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L January 1962
FOR INVESTIGATION AHD (OR) NAME CHECK
TO nf i
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HISTORICAL
SUBJECT
l . INOICES RESUlTS IIIEOUEST(D IY
10 Jan:.Iary 1962
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24 Ja:1uo.!'y 1962
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ClTIZE}SHlP
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FATHER
PRQ PAP.! I
APPROVED FOR RREASE 1994
CIA HISTORICAL REVIEW P R O G   ~ M
: Antonio Carlos VECl.ANA Bla.'lch
18 October 19213 Cuba.
I Cuban
s 401 NW 67th Street, Miami, Fla..
1 Sira Antonia MUIR:> (resides in Havana., Cuba)
1 Antonio VECIANA DPOB1 1901 Spain
Ana Blanch DPOB: 1906 Spain
5
1il6itEl
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Occstcs • IWIZ Penn
201-735296
- Photos
1930 -
*
1950's
1957 -
1957 -
Born 10 February, in Cuba.
Primary and secondary education in private
institutions. Reportedly well-educated
with degree in political economics from
of Havana.
Communist since before Cast1·o; fathet· is
militant Communist.
RUIZ emigrated to U.S. travelling throughout
East Coast and holding minor jobs.
RUIZ' wife, Nilda VECIANA, lived in New
York for five fears in the 1950's: 48th
St. I 3 blocks rom Times Square.
RUIZ said he spent f in the U.S.
(years not stated). See 19
June 1970.
RUIZ began to work as an apprentice.butcher.
for a Polish-American, Alexander SA.\lKO,
who had a grocery store on Flagler St.,
"Fruit Center" (grocery, meat market and
fruit store;) RUIZ did so well attracting
Latin-American customers to the store that
he soon began to   in the
area for SAMKO.
In Miami RUIZ and another Cuban exile, Maj.
Jose Maria MOLEOY Carreras, were jn contact
with an American of Cuban descent, known as
Joe LOUIS or LUIS, an underworld
who was competing with Italians in the bolita
racket in .Tampa. RUIZ said LUIS offered
RUIZ and close associates $800. a month,
plus car and expenses, to supervise "collection
in Miami. LUIS even asked them to kill a
man named FERNANDEZ, who was involved in
the game in Miami, for $5,000. each.
* During the Batista regime, RUIZ was in asylu:n in Mexico,
involved in the Triple A movement of Dr. Aureliano
SANCHEZ Arango.
193H -
1957/58 -
1959 -
1959-62 -
1963 -
1964 -
19o4 -
flUIZ left Miami in Februat·y 193B with
HatTY VILLEGAS Tamayo (cpn t2ct of PINEl'RO,
DGI Chief; also as guerrilla. with
Che GUEVARA in Bolivia) and three other
members of the 26th of July Mov eme nt,
and reportedly enteeed Cuba clandestinely.
When RUIZ left Miami in 1958 he reportedly
turned over to his brother (name not noted)
a house in North Miami, a brand new car,
and a thousand dollars in the bank .
• RUIZ. siid that he was living in the U.S .
illegally. --- ·
In Havana RUIZ was involved with a group
in sabotage activities; planting bombs
and other terrorist acts, against Batista
regime.
Prior to 1959 RUIZ was reportedly operating
cJandestinely in the D.R. trying to over-
throw TRUJILLO regime . TRUJILLO wanted
to get RUIZ. RUIZ escaped and went to
Cuba.
Chief of Dept. of Construction, Expenses
Studies, Office of Financial Statistics,
Ministry of Treasury. Also reported to be
G-2.
1 August - appointed Commercial Counselor
at Cuban Embassy Mexico City. Reportedly
DGI and sent there to infiltrate counter-
revolutionary group.s
...
22 November - RUIZ flew from Mexico City to
Havana. Returned to MexiiD City on 29 Nov.
January - received correspondence from Andy
_BUCKNER.., Jl U.S. citizen _of Sherman, Texas,
who to November 1963 info. he had _
_ g _i ven z__.
May 1964 -   report ed that RUIZ, in
Mexico City, was case officer for CUIS
operations targetted against some nearb y
area .
Appointed Vice-Minister for Economics of
Ministry of Foreign Trade which he held until
he went to Spain.
Between 63 and 67 RUIZ reportedly held
positions of confidence in CubanGovt in
the fields of and commerce .
HUl'l.
1967 -
19G 8 -
1969 -
1970 -
1971 -
- .\ -
11UIZ went to .\l:ldrid :lS n0w Cul>.tn
• lf.HI f:lmil)' with him :lncl mul·lt
money. Was living hi(,!ll on Lhe hog. V£1iYIIIGll.
18- D:>.vid JACOBUS, an Ame t·ican,
con tafo_ted RUIZ in M,edd J at Cuban Embassy .
(See L _ .J
24 April, 11UIZ advised officer at
Oristides DIAZ Roverosa, to disguise self
for goo1 organization, bccausehe was nlready
· ·landestine. RUIZ comments that he was
arrested only 0nce but it was only a joke.
J\si that, he says they never caught
hjm,
22 July - Memo for the Record, refers to
RUIZ' residence in the U.S., Haiti, and
the D.R.
RUIZ arranged camouflaged trip to Cuba
for ALLENDE.
CIA had ( ·-- _ . Jgo to Madrid \ fn
19i_Q]to reestablish   with RDTZ.
(Wouldn't surprise me ifL J didn't tell
RUIZ of arrangement .) Shortly thereafter
r etjrned to Cuba. We tenninated interest
RU!lt was with MINREX office of Scientific
Techno1igic Affairs in Hav.;na.
• .;
Chris Hopkins
Task Force "K''
:
David Atlee Phillips
Post Office Box 34320, Bethesda, Maryland. Telephone: (301) 365-2238
Mr. Dan Hardway
House Select Committee
House Annex No. 2
Washington, D.C. 20515
Dear Dan,
3 May 1978
on Assassinations
oososo
Herewith, two items. First information for reimbursement
of some travel expenses, with a receipt for the plane fare. I
have not claimed per diem.
Next, a photograph taken in Mexico City in 1962, which is
the closest I can find to your request for one taken in 1963.
Salvador Diaz Verson. I remember that he was prominent,
far to the right and either a newspaper editor or radio/tv
type, involved somehow in politics. If I ever met him I don't
recall it, and I don ' t believe he worked for the Agency, but he
might have indirectly. Agency files should tell y about that.
Jerry Buchanan. Don't recall who and don't
believe I met him. The name does have a familiar ring however.
If you can give me something else I'll dig into y memory again.
v
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REPROOUCEO 1\T THE N/\TlON/\L
-
JFK ASSASSINATION SYSTEM
IDENTIFICATION FORM
DATE / ,1/ '"'/(\ •
'• -
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I:>ate : 09/15/95
Page: 1
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AGENCY
RECORD NUMBER
RECORD SERIES
AGENCY FILE NUMBER
AGENCY INFORMATION
0 0 0

    1 ooo .:3
JFK
80T01357A
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ORIGINATOR
FROM
TO
TITLE
DATE
PAGES
SUBJECTS
DOCUMENT TYPE
CLASSIFICATION
RESTRICTIONS
CURRENT STATUS
DATE OF LAST REVIEW
OPENING CRITERIA
COMMENTS
DOCUMENT INFORMATION
CIA
MEXICO STATION, CIA
CABLE RE ARRIVAL OF PHILLIPS, DAVID, C/OPS.
00/00/
1
PHILLIPS, DAVID
PAPER, TEXTUAL DOCUMENT
SECRET
OPEN IN FULL
OPEN
07/19/93
JFK26:F13 1993.07 . 19.14:19:04:590620 : BARELY LEGIBLE
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REPRODUCED AT THE' NATIONAL ARCHIVES
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CIA HISTORICAL REVIEW PROGRAM
. RELEASE IN FULL 1995
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HZ.X:Co CiTY
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·.UN_ITED STA1: ·
Al ll!t.   f'
Memorandum
TO : Chief, Contract Pe!"sonnel Division
ATT!r : ( J .
FROM Compensation and Tax Division
Office of Finance
SUBJECl": Agency Sex:;vice of David Atlea PHILLIPS
'
The records of the Office of Finance sbo-w the follo-wing Agency
service for Subject.:
Contract Agent: , •

EOD 1 February 1951 © $6oo.OO P/H •• ,.,..o
Term 28 Feb!"uary 1951@ $600.00 P/11 St'""
. EOD 25 1952 @ $6oOO.OO P/A t.-·?>
Term :n August 1953 @ $6000.00 P/A c;,tf
EOD 4 1-la.rch 1954 G $7200.00 P/A O 1
(o,.frl<i J;.m/1'/•e: . ;a
Pay Inc. 1 August 1954 @ $8360.00 P/A
Term. 31 Harch 1955 €l $8)60.00 P/A
_Staff Employee: · Q \(. •
Ex. Appt. 1 April 1955 @ $96CO.OO P/A 0'
Res. 6 February 1956 @ $10,320.00 P/A .
Staff Agent:
Ex. Appt. 7 February 1956 (;) $10,320.00 P/A
PSI 7 Octobe..- 1956 @ $10, 535.00 P/A
)<. •
Pay "!laise 12 January 1958 $11,595.00 P/A
PSI 6 April 1958 ® $11,835.r..o P/A
F.es. 13 -',ugust 1958.@ $11,835.00 P/A _....J
.
Contract Agent: f D
EOD 19 1958 :;; 57,200.()() P/A I
Term. 13 !·arch 1960 :"· C7,200.0C' P/A ) G, ... ""
Staff Em;:>loyee:
Ey. A..,pt. 14 !-'arch 1960 .,   P/A ( /<-. !
Subject res been a Staff E"'?loyee since 14 l·arch 1960
1
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L/ Chief
· Agent Payrnll Branch

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REPRODUCED AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES
__ jJ -1/ _-1___ DA'TE :r-/!l/1)
AGENCY SSCIA
JFK ASSASSlNATION SYSTEM
IDENTIFICATION FORM
AGENCY INFORMATION
RECORD NUMBER 157-10002- 10165

f.
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RECORDS SERIES
TRANSCRIPT
AGENCY FILE NUMBER R-696
r/ DOCUMENT INFORMATION
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, . ORIGINATOR SSCIA
FROM PHILLIPS , DAVID ATLEE
i ·"e TO:
I TITLE :
1
• TESTIMONY OF DAVID ATLEE PHILLIPS
'I
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DATE 07/31/75
., PAGES 178
I   . .. SUBJECTS
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1CUBA
-.. - · CASTRO
j . I , •
.tA.NSKY I MEYER
l
: BAY OF PIGS
. I 3 jSSASSINATION
\ . SANTOS
i g . ,R.UBY I JACK
r ' CHILE
p ALLENDE
,:! MONGOOSE
PAPER, TEXTUAL DOCUMENT
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DOCUMENT TYPE
f· CLASSIFICATION
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. RESTRICTIONS 1A, 1B, l C, DONOR REST. I
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I}C .. DPENING CRITERIA

. : COMMENTS
·:-: • B . 256
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··· Folder 14
04/25/94·

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Mr. Phillips. I don't recall.
I think we probably
2
contacted him, but I am not absolutely positive. But enter-
3
,taining all,possibilities, all options to see if there was
4
some way to do it. As I said before, however, that ultimate
5 option of assassination did not occur and was not mentioned.
6
Mr. Schwarz. Continue with what you actually did.
7
What did you actually do in order to insure, if I use your
8
words correctly, that General Schneider would not remain in
9
office, what were the thing:; l:eside contacting people that the
10 Agency did?
ll Mr. Phillips.
Well, to make it an absolutely accurate
12 description, certainly we are not at any, one time zeroing in
13 on General Schneider as the only thing.
14 Mr. Schwarz. But that was not the problem, was it?
15
Mr. Phillips. It was a·problem.
16
Mr. Schwarz. It was the main problem, wasn't it?
17
You needed a coup, and you knew the political solution
18
wouldn't work. You knew the greatest problem. You needed the
19
Army. You knew the problem in having the coup was that there
20
was a constitutional mentality, crazy constitutional mentality
21
in the Chilean military, right?
22
Mr. Phillips. I didn't say that, sir.
23
Mr. Schwarz. Okay. I am sorry. You knew that there
24
was a constitutional mentality and that that was the problem?
25
Mr. Phillips. That is true.
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And consequently Schneider, I suppose, was probably the
number one problem .
Mr. Schwarz.
He was the number one problem?
The Chairman.
And he was the commander in chief of the
army.
Mr. Phillips. That is true.
Mr. Schwarz. And the leading
constitutionalist?
Mr. Phillips. That is
Mr. Schwarz. What did you do?
Mr. Phillips. Entertained all possibilities, talked
to people, and said what can you do, and looked to people
to support, and looked for General Viaux with his ideas, and
turned those off. And looked toward the Valenzuela group, I thi k
it was. And they seemed to havemuch more capability and to
be much more serious, and so forth. I suppose if someone said
try to bribe General Schneider, and someone said, all right,
let's do it, then someone else said, General Schneider
can't be bribed.
And those men went so far as the kidnapping of General
Schneider. And we were aware of that.
Mr. Schwarz. YOu were aware of and approved, didn't
you, the kidnapping of General Schneider?
Mr. Phillips. Not in the case of General Viaux, because
we turned him off. But in the other case we were aware that
part of their plan was the possiblity of a kidnapping, yes.


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Mr. Schwarz.
And you offered through
whom we will come to in a moment, $50,000 if they could
' accomplish it, didn
1
t you?
30
Mr. Phillips. I think that was the correct sum, yes.
mr. Schwarz.
And you gave them prior to their attempt
on the 19th of October some tear gas and some gas masks to
help accomplish the kidnapping?
•.
Mr. Phillips. That is trUe.
Mr. Schwarz. And subsequently you provided to the Val-
enzuela group some machine guns, didn't you?
Mr. Phillips. That ia ture.
Mr. Schwarz. · And those were going to be used in a
kidnapping effort by the Valenzuela group, and you knew that,
didn •.t :YOU?
Mr. Phillips. I recall that they were to be
used by.'the group, and that kidnapping was a part of their
plana. I can
1
t recall that they said they needed th- ape-
cifically for the kidD&ppinq. I do recall that the reason waa -
automatic reaction froa Latin America ia, why do people

"'···
nMd a:r1u when they have qot araa everywhere all over Latin
America.
And they aaid about, their own araa could be
identified, and they n .. IS.t that couldn't be identified.
I don't recall if it vu apecific:ally-JMDtioned·th&t'it vaa
25
· just for that. It vu certaiAl.y un4eratood that they aiqbt
·UNCLASSIFIED
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REPRODUCED AT
very well be used.
UNCU\SSIFIED
Mr. Schwarz • I am going to come back to some more
31
things in this document. There are some very important state-
ments in it. But draw the line again. You thought assassina-
tion was a bad thing?
Mr. Phillips. I did.
Mr. Schwarz. On the other hand, you believed, at least
in your capacity in performing your duties, whether you
personally believed it, you believed that the kidnapping of
General Schneider was a good thing?
Mr. Phillips. Absolutely not, since I said in my
personal capacity I thought the whole idea was a bum idea.
Mr. Schwarz. I tried to put you in your official
capacity.
Mr. Phillips. In my official capacity I realized that
the removal from office of General Schneider was an important
element of any successful military coup. I make that state-
ment in the context of what I have said previously that
I didn't really think it was going to work all along.
The Chairman • Let's say that your testimony is very
lucid, and I commend you ·for.: it. I think you are telling us
in a way that makes it easy for the Committee to follow.
And the distinction·you draw between your personal view and
your official duties is ·helpful to the Committee. I just
25 .want to encourage you, because your testimony is exceptionally
UNCLASSifiED
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REPRODUCE:) AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES ,
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32
l good.
2
Mr. Phillips. Thank you, sir .
3 Mr. Schwarz. That is why I knew that he would remem-
ber when we wanted to come back to that meeting, because you
5 are a very helpful and good witness. I concur in your
6 cornrnen t.
7 official capacity you thought the kidnapping was
8 a good thing?
9
Mr. Phillips. I thought it was a necessary thing if
10
there was to be a coup.
11
Mr. Schwarz. And the submachine guns weremade by the
12
Agency with the knowledge that they might be used in the
13
kidnapping?
14
Mr. Phillips. Yes.
15
Mr. Schwarz. Now, put together, if you can, and ex-
16
plain how you fit, how you make them consistent, the attitude
17
against assassination and the supply of very deadly weapons.
18
You will agree that submachine guns are very deadly weapons,
19
do you hot?
20
Mr. Phillips. I do, sir.
21
Mr. Schwarz. Put together the attitude against
22
assssinations and the supply of very deadly weapons to be
23
used in a very dangerous activity, which is a kidnapping
24
and remember, of course, that the man did die.
25
Mr. Phillips. Yes, I do.

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UNG!J\SSifiED --- 33
REPRODUCE'J AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES
, .. -
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Mr. Schwarz.
Although not through those submachine
2
guns.
3
Mr. Phillips.
May I ask you to rephrase that question.
4
I am not quite sure of it.
5
Mr. Schwarz.
It is not seeking a fact, Mr. Phillips,
6 it is seeking an explanation of how you can make consistent
7 on the one hand your testimony of opposition to assassinations,
8 which is given with great credibility from its appearance,
9 how can you put that together on the one hand with your testi-
10 many as to what was actually done as far as supplying deadly
11 weapons for a purpose which was highly dangerous, in a
12 context where in fact the man died'when'he was-kidnapped.
13 vr. Phillips. Well, of course, this is a very complex
14 and complicated question that you are asking. I think that
15 the answer is that if you find that you are going to involve
16 yourself in foreign endeavors, that you very seldom find a
17 situation in which you are capable of placing stop and go
18 buttons on the machinery that you have set into motion.
19 In the Dominican Republic the involvement of the Agency
20
·of the u.s. Government in the death of -- I like to think of
21
that not as an assassination, but tyrannicide I just don't
22
see how in the world anyone could have pushed a stop button
23
for the general Tony Imbert type of thing.
24
The same thing is true when you go past the line of
25
meddling around politically and trying to persuade people and
T.QR _liiGRET .
UNCLASSIFIED
,(',
..
REPRODUCED AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES
JFK ASSASSINATION SYSTEM
IDENTIFICATION FORM
.. ;· •;;.:u ( ,J1<'K ACT)
').:',';';;; (;IIJ))f \
Page:1
----------------------------------------------
-----------------------------------
HQ
AGENCY
RECORD NUMBER
RECORDS SERIES
AGENCY INFORMATION
FBI
124-10162-10023
AGENCY FILE NUMBER : 105-82555-2101
'--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ORIGINATOR
FROM
TO
TITLE
DATE
PAGES
SUBJECTS
DOCUMENT INFORMATION
FBI
LEG, MX
DIRECTOR, FBI
02/24/64
4
OSWALD, LEE, POST-RUSSIAN PERIOD, UNSUBSTANTIATED SIGHTING, CUBAN
EMBASSY MEXICO CITY
DOCUMENT TYPE
CLASSIFICATION
RESTRICTIONS
CURRENT STATUS
DATE OF LAST REVIEW
OPENING CRITERIA
INDEFINTE
COMMENTS
PAPER, TEXTUAL DOCUMENT
s
1A, 1B, 1C
X
01/25/94
(R] - ITEM IS RESTRICTED
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REPRODUCED AT THE NATIONAL ARC\ IIVlS
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lvfemorah;,um
TO
DIRECTOR, FBI (105-82555) DATE:
2/24/64

