM QUALIFICATIONS: Educa-
tion: Equivalent to completion of the 12th
grade. License: Possession of a valid
State of California Class C Driver’s Li-
cense. 6 months previous sewer collec-
tions systems experience desired.
APPLICATION DUE DATE: November
15, 2013 by 3:00 pm. Applications may
be submitted online, via email, delivered
in person, or via US Postal Service (must
be postmarked November 15, 2013).
HOW TO OBTAIN AN APPLICATION
AND JOB DESCRIPTION:
For an application and complete job de-
scription please visit SAM’s website:
www.samcleanswater.org, click on the
link to the left, “Employment Opportuni-
ties”, or you may phone 650-726-0124.
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 524321
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
David Nathan Kahn
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, David Nathan Kahn filed a pe-
tition with this court for a decree chang-
ing name as follows:
Present name: David Nathan Kahn
Proposed name: Dakmali Karuna
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December 4,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/18/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/10/2013
(Published, 10/26/13, 11/02/2013,
11/09/2013, 11/16/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257758
The following person is doing business
as: Wag Steady, 3205 Llano St., SAN
MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Martyn Jones,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Martyn Jones /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/24/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/19/13, 10/26/13, 11/02/13, 11/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258113
The following person is doing business
as: Cafe Bliss, 2039 Ralston Ave., BEL-
MONT, CA 94002 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Feng Yan Li,
2532 Ulloa St. San Francisco, CA 94116.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on .
/s/ Feng Yan Li /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/19/13, 10/26/13, 11/02/13, 11/09/13).
26 Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257666
The following person is doing business
as: Lead Gen Xperts, 1546 El St., SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Karen Johnson,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Karen Johnson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/19/13, 10/26/13, 11/02/13, 11/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257759
The following person is doing business
as: Renew Construction, 1580 Laurel St.,
Ste. b-1, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Robert Stafford. 829 Edgewwood Rd.
Redwood City, CA 94062. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Robert Stafford /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/24/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/26/13, 11/02/13, 11/09/13, 11/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258251
The following person is doing business
as: Garden Gateway Care Home, 12 Sul-
livan Ave., DALY CITY, CA 94015 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Marlyn Sartiaguda Sheumaker, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Marlyn Sartiaguda Sheumaker /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/26/13, 11/02/13, 11/09/13, 11/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258110
The following person is doing business
as: Glamour Salon Spa, 650 S. Norfolk
St., SAN MATEO, CA 9440 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Kevin
Ngo Dienxuan, 2271 W. Middlefield Rd.,
Mountainview, CA 94043. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Marlyn Sartiaguda Sheumaker /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/26/13, 11/02/13, 11/09/13, 11/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258303
The following person is doing business
as: De Colores Hair Studio, 1403 Chapin
Ave. BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Nancy
Serio, 1230 North Rd., Belmot CA
94002. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Nancy Serio /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/02/13, 11/09/13, 11/16/13, 11/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257960
The following person is doing business
as: Organic Body Bar, 4060 El Camino
Real, Studio 25, SAN MATEO, CA 94403
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Diana Dannelly, LLC, CA. The
business is conducted by a Limited Lia-
bility Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Diana Dannelly /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/02/13, 11/09/13, 11/16/13, 11/23/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258283
The following person is doing business
as: Agilimpex, 2319 Alameda De Las
Pulgas, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Martin Rojo, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Martin Rojo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/02/13, 11/09/13, 11/16/13, 11/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258324
The following person is doing business
as: Bitters and Bottles, 240 Grand Ave.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Bar Antz, LLC. The business is conduct-
ed by a Limited Liability Company. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 07/01/2013.
/s/ Joseph Barwin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/09/13, 11/16/13, 11/24/13, 11/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258421
The following person is doing business
as: Ryan Limo Transportation, 1456 Bel-
levue Ave., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Bouagou Jalal, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ Bouagou Jalal /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/09/13, 11/16/13, 11/24/13, 11/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258364
The following person is doing business
as: TFG Interim Partners, 1700 S. El Ca-
mino Real, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
The Ferneborg Group, Inc, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 11/01/2013.