' '
MEXICO CITY (105-3702) (P) \.)
\J - CJ
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LEE HARVEY OSWALD, aka t· • t
SECF<ET
FROM
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IS - R - CUBA "'/ :r;,; jt;i\ ' .'
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ENCLOSURES:
:ialc.s;f::?A_ _' . ,_- __ , " --;- .. _, ,
REFERENCES:
(A,O._ 1:: 'r%: ;rr-::_,f£.·
r4 · tt!(pYs'Y -
Mexico City letter and letterhead 2/7/64; ·
Bureau cable City 2/12/64, and cable
to Bureau 2/14/o4. Cf':l Cf..f.f}.$,@DjtLS/U
ADMINISTRATIVE· ' --· -·· . - ··
  • • , . .. '. • , , , : '·( uJ , .
;T"FK Sfc':C-tlt
It is to be noted that data secured CIA,
Mexico City Station, as set below, is classified "Secret"
and is not to be without specific author-
. "''
I
ization that {l_ _ _
\
On 2/19/64, DAVID A. PHILLIPS, CIA, Mexico City · 1/J-
1
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Station, advised that a June 1963 photograph PEDRO tl [ ,\,,
GUTIERREZ VALENCIA, which had been provided by this indivi- IG gr:l
dual, was searched against CIA photographic records sur- S c'
1
,.
""" __ ,_'- __ veillance activity at the Cuban Embassy, Mexico, D. F., for ,\
.";- _ the period September through October 1963, with special ",'¥·· · ,
i on the period 9/30/63 to 10/4/63, in an effort to   \
·. '·<;pinpoint the date or dates GUTIERREZ claims he was at the ·. ;:·  
, ,_";'-'Cuban Embassy and observed a Cuban in the company of 2.n "
1
' __' __- ';: res_ e. mbling subject OSWALD. GUTI-§RREZ claims that :, !:.; (;j
; ), I e _ '· above occurrence on
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REPRODUCED AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES " .:. •
3/6/64
r"\
City (105-3702) (P)
SUBJECT: LEE HARVEY OSWALD,
IS - R - CUBA
•· · ll' :. I (    
aka Q r--r
3 Cj?;J \)U:USV y•e:A
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Enclosed arc 30 of letterhe ad memorandum
o dated and captioned as above . d · ,...,
'Class i! i e b
. REFERENCE c;,:_,:,- "'I
'" City letter a?d
.. ·:
( The Bureau will note Lhat the l e tterhe ad
ENCLOSURES
I
, ..\l.4_!,ENCIA, who has alleged that he observed . .. - ;
}-.! n.c morandum deals with the all e gations oJ   . . ,
identi f i e d by him as OSWALD in the c ompany of an uniden L i f ied
/ Cuban aL Lhe Cuban Embassy in Me x i co , D. F., on October 1,
J
1963
. It is to...Jie noted that the data s>cure d C;£.1.,....
Me xico ty as set forth bellow, . classified J
"SECRET ' and is not to be further disse m1ntt e d without -
. .-('t.' specific authorization of that agency .
•"' (,
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1
On 2/ 25/ 64, DAVID Aa PHILLIPS, CIA, Mcxlco City
\n>) ).\I
• I Station, advised that CIA personnel on _permane nt '' plant,''
\ which is a photographic surve illance plant at the Cuban
)
Embassy , Mexico, D. had reported on 2/ 25/ 64 that a be ige
colored Dina Renault a u tomobil e observe d to enter •
pre mises of the Cuban Embassy, Mex1co, D. F. , on
.; "'TA
) -, • 'T ll)t:r AGENCY L.-...:... j
5 - Bureau . . . Rr-:·o I Q._ _ · -·· " . .. .. •---""':
' (1 _ Liaison Sect1on)
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MC 105-3702
'flEPRODUCED AT THE NATIONAL i .
PHILLIPS further advised that the license plates
on this vehicle were Federal District of Mexico plates
#26-58-61 and it had been determined that in May, 1962,
these plates were registered to one ARTURO GAONA ELIAS,
Calle Tolteca #53, Colonia Morelos, Mexico, D. F. These
plates, 'l.CCot·ding to the/.:;,;..A;s inJon•mtion, were registered
to a 1959 Renault
PHILLIPS also advised on 2/25/64
City Station was unable t;U-o/'ntiJy ARTURO
CIA files at Mexico
that CIA, Mexico
GAONA ELIAS in
The Bureau will note that the above information
is possibly significant, inasmuch as GUTIERREZ VALENCIA has
alleged that when the American identiJied by him as OSWALD
and the unidentified Cuban departed the premises of the
Cuban Embassy, Mexico, D. F., on or about October 1, 1963,
they entered a late model beige colored Dina Renault automobile,
which was driven away from the premises by the unidentified
male Cuban.
On 2/28/64, ROBERT SHAW, Mexico City Station of
CIA, advised that through CIA sources he would attempt to
ascertain whether ARTURO GAONA ELIAS, Calle Tolteca #53,
Mexico, D. F., can be identified througp the records o:f the
Mexico City Electric Power Company {)t\fu.)
On 3/4/64, ROBERT SHAW made available 16 photographs
of female employees of the Commercial Section of the Cuban
Embassy at Mexico, D. F., including a few photographs of
wives of Cuban Embassy employees who were there during
September and October, 1963, for exhibition to PEDRO GUTIERREZ
VALENCIA to determine iJ any one of the photographs oJ these
individuals could be identii'ied by GUTIERREZ VALENCIA as
the woman he was in contact with at the Cuban Embassy on
or about October l, 1963, in connection with a credit appli-
cation made by this woman at the Palacio de llierro Department
Store in Mexico, D. F{!:)(u.)
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R[PRODUCf'D AT THE NATIONAL AI<CHIVL::>
_.,,
MC 105-3702
The Bureau will note that the results of the
of the photographs mentioned above are set
forth ln the enclosed letterhead memorandum.
Th<' contacts with .Wexican Social Security official
.4.xl\\\'l<'   tu; 1.-1. ltiOIU, as disclosed in the letterhead
.,, • .,, ,, ... ndum, '"'' ,.,, Ita ndl c•d by SA JOSEPH B. GARCIA.
SOUHCES
------
The confidential source abroad mentioned in the
<'n<'l <>:<Pd l <'!. t.erhead memorandum is SA ROLAND E. TRENT, who
conducted investigation Which is not otherwise attributed.
The second confidential source
in the enclosed letterhead memorandum is
The third confidential source abroad mentioned
in the enclosed letterhead memoranoum is
' .
The fourth confidential source
in the enclosed letterhead memorandum is
CLASSIFICATION
I '
The enclosed letterhead memorandum is classified
"CONFIDENTIAL" to protect the Bureau's foreign operations,
to protect confidential informants of continuing value in
investigations involving matters important to the internal
security of the United States, and to protect the Bureau's
interests in a foreign diplomatic establishment.
LEADS
MEXICO CITY OFFICE
At .Mexico, D. F.
Will continue efforts to resolve the allegations
of PEDRO GUTIERREZ VALENCIA and to identify ARTURO
ELIAS, woo was tOs rsgistsrsd ownsr of a l959 Renault 'l{l<)""
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Ht:PROOUCEO AT THE NATIONAL_ ARCHIVLS
MC 105-3702
•r r·,..,
·automobile which   was observed by
GUTIERREZ VALENCIA on or   l, 1963, at the
Cuban Embassy, Mexico, D. F.,f(Ct-)
In this connection, it is to be noted that the
registration data on this vehicle is for early 1962 and
that it is a rather common practice in Mexico for automobiles
to be transferred from one owner to the other without
bothering to change the registration to the new owner
and GAONA ELIAS, accordingly, may not be the current owner
of this 1959 Renault.
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Document Print Date
AgencyName
AgencyNumber
DiskNo
ControlNo
Document id number
Recseries
Agfileno
JFK Box #
Vel/Folder
Title
Tirest
Document Date
Whofrom
Fromrest
Who to
Torest
Numpg
Originator
Daterev
Classify
Curs tat
Doc type
RC1
RC2
RC3
RC4
RC5
RC6
RC7
Comment
Keywords
NARA IDENTI FICATION AID
7/22/1 993
0
0
0
1993.07.22. 08 :55:23:460530
JFK
80T013578
JFK36
F29
ANTONIO CARLOS VECIANA BLANCH
N
5/2/1977
8
CIA
u
SAN
PAPER
1
1
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BACKGROUND
VECIANA
· ~ ~ ~ • ~ e ~     ~
l
- ----
- - .
""
,-
, )
1977
MEMORANUDUM FOR THE RECORD
SUBJECT: Antonio Carlos VECIANA Blanch[
dpob 1928, Cuba
] 201-312966
1. Information from review of VECIANA's 201 file:

1960 -
1957-61
J 21 Oct 60:
President of Association of Public
Accountants
Employed as CPA and Manager of Banco
Financiero, Havana, Cuba, a
comoanv owned by Julio LOBO
[ .r
.J
Formerly Chief of (People's
Revolutionary Movement) in Havana area .
b.[ - JoN 14488) 9 Dec 60:
On 7 Dec 60 VECIANA called on{ lvi th
c .
,Felix{ERNANDEZ Yarzabal, former the
l ... .. _. group, who at that time representeA..._ the . ,
C ... . .::Jmovement in Sagua La Brande area. £. - . .. -=r'
was Justo CARRILLO Hernandez' Montecrist i-Group'-- .I
been Cuban Revolutionary Council.
(- ... . .. .,had with member Manuel RAY?.
VECIANA told the I,_ . --· :-l of a plot against
Fidel CASTRO, et al., in VECIANA was
involved. [ 1rave VECIANA no encouragement
whatsoever. said he had previously spoken
with a State political officer (iden not given).
7 Oct. VECIANA entered U.S. at Key West. Had
passport, no visa. Came via small boot, rece ived
$100 month ·refugee assistance.
d. WAVE 0311 . (IN 44277) 29 Dec 61:
29 Dec 61 Station requested   on VECIANA
for use as   - an :or MRP. His wife and
chitdren were living in Cuba. His parents were
·living in Spain. Wife: Sira Antonio MUINO, later
came t o U.S.
...... .
VECIANA
- 2 -
e. C-
J (IN 24738) 7 July 62:
VECIANA, principal of ALPHA 66 attended meeting
- ----·- -----2- Jtdy-62 · in home· of Emilio FUENTES, Bayamon,
Puerto Rico. Purpose was to solicit funds
from 40 persons attending (above-average Cuban
exile professionals). VECIANA pitch was
demand rather than request for funds with
inference against any who failed
to fulfill this "duty." VECIANA said it was
necessary that they undertake an action
outside of U.S. control. In this
the group was in contact with CIA through person
named "Joe" but group was not going to confide
in CIA and were taking precaution of avoiding
CIA penetration. VECIANA left P.R. 4 July
for fund raising junket to Chicago.
f. OOA(s) 3232106 (WH 765) 26 July 62:
VECIANA was interviewed by Harry REAL 23 July
62. REAL was officer of New York Contact
Division. VECIANA said they needed Agency
help, but under no circumstances would the
Agency be identified with its activities.
VECIANA said they already had $50-60 thousand
dollars at their disposal scattered in different
places in the U.S. and P.R. VECIANA's immediate
requirement was conversation with someone in
Agency sufficiently highly placed to make
commitment.
  DBA 18681, 8 Aug 62:
VECIANA allegedly went into voluntary exile ca.
Dec 61 arriving in Key West via small boat from
Cuba. On 5 July 62 he left P.R. for Chicago and
New York City to collect funds for Alpha 66
activities. VECIANA had been contacting Cuban
exile groups in P.R., Fla., Chicago, and
possibly NYCity to collect $64,000 cash to
carry out plans. Money w)·s being placed in
Bnnco de Ponce, Santurce, P.R.
FBI informant said VECIANA indicated names of
following three individuals then in Cuba who
were expected to assist Alpha 66:
Vicente NOBLE
Guillermo RUIZ /believed to be VECIANA's
-cousin's husband Orestes
Guillermo RUIZ - DGI7.
Bernardo PARADELA
Informant said he knew all three as they had
been connected in 1956 with SIM (Military
Intelligence Service) in the D.R. VECIANA said
PARADELA w:·s then in jail in Cuba , but NOBLE

VECIAN1\
- J -
nnd RUIZ were on tl1e losse in Cuba, and were
cold blooded killers.
h. DIRECTOR 73652, 6 Sept 62:
Alpha 66 meeting conducted in San Juan on 30
Aug 62 by Geronimo ESTEVEZ attended by 200
Cuban exiles. Meetings were held weekly. Had
plans to recruit young Cubans in Venezuela,
P.R. and Miami.·
i. DBA 25402, 22 Oct 62:
VECIANA was trying to obtain 2 boats from some
unknown Americans somewhere in TEXAS. VECIANA's
org (Alpha 66) centered in P.R., 9perated out
of unidentified islands in Bahamas, and had
representatives in Guatemala and sympathizers
in Miami.
j, Memo to FBI from CIA, 6 Nov 62:
Reported that Alpha 66 officer Dr. Ramon PEREZ
Daple, assistant to Dr. Jose Luis GONZALEZ, both
of whom are Castro Cuban infiltrators.
k. DBA 28528 , 1 Dec 62:
Large sums of money were allegedly donated to
VECIANA for Alpha 66-activities by Julio LOBO.
1. Memo for Record, 31 May 66:
VECIANA had roomate in Puerto Rico, Felix ZABALA,
who visited Cuba Nov 65 in regard to Camarioca
refugee departures. Has an identical twin brother
in Cuba. Had sister in Cuba, at t time, who was
secretary to Ramiro VALDEZ, Cuban Minister of
Interior.
 
VECIANA told Cuban Affairs officer Miami 1 Aug 68
that Orestes Guillermo RUIZ Pe!:'ez (DGI) married
to VECIANA's cousin, was dissatisfied with Castro
regime and·receptive to recruitment. VECIANA
reported same info. to Cuban Affairs officer in
64. In 68 VECIANA served with AID in La Paz.
(' .     . . •
• : •r: •' '. • ;t. .::,.w.;, ... • : ... • ... ·•
VECIANA - 4 -
n.
cited in m above
VEC IANA appeared at State political section
23 Sept 68 with same info. re RUIZ.J VECIANA
said TAYLOR in Miami invited VECIANA
to visit would follow-up
RUIZ ,....
o . OGC 74-0019, 4 Jan 74:
Letter to U.S. attorney N.Y. from OGC, John
Gre aney re Antonio VECIANA and Ariel POMERES
in re unlawful acts of bo (.h from 1 Nov 72
to Jan 74 re unlawful importing of cocaine
or other narcotics.
2. N.B. The Guillermo RUIZ married to VECIANA's cousin:
a. lived in the U.S. illegally in 57.
b. was assigned to Cuban Embassy, Mexico City, Sept 6
as diplomat. DGI activities, was to penetrate
count€r-revolutionary organizations. He
flew from Mexico City to Havana on 22 Nov 63.
c . Married to VECIANA's cousin.
d. Reported by VECr.ANA to support Alpha 66
Chris Hopkins
LAD/ JFK Task Fo rce
VECIANA has allegedly been involved in
several assassinati on attempts against
Fidel CASTRO which for one reason or
3nother never came off . They wer e not
connected with the Agency .
. L. 102-5 "'t
A
DATE-¥-Ytr

• c /,; ,; 19&1
Security Violation -     CJ..asa1.ried )hterial.
PlfiLLIPS I Dzrv'id ,L
J.. An inves'Ugatia.ll by this c:!'t"ice bc.a detm•m1ned that )Cr. P.!lill1ps
d1Visi.an
1
was respon<J1hle :tor an E:lr;pOsed Claas.tt1ed
Jbteri!l.l violation 'llhicll. occuued = ll 1\prl.l 1.9(ll.
2. records this c.f'fice indicnte tha.t xr. Ph1111pa has been
'-"ith an Erposed c:wsa1fied Mc.terta.J. &ecllrl.t.y violatiml 1lh1.ch
occurred em 22 AprU 1.960. S1Dee there bli.ve mrt. been the reqtJ1zed two
COlJtlmmus ;yaan bet'TE en the violatiaa or 22 .Aprill9{>o 8Dd th1a oc=-
rence, tbia ia to be CODSidared. Hr. Ph11Hpa' Vicla.t1ol1 ror
e.d::illistro.tive action as .specified in Section 5 or CIA
3. It would be Bi'pred.ated 11' J'OU would advise tbis office or tbe
adilti.!llstra.tive ac:ti.c>l1 taken in this case. !the action sbauld be DOted
1n tbe Bp<J.Oe prortded r= ;yo= COll'V'eSli.ecce at t.l:le bottom 0: the attached
viol.atioll report., and tbis
1
in 'b.lm, torw=ded to this ot:fice.
 
Vl.ol.ati= Beport
jm Apr. 61.)
Distribution:
O&J. - AdDressee/Area SO
1. - Subject's security rLle
1. - SB Chrono
-GBNFfBEHflf 1 •

....
H[ NATIONAL Afi.CHIVES
HEPRODUCE'. J AT T .
JFK ASSASSINATION SYSTEM
IDENTIFICATION FORM
AGENCY INFORMATION
AGENCY SSCIA
RECORD NUMBER 157-10003-10486
RECORDS SERIES
INVESTIGATIVE REPORT
AGENCY FILE NUMBER : 109-584
DOCUMENT INFORMATION
ORIGINATOR FBI
FROM ROBERT JAMES DlvYER
TO
TITLE
INTERNAL SECURITY - CUBA AND ANTI-FIDEL CASTRO ACTIVITIES
DATE 06/14/63
PAGES : 27
~ · SUBJECTS :
~ ANTI-FIDEL CASTRO ACTIVITIES
'-'
u, INTERNAL SECURITY - CUBA
ru,
~ · CARDONA, JOSE MIRO
8' MACEO, ANTONIO
w: VARONA, ANTONIO
~ · CUBAN REVOLUTIONARY COUNCIL
-
DOCUMENT TYPE
S CLASSIFICATION
'" RESTRICTIONS
g CURRENT STATUS
~ DATE OF LAST REVIEW
'"

~ OPENING CRITERIA
COMMENTS
  ~ O X 464-1'
PAPER, TEXTUAL DOCUMENT
u
2, 4, DONOR REST., REFERRED
X
04/19/94
Date:04/I0/94
Page:l
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
[R] - ITEM IS RESTRICTED
.. t:.
,· . -· '( 1 I /-J
(MJY :lL.IU'! C:C.H
• , ...   \..-.:...;.. .. : . ,. ,_u
REPRODUCE:J AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES
1111 105-1742
RJD/neb
Comandos L, Miami
On April 8, 1963, AUTO:iiO CUEST/1 DEL VALLS
advised that l18 is the of L and tJas
previously a m8mber of /\lphet 66. 'lhe
tion vias under the of AlJTONIO L:L\CiCH.
CU::.:STA s ta r:-:2 t abDnclo::.ed A lphu. 6 6
ana
. ·o;,-'th Se d'""t; ol::-·-,n- 1''7--- ... ,__ .. ..
J .... n._L:. .. e con L,f.._ ....... onu _ LI- •. L o .... ...... J ...... .;..y
organiz.ati.on in Lll.l of 1962. VECV.r·:A too;,: ,.;ith hL":l
the r..::;;::; Alpha 66 so ;:ha ori:;incJ l. Alnha 66
its nc.m2 to Co::-.. 3r:dos L, t:hi.ch is th-2 same
organization that raid3 a;ainst Cuba in 1962.
\
1
CUESTA on :-:arch 17 and i•1arch 18,
1963, Comandos L departed separately in t::o beats,
n r-:lhin r.¥"'lir-:..-,r
11
\ll'ron
11
2t'd a
- _._ -- ._ .,· J, - - -·- -. • ..1......, l.: .._ ' l <....;. \ I • < , 1...) .;. I l!
f
·- . C 6 ;b -- ..,-- ---:.--,ir..?-1 ••rl'::ld .,..., .. ':!.,.... ('-·· ·----
OOL !::ip o;;.Q Oa.L. .u ,-, ..... uC ...... t...:::. l.'-···---- ...... -.O ........... ._ .,._:.....__ .... ::..:.L 1...··::." J
Bahamas, and then soutl1 to the Cay Sal rank
in the An ai:t..:ck ag<J.i"[1St a Russian ship
made under cover of darkness dc:rin; the e2.rly morning
hours of March 27, 1953, by the twenty-three speed-
boat, containing CUi::ST:..., FC·:H, ALfP2DO lHR,
ANGEL PUX2S, • AL'/.".?.EZ, ,,nd .-\;-:ro;no P:::REZ. raiders
attacked a large Russian freightar in Caibcrien Harbor,
Cuba, firing a t\.Je.nty ;nillir..eter cannon and other \.'Capons,
and then the raiders :J\?t oi.: a r,...;hich \·J2S
suspended beneath the surface of the water and against the
hull of the Russiar. v<:ossel. ·'/.
16 .
.

..