/s/ John Ferneborg /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/09/13, 11/16/13, 11/24/13, 11/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258321
The following person is doing business
as: 1) SFO Express Mart, 2) SFO Ex-
press Maket t300 S. Airport Blvd.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Greiner Sevices Stations, Inc., CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on .
/s/ Joseph Campagna /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/09/13, 11/16/13, 11/24/13, 11/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258300
The following person is doing business
as: 1 Salon, 34 San Pedro Dr., DALY
CITY, CA 94014 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Ying Mei Zhong,
1550 Sloat Blvd., San Francisco, CA
94132. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
12/0113.
/s/ Ying Mei Zhong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/09/13, 11/16/13, 11/24/13, 11/30/13).
203 Public Notices
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF
THE USE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT #255935
The following person is abandoning the
use of the fictitious business name: Fa-
mous Bail Bonds, 133 Arch St., Ste. 7,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062. The ficti-
tious business name was filed on
05/17/2013 in the county of San Mateo.
The business was conducted by: Dikran
Ohanian, 6937 Village Pkwy, #2448,
Dublin CA 94568.
/s/ Dikran Ohanian /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 10/18/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 11/02/13,
11/09/2013, 11/16/2013, 11/23/2013).
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CIV521342
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado):Nicholas Makreus, aka Nick J.
Makreas, an individual: Does 1-30
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): Citibank,
N.A.,
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
203 Public Notices
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
Superior Court of California, County of
San Mateo
400 County Center
Redwood City, CA 94063
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Harvey M. Moore, Esq. (101128),
Terri Lazo, Esq. (228663)
The Moore Law Group, A Profesional
Corporation
3710 S. Susan St., Ste. 210
SANTA ANA, CA 92704
(714)431-2075
Date: (Fecha) Apr. 29, 2013
John C. Fitton, Clerk
(Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
November 9, 16, 23, 30, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND IN BURLINGAME CALL
TO IDENTIFY (description) Foster City
Police Department Property Section
(650)286-3300
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
HIGH CHAIR by Evenflo. Clean, sturdy,
barely used. $20 (650)726-4985
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
ART PAPER, various size sheets, 10
sheets, $20. (650)591-6596
ART: 5 charcoal nude figures, unframed,
14” x 18”, by Andrea Medina, 1980s.
$40. 650-345-3277
RUB DOWN TYPE (Lettraset), hundreds
to choose from. 10 sheets for $10.
(650)591-6596
296 Appliances
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both (650)520-3425
296 Appliances
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both (650)520-3425
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
OSTER MEAT slicer, mint, used once,
light weight, easy to use, great for holi-
day $25. (650)578-9208
PRESSURE COOKER Miromatic 4qt
needs gasket 415 333-8540 Daly City
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
298 Collectibles
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1953 CHEVY Bel Air Convertible model.
Sun Star 1:18 scale.Blue. Original box.
$20 cash. (650)654-9252
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
2003 AMERICAN Eagle silver proof dol-
lar. Original velvet box and COA. $70
Cash. (650)654-9252
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
298 Collectibles
MARK HAMILL autographed Star Wars
Luke figure, unopened rarity. 1995 pack-
age. $75 San Carlos, 650-255-8716.
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
SILVER PIECE dollar circulated $30 firm
415 333-8540 Daly City
STAR WARS 9/1996 Tusken Raider ac-
tion figure, in original unopened package.
$5.00, Steve, SC, 650-255-8716
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90.,
(650)766-3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
UNIQUE, FRAMED to display, original
Nevada slot machine glass plate. One of
a kind. $50. 650-762-6048
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 SOLD!
300 Toys
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
LARGE ALL Metal Tonka dump truck.
as new, $25, SOLD!
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
STAR WARS R2-D2 action figure. Un-
opened, original 1995 package. $10.
Steve, San Carlos, 650-255-8716.
STAR WARS, Battle Droid figures, four
variations. Unopened 1999 packages.
$60 OBO. Steve, 650-255-8716.
TONKA DUMP Truck with tipping bed,
very sturdy Only $10 SOLD!
TONKA METAL Excavator independent
bucket and arm, $25 SOLD!