-
-t'l

-

.,_.
"'"
s
e::J
JUL  
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR !10NTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND
DAVID ATLEE PHILLIPS
Plaintiff
vs. Law No. 57691
WASHINGTON MAGAZINE, INC., et al
Defendants
MEMORANDUM OPINION AND ORDER
The defendants have filed a Demurrer to the plaintiff's
Amended Declaration. I have read the Amended Declaration, the
text of the published article referred to in the pleading and
filed in these proceedings, the demurrer, the response, and the
reply, together with the several memoranda of points and
authorities. Additionally, I listened to oral argument and

read plaintiff's supplemental statement filed thereafter.
From this review I conclude that the principles
asserted in Capital-Gazette Newspapers, Inc. v. Richard L. Stack,
Court of Appeals of Maryland, No. 53, September Term, 1981,
filed June 4, 1982, that the demurrer be sustained for
.
the principal reason asserted, that ''Plaintiff fails to plead
adequately actual malice on the part 9f the defendants."
Reviewing all of the allegations in the Declaration,
the text of the published article, and its accompanying illus-
trations, there is no showing of defamatory material that was a
calculated falsehood or some lie "knowingly and deliberately
published." There is no showing that the material was the pro-
duct of the defendant's imagination; contains defamatory
material so inherently i.mprobablA that only a reckless person
could have put it into circulation; or that the defendants had
obvious reasons to distrust the accuracy of the defamatory
material or the reliability of the source of it.

Witb this conclusion it is unnecessary for me to
address the other' points raised in the demurrer. Accordingly,
it is by the Circuit Court·· for Montgomery County, Maryla.rid,
this 6'tl-. day July, 1982,
ORDERED that the defendants' Demurrer to the Amended
Declarati.on be and the same is hereby SUSTAINED.
..
 
Circuit Court for
gomery County, Maryland
L
I'
1-
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)
<.....
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'·. ,_,
.H ---- ~ J ;-· ·-.")
N ItT; A --lf.!2 . . ,
REPRODUCED AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES
c,..,.-<' ...<)
,, .1., B P"'''ni
.. ------- ---
s ~ ~ .. 6_J' ------;
. ..... , ...... .
--··--· __ .....,_ ____ , ___ ... ·- .. ~     -- .. . ..
I .

/
.,
. .
(
V1 A
SUBJECT
I
i
., ,, : 1.J.:·.' l !..!/ /
Ul
. j " " ,.f-.)}' ,·.·f cc· I .. l 1 ·o lr\ l "'l· ,, .,, , . .
. ..... v . lt .. ( (! t : ... ;:., :. . .
Jok• II. H:tll cr
I 11 s pcct.nr
Jilek Anderson G May 1977  
"OclJ-i:lJ\ {\Cti'lity i n in "1963"
ou: for Uin:cto: o·:=
Intt-l"l ·i9encc- OLC 77-1816 ( :::L"Luchcd)
. .-· I
;
7. Bi:• cknround: The:! ctt J<:.-:k co 1 ti.•lll is it
. ·- · __ ______ ...
m·i;du, ·c o f f act aucl C!iTOL 1\t lt:ast pm··t"ion.=. or i t sr:en:
to L::!2n leaked b_y vtith -t:iw  
Com:.t ittce on
3. infonnat inn 011   iu .
fo1lo':i5:
il . ·Alph<: fif, un unti-C::sLro Cubc!!1
Ot' CJi:!ll i zat"i o:t . 1\ntoni t> \' cci 0na 1;1cl5 of its
Vec:i cont;:tctr.d on t.hn:e
fCJr Ct ssisti:uicc ·in n11 .. ssini1tiun p1ut
Cas tro   1960; ,1uly ?.nd f1.p"Til_..
1955 ) . On euch   hr: \·e::. • (!:)'::tt . lh?.
r-..:_;'2ncy f;,::.! f!O   TO!' (J'f of
r\1 ph:l Go.
b. ,'1 !l il \i:tS   • in !CI!
by   u.s . {it··;: v ·t-t1i' p::-·,··ind
1907 t. n \luly "19:';(; \';i.-ir:h tii,1:· h:' \·::,:;    
·, .. ••' r .,..,, ·, . '·, ,.,...
\ "t !..1, . ).,1 • • .. -•·. 1 . , •.: .
(
. ... ,. • • (."• J ... • •-;il.i· ,, (;1:1,.··:
. • • · '-· " '"' ' t ,. t c • 1 .. "- ... " ' I • '
1
' • '' • ' • • ' • · • •
C::;-1 ·:-1 t ln t :· ll !li fi r.!:\·, I I c··;-,:::.> Hu :in.
CC"::'"I: t: •c Vi i.J:l •:: i t il f . I rlu ;): j·_ i ·: ·i l i H1 !'i :/ ·j 5 l!!.';·.:·i
;· r: Cf)!!S i i! Gi  
. ' . . . ' i ' _, , .• • . ! l j \
, • :; ..., I
• I . , 1 :
C(''' .. , r- . -·. , -
J 7ll£i..
4 _ ; · '

' .....
\
.· i
..
------ ....
.. , "' ,. ,, ... '' .'··-
REPRODUCED AT THE NATIONAL
d. AndcTSOii i!tteinpts to Oi1C  
Gishop with CIA in Dallas; in
have tried to identify Bishop 1·:ith our DCD
sentative in Dt:llas., r1r. J. Ht:lton l·!o0re. ;,:,-
cOl·ding to our 1·ecords, no Agency office;·s e·:<:r
used th2 nar.:e cf Horl"is Bishop C\S an alias. l!o
one named Horri s Bi shcp 1·:as ev<:r emp1 eyed by the
Agency.
e. The FBI identified the three men Hho
visited !-Irs. Od-io. Lee Harvey Os· .. Jald 1·1as not
one of them. The l-Jarr-en Comm-ission \·;as satis-
fied that Osv1afd could not been in Dallas.
at the time of the visit ..
Attachment - 1
Distribution:
Original -Director of Central Intelligence 1·1/att..
1 - Deputy Director of Central Intelligence
1 - Assistant to the Director (Public Jl.ffairs) tJ/CJtt.
1 - Office of Legislative Counsel \·J/att.
1 - Office of General Counsel '.'t/att.
1 Executive Registry 11/att
1 - IG Subject t-i/att.'
1 - IG Ch·ono 1·1/att. ·
1 - J.L.leader Chrono 1'1/att ...
OIG/J.L.leader:aal
• .. llr,\, ....
_ --·· ...... JiJr\1. ....
• --. ·- .•. i
• •• • • • 0
/ . " ..
. - ... . ..

'"
'
'\
'
'


REPRODUCEiJ AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES
SECRET.·
v.
r ·::·· ·z· ' I n 5 3 _,
\. : ,;· .1. . .J
l,'JI/.'1[,\,\U
' .....
:J I•L(
CIT( Clf.iCT0'2 5 ·:: 0 a
2
·
"l
REFS:
A.{
B.
J
crx_ s.7B4ZB)
IX 579398)
• s surrrcrs:.J RE[_
---- ---- -

rc·:-· ·
[;_;_ ' - ,: . ;- - . ' __ _:_;
1. SHARE
}9o<mc.
I!OiiEVER, 1\0ULD BE AXY IHO YOU ABLE DEI'ELOP
IXD£1'1::\DEXTLY \"ECIA:;,I' S ACTIVITIES.
2, FOLLO:i!XG TRACES. VECIAXA. B.\XKER

liiJO LEFT CUBA !'OR   DECH:BJ::R 61 BY   BOAT.
XEII'S OF XOVE!-lBER 61 REPORTED IX OCTOBER 60 li!O ATTDIPTED
CASTRO FIW.'·I ,;p,\RT!-IEXT NE,\R R.-\LLY BUT GV:-1 FAILED
TO FIRE. 6Z POA GR,\:\TED FOR USE AS S,;30T.IGE )k\X FOR
r.ci'OLUTICXARY ::OI'DlE:;T Of PEOPLE (:!RP) EXILE
, 1.'> RESPOXSE TO 1\11/MIA:-:I REQUEST. XO :lECORD IllS FILE l'.IICTIIER liE
EI'ER USED OR CC.\T,\CTI:D. PCA :1:0\'E:ivER 62.
3. IN 62 liE BECA:-rE LEADER OF ,\!.F,\ 66 .-\.':rJ IX JULY 62
AS!:ED fOR AXD 1\,\S Gfl_.I.';TED O:TERI'icW ;·,'!Til(' '
(
)
L .. · ·· .·csAFR iSl2
A.\D .'·t\Tl'i;I,\L ,\ID IX     >/hi( '
. . '
OPER,\TlO.': JIJ:.:Eu A'f CAST::C ol\'Ei'TiiiiC>:·;, PCI::·;-;:n O:iT I!E l.Wf:XLlf:D
P.PPIOVED FOft Mlf.ASE ltM
CIA ii!STORICAL RtYit'W PROtrJM
Ai.i ;.or•; nC' ''"lfQ
Wt..::Lilt
\
; i
'
' I '
! j.: ---
' .
I I
. ·-t.{ 1r,;: ''•:<!.<::•:· ...
.
lh\'l'b;_,I;- •1 t) >'
.. ... . '/' ---
---1
.,
!
l .. : k.) 1',:,;(1(
.__ r.c•.··••· :.) ------ (.r.·:.:•t
C tu .. c At:.t
___ -- __ .. --- :: nu: ,., c:; f•tr •.o
: ::. ... ,, .. -- ----------------
-----------
----------- --------------
.'I
. -----------
----------

------------------ '-------- -----
h . ••. c,n,
ro ,-
,.
,,. .• ..,, to:u1
---, .• ,.,. -c• r.urn:;;;,--- ---
S E C R E T
-----------
CIT£ COlt
i·:rrH_ PL.\:\ 1\lTIIOUT[ JI_ELP.
, Ri'GlSlR..-IflON :
' ]5/- /. '·"'L'I'S·l-''" •·o.-c'."£ 0 6' B\' ' S A"\'Y
-.. \ . . t:u. ,\ • •\ .. !, • ""·
A::o HR.Iif.\.\TED li!Tf!OI;f Pf.!.JUDlCE JULY
5. 1:\ )lW 66([ :li'LDHE :-lET lOTH ITCLINA WIIO
·s•· - c.. rt-
AG\1.'\ HEQIJESTED/[ _, J .\ OF c.\STRO.
6. F!LE 20l-3U9 •
E.'\0 OF i-IESSAGE
\'cciJrla rcportcdl)· pl:irlning ass3ssination
on C3stro's
cc:r.r;clf:r,tl"l: OffiCrns
---- ----·----- ·--- ----· ;-- -;._, .. ,; .. -1---
1 : (o 1 •' · •· J'.:
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1
., ' -·,• •• _j
--- .. - " • p -· _,_ . ..
.·y •• ,, •• ,"' • • · :.tt1 I' • •'"•'" c • ·rr .. ·'l:r:ntJ.
    • .... ' .. ;...(,r··.· ·: ·:

• .-.-. .,
,l"_:.,;; ··;r • .:"TII'o:l
VlilCI.R
cc;oy roG.


REPRODUCED AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES
'i'''' {l;l ,,l\._.......f:!. ____
VV IV....,tiiV •  
: 2 ..; •• - 1_ •
.!'"\ : ·-••
.......... , ............ o .... ,
...
OMF. 0 . 0 0 0 0 0
l
.... ,t .. oe••-··
s E c;.<;R··r T
.... r;;··---·-
................ '0<(._
suff
HRECTOR
COHr 11JH '/
INFO
y
TO: IJH/MIAMI(
(Ef:-· URECTOR
C)
l· ..fOLL,OIJING TRACES AIHONIO CARLOS V
LC·t'tt" L_!.l-.dft·-')
THREE K Of REFERENCE:
·OAf!::
OIUG:
UNlTz
[l(f,
X s
. :
A. FOUNDER Of ALPHA bb GROUP <l9b21b5} fORMER
MEMBER Of PEOPLE'S .REVOLUTIONARY MOVEMENT IN CUBA
{1960-bl}o Y
B. POA GRANTED vEciA:IA JANUARY l9b2 FOR
REVOLUTIONARY MOVEr,ENT Of PEOPLE {MRP} BUT Nl . : . : .. ---_::'
v •:.
IN HIS FILE IJHETIIER HE EVER USE» OR CONrACTEP. POA
- .. -·-'
CANCELLEP NOVEMBER 1962. Y
(. ISR REGISTEREP VECIANA r{
c ,... . ai .. --·
]NOVEMBER   -=.J._J
ANP RECORP SHOWS HE TERMiriHE» PREJUHCE JULY
1'l6b. y
»· EMPLOY(» IJITH OFFICEI OF CAPITAL PEVELOPMENT
u.s. AGENICY FOR INTERNATIONAL DtVELOPMENT {AlP}, LA PAZ,
BOLIVIA, CIRCA APRIL l'l6o!! TO JUtlE 30, l'l72.• Y
1
---·-- I - . ..., .. ,,... "'.r ;""
v.xY
d<.> ' • 3 i;t_ 'i' "
'
  J
·--C,.olo---··
.!l:fPRODUCJION 8'1' OTHU TrtA!II TN( ISS.UING OHICf IS PR0tti81T[:J E 2 IMP0£T
CL BY: 237261
fOR RUEA:SE 19M
etA lUSlOiUCAL Rr41EW
., .... --·
'.,.;.. ,. .
....
REPRODUCE'.) AT THE NATIONAL ARC-HIVES
. -
VU II.>VINI.> IYit:.::>::>l\l.>t
.......... <: ......... ,, o .....
·-

......
Onf 0 0 0 0 0 0
SECRET
-·· .... ·----··-
p ... , ...... _
oootu•o-.•• .. ..r•-•
STAff D<RECTOR
COlli. INFO. flU
0
0 --·
0
--··
...
'
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2. fiLE: E2,
  •MENTIONED ANTONIO Y [CIA N A AND STATE.D
1 ' THAT HE UAS DENOUNCED AS A CIA AGENT.

]

'·:·'( .. •·...
I
j
I
I
I
I
I
I
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KtfKUULLtU AI
--
:-.. FrcH:; ll11' :dHH''-'

c,r 1\ir. A, it t:. rc:t.lli, ..  
t!J;If ;,ir \ r'\nlfHliu C:1;   \I:CI,·,;;,\ J'.!dll•."l; _;)
;_:r:t:1.\i:\, an

    I);Jst 1;: ;1 i'tll•!l'
;tc:cottn L t :1 -:o:_- 1 ;r t" 1 on til l\a vaHa.
LO l!Clp l1l pl0t- CClslro. \'iJ.!(\1\!t\
r 0 r v j s 5 [ () r L L' It r c I (l t. i \' c s (I r t h c f () u r n: c H :J s s .i g i ':. c d t 0 k _i_ l I L; t L. ,. II ,
:tl,:o requc·,:lc:tl fou1· rifles ad:lpt:•.•l'S C0r pit;-;
  ,._ Jdi.d no,t VECtJ\:\:\ ClnJ sullSt'(r,t;(·ilt li·
.. ,. .
chcckctl with' -·-
1
who reported that \TCJ,\:'!\ h:td m:dc'
siJ•JiLII· ""ilU--cycct" co On 23 Nov.c:td>c·r JCJ(ll tile
''liaiiJi ric111s puhli:;llC'd a report of an unsllcccC>sful hr
VTC'TI\i!\-to ki II C:1stro. VECI/\N/\ reportedly had ::nrangcd to
assassinate C;tstlo aJJtl Cuban I;rcsi.dcnt Osvaldo Liorticos 011 S O··Lni>c·J
in hut tile bazooka he was failc:cl to fire.
4.
There h;,s been no Agency rclaticHtsl! ip ,,; th VEC:li\1'1•1. / '
)
\.. ) Vl:Llf.NII Has horn on /
<t ucconcr 1u ttc (]. mcmhcr of the Itc'.:'O-
lution:try an anti-Ctstro group in Cuhct durin): lCJ(,; ·(>l, :Jr>tl
Has one of the founders of Alpha-6(,_ A ccrti.[icd p11hl i.e vccotlllL:<nl
by traclc, VI;CI!INA 1\.l.IJ; lll La Paz in 19(,8-72. VF<:f:\ii.-\
r
I ) On 2:1 -July l'l(,2
l_\IL\...LJ\r·.;i\ \Vas ulLCrVlClVCcl, ac t11:. by f\lr. !larry   fro1:1
tile TlC:JJ Nc1< York office. VECI/\1\!f. asked !!cal to :'rrangc a race: i11g
'' senior Clf\ oCfi.ccr to i\lplta-(,r,•s plvns to assas,;iJo:ttc
C:astn1 anti to nquc::;t C[/\'s ilssi.st:lllCC (U.S.$lll0,00Cl; 10,000
hand   • There i•-. no jnd-ic:ltjo;l th;tt. til_is
evct· acted "!'"" I>r Cl'f\.
,. ,ln i\jJI"! I Jl)(l(l (} Lf\ Piv[c;ion orf·iccr{: )u:.ll!_''
Lll(' :1l i:1'{ ·,_Jet \'I'.Cl !•.!'<.'\ in Ncl·: York <: i ty. Tltc
Htc:ct:trtg ;tr·t·:rH;:cd by ;1 i·ctit·cd n;tval ofCjcc-r, Cog·:L·cll)
h'IH' had inContP:·d I:J,ic:f,. \'JII l)jvisiun that he IJ.:ld   (I[ \-;tlttC'
\nl('Ili. · ;\rr.ivcd in Nci.\
1
Ynrk City tot· the ntccL_i_tt:•_.
ltc intJ·odtJCt·d IJy Cf"lr,s\vc·ll to lie im:,lcdi;Jt:cl.)' Lt1tnc!1r_•;l ·
a ul· t·ltt: political si.tu:1t10il :1nd note<! hiY.
_feel itlj: that ti1r' u;Il}' i·:n1 the   oC.
;tdviscL: \:'1:::1,\Ni\ th;Jt   in no posit.ioit to \·;ith
01" !JiHt ill (Ill   :ti.lCJI!jtt ;!tid L:J•;
111   inroi-Jil:ltion h·lliL:h I!:..· 1i:1:·. tile l'ltrpo::.(·
or Vl:t:I/\N;\ •     . I
,_ _ ;'! ll;fugct..', in .. • 11.1 ... ::-.
cJc:-1t· lc \Jt
1
ll'.'t:\iLl'. VJ-.'..ll\!\_.\   <tLI.cr:!pt-,!lP tu
t jaJ i> th   ·\J:<·;Jcy fin:!JJLi:tl :-.tll'll··lrL Fu!' iti;: ion. ·
RlPKUUUClU A1  


9 October 1978
FOR THE RECORD
SUBJECT : with 'Former DCI McCone
1. I met with Mr. McCone this afternoon ia his hotel
room at the Madison Hotel in Washington, D.C.
Present \vas \'falter Elder, Mr. NcCone's Executive
Asssistant his ser·vice as DCI.
2. I showed Mr. McCone a declassified copy of the
transcript of his deposition taken by HSCA personnel,
referring to one Maurice (copy attached). I told
·· 'that an exten-sive search of Agency records
showed no person by that name in Agency records. As a
result, I wished to have him look· at photographs of
Agency employees during the '1960s with that surname.
Mr. McCone declined, saying that he had lunched at the
Metropolitan Club that very day and had not recognized .
old frj.ends from that per-iod. He felt that photographs
would not help. •
3. Mr. McCone said thit the name was given him at
the erid of his deposition; which bad taken some five hours.
It came along \vi th ·another· dozen or so He .hfd
rec?gnized the names· of · Dave Phillips and but
not many of the othe'rs. The' name Maurice is hop 'rang . a
bell" . but he really could not say hm'l. ·He suggested that
it may have been a football player.
--
4. Mr. McCone said that he have in error.
He asked if he should write the HSCA so stating. I said
he could do as he wished, but it should suffice for me to
simply report my meeting with him. He said I could say
that he had been in error. He said that my letter should
state that I had met with him, in the company of his
11
Executi ve Officer" who ·had access to all his records of
meetings with people, and that he had stated that he had
been in error in to the HSCA representative that he
had a CIA employee named Maurice Bishop . I said I
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..
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would show my letter to Nr. Elder to be sure it was accurate.
5. I told 1-lr. l-Ie Cone that an Agency employee had also
reacted similarly to a question about a Maurice Bishop. He
asked who it was. I replied that it was a junior officer
1n \'IH Division named He made no comment.
6. There was talk about other aspects of the assassina-
tion issue, which are not relevant to this specific ,question.

S D
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Attach;nent
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Q Do you kno'v or did you knoH Haurice Bishop?
A Yes.
Q \'ic.s he an agency employee?
A believe so.
Q Do you kno\·1 \·I hat his duties Here ·ln 19 6 3?
A No.
- . . -
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Q Do you kriOH Hhether any of these 'people· \-;orked c.t
headquarters in 1963 or worked in the field in 1963?
A o'lc1l, move back and forth and it is pret:ty hil
to tell just \·!here they Here in 1963, but the rcconls \·Jill. s·
'
and yo ::c. can get it from the Office ·of the t Di:o::-cc tor.
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people? , . ·- ...
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No.
Q What positions they helcl--let !it'3! rephrase that.
questions. Do you kno\-1 the h?-ghest that each of
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these incividu<!.lS he].C. in the CIA?
l'l- No, I Uo no"t ..
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Q :For. i:.:ts tance, C.o you     \-lhether !-;aur ice Bishop
\-mrkeC. J.n the Henis:;:>here. Division or Hhether h2 _'1.-:orked
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in some other c1ivision of the CIA?
A I do not kno1r1 ·I do recall. I kne'l-7 at that til!'.
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but I.do not recall.
Q Do you kn0\·7 'l.vhether Haurice Bish<;>P used any pseudo-

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Q Do you k:r:o'" \vhether the name, I·laurice 'Bishop, \-:as i
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fact a pseudonym?
A No, I do :not knoH that.
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Hr. Goldsmith. Did you know an individua,l na'<led nauric"'
llishop?
-- ·---··· ---· ·- --·
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)\.gain Hi". Bishop "u.s in·the bt1t
J Phillips, yes: Bishop, no.
J;.;tew. :r kno'f! Hr. Berk; i? .. over·:. there and I knm.; Hr. Hardway :is
1
1 over there but· I have no relat}onships ,.;ith tbe..-a. Do !"fOU
X knew them both" c:tX\d Pbill.ips X
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9   · l·lr. Goldsm:D;h·.
Do you knoH posi·t;i.ori, ·if any, he. hel.d
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i·ir He ·held a: posi·tion.• higher. than mine but I
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1j did not know, you
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l-1r. Gold:=;;ni·t.h • Did yon ever have <J.ny.- contact
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l1r. Gold:mi th. Did lm \'10:;:-k ·in· the Hemisphere
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a Division?
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X think so but again I not sure of all
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the details •
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Hr. Goldsmith.
Po you • un:[ other individual.s '''ho
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·· · Dave Phillips.•
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Hr. Perhaps Hr. 'I don't know.
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l·!r. Gol.dsmi th ;.1 -:t'1as Nr. Dishop • s office located
perhaps
at Cil\
l{EPIWULl.EU Al AKC.nt>co.
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l·Jhen you saH this indiviclual and you kne·,
, !·lr.
is Uaurice
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Mr •.  
Did y-ou knoH a man n<:tmed Firgault?
Hr.
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I don't think so.
• . • • . !'.'. ": c.·:\
Hr. Goldsmith •.
At this. time x·-,-lould "like to sho'fl you an
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I don't believe so, sir.
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Hr. Goldsmith.
'J'hanl; you. You caw.put that aside now •
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Did you know an individual Antonio Vcciana Bla:tc?
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.• Now this sounds familiar to me in my
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Cuban operation, I don't know \vhere.
It mil):' have been \·:ith
 
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I could not even make rnentul image of
Apprc"xima. tely heW old  
! . don't know$ This i.1us·t see.ll strange ·to
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_jj _ it really must, r know hut, you
no-:.1 can I say it?
la· ·!! ._The relationship. of one agGnt to another
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, 1 ··. try your best not to
is a thing that yoti
not to · knOl'l.


·11 Y ·.
l·lr.. Goldsmith. t·1as Mr. aishop an administrator or a case
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Nr. · r \·Tould say his position '"as higher than
h honcho against a chief.
N.::-. Goldsmith. l·7here did you generally him on ·those
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I of brigade?

I Mr. . . ·: . I don't
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7 ' everyone. He might very \·Jell have been involved in this ."thl:
. . - ·: . - .. ..:- .
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a I .•. Hr. Go_ldsrnith. Getting. back ·:aishop; \'las th
time· yofl..- saw him to· of y.our mernm:y? .·· ·.
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l1r .. I \-lOUl.d think abou·l:: the early Six tie!'!.
11 II _;:.'_::i !•lr. Goldsmith.
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1·1ere you ever formally introduced to hir

!·lr. No.
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· And from the time that you firs·c. hir
. tile early until the last time tpat him,
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·;! which I you said 'Hould have been
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!I ho,.,. many times did you actually ;;ee ... ilii.-s· man?
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Hr • . . It '1-lould no·l: have been that 'late because :i
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; late 1964 or early 1965 I left the Cuban operations and
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i of interest, so in those times, say 19GO.to·
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! 1964, it have been two·or three times.
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comment that once you stopped \'!Orking in· Cuban operations,
left thnt area, you no Mr. Bishop? .
Hr • If I did, it \vould be just in the halh1ay
a;u:l I don't think so. I \vas now in another part of the agenc

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KI:.PKUlJLLt.lJ A l !tit. I AI<UH > •
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:::ions saH an individual Hhorn :you to Haurice D:lsno.
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t·Jhom .·told i5   .
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•· Hr. Coldsmi th. Nr. Chairman, I hnve ·no .further, qu<:s·tion.
.  
at this time. I may have a follo;;-U:p questions._.J If the
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cor..roittee has questions, I \-rill •yield at time.
Hr. Preyer. Allright.
·Mr. Fithian •
11r. Fi·thian. Thank you, t1r. Chairman.
-· . ...
Do you get any feel for \·Jhether .. other people thu.t you ge
to_ see just c2sually at· .. the Cil\. are -- I don't knm-1 how to pu·
thi!; -- higher or lm>'er on the pecking order?

Mr. Pardon?
. .
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" Hr. Fithian. Do you. have· a feel for an· that
--------- -------
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you see over at the agency as;to whether or they
are higher up in the structure?
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Hr. Fithian; Yes.
Hr.
·you
mean \-Then· I ·\-las working at the agency
if
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sa'-r someone
1-lr. Fithian. You didn't see them, you.\-rere· not '"orking
\-Ti th them every day, -you just see· ·them from time to time, do
-----------------------------------
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I 'chink :C l-;noH \·:hat yon   b.:ying \:o
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. Of cour::;e I uas no·t a very high grade.
--
J.lr. Pithiz'in.
That is the only· guest:ion I had, Hr. Chair-
: .
Preyer.
Was your office in Langley in the: CIA head-
.•
Mr.
• Yes.· At the time I was·in headquarters •..

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Mr. Preyer.
And Dave office was also .there?
Hr.:·
Yes, sir.
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1, :.;'-: Hr."'Prey;'!J:. And _j; l-laurice Dishop,':s -.;>ffic;:e was not on
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11 · $arne floor as yours in X.angJ,.ey?
11 II . · · Nr. --·
'.·.
r don't; know. It '1'7as <\ very large floor
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:, and there were many people on the floor that nothing to
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1-lr. Preyer. . ·nid Bishop have some relationship in•;    
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and age to Phillips?
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22 II •

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Preyer. Do you recull 1nore on the nL1me people
said, "That i!> Haurice Bishop''?'
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but I know that.
. . ..
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l1r. Goldsmi t:h. Is i .t 'that tha Naurice
-
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Biship may have an ·alias?
--
r.ir. Vej';y possible.
Nr. Golds:::1ith. \'lhy do you say that?
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fact it \'iaS not. . ·
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was not at · all uncom!ilon, i!l that true, to yo
knowledge:?
Hr. ·
That is t.rue.
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T.. ~ .;
  ~
REPRODUCED AT THE NATIONAL ARC.HIVES
JFK ASSASSINATION SYSTEM
IDENTIFICATION FORM
AGENCY INFORMATION
AGENCY SSCIA
RECORD NUMBER 157-10007-10311
RECORDS SERIES
AGENCY FILE NUMBER
ORIGINATOR CIA
FROM
TO FILES
TITLE :
INTERVIEW/ROUGH NOTES
DATE 03/02/76
PAGES : 11
SUBJECTS :
DOCUMENT INFORMATION
INTERVIEW THRU TRANSLATER OF VECIANA, ANTONIO - 3/2/76
SUBJECTS INCLUDE: CUBA; CASTRO; LOVO, JULIO; ASSASSINATION.
DOCUMENT TYPE
CLASSIFICATION
RESTRICTIONS
CURRENT STATUS
DATE OF LAST REVIEW
OPENING CRITERIA
COMMENTS
PAPER, TEXTUAL DOCUMENT
u
OPEN IN FULL
0
09/01/94
[R] - ITEM IS RESTRI CTED
PATE } / I lj'l J
Date:09/01/94
Page:l
~
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REPRODUCED AT THE NATIONAL ARCHI.VES r l R., y n 1
0
t.:p out o propo1 _ --.J ... cc s .....
nay not involved in any acGnGsin3tion nttcnpts
and RnX never really knew was going on •••
:•Neg_ i'/!/'1;
very \.teak.
with him
( r e the b oat 'he got out of Cub a on) He says it w as very
e'asy for him to get boats. He had at least xk three ways
to get out of Cub a when he left and he felt the boat was
the best. The American was behind it all •
•• The American taught him how to do everything and he therefore
had ·access to anything he " anted or knew h o" to get it •••
Not all the money b eins used in anti-Castro activity came from
tl1e American, he said. It was also coming from the Castro government
itself, through fraud and being sl'lugsled out by anti-Castro
agents" ithin the government... Large amounts of money •••
One example, one of the checks he got, for about $150,000,
was actually signed by Che fuavera •• , Some of the people
  helped :!.:HRIII hi10 then, those who lo'ere high in the
finance end of Castro's government, are nolo' very high
i rr-ta-t-1:n-/,,a-e-r-i c ,' n b a n }< i n g c i r c 1 e s ·afi"Cf1 n W a s h i n g t<J n a1. s o ,
in TnterAmerican Banking Development. (
-
(In v o 1 v e d " it h Han u e 1 Art i me at a 11 7 )
Hhen I cal!le to the u;s. he lo'aS in jail in Cuba.
"ith Artime.
Never worked
Artime was associated in Cub a with Opus l!R:iK Dei, a very strong
European Catholic organization, very strong in Spain. Artime
was very involved with that ...
(CUSA7) Doesn't kna..t '.o7hat that is.
(Ever rerocmb er a boat of that name?)
boat that used to "ork with the CIA?
Is that the boat, the big
Daesn't recall?
(Fiorini)· The only time he got involved "ith Fiorini "as when
Fiorini had a secret group KxiiRJi.xll -not CIA-- called
Cellula Fantnsma and Bishop asked him to infiltrate it.
But the group""" spon/o/-i):ed a trip of leaflet droppings with
two American pilots who "eee killed. The operation, he hears,
cost '$300,000. That brake up the group.
(Did. Bishop know F io r in i 7) [none ommi t ta 1 answer] He never had
any contact with Fiorini.
(Do you knolo' Jorge Salazar?) He says
name is nCM living in lass. or Conn.
never lived in Dallas.
the only person he knew by that
The £ix Salazar that he knCM s
He says he remembers once having met Lee Harvey o,., ald. Jle says he
doesn't remember the way it says it happened in the magazine. He says
he did meet Lee Harvey OSM ald, but in different circumstances than
what the magazin.e says. (Halo' did you meet him, when?) Bishop
introduced him. (Where?) Dallas. (When?) Around '62. (Halo' did it
come about?) He said lo'hen Bishop came up to him once he came up..., ith
Lee Harvey Os.,ald, but you know it" as such a engagement like, it came
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i' 1\TE __                     _
up like, "This _ .... Lvey 05'.J.old," [fast) he never of
the name, really, twice, he e didn't even reP.Jember him. (Where?)
It was in a building, he doesn't remember whether it was blue
or white, it was a bank-- the building had a bank i:t: in it --
and tl1at
1
s where they used to have meetings. He said the thing
is, he was called to Dallas to meet Bishop, to mcet:t him in front
i of the building -- there was a big bank or insurance company
in the building, in the lobby -- like all the times he met him
he would tell him to meet him there, so this time he met him
there, but this time he brought another guy. The guy never
talked. Then he left and AV had his meeting with Bishop.
Then vhen the assassination came- ·out, that ,_...,_s the guy.
Then when he SaY it ·•as Os· .. ald that killed Kennedy, he nearly
freaked out, but he never said anything, he denied everything.
After the the assassination of Kennedy, a federal agent came to
him and asked him if he kne.o anything about the assassination.
He didn't tell the agent that he had seen Os,..ald, he didn't
vant to get invo ved (An FBI agent?) No, I think he's
a CIA man. He was in Key West for the Customs for
the CIA. "He "1!-t:-!r€-'man who interviewed me." lf He said he
came to see him because he had received instructions and a
1 is t of p eo p 1 e to check out • He a aid he in t 7r vi e.r e d ab oUt a
dozen people and AV was on the list.
He said that when this came out, they found out that Lee
Osvald had a neighbor called Rodriquez. He Yaa surprised b ecase
one of the heads of Alpha 66 in Dallas was named Rodrique%
and AV was afraid that· they would think he was involved, that's
why K he didn't say anything to Dioddato. But later he found
out it vasn't the same Rodriquez, that Oswald's neighb[3/o7 .
Rodriquez Yas a }exican •
[further explanation): lie says that he heard that afternoon when
Kennedy was killed that a Latin named Rodriquez may have been
involved in the assassination and when hexREXBX:t: heard that he (AV)
got scared because he kne-.1 that he knew a Rodriquez who was
connected with Alpha 66 in Dallas.
(How long after assassination did Diosdato came to question you?)
About three or four days. They hadn't buried Kennedy yet.
Diosdato also intervieved Yenoyo.
Be figured Diosdato was a CIA agent because a lot of times in his
(AVs) activities he had to go through Key West and he used to
by and see Diosdato. He knew be was very powerful. The theory was
that he worked for Customs, but he was really a CIA agent.
(Are you xk sure it vas O!Nald with Bishop?) He said he learned how
to retain the characteristics of a person, he had trained himself to
do that. And if it wasn't Oswald it was someone who was exactly
exactly like 0""' ald, his exact douh le. •
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tl1c Lol:t.v1:1n jolREPRO · -··   ho· . ..- come he (:Ot
it fast, since he hnd a record ns a terrorist
and Ca.:;tro assassin<Jtion plotter. \:ho the one who r,ave
the OK. lle feels there has to be someone up there ;;ho gave
the OK even though he had a rec.,rd. He wants to kno" who.
He didn
1
t think of it then but he thinks of it now.
He he doesn't want to say this is definite, but there are
somethings that are beginning to make him think that Howard
Hughes had a lot to do with Bishop. He said he once saw
a file wl1en he l{as in a hotel room with Bishop in La Paz,
Bolivia, which had JIH initialed on the top. At first he
thought it was Howard Hunt or HLHunt but now he thinks it
w a s 11 ow a r d Hugh e s • Jl e sa i d i t w a s a f i 1 e ab out a c t i v i t i e s
involving the sale of arms to Israel through Bolivia.
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Da ve Marston
··' ;
Gaeton Fonzl
I
- f-lere · are · coples-- of the :...... tapes of m.·y Interview with Anton.lo ·.--····
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Veciana. The recording - conditions were - poor. He speaks very
quickly and "there was . a great deal of background noise, includlngl''f
the ·Jets from the nearby airport. In addition, beca-use I
thin, longplaylng cassettes, they have a tendency to Jain. The
original Is squished In places and there ar·a ·· Some untntelliglble
p a rts,but not, I thTnk, . of anything of significance • .. It witt be
a very tedious, difficult time-consJmlng effort to translate
everything Veclana says word for word, but I thl,k it's very
Important that It be done, since alI my translator did was give
me the gist of what he was saying as we talked. I believe there
may be detai Is and facTs In his words that could provide us with
key clues.
I was going to write you a rough note from the sketchy notes
took during the interview, but re-I lstening to parts of it as I
w a s m a k I n g t h e cop y , I _·dec I d e d I t w o u I d b e w o r: t h t h a e f f o r t to
make datal led notes the tape and get them to you
while we're waiting for the translation to be done. I
1
II do tha t
tomorrow first thing.
You should know this: Before the Interview began, Veclana appear
v ery talk and questioned me extensively about how th
informatlOfl - WOU-Id be usid .. t _."sald -_l . \vas Primarily- Interested In th
p o s s- i b. (I i t y t h a f c e r t a .i n v e r n men-ta. , -a g ·a n c I e s . h ad us e d t he a n t I -
cornmlinlty -· for their   and tha·t - was- t-he- di"r.ectlon- of ·
invesflgatlon.(l did not_ mentlon the Kennedy and it
was Veclana himself who ' flrst mentioned Oswald, as a result of the
O' Too le -J;loch · magazine piece · he had obviously just read."> - Before
he talked, Vec iana on my assurance that the Inf ormation
he g a v e me w o u I d n ' t b e e d a g a I n s t h l m • -
If Vec lana is tel ling the truth-- and there are certain e l ements
of his sto ry which ·can-:be checked out -- then 1· think we have to
significance of what h e sa ys in r e l a tion to the
C'0-r. ittee's assassinati o n r epo rt, whi ch is 1-1h a t Pa ul Hoch
in his l e tter to the Senator . I t a l so bears o n wh a t .C rou se wrot e
in h i s Esqu ire co l unn .   indicates that a case
c ;J n b c r; a d e- for t h 'J pos t u I at i on t h ;:d the (e h rust u n d d i r e c t i on o f the
..... ., r ·;-<; lttca ' s assr:!ss in n t i on l n t l eas t as far as Castro i s
co;'"\ c e r n c d ) '•I u s o r c he s t r .:1 ted t: y t h c C . I . /\ . S t r on s s t u f f • I· rfi d, I f
c . : f i r ,.., o d , g r o u n c1 c; o:'l n rJ u 9 h , I 1·. o u I d n s J u n e , f o r ?. r e - o p e n i n 9 o f
'::: .·r inr;s . I f tr. ct harrcn s , I 11 0;:'8 ··- s iven  
: i ,ht t;i1ck on hj; r t::cent ::; ituDt i on --he ' s a r o u nd .
; ·, C· : : :: !:' h i I o::; o p h r c n-: Cl a v ,; t h i :; ll i t o f i n f a I I i b I n Cl d v i c e : r; c n ' t
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TO: Dave Harston
FROH:- Gaeton Fonzi
Been thinking about what . .Veciana .said the ·other day and,
more imoortantly, \vhy he, said it. As you know, Veciana
obviously made the decision to talk with me before he had
gotten out of prison because his family had told him I wanted
to see him and he, in turn, told them to tell me that he
\•rould talk, when he came out·' It was obvious that he· was
confused about the situation in which-he found
He still has a prison pallor about him and the scared, cautious
look of a guy suddenly finds himself out·from behind
bars. ·. As he said in the interview, he feels that his gmlilng
to prison had something to do \·lith his previous relationship
to Bishop. I think he feels that Bishop may still be very
angry 1vith him about what happened during the Castro ·
assassination attempt in Chile in 1971 and the fact that
Veciana didn't tell him.abont the sub-plot to blame .it
on the Russians, although Veciana says he didn't know it.
It's very possible that Veciana feels that his being set
up on t.'te narcotics- charge -- and I have to admit that. from
appearances and his family relationships Veciana seems a
highly unlikely character to be involved with narcotics
anyway, that had something.to_do with perhaps a warning from
  be telling us \vhat he knows about
Bishop in .order to protect himself from any future har<i:ssment
Bishop. In addition, the way the Oswald business came
up adds to his credibility, I believe. I never brought
up, but· only brought Dallas up in terms of
askeng abont. Alpha 66 meeting at the Harlendale address.
That's when Veciana said he had-just read about that address
in the Hoch magazine piece that had just came out, \vhich
speculated that oswald might· have attenE!ed meetings .there.
A.c<cl that's \vhen Veciana said he had never seen Oswald there
out that he had seen Oswald somewhere else -- with Bishop.
The fact that he didn't appear to knmv up until that point
of my special interest in the Kennedy assassination makes
that bit of infomation even !:'.ore fascinating. Hare later.