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $500. (650)766-3024
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
APPLE Harmon Kardon speakers, sub-
woofer, one side rattles. In San Carlos,
$40, 650-255-8716.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
27 Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
INVITATION TO BID
SEALED BIDS will be received by the San Mateo County Harbor District at the District Administration Office, until 10:00 AM No-
vember 25, 2013, at which time they will be publicly opened and read for performing work as follows:
Furnishing all labor, materials, equipment, and performing all work necessary and incidental to the construction of the
project known as Pillar Point Harbor Concession Building Sewer Line Replacement Project according to plans,
specifications and Contract Documents.
Project is to be completed within 60 consecutive calendar days from the date specified in the Notice to Proceed.
Time for commencement and completion of the work is important, and is to be of the essence of the Contract.
A mandatory prebid conference will be held at 8:00 AM on November 15, 2013 at the Pillar Point Harbor at the Harbor Master
Office in Half Moon Bay. Failure to attend will cause disqualification of a bidder.
Bidders may obtain copies of the bidding documents from Scott Grindy at sgrindy@smharbor.com.
Bidding procedures are prescribed in the Project Manual. Bids shall be executed upon the forms bound and made a part of said
Manual. Bid guaranty in an amount not less than ten percent (10%) of the total bid dollar amount and conforming to the prescri-
bed bidding procedures is required to be submitted with each bid, as a guaranty to be forfeited should the bidder, if awarded the
contract, fail to enter into the same, or fails to furnish in a timely manner the bonds and/or proof of insurance.
Pursuant to the provisions of California Labor Code Section 6707, each bid submitted in response to this Invitation to Bid shall
contain, as a bid item, adequate sheeting, shoring, and bracing, or equivalent method, for the protection of life and limb in
trenches and open excavation, which shall conform to applicable safety orders. By listing this sum, the bidder warrants that its ac-
tion does not convey tort liability to the Owner, the Design Consultant, the Construction Manager, and their employees, agents,
and sub consultants.
Pursuant to Section 1770, et. seq., of the California Labor Code, the successful bidder shall pay not less than the prevailing rate of
per diem wages as determined by the Director of the California Department of Industrial Relations. Copies of such prevailing rate
of per diem wages are on file with the Human Resources Department of the San Mateo County Harbor District, which copies
will be made available to any interested party on request.
The successful bidder must insure that its policies and practices provide equal opportunity to all applicants and employees without
regard to race, color, creed, sex, age, religion, ancestry, citizenship, national origin, handicap, mental condition, veteran or marital
status. The successful bidder must comply with the Americans With Disabilities Act.
Pursuant to Public Contract Code Section 22300, for monies earned by the Contractor and withheld by the San Mateo County
Harbor District to ensure the performance of the Contract, the Contractor, may, at its option, choose to substitute securities meet-
ing the requirements of said Public Contract Code Section 22300.
All bidders shall be licensed under the provisions of Chapter 9, Division 3 of the Business and Professions Code of the State of
California to do the type of work contemplated in the project. In accordance with provisions of California Public Contract Code
Section 3300, the Owner has determined that the Contractor shall possess a valid Class A License at the time that the bid is sub-
mitted. Failure to possess the specified license shall render the bid as non-responsive.
The successful bidder will be required to furnish a Payment bond in the amount equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the Con-
tract price, as well as a Faithful Performance Bond in the amount equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the Contract price.
Each bidder shall submit with its bid a statement setting forth its experience on the forms included in the Bid Proposal.
Bid forms received after the designated time will not be accepted.
No bidder may withdraw its bid for a period of sixty (60) days after the date set for the opening of bids.
The Owner reserves the right to reject any or all bids, and to waive any irregularities in the bids.
Dated: November 7, 2013
Contact: Scott Grindy, Harbor Master
(650) 515-7792
303 Electronics
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SANYO C30 Portable BOOM BOX,
AM/FM STEREO, Dolby Metal Tape
player/recorder, 2/3 speakers boxes, $50
650-430-6046
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SLIDE PROJECTOR Air Equipped Su-
per 66 A and screen $30 for all
(650)345-3840
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
3 DRAWER PLATFORM BED Real
wood (light pine, Varathane finish). Twin
size. $50 (650)637-1907
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
AUTUMN TABLE Centerpiece unop-
ened, 16 x 6, long oval shape, copper
color $10.00 (650)578-9208
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLONDE Wood, 6 drawers,
31”x 61” x 18” , $45. (650)592-2648
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINA CABINET, 53” x “78” wooden
with glass. Good shape. $120 obo.
(650)438-0517
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet, 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
CURIO CABINET 55" by 21" by 12"
Glass sides, door & shelves $95 OBO
(650)368-6271
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
304 Furniture
DRESSER - 6 drawer 61" wide, 31" high,
& 18" deep $50, (650)592-2648
DRESSERlarge, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
HEADBOARD, QUEEN-SIZE,HALF-
MOON shape,decorated with small
stones,very heavy. Free to take away!
(650-342-6192)
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white
pen and paper holder. Brand new, in
box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
PRIDE MECHANICAL Lift Chair, Infinite
postion. Excellent condition, owner’s
manual included. $400 cash only,
(650)544-6169
QUEEN SIZE Hide a Bed, Like new
$275, (650)245-5118
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99, (650)592-2648
ROUND DINING table, by Ethan Allen,
sturdy good cond. $95 (650)726-4985
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
304 Furniture
SHELVING UNIT from IKEA interior
metal, glass nice condition $50/obo.
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TEAK BASE and glass cover cheese
holder. Great for holidays. $18.
(650)341-6402
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV CABINET, brown wood, 3 shelves, 2
doors, brass hardware, 34 3/8wx20
1/2dx28 3/8h good condition. $35
(650)347-5104
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057.
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
BRADFORD COLLECTOR Plates THAI
(Asian) - $35 (650)348-6955
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
COOKING POTS (3) with lids: 21/2 gal,
4 gal, 5 gal $20 for all. (650)574-3229
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
ICE CREAM MAKER - Westbend 4 qt.
ice cream maker, brand new, $30,
(650)726-1037
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO (650)345-5502
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
OSTER BREAD maker (new) $45.,
(650)520-3425
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
STANDARD BATHROOM SET beige lid,
cover and mat. $10 (650)574-3229
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
306 Housewares
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
VINYL SHOWER CURTAIN beige /coral
/white floral on ivory, $10 (650)574-3229
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40 for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
6-8 MISC. TOOLS - used, nail tray with
nails, $15., (650)322-2814
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman, 10”, 4 long
x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 10" mitre saw with 100 tooth
carbon blade $60 SOLD!
PROFESSIONAL MORTAR BOX Like
New $25 (650)368-0748
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
FILING CABINET, 4-drawer, letter $25
(650)341-8342
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20.00 (650)871-7200
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, anti-oxident proper-
ties, new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WALKER, Foldable with
wheels. $15 (650)756-7878
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
310 Misc. For Sale
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN Olde Brooklyn lan-
terns, battery operated, safe, new in box,
$100, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
BABY BJORN Little Potty Ideal 4
travel/early training,(650)595-3933
BLUE/WHITE DUCK shaped ceramic
teapot, hand painted, made in China.
$18. (650)341-6402
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BREVILLE JUICE Maker multi speed
(Williams Somoma) never used $90
(650)994-4783
BRIEFCASE 100% black leather
excellent condition $75 (650)888-0129
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
DOLLS: NEW, girl and boy in pilgrim
costume, adorable, soft fabric, beautifully
made. $30. 650-345-3277
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 SOLD!
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HOT SANDWICH maker elec, perfect,
$9.95 (650)595-3933
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks, $60.,
(650)343-4461
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $7., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOW RIDER magazines 80 late 1999 all
for $80 SOLD!
LUGGAGE, BLACK Samsonite with roll-
ers, 3 compartments, condition clean,
never used. makeshift handle, $40
(650)347-5104
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MARTEX TOWEL SET (bath, hand,
face) - gold-colored - $15 (650)574-3229
310 Misc. For Sale
MARTEX TOWEL SET (bath, hand.
face) - clay-colored - $15 (650)574-3229
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12”Lx
5”W , $12. both, SOLD!
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO (650)593-8880
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
33" wide x 20 inches deep. 64.5 " high.