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Gon:;:ul u!J &. ?onz1
On 29, 1977 thi$ 't;riter nccompanicd by Gaeton Fon2 i ·
,: .... ·. t · 1iith Antonto "lecia.na.
'·.
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· "-' stated he was not going to coo;:,era t ca.' wi·th
t:r.ci u. anymore, tr..at it wa.sn' t anythii1g
.1i t h· j_t' 011Z 1 or. •
: .. '.··
Hls reasons for not tianting to t.:tlk to UB anymor<a
,.; · .; .col, O' ·Ts
_..: .• J. - • • •
· ··· · 1. Veciana be put his t nwt in the U. s. Go ... l ern:tent
l 1ia3 im·olved in 3\QVeral ope-rationa and all b<! go·t out of
.:::.13 \·Jas j a.i'l titile. The DEA framed hir.l. on a narcotics cha-:-g.a
·!-..e uas · \.Ulable to clenr hitu:self of
of ' the luck cooperation from government aiancies.
· :htch refuse to he lp h:i.m.
·· · :--:h.· z. Veciana believes that he and otber Cuban e:dlc.!.i ha. ..
by the U.5 . Govern:r.ent b::!cau.::J oa of .::m effor t by
.'·: ·Jl :!.ticons and present administt"ation to rrjlat1on.3
ti ': h Cuba ." ·
3 .. Voc i ana s tate s that Cuban G-2 ar.d U. s. a gents
b.:.:"i! n o;tchanz i r.g inforrantion. Veci ann strr t a;J tha t    
\t.:! : !.! brought. to Wa!lbington. D.C. by U.S •. J\ge.nt3 via.. l1iami ar.d
i n: ort.'1atio;1 exchanged.
4 . V(:c i ana als o ntnt es that the FBI \Till n ot t ,:; ll h i t;) t/hat:c
!Y r;ot ;ha iibfor.nation that ll tht·ca t ha 3 bec:n made hi s
J. i :c . Ar. os e.nt (which he refuses ID) told bim he couldn•t
r):v t! him <:my infor:nation there are teo many laak!l in
  P..E: prir.tlr.g Vee! ana ' s nama i n hi s
-;-m:'.l in the ho1.• . .><;!   •
,m J · • •   i na;: • ".ibv     :tnfv-rril."l!:ion to
S .     s t.:1te.9 Vi c Ch(•r•J'lOl 7 Hi.-\u:.i
•.)-rt:1t::ci him he -vrould be o. sometime in the near f ut ure ..
, :::!.:   '\lculd not tell Vccia11a his o\:har tha n s omeone
1
'1: ·o;D. t he committcaeu
Veciana stated that be would comply with a subpena and
( ! .tl f y bef ore the Committee.
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REPRODUCED AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVE!JI

HEMO - 9/20/76
TO: Troy Gustavson
FROM: Gaeton Fonzi
Instead of finally resolving anything, the confrontation
bwtween veciana and David Phillips on Friday in Reston
only raised a lot more questions in my mind and I think
the should have this background on record to help
him put it in perspective. As you know, when I brought
Veciana down to the Miami public library to have him
look at a photo of Phillips in that article in People
ro
magazine, we also brought along Dr. Abella, Veciana's friaed
who said he saw a man who was a Castro agent in some
photograph in some magazine that carne out after the  
The photograph was taken in Dealey Plaza or along the
motorcade route somewhere. Anyway, he wasn't sure in what g
magazine the photo appeared and so Veciana suggested that,
since we were going to the library anyway, we bring Abella
along to search through magazines with Kennedy assassination
articles and pictures in the hope of finding the one Abella
remembers seeing. When we got tdttx:ldnrx the library, we
dug out the Phillips article first and showed it to Veciana.
He put on his glasses and looked at it very carefully. He
turned the pages back and forth studying all the photographs
and, although I watched his face very carefully, I couldn't
get one glimpse of recognition in it. I finally asked him
if it was Bishop. He said he was pretty sure it wasn't but
that Phillips looks "very close" like him. But, I aaked,
it is not him, right? "No," he said, "it is not him, but
he is very close." That's about the most I could get out
of him. But the strange thing is, I feel, that Veciana
just didn't close the magazine and write him off. While
Abella and I were searching for the other photo which, by
the way, we never found, Veciana kept staring at Phillips'
photo, which was perhaps 15 or 20 minutes. Anyway, that's
why I felt it was so importantKto have Veciana see Phillips
in person.
The sequence of what happened in Reston is also, I think,
of some significance. As you know, Sarah picked Veciana and
me up at the airport and drove us to the convenxtion center
in Reston. It was a longer ride than we had anticipated and
we arrived late for the luncheon. Phillips, however, had
someone waiting for us in the hallway and places reserved
for us at his table. I was very anxious to try to observe
both Phillips' and Veciana's reaction when they first saw
each other. Phillips was seated at a table in the rear of
the room, a very large round table of perhaps nine or 10
pepple, and as we same in he had his back toward us. We
were in single file, I, then Sarah and then Veciana, as
we followed the guy who had waited for us take us to be
introduced to Phillips. The guy tapped Phillips on the
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shoulder, he got up, turned and was introduced to me.
He said something about being happy that Senator Schweiker
was taking an interest in the activities of his association
but he really wasn't too sure why the Senator would be
interested. He looked directly at me, I noteced, when
he was shaking my hand and talking with me. He didn't
even sneak a quick glimpse at Sarah, who was standing
directly behind me, or at Veciana, behind her. I then
introduced Sarah to him and then Veciana. I introduced
him only as Antonio Veciana and XRRH didn't mention
anything about Alpha 66 or anti-Castro activities.
Phillips smiled, shook Veciana's hands very quickly
and very casually and quickly invited us to sit down
at the table. As hard as I tried, I didn't catch any
glimpse of recognition in Phillips' eyes, if that were at
all possible to do.
Both RH±z Veciana and I saw across the table from
Phillips and since it was such a large table (there was
a UPI reporter and Phillips' wife bwtween him and me)
I didn't get a chance to chat with him at all. Veciana
just sat there for most of the luncheon, put his glasses
on,   folded his arms and hardly touched his food as
he stared at Phillips almost the whole time. I don't know
\vhether Phillips is naturally nervous, but he was shaking,
at least his hands were shaking badly, and he was smoking
nervously the \-Thole time. I was watching him to see if
he was at Veciana at all, but he seemed as if he
was almost deliberately avoiding doing that. But maybe
I would have gotten nervous also if some guy was just
sitting there with his arms folded staring at me like
Veciana was doing with Phillips.
The guest speaker was General Wilson, the new head of
DIA, and, he \vas, by the way, excellent. After he was
through, Phillips jumped up and went to the
front of the room, I suppose to thank him. I wanted to
try to catch him before he left to aske him if he would
speak with he, but there \-Tas too much of a crowd to
follow He eventually did work our way out into the
hallway and finally caught him against the wall out there.
I thanked him for having us at the luncheon and told him
I thought he might be able to help us out in the investigation
\¥e \-;ere doing. He asked what investigation. I said the-
Kennedy assassination. He smiled nervously at me and said
he \,·ould be happy to xspeak with any member of Congress or
his representative "in Congress." I told him I wasn't
interested in any kind of formal interview but since we've
come up with some new I thought perhaps just
chatting with him about it might be of some help to us. He
repeated, almost in rote like he was taking the Fifth,

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that he would be very happy to answer any questions from
any eongressman or representative of any Congressman "in
Congress." Meanwhile, as I was talking to him, Veciana
had come up behind me. Veciana then asked
him a few questions in Spanish. Although I caught the
gist of them I later confirmed with him that he asked if
he had been in Havana in 1960 and whether or not he
knew Julio Lobo. Phillips said that he had been in Havana
and that"he knew the marne of Lobo. Then Phillips stopped
and asked him, "What did you say you"txa name was?" Veciana
told him and then asked, "Don't you know the namel"
Phillips thought for a moment and then shook his HHM head
and said, no he didn't. Phillips then asked me if Veciana
worked for Sch\-Teiker and I said, no he didn't but he
was ak helping us out with the investigation. Phillips
then quickly exuased himself, thanked us for coming and
said he was awfully busy right now and couldn't chat with
us futbher.
As soon as we got out of the place I anxiously asked
Veciana if Phillips was Masx±EB Bishop. He said no, it
wasn't him, and then he added, "but he knm-1s." I said,
what do you mean, he knows? Veciana said "He knows who
Bishop is?" I couldn't get out of Veciana why he said that
or how he came to that conclusion, but he did point out
that it was strange that Phillips said he didn't even
recognize his name, which was very well known in Miami
anti-Castro activities and was in the newspapers often
as the spokesman for Alpha 66.
I must admit I have some strange feelings about all
this. As you know, as a result of having spent so many
houss with him and going over his story in such detail
over and over again, I'm pretty convinced that Veciana
is telling us the truth about his contacts with Bishop,
but now, for the first time, I have some doubts about
Veciana's credibility when it comes to Phillips. For
one thing, I know that Veciana is much more sure of himself
now than when he first came out of prison and he is very
much back in the labyrinthian world of anti-Castro
activity here with all its intrigue and   He
has told me that he still wants more than anything else
to kill Castro. Although ek he told me when he first
got out of prison that he thought his relationship with
Bishop had something to do with his being set up on the
conspiracy charge -- he said Bishop was very angry with
him for \vanting to go on with plots to kill Castro when
told him not to -- I think he is now to
feel that maybe Bishop had nothing to do his going to
jail and, in fact, could now help him. In fact, he has
even told me that one of the reasons he now wants to find
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Bishop is that he feels he may be able to get Bishop
to help him again in his anti-Castro activities. At
any rate, I think all that is helping feed my doubt
about veciana's credibility when it comes to Phillips.
Suppose, and this is just an unfounded assumption, that
Veciana now feels he has taken his candidness with us
as far as he to, that he revealed his information
about Bishop to us because he was confused and frightened
when he first came aut of prison and thought perhaps it
might be a way to protect himself. Now, however, he
has gained more confidence and now feels that Bishop,
instead of hurting him, could once again help him in
the future as he did so much in the past. Veciana may
now feel that it won't pay to identify Bishop and,
in fact, if Bishop knows he can do it at any moment,
he might find that an incentive to want to get back in
action with Veciana to keep him from doing sa. They
may both feel that they can wait for all this to blow
over, even if it's a year or two, and then ax% quietly
their relationship. But, as I say, that's all
just speculation and just to give you an idea of some
of the factors kicking around M in my mind when I'm
evaluating, in xex retrospect, what happened at Reston
with Veciana and Phillips last week.
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JFK ASSASSINATION SYSTEM
Date:08/ 13/93
Page:1
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IDENTIFICATION FORM
AGENCY INFORMATION
AGENCY
RECORD NUMBER
RECORDS SERIES
NUMBERED FILES
HSCA
180-10097-10139
AGENCY FILE NUMBER : 002235
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DOCUMENT INFORMATION
ORIGINATOR
FROM
TO
HSCA
FONZI, GAETON
FENTON, CLIFF
TITLE
MEETING WITH VIC WALTER RE VECIANA
DATE 08 / 31/77
PAGES : 2
SUBJECTS :
CIANA, ANTONI O, INTERVIEW
LTMAN, WILHELM
ALTER, VIC, WCKT-TV
CKEOWN, ROBERT
, MARK
DOCUMENT TYPE
CLASSIFICATION
RESTRI CTIONS
CURRENT STATUS
TE OF LAST REVIEW
OPENING CRITERIA
COMMENTS
X 53 .
MEMORANDUM
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OPEN IN FULL
0
05 / 17/ 93
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AT THE NATIONAL
MEMO 8/31/77
TO: Fenton
FROM: Fonzl
Pe: Meeting with Vic Walter re VECIANA
Vic Walter Is the local television CWCKT-Miaml, Channel 7l
who Interviewed Antonio Veciana on a series of programs
last week. I had called him immediately following the
initial program to ascertain how he came across Veciana
and how he motivated him to appear on television. Walter
told me at that time that he had ootten a tip from a
friend of his In Washington who a friend of an associate
of syndicated columnist Jack Anderson and that the Anderson
associate had called Walter's friend, who works for ABC-TV,
to tell him that Anderson was qolno to break Veciana's name
In his column. !That column, by the way, did not appear In
the Miami Herald .unti I August 15th, although the Washington
Post carried It on July 19th> Walter said he therefore
caTTed Veciana and convinced him that since his name was
going to be made public anyway, to appear on television
would help his current anti-Castro efforts.
I met Walter today to obtain from him a copy of the tape
of his entire Veciana interview, including those portions not
telecast, which he had promised to give me. He gave me
a tape of only those portions of the interview that were
televised. !Copy of tape enclosed.) He said that as a result
of the news stories apoearing in yesterday's and today's
reports of Willem Oltmans' press conference, he might
review those portions of Veclana's interview that were not
used and create another program from them. He did not
specify what relationship Veciana's Interview had with
Oltmans' revelations, if any. He therefore did not want to
release anything which might still have some use to him.
Walter said that he has been trying to get in touch with
Veclana yesterday and today (Wednesday) but was told by his
wife that he was out of town. He said he is concerned about
Yeclana's absence because Veciana was supposed to have shown
up at the television studio yesterday both to talk to him
again and to make arrangements to purchase commercial spots
for his Taiwan Chinese Circus, which is scheduled to come into
town next week.
Walter said he spoke to Veciana on Monday or Friday. (He
contradicted himself on the day.) Veclana told him, he said,
that I had been in touch with him and had interviewed him
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at his home on Friday evening with another Investigator
sent down from Washington. (AI Gonzales and I spoke to
Veclana In the lobby of the Dupont Plaza Thursday evening.
See his memo.) I told Walter I had been In touch with
Veclana for more than a year but could not confirm or
deny any specific meeting. He said he was going to
use the fact that House investigators were In touch with
Veclana last Friday, after Veclana's appearance on television.
on his newscast this evening. He also said he would use
the fact that Veciana told him that he expects to be called
back to the Committee for the fourth time In the near future.
I said I couldn't confirm or deny anything Veciana told
him but suggested that he attribute all his facts to
Veclana, his source. I did not tell Walter that Veciana has
his committees confused.
Walter also provided the following information:
He had gotten a ca I I from a man whose name sounded II ke
''Terrazza'' (He's going to check to see If he has It written
down) who told him that Veclana had been In jail and that
he Is an associate of Replica publisher Max Lesnlk who, the
caller said, deals In drugs.
1-'e had a I so gotten a ca II from a I awyer in Cora I Gab I es
(whose name he thinks he also has written down somewhere)
who suggested that he talk to Robert McKoewn and that, if
he wanted to, he could arrange ft. The lawyer then called
McKoewn who cal led Walter. McKoewn told Walter that he
would submit to an interview for $500. Walter declined.
McKeown also told Walter he was working on a book about
his experiences with Mark Lane.
Walter said that Veciana told him that he Is still trying to
make contact with Maurice Bishop and that somehow his
association with the Chinese Circus might yet lead to that.
(What the specific relationship might be, Walter said, Veciana
didn't say.)
I told Walter I was sti I I Interested in a tape of his entire
interview with Veciana but that there was nc rush for it and
would appreciate it whenever he wanted to get It to me. He
said he would.
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JFK ASSASSINATION SYSTEM
IDENTIFICATION FORM
Date:08/13/93
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FROM
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SUBJECTS
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DOCUMENT INFORMATION
WCKT-TV
VECIANA, ANTONIO
08/19/77
3
VECIANA, ANTONIIO, INTERVIEW
TELEVISION, WCKT
OSWALD, LEE, POST RUSSIAN PERIOD, AFFILIATIONS, CIA
BISHOP, MORRIS
OSWALD, LEE, POST RUSSIAN PERIOD, TRAVEL, TRIP TO MEXICO
THREAT, CASTRO, FIDEL
CHILE
DOCUMENT TYPE
CLASSIFICATION
RESTRICTIONS
CURRENT STATUS
DATE OF LAST REVIEW
OPENING CRITERIA
Box 53.
COMMENTS
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THE NATIONAL  
Statements by VECIANA on
on WCKT-TV (Miami) week of
August 19, 1977
j
I have been in Dallas many times and remember
a meeting of August '63, perhaps of the first days of
September I was there. At that time the United States
government had confined me to Miami Dade County. No matter,
I traveled to other cities anyway, Dallas was one of them.
In August '63, I had a meeting in downtown Dallas with
Mr. Morris Bishop a United States Intelligence officer.
I remember that Lee Harvey Oswald was present in that
meeting. Oswald remained silent all the time. Bishop
discussed with me different matters about the Cuban
situation and other efforts in the War against Castro.
I have worked with the State Department in
specifically in the American Embassy in Bolivia South
America. I have cooperated with the FBI in different
situations and also I worked for the intelligence service
under Bishop for more than ten years. In 1962 I ordered
the attack to the Russian merchant ships which traveled
to Cuba; these were Bishop's instructions. The plan was
to force President Kennedy into making drastic decisions
against Castro government. While Kennedy traveled to
Central America we prepared a press conference in
Washington, D.C. Really, the President did not fall into
the ambush and, he was very angry. He decided to confine
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REPRODUCED AT THE
me to that country. Among the activities against the
Cuban communist, I have tried several times to kill Castro,
I remember the last one in Chile in 1971, November 31,
always following Bishop's instructions. I have no doubt
that President Kennedy's assassination was a conspiracy.
Castro had good reason to kill him; he knew perfectly well
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that in United   t ~ t e s high level, a plot to kill him was
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being considered. However to my personal understanding
Castro was not involved in President Kennedy's assassination.
The President was killed by other people for other reasons.
My profession in the last 17 years has been risky,
my life has been in danger on different occassions, the FBI
knows that my life is in danger, yet I hope that they take
a step to keep me alive.
Lee Harvey Oswald was not allowed to talk, all he
said was that he was a patsy. I believe he was telling
the truth. There is no doubt that he had good contacts
with some intelligence agency in this country. I am sure
he was a double agent, I am convinced that with an indepth
investigation we'll discover the following points. First
the person who traveled to Mexico City and visited the Cuban
Embassy was not Lee Harvey Oswald, but was in fact a man
disguised as Oswald. He was his double, from that time on
Oswald was being framed as the Castro agent. A few months
later, I confirmed that Mr. Bishop instruct me to make
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arrangements with my cousin Guillermo Ruiz who was working
with the Cuban Intelligence Service in Mexico City, to
offer my cousin money so that he would state that he was in
contact with Oswald about Kennedy assassination.
Another part. Castro's planned assassination in
Chile had the same pattern of the Kennedy plot. The killer
would die and everybody would believe that the killer was
the communist, to my judgment Mr. Bishop participated in
both plans.
I have swam and escaped in a fishing boat from Cuba
but I will continue with the fight against the communist
until the end. Right now, I have not broken my promise, if
the United States government hasn't changed its policy, I
don't play games, but I will continue to fight with other
allies .
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.eferenc• copy,

AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES
Cliff Fenton
 
Gonzales & Fonzi
U: Intertiev with Antonio Veciana

Veciana vas visited at his home, 811 NW 30 Ct., Miaai
nd shovned a picture of Cnaai na Catherwood in an effort to
ave him identified as "Bishop". Vaciana. stated he did not
flow him.
asked this writer if I bad beard about inriqua Nunez 1
stated I did, that I bad read that be bad been involved in a
Bunfigbt in Puerto Rico and vas dead.
Veciana stated that Hunaz bad been assassinated on orders froa
Cuba. The story that appeared in the newspapers vaa not true.
had aet with Nunez and bad warned hi• about a bomb threat
and an atteapt on his lifebec:auae of tbe constant pressure be
applied in Replica and on radio broadcasts againat the c:o..uniats
l n Puerto Rico and Cuba.
feciana states tbat Nunez vas gunned down in this Nnner. Mune2
-.ad aaany otbers were at a Bacardi Rull function and Nunez wu
t akina pbotoa wben bia assassin approached hia and said,
turned and the aunaan shot bla in the side and as Nunez fell
ahot hia in tbe bead. Another person person observed this &Del
lrev his aun and the assassin fired a sbot at bia which miased,
peraon tben fired killina tbe usassin. Tben an unkDovn
we said to tbe person that bad a bot tbe asaaaain., ca.ae vi tb •
Uld I' 11 gat you out of bare, but it did not work because all tbe
tXits bad been seal.cl off. The abooter of the uaaaain JUDqed to
tscape when an abulance arrived to take a wounded VOIIAll out of
:be place. He then vent directly to an attorney and told bia the
story.
[eciana vas then uked about tbe Marita Lorenz atory in tbe nevs-
apera accuaina Frank Fiorini, Pedro Diu Lanz and Lee Harvey Oavald
f being at a ... tina in Miaal vitb maps of Dallu, Texaa and then
;ettina into an auto and driving to Dallas. Lorenz tben c.- back
o Miami and two days later Jn vaa assassinated. Veciana stated
te didn't knov Lorenz but had l»een at aeveral ... tinas in which
rank Fiorini and Pedro Diu Lana bad b.en preaent, tbey worked
ogetber going back to Cuba.
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t-1EMORANDUH
TO: Cliff Fenton
t)
FROM: Al Gonzales ~ ~
DATE: August 25, 1977
3)
014599
RE: Interview of Antonio Veciana
This writer accompanied by Gaeton Fonzi met
with subject in a donwtown Miami hotel lobby (subject's
chosen meeting place) and there interviewed him.
After speaking with subject for several hours,
this writer found him quite a credible and cooperative
witness.
Subject made the following statements:
States he never said that Bishop was CIA. He
believes that Bishop was with some sort of intelligence
agency or with a powerful interest group.
Swears Lee Harvey Oswald was with Bishop one time
when they met. Oswald did not say anything. Also states
that he convinced Menoyo to pull Russian ship caper.
Menoyo was against it but Bishop wanted it so it would
put pressure on the President .
States JFK committed biggest blunder of his life
with the Bay of Pigs fiasco. It cost millions of dol-
lars and many lives.
Thinks Castro could possibly have had something
to do with JFK assassination in retaliation for the many
attempts on his life.
Veciana has one goal in life and that is to kill
Castro. Money isn't important to him. Re: $253,000
received from Bishop. He can account for the money but
requests in writing that it won't be misconstrued as
coming from drug deals. He has never dealt in drugs
even though he was framed for it.
Veciana visits Puerto
that Puerto Rican Terrorists
will give them independence.
otherwise, they are prepared
in the U.S.A. in key places .
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Rico frequently and states
group believe the U.S.A.
The day that they suspect
to plant a t lea s t 200 bombs
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Fen tor'
i\ugust: 2s, 1977
Pa,Je ·.r\ .. '0
Vec,ana states that Castro has a team in Miami
area atte1npting to lure him to Jamaica or Panama because
he wants him alive. A so-called friend asked him to
accompany him to Panama recently which he declined.
Castro has at least a half a million dollars in-
vested in Haimi businesses and is still poring in more
money.
Castro has one ambition in life, and that is to
occupy the White House, along with that idea he has in-
vasion plans of the u.s.A. mainland.
Veciana states he does not know Robert hlemmen
but can have Alpha records checked if we want it_
Veciana was asked why he went on television?
In answer, he stated that he had several reasons of which
one, was to lure Bishop and make contact. He also states
Bishop's first name is Maurice, not Morris. Secondly,
Walters promised him $10,000 for advertisement purposes
(circus, which he promotes) which he reneged on.
Veciana states he is willing to cooperate with
the Committee and will testify when needed.
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N.t.PKUULU.U A l lt1t. l'IAilU• AL A.t<.l .. lli\1:.::>
• ... .. . . ... .; "< 6-&
Office MemoY1mdum · uNITED sTATEs Go vERNMENT
TO File DATE : 11   1961
..
Alien Affai rs Officer

s t: .eJECT: GoJ ..:' :!Z_'Qj-.SZ, J;:_-,..,ya , Eloy
----
APPRoVED fOR RElEASE 1993
CIA HISTORICAl-R£1JIBV PROGRAM
1. Jerry ?·!ullsne, OSj\.fH/4, informed me this afternoon that
a w:>men (name Uil.!:noWJlJt. identi:f'yin.e; he:-sel:f as the subject's
had called HZ: . 'Frank 3ender of thi s Agency
tiv;-r. !:he · .. -as e·,;ar/ that her brother was in jail at J<cAllen with
othe:- that she understood that s ome of these had
been :-eleesedj a nd wanted to know just what the situation was
with her brother. Mullane wanted me to find out if subject had
been released.
2 . I cor::.acted George El'TlS in this connection 6nd he
that he "::)uld cl:eck and i nfor.n 1:1e lat er in the day es to ••hethe!"
subject is still in detention o r has been released. Hr. Elms
r.dvised that after checking , l1e e:e ee n , · n :d t hat the subject is
still in detention at McAllen, Texa s, and that he had no i dea
•nen he would b e released.
3. In the absence of Jer ry J.1ulla:1e, l-Jho had left f or the
dBy, I :pes sed thi s info:nnation to Earry Hiller, and
him to ascertain the name of the indi vidur.l calling Hr . Bender
stating that she 'JSS the subject ' s sister.
OS/AAS/Jllrf. : es ll .May 61
4. i nformed me tha t the subject's sister is
Miss Mercede who i s visiting llashin!;t ='n, and wh::>s e
add:-ess 1n e .J)istrict is 5614 EJ::d.Clrf :trive, .!.... ..-,f.:-.::.:: :::. ·:..:es ,
·.:&shingto 23, D. C. :he tele:pho:1e nUr"'!lbe:- is F-E: 6-93;4. ·:r.
requested that this not be given to &t
as they wont to conduct investigation i n

subject 's sister .
KtPKUULLtU AI
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  • PER P.L.
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102-526 (JFK ACT)
DATE ' ( (l((n
DATE
REPLY REQUESTED
18 December 1978
SPEED LEITER
Tv••T>4•o
LETTER NO.
TO :
Scott Brc kinr idge
fROM:
Bill Sturbitts
ATTN:
PC/HSCA/OLC C/LA/STB
SUBJECT: Antonio Carlos VECIANA Blanch (DPOB: 18 October 1928, Cuba)
Bob Blakey asked yesterday if we could determine if VECIANA had a ''godfather
11
or
some prominent person who might be providing him funds prior to 1962.
I have reviewed the VECIANA 201 and determined the following: VECIANA was employed
as comptroller of Julio Lobo's finance company 1958-1961. At that time he was also
"chief of action
11
for the Movimento Revolucionario del Pueblo, an anti-Castro under-
ground movement. He apparently carried some weight and respect as President of the
Cuban Public Accountants Association. Allegedly, according to the file, bank employe
were embezzling funds for the support of the MIR which is described as a fund-raisin
mechanism for the Second National Front of Escambray. (SFNE)
VECIANA fled Cuba by small boat in late 1961 and began his fund-raising activities
for Alpha 66 in early 1962. In July 1962 he claimed to have $50,000-60,000 in U.S.
and Puerto Ric• banks belonging to Alpha 66. He is characterized as a"specialist in
fund raising for Alpha 66 which is the financial section of the SFNE
11
• The fund-rais
ing activities of VECIANA centered in the United States and Puerto Rico, although
there are indications that VECIANA intended to seek funds elsewhere in the Hemispher
such as Venezuela. In November 1962 the Inter-Agency Source Register indicates he
was an asset of the ARJ1Y and terminated by them without prejudice in 1966.
From reading the file I get the impression that VECIANA was a slippery tongued typ
completely capable of conning anyone and funds fer h1s pet:sona l use
SISMATUitl
.....
Based on the above I don't think that VECIANA had, or needed, any personal source
for his own funds, He was only in the u.s. a few months before he founded Alpha 66
and commenced his fund-raising drives.
P.S. We cannot find any info on identity of the

Army Lt. Col. who was chief of the Army covert
action activities in Puerto Rico and Miami during
Veciana 's association with them nor the name or
identity of Veciana
1
s Army case officer,
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DERIVEiJ Fn::;:.. .]) 9 ('I
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RETURN TO ORIGINATOR
USE PiiHVIOUS
EDITIONS
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WASHINGTON, 0. C. 20!10!1
• SECRET
Office of legislative Counsel
18 December 1978
Mr. G. Robert Blakey
Chief Counsel and Director
Select Committee on Assassinations
House of Representatives
Washington, D. C. 20515
Dear Mr. Blakey:
As a result of your request to Mr. Sturbitts yester-
day morning, he has reviewed the file of Antonio Carlos
VECIANA Blanch. He has submitted an informal summary of
his findings as follows: (C)
"VECIANA was employed as comptroller of
Julio Lobo's finance company 1958-1961. At that
time he was also "chief of action" for the Movi-
mento Revoluncionario del Pueblo, an anti-Castro
underground movement. He apparently carried some
weight and respect as President of the Cuban
Public Accountants Association. Allegedly, accord-
ing to the file, bank employees were embezzling
funds for the support of the MIR which is described
as a fund-raising mechanism for the Second National
Front of Escambray. (SFNE) (S)
VECIANA fled Cuba by small boat in late 1961
and began his fund-raising activities for Alpha 66
in early 1962. In July 1962 he claimed to have
$50,000-60,000 in U.S. and Puerto Rico banks
belonging to Alpha 66. He is characterized as a
"specialist in fund raising for Alpha 66 which is
the financial section of the SFNE." The fund-
raising activities of VECIANA centered in the
United States and Puerto Rico, although there are
indications that VECIANA intended to seek funds
elsewhere in the Hemisphere such as Venezuela. In
November 1962 the Inter-Agency Source Register
indicates he was an asset of the ARMY and terminated
by them without prejudice in 1966." (S)
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Mr. Sturbitts feels that Veciana did not have or
need any personal source for his own funds . He was in
the U.S. only a few months before founding Alpha-66 and
commencing fund-raising drives. (C)
In addition to this Mr . Sturbitts reports that we
do not have records identifying t he Army officer who
headed the Army activities in Miami and Puerto Rico during
Veciana's association, nor the name or identity of
Veciana' s Army case officer . (C)
Sincerely,
'
          J
S. D. Breckinridge
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SYSTEM
IDENTIFICATION FORM
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AGENCY INFORMATION
AGENCY SSCIA
RECORD NUMBER 157-10004-10158
RECORDS SERIES
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CUBAN OPERATION

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RESTRICTIONS
CURRENT STATUS
DATE OF LAST REVIEW
OPENING CRITERIA
COMMENTS
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notes -- III
(Confirr:-.cd the fact that nc;;s clipping (l'iYT Jateline 3/19/63)
,,·ns the one about the l'.'<Jshinp,ton press conferer.ce he had
.enrlier referred to <!S hcing set up by Bishop.)
Tt wns possible he in Pt:erto Rico in July of 1963 and tl1en
in Dallas in August. As Jnte as 1972 l1e \IRS still traveling
a lot nnd noted that in one period then he SJ>ent five different
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·ve ddifferent countrj:es. [vend "·hen the
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[Irmidgr;>tion
'' Jlepartr.\Cnt? or ered him not to leave Da e County, 1e ha no

4
trouhle getting out. (h'ith different passports?) No, he
r,· 't need them because he was traveling to Puerto Rico and
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'ig :; within U.S. But it Hns easy to r,et a false p<1ssport needed.
iii"' ·enid Bishop ever provide you 1dth false passports?) !\o, that
jl·g ,,·ns part of my o1m job.
11:; (ne: Caldh·ell [correct nalile]) He's almost sure that Godoy HaS
the onc-\{]1o-rr.ew \ald"ell 3nd nrrrrnged the JCeeting with him.
'I . And then later when he tolcl Bishop about CaldNell, it was Bishop
NllO told him that Cal,lttell CIA and th3t he kneH Bishop
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and that he Has an alcoholic. AV then figured that Bisl1op
kneN Caldwell pretty well because AV had noticed that Caldwell
was a heavy drinker. He thinks CaldHell also knew Bishop.
lle says he can find out where \.alch;ell is, but it has been
a long ti!ne since he's seen him. lle had an office on :.:adison
'Avenue. !Je thinks he nay still have his card, a plastics company
Connecticut. Remembers l1e met him at the Racquet Club in
!'ie1.; York.
v
(Re meeting with secretary) He says they use to write
.to a lot of people for support of Alpha 66, for money, and he
guesses that ll11nt may have been one of the people who expressed
interest in helping. He says he met Hunt's secretary once,
but Godoy was the one who dealt with him. (Is this Gaston Godoy?)
No, Latt he heard he was in Puerto Rico working
for-:-m insurance comjlany. (\\'here did he meet Hunt's secretary?)
In Yorl:. l1is name Carroll?) He doesn't remember. Godoy
could give us infor!ilation because he talked to him a lot.
(Ever in contact Gen. 11alker?) No. But there were some
right wing people in Kentucky he was going to make contact with.
When he told Bishop he was going to meet them, Bishop said it
Has hest to stay away from tl1em because they had Ku Klux Klan
connections.
  was with Second Front of Escambrey?) Yes. (Did Bishop
have to do with seeting thatup?) The scheme was that
Menoyo would do to Castro what Castro had done to Batista. But
Bishop didn't trust Meooyo and thought he hecome a traitor
after he got power. AV didn't think so. lie would often argue
with Bishop about tl1at.
(nid Bishop ever meet   No. Menoyo in Cuban prison now.

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NAEA
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1:hat used ·.:hen tr:1vcJ.i.nz
  No. Only

1'c \.':l.S in  
anrl he saw his J•assport.' l!e s.::ys he ),:r::xt'l l1ad it c·n his
sui ;1nd h·hen Bishop l'ent to the \.J;:throcm, ;,v i looked at
it.
(Pa:;sport flishop?) l\'o, that h';•s not tLe !'1 nar:e en it.
.Jle l:e h<1s al,out tHo suitcases full of rcrorts :'nd papers
v and they're all disorganized, but ,;t<1rt lookinr 11 through
then next h'eek. llut he remcr•bers h'hcn he SGH ti1c i'"ssport it
h'(:Sn 't Bishop's name, but he wrote it on a scrap of ne\\'Sp2pcr
r;ayhe he can find it. lie's anxious to find out c.l cut llisllop
himself nolL

o> .{Docs he believe his r.arcotics arrest H.:tS somcho1-1 t:t<l relate<.\ to
, Jdl his years of dcalir.g with Bishop?) Yes. Jle s:1ys he believes
:li' .;there is soDe relation Hi th the past years. But he s<Jys just to
DATE ,. ;;'·)t
i "' 1'enember th<Jt the n<Jrcotics rlep?.rtment (DFA} believes that he
: is guilty, and th:1t if he ••r:re working for the narcotic department
· ......... J1c \.Jould belicv e it too.
11:1· 23 (Jlut how tloes he relate it?) f'e says that in 1973, when eve1·ythinn
1 t•, (.I) b
'I·'"' •·.'ont d01m ['''i th Bishop?), they coulJn' t kill him bec:wse he had
;tt,,
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·.·:·,.';: too nuch information, th:1t if he ever got killed too nucl1 woul<.l
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0
come out. So he figures the only 1·cay to finish him KXXS. was to
•'!·H put him in jail, to set him up. lle cloesn't know it
.... \;as even Castro on the other h2.nd. Jle has had three assassination
attempts on his life. Tl1ey even put a bomb in Puerto Rico to get
. o In tl1ey came to get hin at l1is );ouse. Also in
, ,u Venezuela. In f..Jiami never.
II r:; (Do you think Bisho!; was afraid )'Ou HoulJ carry on ;mti -Castro
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activities by yourself?) lie says Bishop ah:ays believed he (P.V)
Has doing private deals on his o1m, against the policj: l1e had
1,·ith Bishop. For example, Bishop alh'ays thought he •·:as behind
,:,:

the scheme to blame the Russians for tl1e Chile Castro attempt.

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(Was there anyone else xx aware of his contact Hith Bisl•op?) Only
the woman who he \\'Ot1ld contact me through. (No one else?) Menoyo
knew that he (AV) 11as working ••i th an Americ::m hut he didn • t
know Hho.
(The Cecilia Vazquez mentioned xx in the clip as being at the
Wasl1ington press conference with you ... ?) Yes, he's x in business
in Santo Domingo now. (Was l1e aware of Bishop's role setting
up the conferaace?) No.
suspicious of a possible
  No . H c says that
Behind Bishop ot o goo nancial backing and
Rll! lliRI"!l memo that said H.H.
He knows tha lot in the West, in Texl!,s
Q,n He 1 meet Ris. op once in Las Vegas, around 1964,
But B1shop told h1m he was JUSt going to rest there, hut he doesn't
know. (Where in Las did he meet him?) He remembers he was
only there for two or three days and he called a CubGn named
Guerra showed him around the city. Bishop met him at
his (AV's) hotel room but he doesn't remember what hotel. They talked
for about 3 or 4 (Who picked the hotel?) Bishop told him.
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NAEA.
DATE ,. ,;· }{
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1 •
l:e • tl1at vl1cn he to1<1 ns l:1st tine ):e dit1n't
S8laznr in   o11ly or1c in   he
has siPcC !"CC:1llcJ t}:?.t llc did lf1CCt a in D3llas, h
1
<1S
int,·o<lt:ccd to lli;;1 briefly :1t one of tl·,o JCJ:!ll}' he ],,d
tlJCl'C, 1Jut docsn' t lnow hin, docP.n' t 1:lw t he
looks (At the llolloJHkle house?) 11oosn't roncr.>l'cr "hcreJ.
(f:vcr l:ccp ;; diary of activities?) ?'o.
(Ever lwvc conLcct Hi th Fll:!tlio Jlcl Valle?) The man 1Vho
got killed? lie never met hir:1 but hcz,rd he was involved in
n<1rcotics. l'c rceccmbcrs te1lking to a teller inn bank
s:Jid [:1t the Eoulcvard llank] , 'See that guy, I lent
him[$10,000]? [a goocl the other day and now I fincl he
wns in 11arcotics :1nd l:illed.
(Knm·: \l:lr.uel Azzam?) '1\o. l!e only rcJ;JOhlbcrs the incident at

(Kno1: a friend of Artime's named Carlos Ponce?) r:o.
the
(Ever heard of Artino being involved in narcotics?) No. Once
},c l1enrd tlwt he "'nS involved in some underground stuff in
Nicar.:l);U:J.. l!c :<e:<K has ];card that he has a lot of relations 1·1ith
.
·.\ the prcsiOent of Nicnrngun.
(\':hen did you first meet Iliosd:1do?) Diosclaclo • out of
and when l1c was involved in Rnti;Castro activity, going
on r:;ids and smuggling out arms, Diosclatlo would give hir.1 the
•·green light" on ,,·hether he could do the missions. Sometimes
Jliosdado wo11lcl say don't do it because I get the permission,
and sor.1etimes he Hon<l.d say yes, sure.
llc 11.:1s <: \•:ell kno•.m man in Key \•,'est all the Cubnns
kncH him.
(Docs l1e know for sure Diosdado worked for CIA?) t!c says l1e doesn't
know for sure, bttt he had authority, an official car, arms, a
microphone in the car. Officinlly he Has ,;ith the U.S. Custorc.s
but everybody thought he ,,·as ,,,or}:ing for the CIA. llc 1-1as very
interested in <Jnybody came froR Cuba, he would intervie1; thcr.1
ask them questions 2.bout 1cas going on tk2KX there. If
he a Customs \C1an he about that.
(Did niosdado ever mention 'Rocky') If he did he doesn't remember.
He says he remembers that the same day that Diosclado came to ask
him ::1bout the Kennedy assassination thnt' s when he had seen tl1e
of Oswald and was very nervous, but as soon as he walked
in tl1e door he told l1im, hey, don't worry about a thing, I don't
even know I'm doing this, they just told me to do it, interview
some Cuhnns. lle remembers he maJe a conment saying that, 'All I
know this is going to cause a lot of people in the Secret Service
trot1ble, maybe their jobs, for the errors that r.1ade.'
(Correction: 'somcfl reople' 'no, not their jobs, but hurt careers')
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REPRODUCEU AT THE NATIONAL ARC-HIVES
:--:tole: :··ct: t!.·:l. :e: ···· t ... .. _,-::·L·, t!·,;.t. -.,,,_ui,c
::::·:c :1 list) Yes, yc:s, ;·\:s, \t1at Lc J•::d • to
illtC'rvi.-.::, .. : :1 rrcup of ;:ctivjtts. T!·.tt 's 'l1;:t 1c<-: hi;.1 tk dc,··n
!·.c •:;;s only one of a g1-0llj• hcjng intcr\'ic1.cd, r.ot  
Liil.
Ire says that he's going to !<ow York in .July and ],e 's to
e\'cryone dw ,,·as involved in sendin.c: hin to prison :;nd l:c
1
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GOing to sho" t1lcn the evidence that he 1-:;1sn' t pd.l ty, just
for kw his o1m rcrson<:Jl sotisfactienj Just to l'ro1·e to
them how wns a lie and how he 1·:ilS sot up. !!e
says he didn't debate anythin:s 1dth then at the rc:-:."n!Jing of
the trial, l1e never s:-tid :1nything. But no" he 1:::nts the
opj·ortunity to tell tl•ern they're h'rong.
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if'<:-<
(Is he ilW:1re tl1at tl1e
;t,c does knoh' that,{
.:ti_:·
DEA contains former [IA AGents) Yes,
.; (Re report July 63 when be lv3.S in Puerto Rico to orgnnize pl;mned
on delegates at UN?)
'e>