$70.00 (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PET CARRIER Excellent Condition Very
Clean Size small "Petaire" Brand
$50.00 (650)871-7200
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SCARY DVD movies, (7) in cases, Zom-
bies, Date Movie, Labyrinth, in original
boxes. $10/all. (650)578-9208
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
TRIVIAL PURSUIT - Master Game/Ge-
nus Edition. Has all cards. Mint condi-
tion. Asking $10. (650)574-3229
TWIN SIZE quilt Nautica, New. Yellow,
White, Black Trim “San Marino" pattern
$40 Firm (650)871-7200.
USB VEHICLE charger any mini USB
device $20 (650)595-3933
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEST AFRICAN hand carved tribal
masks - $25 (650)348-6955
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
XMAS DECORATIONS: 6 unique, hand
painted, jointed new toy soldiers, holding
musical instrument. $34. 650-345-3277
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap $75.
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
UKULELE STILL in box unused, no
brand $35 (650)348-6428
312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
28 Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Long-odds track
bets
10 Early launch
rocket
15 Marketing
resource
16 Gear part
17 Small-time
18 All, in Assisi
19 Piece of work
20 Questionable
strategy for a
runner?
22 Tastes
23 Kept from
spreading
24 Media __
27 Kind of colorful
shirt
28 Bad blood
29 Stale quality
33 Fire
34 A cup may be
one
35 Computer menu
option
36 Polite assent
38 Scrubber’s
target
39 Comedian
Fields
40 Capitulate
41 Soil test
measure
44 Reduce
45 Golf tournament
display
47 Cristal maker
50 “__ Smith and
Jones”: ’70s TV
Western
51 Available to
order
53 “__ honest ...”
54 Like a tense
person’s teeth?
55 One who’s
doomed
56 Read
impatiently
DOWN
1 Latino Muppet
prawn
2 It calls for
immediate attn.
3 Buzzed
4 “Jaws” omen
5 Mythological
paradise
6 Woodworking
devices
7 They have
points
8 Dog star
9 Make safe for
use, in a way
10 Diplomacy
figure
11 Bring up
something
sensitive
12 Singer Lenya
13 Where to see
some old
clothes
14 Culture __
21 Fed. security
22 Bodybuilding
goal
24 Conspiratorial
25 French bean
product?
26 River inlets
27 Come about
29 Head out West?
30 Emmy winner
Falco
31 __ Valley
32 Uzi
predecessor
34 Actor Gallagher
37 Tennis shutout
38 Floral-sounding
Los Angeles
suburb
40 Sonic server
41 Braid
42 First response
to a call
43 Former boxer Ali
44 Page of music
46 Short run, for
short
47 Eliot title
character
48 “Listen to Your
Heart” singer in
the musical
“Young
Frankenstein”
49 Prompted
52 “Big deal”
By Norm Guggenbiller
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
11/09/13
11/09/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
ALPINESTAR MOTORCYCLE JEANS
Twin Stitched. Internal Knee Protection.
Tags Attached. Mens Sz 34 Grey/Blue
Denim $50.00 (650)357-7484
AUTHENTIC PERUVIAN VICUNA PON-
CHO: 56” square. Red, black trim, knot-
ted fringe hem. $99 (650)375-8044
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
INDIAN SARI $50 (650)515-2605
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
316 Clothes
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
SILK SCARF, Versace, South Beach
pattern 100% silk, 24.5”x34.5” made in
Italy, $75. $(650)591-6596
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored, green lapel &
hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMAN;S LEVI'S Jacket Pristine cond.,
faded Only $29 (650)595-3933
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
70 SPREADER cleats, 1” x 8” for 8”
foundations. $25. (650)345-3840
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $30.00 for all (650)345-3840
ONE BOX of new #1 heavy CEDAR
SHAKE shingles $14.00. SOLD!
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
USED LUMBER pieces 5 2x4's, 2 2x6's,
3 plywood sheets ALL $30.00
SOLD!
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. (650)341-1861
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
CAMPER DOLLY, excellent condition.
Used only once. $150. SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler$20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
318 Sports Equipment
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
STATIONARY BIKE, Volt, Clean, $15
(650)344-6565
STATIONERY BIKE, $20. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057.
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE
SALE
Great Variety
Saturday,
November 9
8:00 to 5:00
1251 Parrott Drive
San Mateo 94402
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Rugs
THROW RUG, 8’ x 11’, black and gold.w/
fring, beautiful,clean. $50. SOLD!
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens. 28mm-210mm. Fil-
ter and lens cap. Original owner. $99.
Cash. (650)654-9252
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
TOYOTA ‘00 CAMRY LE, 4 dr, auto,
clean title, smogged. 129K miles, $3,800.
(650)342-6342
VW ‘01 BEETLE, Turbo Sport, 97K
miles, auto, $5,800. (650)342-6342
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
BOX OF auto parts. Miscellaneous
items. $50.00 OBO. (650) 995-0012.
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
29 Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Asphalt/Paving
NORTHWEST
ASPHALT REPAIR
Driveways, Parking Lots
Asphalt/Concrete
Repair • Installation
Free Estimate
(650)213-2648
Lic. #935122
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Mantels • Chair Rails •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Carpets
COLEMAN'S
CARPET SERVICE
Green, Soap free,
Detergent Free Carpet Cleaning!
Dry in a few hours! $99.00!
2 Room minimum!
Call Gisele (510)590-7427
Contractors
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
Cleaning
Concrete
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
VICTOR’S FENCES
and House Painting
•Interior •Exterior
Power Wash
•Driveways •Sidewalk •Houses
Free Estimates
(650)583-1270
or (650)808-5833
Lic. # 106767
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
Flooring
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
GUTTER
CLEANING
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
• Gutters and downspouts,
• Rain gutter repair,
• Rain gutter protection (screen),
• Handyman Services
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
by Greenstarr
Chris’s Hauling
Licensed Bonded and Insured
Since 1985 License # 752250
www.yardboss.net
º Yard c|ean up - att|c,
basement
º Junk meta| remova|
|nc|ud|ng cars, trucks and
motorcyc|es
º 0emo||t|on
º 0oncrete remova|
º Fxcavat|on
º Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
&
Tom 650.355.3500
Chris 415.999.1223
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Landscaping
Landscaping
by Greenstarr
º 0omp|ete |andscape
ma|ntenance and remova|
º Fu|| tree care |nc|ud|ng
hazard eva|uat|on,
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Tom 650. 355. 3500
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
30 Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Plumbing Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Washing
EXTERIOR
CLEANING
SERVICES
- window washing
- gutter cleaning
- pressure washing
- wood restoration
- solar panel cleaning
(650)216-9922
services@careful-clean.com
Bonded - Insured
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
• BANKRUPTCY •
Huge credit card debit?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650-363-2600
This law firm is a debt relife agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
GRAND OPENING
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
Food
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
Health & Medical
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
PAIN & STRESS RELIEF
$29 UP
Weight loss, Migraine, Stroke,
Fatigue, Insomnia, PMS, HBP,
Cough, Allergies, Asthma,
Gastrointestinal, Diabetes
(650)580-8697
Acupuncture, Acupressure Herbs
1846 El Camino Real, Burlingame
Accept Car & work injury, PPO
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
Insurance
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
851 Cherry Ave. #29, San Bruno
in Bayhill Shopping Center
Open 7 Days 10:30am- 10:30pm
650. 737. 0788
Foot Massage $19.99/hr
Free Sauna (with this Ad)
Body Massage $39.99/hr
Hot StoneMassage $49.99/hr
GRAND OPENING
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
Massage Therapy
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL GROUP
(650) 595-7750
www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Travel Service
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
CST#100209-10
LOCAL/STATE 31
Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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of how the state’s 58 counties are responding
to the governor’s criminal justice realign-
ment plan.
Researchers identified five counties they
called “the poster counties” for realignment:
Monterey, San Mateo, Santa Barbara, Santa
Clara and Shasta.
Before realignment, those counties largely
emphasized “a more punitive approach,”
defined as “sentencing a higher proportion of
convicted felons to incarceration.” Now their
plans call for spending more of their state-
provided money on treatment programs.
Five other counties went in the opposite
direction, the study found. They are Alpine,
Calaveras, Contra Costa, Imperial and Marin
counties.
They previously had fewer offenders in cus-
tody but planned to use the state money to
increase their spending on law enforcement.