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Yes, we were considering such a pl:1n hut after he consulted
Hith Bishop on it they decidet! not to carry it out. lle did
get a pass tinder a different name into the UN and he checked
out the building and all the possibilities. lie said Bishop
told him no matter how ir1port;mt he thc.ught it 1-1as 1;hntever
was done in the liN WOIJld c:-tuse trouble for the Uilited States.
The main ide:1 was to do sane big at tl1e liN.
(Spend much time in New nrleans?)
.(Any contact Hith Rringuier?) >!o.
with   [?] , who used to help
met rlTSllop· in New 0rleans.
Very little time.
lle he h'RS in il meeting
Alpha 66, llut he never
recall anyone with tlescribed leu: hairline)
<J!:
Yir lie was in Dallas a lot of times, so many l•e doesn't
before Kennedy assass. anti after.
J)i ; I


(Ivhere you in c<ID.t.ac:.l:.-.l.d th any CIA J!2.Q12.!.£._in f.liami ?) Yes, on som!'
il' occi1s1ons he dealt with he :tlll thougl1f "·ere t'IA. 'Fli'cy used miln'y
li:< C!Tf!erent names .. Even in PuertoRico he met someone 1-1ho ch8ngcd his
I name. [?] He says that when they told him be c.o.ul.0.n..:..Lleaye Dade
'' County in r()3 (ll. this CIA...z.t!Y took him to Immi ,ration to get ,
j' ii£Wia it, hut the director of Immigration said t e ? from
;1. Was 1;-;"""n couldn't be cli:u:l]i:fui. !na-t's whtm mm1grat1on used .
11· fOlie on Biscayne ll'oulevard. But CIA came to him often and asked
:J!;·i' him for his cooperation and about information on ..::thJU]HHII!'I other
1
i
r, • people. Once he met a in Puerto Rico who 1-1anted to see   (,:A:
.,, the Alpha 66 cam the had the Bahamas. )•
1
eno a didn't like the {!J.qJ7 I
1aea o sowing 1t to the CIA but they did! finally et t em see I!_. r-"'A·CS!
<t-.PMF<T !
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• REPROOUCEO ATTHE NATIONAL ARCHIVES
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.:··: vr:cc, ·,e t 11.r:.-s.   .. ;.cnctl to sec hir· ::t t!:c .'1irport. !
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•(:' involved in of Figs. lie Hcnt by the n::mc of T'<lu:trtlo.
i'lr''' ('>cr vork h'ith   Just very little. lie 1:cnt to a
· · few of the About fot•r rcctiJigs.
i)i Lobo 1·::1s the one h'Lo intro(ucecl him to Cellula Fantas!'ln. T'1at
'1 · c•I'C'rntion cost :1hout $300,000. Lobo intrcJuccd AV to the
1
' ccorinntor of it, Pojas. .ccrgio Poj as. lie Has Castro's
il :::·L,ssaclor to Lor.,!on hcforc!Je-·(reTccTed.
I
' (Lobo financed Cellula Fantasr1a?) No, but he did put some
,., '"'"' '"oney into it. Se:'1osa, president of he J'Ut some
I
in too. Ee I;i!Ve it to Lobo. He (;\V) net Senosa
•,, at t}Je Dupont Pl:1za. Fe thinks he died. (7?]. There 1-;ere
11' th'O brothers :1nd one of died. Lobo gave Veciana's nilme
d f·-· tg...Semosa and r.e • him. _lle had about 40 bodl:'guards Hith him.
II r l,ie' <'Ot a call to go Jneet ln:n and Semolla told lnm that Lobo \·:as
r;::;- o
"'tl]c one h•ho gave him his na·ne and that he, as a l'1:1tter of fact,
N J1nd so1ne ],usincss Loho. Sc1noza said that Lobo had
C>
:· him (tall:ed to hilil about] a plan against Castro and he wanted
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< to give hil'l some money, Hhich he gave to Lobo.

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(1\Ed P.isl10p had asked you to infiltrate Cellula F:1nt<1sma to find
out what it Has doing?) Yes. He said the report he gave Bishop
••as that he noticed they weren't getting anywhere
and that they seemed to drink a lot. The meetings were in a hotel
. in Hi ami Springs
i(Fiorini was there for the Meetings?) Yes.
Q'!as he---rtre leader?) FTorliil lvas"Ti1:e a special advisor. The
Jihl1 t:1ry lC:1<Ter of IT h'as l'edro D'Iaz----r::-;rnz. ROJas Has '"'t"'hi-e-.;_;."'
cocfta:lfi'<Hor-.-TTlere were a lo'f'oTj,·cople in the group but he (AV)
didn't know them.
(Bishop knew of Fiorini; Does he know if Bishop ever met Fiorini?)
:\b, no, he dd>dal'ltt.lle said that once he Bishop s:1ying
about Fiorini Has that he wasn't just another soldier, he was
more than that. lie wasn't just a dumb soldier, he \vas more than
that. Bishop told him that.

, . Ewing Smith many times?) About four or five times. lie says
that Hhen he Hent to the Americ:1n Embassy that Castro's government
checking out· Smith hil'lself told him tl:at coming to the
 

• was l1ke the k1ss of death .• But someone 1n C:1stro 's
.[''_·.·.'·\rsovernment '''" knew told him that the fiad a cae1era in front of
• ., 1e :m 1ass . hs name 1s Gu1.llermo Ru1z an tl1e cous1n l:k he
;.;'.4., !'Ia spo ·en o w o lS 1n Castro s Inte 1 ence erv1ce. Ru1z told

·· ·.mil sohehadbetter arefulor'they'llllrcak
!l your guts.'' lie told AV that he knew he'd eon oo 1ng around the
1
AV said he wasn't doing anything, he just wanted
I to get out of the country, he was just going to the Embassy to get
·[I his visa. Ruiz said that the door he Has using wasn't the door to
go in to get a visa. That's how AV knew they were checking him out.
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REPRODUCED AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES
/\\' : . .:.1.:. :J•ine to /LLc   ; c1·.:..-vcr, <tli.o.st it has clo.scJ
c\rn:r. . . "e soys t:r;rt en the 20t)l cr 21st of (1960], tf:e
l;1st t:c<.le he was in tl-,c Er.k!ssy toPcing to ;;!;ci: r::1i.l he (K,Ji 1)
told   he was 11i' going to the United Str;tes •'·nJ weuld come
1•ack and talk to him later. soicl 11e l<as going to Texas
I
for Christmas. That's why he ah:ays tl!ougl;t Iii shop had
told him to go to Kc.il hecause he   pcrh.".')S they '''ere
friends fran Texas. '
(Do you think Bishop ond
k110W. SJ:litll was a young
pretty sure l1e ,,·;1s CIA.
Smith ,,,ere friends J:e doesn't
person, alhays \v'ell dr('Ssed. f'c' s
'I''
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'.,'l:!f, . (Smith the Ohn no, he 1-:as the political
'i·l ... advisor. Not f;1rl SJ:lith, [wing Smith. '
1rt; Jti1e s;1ys l:e doesn't anything to come out in the paper, because
:jh "' , he's a'fYiffu1rwmna cause -a-1ot:or-t:Tcmtrlc-xf61rhi·s-ramlly. •
, o h;1s been tryP'f'L01nf'erv1ew lrnn
! e lluT'"Jle\-'o'uTc.r-flc\ie-f never do that. Vo the corresponC!ent
il h1m to come to New
,t:"' ·· rvoTsK'y\vorks out of an ;t office of Replica, just around the
corner from Veciana's hoase. The owned by  
11
••,:§ Lesnick, Lesnic_k was a leader of the Second 1\ational Front
' '8 . 'of Escambray ;;nd the key link with CIA agent..__..,
officially a political attache in the Embassy, before
!_,jl (;Jstro took over. Also in the Replica office nolv is Reynnldo
.,u Pica, good friend of Artliice's ;JM one of the original·
llh;; '·waterg;Jte group.]
    Lesnick at Replica has ·urged him to talk to Volsky.
,:' ·>-- (Is Volsky working for CIA?) Velsl;y has allVays denied it.
)_
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!::•8 But he was in Cuba and he was Hi th the Voice of America.
, , " · • Vol sky also noli receives money from Replica ;1nd AV says he

doesn't un<'IP.rstand that, XX)C what does he do for Replica?
''" All he remembers Volsky ever Hriting for Replica was an interview
with the president of Portggal.
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(Do
the
and
you have any suspicions that Lesnick is being supported by
CIA?) No, he doesn't believe so. Lesnick is a hard worker
good administrator.
(Have Y"" Pver made any major arms deals?) No. only 20 to 50
rifles, 40 or SO pounds of dynamite, $40-50,000 at the most .

(Ever deal with Mitchel i WerEell?) No. But he said that you're going
'to ask him ahout Masfeerer now. (Why?) Because there was a lot
of business between Masferrer and WerBell. They say that  
was s killed as a result of his dealing with WerRell. He (AV)
personally thought wasn't worth anything.
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REPRODUCED AT THE NATIONAL
c·orc spcci fie nJ.out hiS r·t._:(!tii11T with   i1J:d thC' t1,:0 F·C'11 :1 t
t!1c P(l.n ;\r.:cricGn f:.:1nk building?) J!c rcr.1e::·1l"Crs J1c met nisJ:0p
<',o1mtc1m they ""ll:cd to l··lliltlinf:. Jlc didn't lnoh' ,,·here
tJ:cy r•oing •. J!e Jocsn' t rcncr:1hcr ,,;J:a t f] oor they Pot out
cf tl1c on, they tnl!:ing, l'tlt tl1cy cot nntl
took a }.cy cut

o;,cncd the door. There 1·.'8S a suCJll
•)fficc, n sofa <Jnd chairs, and tl,crc h'as n room 1·.'ith nn
.\:--1cri.c<1n f] :tg in the left hrlJH1 corner. \
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•l:e sars it h'<IS n very brief cercnony il!ld it involved the
1
12c;rcc:ncnt hcth·cen Bishop and him. Tl,crc 1<Cre iJ;Jpers that
, .(Like a contn.ct?) Yes, just like a.n :lgrce!'\ent. He says the\
cason for it he now l•clicves w2s just to let him knOh' that
·11c 1·:ould be responsible.
llc no co )ics L(._i.t.
cas any noncy i11Volved in the agreement)
He that Hhcre it said fee there was a clash.
l1e had already told Bishop that l1e would
for money for his country. Only for his expenses.
end he accepted some money.
But he s0ys
never \o.oork
But at the
lle doesn't rcncmbcr ruch about the two men, he never sa"' them
·again
(1'iC1en :t was the l0st time he sa1v Lobo?) It must have hccn
·about 63 or 64. After tl1at he 11as havi11g some financial
'proble;>Js. Jlc saH him in l'c1: York.
(While he was working o.n Alplw 66, did Bishop provide support))
for his family?) :l:NKXWllll xX'!Q ?\o. flo did ;>ay at the end.
'(l!e to La Paz in 1968.)
lie says tha.t when he h'as in Bolivia, the Treasury Department
used to send him a check every mt'!NE)CX month. l!e used to deposit it
in his bank in 1-tiami. Then he would go to the li!Xli:Xxk cxchnngc
bank in because he got a better rate there,
and he 1.;ould cash a check for $1000 every month. l;hc exchange
bank had its own account in a bank in Switzerland. lle says that
was one of the points brought up in his narcotics case. They
accused him of stashing away $1000 a month in a Sqiss bank.
But he says that the exchange bank had a rubber stamp and he
\vould leave the Pay To The Order line blank for them. [So they
later just wrote in, he figures, pay to the order of their Swiss
b2nk account.
[fluch more here on his payment from Treasury Department and
his banking procedures re kix the accusations made against him.]
--·---"
(re Jerry Patrick?) Fifteen years ago he had a bunch of hippies
surrounding him and today those very same peopte are with him
at the truck company. He says that someone who worked there told
him tha.t the company has nothing to do with trucks, it was jurt
a front for a11 intelligence operation.
(Did you ever work with Patrick?) No.
REPRODUCED AT THE NATIONAL ARC-HIVES
!!e ;,<<' • if he C0\l]cJ rc>t tel the fej'Ort t
1
10t r.:1str0 \
  ':cccvcrn TC o.ss.'1ssin<1ticn J'c \\:'1s I
:1 • supposedly dcfrct0d C:0stro .J:;.d 1
,\lpho (•G. ;\ftcr a 1:!1 ile he nnt i end h':JS " s;.y l1e to] d
the r;;r. The FHI th<'n nndc errors in their investi o:Jtion
,., ,
1-:c!lt to people h'l10 repc1·ted b.ocl; to her she l-.ock
to She 1·:cnt l·2cl: ;1.nd told C:1stro and sJ·,e cnst
0
lot
·uf lives of frienrls of his. l'e fc<'ls t!1<1t if he C.<T' sec the
rc!)O:t I1e cary tell h'ho ,.;ere sc;.Je of the people 1-:1:(' ,:ere giving
her 1nformat1on. l'cr n:mc is Isahel (or-lleZ::rte?).
She H<J s trained in in fi 1 t 1· at ion 1 n ·c zc c!;ci;;·r;.-:a
l   S c;r_:;:_ _n i_!:ld_!J:a t f. is he!:_ ...  
··- CRho?)   '''.'...L ro !;e_sJ.ys,
. '( 1 .:.":C realTY 1icl'1cve 1n s;unts.  
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;;;-l·ctbeSil'T"hcl1cVC'ln RnytllTngf<i:if"/'rrny-rhing is possible?] !lut
.. 1'.· ... right n?w for re:;sons he's interested in finc_ling out
·I· '-' who R illsllop rc:llly 1s. l1e S:Jys lie
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f'3. h',1S a C:astro agent hecause he c!lcliT"TITave to l'<lY lum :fTSO,OOO,
:!\: <: filt11e en a. And tne
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(Yet the plilns do\m through the years tlidn 't !\'ell,
the State plnns hnve also failed. The Eny of . '
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Pip,s failed. l!e [who?AV or f.ishop] nade a rerort on tJ1e !1J.y
of Pigs after it happened and it like it had to have
been planned by Castro, tl1ere were so mnny major mistakes.
Although <111 of DishpJ''s plans against Castro failed, t];ere
.l<ere other plans of his tJwt didn't fJ.il. l!e feels tk<t
'Bishop was involved in the pl<ln to dispose of Allende, in Chile.
I!e kno1·1s that by the contrtcts jn C:hile th<Jt Bishop had.
fJ (Was r.Isll5p involved in the planning of Bny of Pigs?) I!c doubts rl
!
. it. Dishop was always very critical of Kennedl', and the position!!
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Q Cuba un er E8.tista. (Andres lie ·ust fled to CuL'<l •
ahout srx montl1s n o and all esc cars !Je was a rastro
And all t esc years 1e wa supvose to >e an ant.i-Castro
act1v1st and terror1st. flcF1nds it lllcredTFi e.
(Re the Oct. 4, 1961 Castro attempt listed in the release:
Is this the one you involved in?) Yes. Tle doesn't know HlJY his
name is not mentioned. [lie has Cuban p3.pers which detail his involvenmtJ
The details are also Torrado was in Russia and he and Castro,
on his return, "·ere going to talk to the people about the trip. It
was an attempt on Castro, not just Torrado as tJ1e release says. Yes,
a bazooka lvas going to be used.
s,
family, ut nlling

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  FOR: Acting General Counsel
ATTENTION John IC. Greaney
SUBJECTS : Ariel Pomeres, aka Ariel Ignacis, aka Ariel
Pomare Orbea
Antonio Carlos Veciana
1. Reference is made your memorandum of Z6 December
1973 requesting name traces on Ariel aka Ariel Ignacis
Pomeres, aka Ariel Pomare Orbea and Antonio Carlos Veciann.
Office of Security has no record of Ariel Pomeres or his
listed aliases.
2. Office of Security indices do reflect a record on
one Antonio C. Veciana Blanch, born 18 October 1928 in Cuba.
n 4 January 19tZ Division requested a
· · Jfor Veciana in connection
w1 til Project :\ Jte wdS oe 1ng cons ide red for use as a
"sabotage malt-tor t1'1e Hovimiento Revolucionario Del Pueblo
(HRP)". Limited biographic information on Veciana reflects
that his U.S. address in 1962 was 401 N.W. 67th Street, Miami,-- -
Florida. He was also shown as President of the College of
Public Accounting of Havana. His spouse 'Was listed
Antonia A Western Hemisphere Division dispatc 1
25097, dated 6 tolay 1966, described Veciana {201-312-96 >) as
a Public Accountant by profession. It further him
as the Titular head of ALP!IA-66 and a lllember of MRP and SFNE.
His residence was shown as Puerto Ricio and he
as having a Cryptonym and of marginal r · interest to
C
ll\AVE,J Branch, as a source of in 'l:ruatlon vo ined by
or the CUIS. ·


..
AI NAIIUNAL tJ •
3. There is no indication that Antonio C. Veciana Blanch
was at any time involved in importing cocaine or other
narcotics into this country in connection with the activities
of ALPHA-66.
Howard J. Os".born
Director of Security
Distribution:
Orig. & 1 - Adse
1 - Director of Security
1 - File copy
1 - Chrono
05/SSD/OSB/HFF:kmd
2 January 1973
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DATE: 1962
MEMORANDUM FOR:
FRCM
SUB.rn::T
Assistant Deputy Director of Security
(Investigations and Operational Support)
Chief, Investigations Division
  (BL\l!Cl-l), Antonio Carlos
#2S6 167 OA ID/3
GIST:
fOR RELOS£ 1!93
CIA HISTORICAl REVIEW PP.OGRAM
Request for an expedite FBI check concerni!lb tile Subject.
DETAILS:
CI/Oit has requested tllat the results of Subject's FBI checks
be returned to their office no later than 2u January 1962

ACTIOIJ:
It is requested that the FBI check be conducted through the
FBI Liaison representative.

Marvin


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THE DIRECTOR OF CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE
WASHINGTON. 0 . C. 20505
.£8NfiB£Ni fAt
Office of legislative Counsel
8 September 1978
Mr. G. Robert Blakey
Chief Counsel and Director
Select Committee on Assassinations
House of Representatives
Washington, D. C. 20515
Dear Mr. Blakey:
This is in reply to your letters of 16 August and
25 August 19 78 concerning a person alleged to have used
the name of Maurice Bishop, and the possibility of his
having an Agency connection .
As you may recall, we conducted this same inquiry
in 1977, following press allegations, and have repeated
it again to ensure that nothing wa s mi ssed in the earlier
check. Both the name s of Maur ice and Morri s Bishop were
checked, in true name files, alias fi les and pseudonym
files. No person with such a name has a connection with
CIA. We did find references to two persons by that name,
neither of whom s eems a likely candidate for what you
have in mind. One may be known to you personally, a s a
retired Cornell faculty member. The other is a resident
of Grenada, B.W.I. The records we have on them are avail -
able for review by your representat i ve s. Incidentally, we
thi nk there is some misunder s tanding on the part of one
of your investigators about there being a "hit" in the
review conduct ed by the Office of Security .
Quite frankly, it is our belief--from our earlier
check, reinforced by thi s one--that such a man did not
exist, so far as CIA connections are concerned. We have
two alternative theories, developed during the earlier
check, that we would be happy to pass to you if you wish.
So far as the information set forth in your 16 August
letter is concerned we have reservations about its
reliability.
Sincere l y ,
f.
S. D.
EBHFIBENTIAl
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Date l f!!.EQ•• •b' I 8ao+e rmtne

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6 May 1977
FOR THE RECOR-G
SUBJECT: Traces on Morris BISHOP
1. Following are traces on Morris niSHOP which were
run as a result of Jack Anderson's article in the 6 ,May
1977 Washington Post:
-CI Staff- Russ Holmes
Cuba Desk (Ops and CI records)
LAD Personnel Wheel under true
name and pseudo
LAD Registry (both true name
and alias/pseudo
checked)
Commercial Cover Staff
No record
No record
No record
No record
No record
Top Secret Control (both true
name and alias checked)- No record
IP Index - see below
2. IP Traces:
One Maurice R. BISHOP, aka Morris BISHOP, born
17 May 1944, St. George ' s, Grenada, West Indies . He is
a lawyer and citizen of Grenada . Has Alien # 31 421 598.
BISHOP is the leader of the New Jewel Mw.ement (NJM) of
Grenada. He travels in and out of the   and has had
closed meetings in the U.S. known to the FBI . BISHOP
di sc losed that the NJM has links going Cuba and indicated
that the NJM is receiving assistance fr.nn CASTRO, but it
is of a rather cautious nature. Accorrumg to his file,
BISHOP is not associated with CIA . (201-888899) .
N.S.
Leader, IG
/
The f oregoing was passed,
Staff, on 6 May 1977.
CC to IO Staff 10 May 77.
Chr...:S Hopkins
LAIYJFK Task Force
  to John
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I
DENTIFICATION AID
7/19/1993
0
0
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1993.07.,19 .14:19:04:590620
JFK
80T01357A
JFK26
Fl3
"CABLE RE ARRIVAL OF PHILLIPS, DAVID, C/OPS".
N
3/20/1978
MEXICO STATION, CIA
N
1
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1
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BARELY LEGIBLE
PHILLIPS, DAVID
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ANTONI O I
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201-303046
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EXPLOSlut-. IN
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CIA HISTORICAL REVIEW PROGRAM
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NARA IDENTIFICATION AID
7/12/1993
0
0
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1993.07.12.11:46:21:620580
JFK
80T01357A
JFK9
F60
"REQUEST FOR POA FOR ANTONIO CARLOS VECIANA BLANCH."
N
12/29/1961
1
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POA REQUEST
VECIANA, ANTONI
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VECIANA Blanch, Antonio Carlos 201- 3 I -:J-q{,{,'
DPOll: 1S October 1928 Cuba c_ J
Req trcs' 29 Dec 61 Rec trcs 29 De.c 61
POA req'd
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29 Dec, 1961
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biB acquaintance that he was not interested and suggested
that an approach might be made to someone who bas much more
110ney.