“If crime is going up ... then it makes sense
what they did, because they’re allocating
these funds to deal with the problems that
realignment is going to cause them, or that
they anticipate is going to cause them,” said
study co-author Jeffrey Lin, an assistant pro-
fessor of sociology at the University of
Denver.
Those counties might be spending heavily
now on new deputies and jail cells, but intend
to spend more on probation and rehabilita-
tion programs in future years, he said.
“Some of these counties might then start to
fall in line with what realignment intended.
Not surprisingly, counties are taking care of
their most pressing business first,” he said.
Researchers did not try to learn why offi-
cials in each county made their spending
decisions.
Twenty-five of California’s 58 counties
showed no significant change in their
approach to criminal justice, according to the
16-month, $200,000 study. It was funded in
part by the U.S. Department of Justice.
In fiscal 2011-12, allocations to counties
ranged from less than $77,000 for thinly
populated Alpine County to nearly $113 mil-
lion for Los Angeles County.
Continued from page 1
STUDY
to the public. While reduced, the amount is
still greater than the zero he originally sug-
gested. The original 2012 proposal called
only for a private marina but Powers eventual-
ly added public slips in the wake of communi-
ty outcry. The addition actually spurred the
City Council in May to send the plan back to
the Planning Commission for reconsideration
because of the significant changes.
At workshops Saturday and Wednesday
night, the city plans to explain the proposal,
answer questions and collect input which will
be compiled for a town hall meeting later this
month. The workshops are also in anticipa-
tion of the proposed project’s return trip to the
Planning Commission.
The workshops are only the latest step in an
ongoing debate over the future of the area. The
public fight began last fall when owner Paula
Uccelli informed tenants of the possible sale
and their pending eviction from the boating
community. Occupy Redwood City jumped on
board the debate and several tenants sued
Uccelli, claiming the plan to transfer the har-
bor lease to Powers and the Pauls Corp. was
illegal because it lacked a commercial marina.
The suit was dropped after a judge refused to
temporarily halt the evictions. Uccelli then
terminated her lease with the State Lands
Commission and removed the docks.
The workshops are 10 a.m. to noon
Saturday, Nov. 9 at Seaport Conference Center,
459 Seaport Court and 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 13 at Sandpiper Community
Center, 797 Redwood Shores Parkway. A town
hall meeting on the community input from the
workshops is 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday,
Nov. 20 in Council Chambers, 1017
Middlefield Road, Redwood City.
Continued from page 1
PLAN
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
Typhoon Haiyan has struck the
Philippines and Bay Area residents are step-
ping up to help the island nation.
The National Alliance for Filipino
Concerns regional chapter based in San
Francisco is calling for monetary donations
to help with relief efforts after the storm
reached land Friday morning.
The storm has caused four deaths and has
forced the evacuation of at least one million
people as winds reach beyond 200 mph. The
typhoon affected a large swath of the coun-
try from Central Luzon to Northern
Mindanao.
Donations will be sent to Visayas Primary
Health Care Service, Inc., which is based on
the ground in the Visayan region.
Donations for typhoon victims can be
made online at http://nafconusa.org/ .
San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee released a
statement this afternoon after the storm
struck the Philippines.
“The people of the Philippines are in our
thoughts and prayers today, and we will con-
tinue to support them in the days and
months ahead as we learn the true impact
caused by Typhoon Haiyan,” he said in the
statement.
The mayor's office is encouraging resi-
dents to donate money to assist victims.
Information about giving to organizations
on the ground and working on recovery
efforts is available at sfgivesback.org.
Bay Area residents asked
to help victims of Typhoon
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Republican state Sen.
Bill Emmerson announced Friday that he is
resigning in midterm, citing his waning
enthusiasm for a job he has held since
2010.
His resignation will take effect Dec. 1,
according to a statement posted on his
official website and confirmed by
spokesmen for Senate President Pro Tem
Darrell Steinberg .
Emmerson, 68, of Redlands, has repre-
sented his Southern California district since
2004, when he was elected to the Assembly.
He won his Senate seat in 2010, and would
have been forced out of office by term limits
in 2016.
His resignation sets up a special election
but is not expected to change the composi-
tion of the Senate, where Democrats hold a
two-thirds supermajority.
State Sen. Bill Emmerson
announces his resignation
32 Weekend • Nov. 9-10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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