3. Another Cuban exile reported that Byron Cameron,
owner and operator of the M/V HOPE, whose address
is Caribe Trading Co., Ltd., Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, met
with several Cuban on 3 March 1964. Among the
persons attending the meeting were
co-owner of the Antillean Marine Shipping Corporation,
Jliami, and two of Babun employees, Osca-r-Fernandez
and Babun and Cameron are
friendly shipping-business competitors in the Caribbean
area. During the course of conversation at this meeting,
Camerog_mentioned that he was in contact with an unidenti-
fied group which would be willing to A&sassinate
J
Cuban officials f9r cash; specifical.Jy_. the
is interestec:f in' Fide-r,·castro, . Rau \Cast.ro,
  : '
4. After a preliminnry discussion at the 3 March
•eeting, it was thought that the amount of $150,000 for
the assassination of Fidel Castro, plus $5,000 expense
•oney, payable in advance, was too high, and Babun
that this _   attempt to swindle
patrio_t Another meeting was then held
on 5 and a counter-offer of $100,000 .-as made for
the assassination of Fidel Castro, plus $2,500 for ex-
penses, payable in advance. Cameron promised to check
with his contacts after returning from a trip to the
Caribbean.
5. During a meeting on 15 March attended by Cameron
and Babun and his associates, the following terms were
agreed upon for the assassination of the Cuban officials:
Fidel Castro, $100,000; Raul Castro, $20,000 ;
"Che" Guevara, $20,000; and $2,500 for expenses, payable
in advance. The time-limit for the proposed mission
would be 90 days from tbe date when Babun could verify,
to the satisfaction of Cameron, that he had $100,000 at
bis disposal for the payment. The contract for payment
.•
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would be honored only upon the presentation of evidence
that the three Cuban officials died at the hands of the
assassins connected with Cameron's contacts.
6. In early April 1964 Eliseo Gomez Fernandez met
with Jose "Pepi.JV/Bosch. Bosch agreed to advance $100,000
and Babun and hrs associates would advance $2,500 for
expenses. a wealthy Cuban exile
in York, subsequently agreed to the terms, provided
that his name was not involved. Accordingly, Babun gave
Cameron $2,500 on 25 April. Cameron then advised his
I
group, and on 25 April he reported that his group had
already called its man in Cuba and told him to proceed
as planned and that "their other man" would be heading
for Cuba shortly. The final coDID!ent was "we hope to

have some good news for you between 20 and 25 May." ·
Lobo planned to fly to Miami on 19 May to arrange for
the transfer of $100,000 to a safety deposit box, the
keys to which are to be held jointly by Cameron and a
confidant of Lobo.
7. The identities of the persons in the Cameron
group and how they plan to proceed with this mission
are not known. Babun's associates are reluctant to
aake any unnecessary queries because they have invested
$2,500 and because   made __    
beginning that_the llafia.was J.nvolved. Cameron re-
I
iealed during the negotiations that his contact was a
police officer in the St. Louis, Missouri, Vice Squad
who was about to retire and who has numerous connections
in the l!afia. Cameron implied that "the other man" in
question is in Spain. Cameron knows that he could be
indicted for conspiracy and that if there is any
treachery on his part, Babun and his associates would
not hesitate to sink his ship, the 11/V HOPE.
I
8. In late May 1964 a prominent Cuban EXilE who
spoke with Jose "Pepin" Bosch reported that Teofilo
Babun and Eliseo Gomez had a plan way to assas-
sinate Fidel Castro for the payment of $150,000. Bosch
claimed that he had CODID!itted himself to furnish
$50,000 and that he was hoping he could get the balance
- 3 -
• II Z-t-R-E-'1
NO FOREIGN DISSEM/CONTROLLED DISSEM/NO DISSEM
--. ---·-_.,... .. __........; ......
. . . . . .
• ·- .,..,.. ....... -"!' •••
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USE ONLY
': 1 {
of the money from the United States Government or from
other sources. Bosch indicated that he believes that a
quick.change for the better in the Cuban situation can
be brought about only by the physical elimination of
7idel Castro and that his elimination is well worth
$150,000. In pursuing his attempts to raise an additional
$100,000, Bosch is planning to ask Julio Lobo to con-
tribute at least $50,000.
Xote:
Richard Helms
Deputy Director for Plans
It is requested that this Agency be informed of
any action contemplated in regard to the persons
mentioned in this report before such action is
initiated.
- 4 -
-J -.tjfo

Sc!l•e-R-E-t
NO FOREIGN
·. .\)\)l' f
DISSE•/CONTMLLED DISSE>!/NO DISSEK ABB!JAD/BACKGMf U O''L Y
. '
..
!

I
'
;
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'FOR THF. R:CCnRD 1 P'eb. 1961
'FROM: l':ammer
1. On this date .'ubject's   vas c"'l'dina+.ed vith Mr. MoCCRD or SRS
in connActirm vith Subj,.ct
1
s open+.ional uM vithin the lB by lolB/4/Propegame..
The impl1c11tions or e. CI operation \dth the by this Agency e.rrl the
po••ibi11ty Subject come to the or the FBI through
'-lith Court WOOl: were •
2. Mr. McCORD exprea•ed +.he opinion the.t it is not to e.dTise
+he l!'BI or the oj)'>rati">n e.t t.hh t.ime. Hove,er, he vishes t.o reTiA\/ the case
in a month. The file "f' fubjAct, along \lith that of +.he WH man vho is
superdaing the operation (DIIrld !tlee PJITLJ IPS II 1.0695) vill be pended
for the e.++e,tion or Mr. McCORD on 1 March 1961.
-
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·ifi;r ante _______ P HILLII' S ______________ DA.VIn ___________ .A.TLEE _ ... ___ ----------·-· ___ C I ass i fica t ion __________________ --------------- _ ------------- _
(Surname) (Fin:t} (Middle)
(PLEASE TYPE OR PRINT PLAIHL Yl
No.--------------------------- Color _____ }I}IITI;__________ Sex __ _}:ALE,_____ Reference _______________________________________________________ _
RIGHT HAND
LEFT HAND
Note amputation•
Left hand
~   ~ ;
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PLEASE DO HOT FOLD THIS CARD
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REF:
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Date 7 JUL 1983
•HtA SINO Ofti C tf
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FROM, DIRECTOR
CONF,
INFO,
TO
""- 29 AtlG'D'ST 1962.
>-·
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PAGE l"WO

(FYI--HAS REPORTED
BETWEEN INFO IN PARAS ONE, TWO, AND THREE NOT KNOWN.
• ..
T
• 4.   i.itii:JI
.Am'ONIO VECIANA. •
. .
ClmAN BA.Nll:m AND MILITAFr EXTT·E lB BJSCE:NT REPORT!
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PAGE THREE
ROUTINE
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SECRET
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Old<: Nov 191?2 JS
SECRET .?',1(;/-_J;.} Cft (
APPROVED FOR Rfl.fASE 1994 ·
CIA HISTORICAL REVIEW PROGRAM
-·.
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OOUCED
AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES
REPR
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MM
AGENCY
RECORD NUMBER
RECORDS SERIES
JFK ASSASSINATION SYSTEM
IDENTIFICATION FORM
AGENCY INFORMATION
FBI
124-10275-10230
AGENCY FILE NUMBER : 89-35-512
ORIGINATOR FBI
FROM
TO
TITLE
DATE
PAGES
SUBJECTS
00/00/00
2
SEE FBI 62-109090-7853X
DOCUMENT INFORMATION
DOCUMENT TYPE
CLASSIFICATION
RESTRICTIONS
CURRENT STATUS
OF LAST REVIEW
PAPER, TEXTUAL DOCUMENT
s
OPENING CRITERIA
INDEFINITE
COMMENTS
1C
X
06/14/94
Date:OG/15/94
Page:1
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
(R] - ITEM IS RESTRICTED
I
·• .
J-36 7-27-76>
VIA:

0 Facsimile
0 Airtel
BT
S E C R E T
  u.w.vu ____.
REPRODUCED AT THE NATIONA[ ARCHIVES l'd Q[B;S'VDl'la¥
PRECEDENCE:


D Routine
' . '.:../

F B 1
CLASSIFICATION:
0
Qd1iECRET
0 CONFIDENTIAL
ASSASSINATION OF PRESIDENT JOHN F. KENNEDY, DALLAS, TEXAS,
NOVEMBER 22, 19".
RE MIAMI TELETYPE TO BUREAU DATED NOVEMBER 22, 1977, ENTITLE
ANTONIO VECIANA,
A RELIABLE SOURCE WHO IS CLOSE TO ANTONIO VECIN,A, nAS
ADVISED THAT HE FEELS THAT VECIANA'S UNUSUAL PREOCCUPATION WITH
THE KENNEDY ASSASSINATION INVESTIGATION MAY HAVE SOMETHING TO DO
WITH THE FACT THAT VECIANA WAS RELEASED FROM PRISON SOON AFTER
HIS DRUG CONVICTION. SOURCE SUSPECTS THAT VECIANA MAY HAVE !1ADE
SOME KIND OF A SECRET DEAL WITH UNKNOWN GOVERNMENT AGENTS WHO
ALLOWED HIS RELEASE FROM PRISON IN EXCHANGE FOR HIS TESTHIONY
WHICH IMPLICATED THE CIA IN THE KENNEDY ASSASSINATION. THIS IS
PURE SPECULATION ON SOURCE'S PART AND HE
G)-
(l
EP /es v:>
HAS NO TANGIBLE EVIDBNCE
hn !/J'I7i
-35
I l{tj
(Number)

(Ti _, . ''"- . , f._ .  
GPO : l977 0-
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... . .
. 7-27-76)
TRANSMIT VIA:
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D Facsimile
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\11.W'VU
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AT THE NATIONAL ARCi-IIVES
REPROD
PRECEDENCE:
D Immediate
D Priority
D Routine
FBI
rj.•P'\
•\ '\L.
  ,;  
CLASSIFICATION:
0 TOP SECRET
0 SECRET
0 CONFlDENTIAL
D EFT 0
0 CLEAR
Date --------;
...... ' [! .,11-

PAGE TWO MM 89-35 S E C R E T
TO SUPPORT THIS THEORY.
IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT INQUIRY BE MADE AT THE FEDERAL
CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTION WHERE VECIANA WAS IMPRISONED IN AN EFFORT
TO DETERMINE WHETHER VECIANA'S EARLY RELEASE FROM PRISON HAD
ANYTHING TO DO WITH HIS CLAIM THAT HE HAD PERTINENT KNOWLEDGE OF
THE KENNEDY ASSASSINATION.
CLASSIPIJ!:" fh NO. 1£888; A r 4 1  

FOR OUR OWN INFORMATION IT WOULD BE WORTHWHILE KNOWING
WHETHER OR NOT VECIANA'S TESTIMONY BEFORE THE HOUSE COMMITTEE
ON ASSASSINATIONS IS CONSIDERED CREDIBLE AND WHETHER OR NOT
VECIANA IS SCHEDULED TO TESTIFY AGAIN BEFORE THIS COMMITTEE
AS WAS REPORTED BY VIC WALTER, TV, CHANNEL 7.
BT
#
.. ;. .... ._ ,. I
Approved:---------
Tra ns mitted - --,.-------::=-:---:---
<Numbcrl (Time )
Per ____ _
GPO : 1977 0 • 235·539
,_' J t '
4
------
! •
REPRODUCED AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES
DL 89-43
SEC REI
In connect:I.©Jn with information set forth on page 375
of instant report, it that it would be virtually im- r
  to identify the origin of the original transmission a' J ('
furnished by M!r o Lo Eo OONN:Jr:NG\ without the use of specialized !Y· (I
equipment and the 227 o07 5 megacycles channel J.C ·
constantly.
With respect· tc the telephone call to the San Antonio
Office by one AMBROSE Wo GOSCH, Which was taken by Security
clerk ERNE:ST GoLOClKER., <liS reflected on page 447 of instant
report, :lt • b® mo>t"'dl it was :Security Clerk LOCKER • s
opinion thi!tt roOSC!f!: it;J:M!l influence of o
Subsequent. tro fll<rlm.i<!llbling hilS lllpirr>1'1liilll!Si cl\lncerning t.he assassi-
nation of KENNJIDf:£, GOSClBI rambled on, elaborating non-
specific information about his family and his job.
In connection with investigation set forth on pages
464 and 465 instant Mro EDWARD MELENDEZ and JOHN
TURNER, Offi.ct'!l ROil!lwell, New Mexico, Post Office,
both 21dvi>'iletd t.b."'it; they not; fi8llllliliar with any person by
the ni8llllle of VEDA BRACKEN o
i. The per:lllona b; the "S<eC((Jnd Nllltionl'lll Front. of Escambry·, //.
Alpha 66", Who were   regarding JOi!m ROBERT .KLINNER, as
refliiicted on piaJge 655 111re 8
o.   ARIMAN'oo:1i:LEI'll'ES
0
Sl!lc:J;'etary-
.-Ge!ll)l.r:al w o E\urSEJti?Pf6,:moA·, Who i.ll in charge of
personnel
With to information set forth on pages 746
through 7 56 ct!llnc:,ern.ing OORO>THlf HENDENHALL, the following infor-
is g
Under of Mlllrch 22, lg64, the Dallas Office was
in receipt of a bearing no postmark, containing
similar informartio:n 1\;!l ti:!il!.t. by other <Offices and is
not restated o
REPRODUCELl AT THE NATIONAL
!/
....
SV!JIC'!r
1. Mr. LC!:C •r..:i.• !'t.rtlt. h.Ja trl;. t.: t<u:J.cc to • • UA
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on   l•,.•l nt•nd Y:tlJ \..h4l vorld • ••r"keti.
2. In • aourat .o! • ocn1'araat1od
1
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a.1(bt W fu..H.abh \c h•cd t • "rrt.r.,-•'t,.f'n.t tn
b,..aU.at1on h• n ..H i:e cr.r;.laine;.l tL•\. r.tJ th1ni:a that C.Ja.r·
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ate•?t•blt to • t::--o,.! • ::! t.h• C·...:t......n ;.ro;.:•. ei;:.a• to i • a
polit!.cia.a, u.J U:ttt Xi.:rr:;_;•• taaLgrc--..;nd, J.• .   t"te.,
VO"J.lri a h.ltbn· dt€7 .. or &c!l.:..t]" roc:g_ t:'"l• ;.:. $, point ot
Yii"V.
J. LOOO \.ben • •     cu.:- v.b4\ t.•J
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..-?ltl.ll:teared, th,.,t U.e !t'lAJ I·? baa ..,..r\•·t out to adYant•r•
i:iDee H ho..f allo'i·t'd t1M !'cr ,;utro
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\he • • of • p•op!e     t.o t-..;1ld \:.='• :-. •4ld that a..U ot
h.11 &IJurcea (rot hi1 ,...c-;1• . .:·.tt h.la budnto51 c:.t>irt
·wicato tha.t. C!e         .u:.! L./' • .:,.t. U.t Te.ct.
SAJ;;,rl!-7 o( t.ha !• r.:.., eM ,.,.., v:H:in.,: to rhe
.e.a:Un•t tb• !JoYerr:..unt. He •\.&t.J • hil   •   rCIU.. l"..ldT;}I'&Z,
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ror u• iD C\.lt-a., !!' ..   b,e.1h U>1 :-.,Jtt.\e.:! that h
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par\ r-:.r vholu1l1 h.l.nta&• e.! l..if Y.!llt.. I..CF:C d.1.:1 ao\ i.DC"V uq
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APPROVED FOR RF.WSE 1994 .
r.tA HlST,RJCAl REVIrN PROGRAM
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WASHIHGTOH, D.C. 20505 '-
)fr, n .. I
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Mr.
Mr.
, lb. Ctlnnc\
APPROVED FOR RELEASE 1993
CIA HISTORiCAl. REVIEW PROGRAM
•.' :c:. ; .;...
, .• ,.
: Jfr.r-: : • .
/: . 10 Ju.!!.e lj lrri
F41•• lfl-A({ I Mr. Su ..
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IIMI:IMIEIG ...   ..                                       llia Caady __
/: - . '-----
'--'"""' ,_.. , .. - ..
SUBJECT
.
. Plans Cuban Exiles to Assassinate
Selected Cuban Government Leaders
-- -
1. The following report was compiled from informa-
tion obtained by Agency officers from persons who were
parties. to the actions described. Agency officers made.·
clear to each of the sources that the United States ·
Government would not, under any circumstances, condone
the planned actions. Presumably the sources of the
report, in submitting this information, motivated:
in part by the belief that by disclosing·· the information
they would obtain immunity. against legal action should
they succeed in implementing the plan.
il· .. y;Y
·X·.- .,
2. A Cuban exile was approached on 2 March 1964 by
an acquaintance- ·who wished to discuss a plan, which was
still in the embryonic state, to assassinate Fidel Castro.
The i!S a PM a
Rh 1 . .]   i p which..:aa..i..l.a -andea
• and who also has a legally sanctioned
interest in distributing and placing slot machines in
gambling houses . The invol vemen.t.._of the acqua
l
the __ filot-machine business brings the .. contact with
the primarily through his partner
who is a former police officer from St. Louis and through
whom there is a tie-in with elements of "Cosa Nostra."
I
The .21Coaa.•
contacts ·atiil in Cuba •
offered to: no advance
£unas-were- requested.- - If the missior. cannot be accom-
plished, or if the plan is unsuccessful, an amount not
to exceed $10,000 would be paid for 1he travel and living
expenses of five men involved in the mission. The Cuban .
exile commented that . he believed he had been ·approached J
with this plan because of his family's wealth; he told
·• REG-124 I e;::,-J3 1.1:-Z --0 . ·'
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DISSElt/NO ABROAD/BACKGROUND USE
.; 5 JIJl '{ J LJ64 ji).J .. - i
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... ('-
DATE .!::) - / (' - 1-':J
/
REPRODUCED AT THE NATIONAL ARC-HIVES
JFK ASSASSINATION SYSTEM
IDENTIFICATION FORM
AGENCY INFORMATION
AGENCY SSCIA
RECORD NUMBER 157-10002-10208
RECORDS SERIES
MEMORANDUM
AGENCY FILE NUMBER
DOCUMENT INFORMATION
ORIGINATOR FBI
FROM
I 1 ___ TO
1:.t:- i . TITLE :
E PLANS OF CUBAN EXILES TO ASSASSlNATE SELECTED CUBAN LEADERS
. i
! \
<
f l
::c ' ... I
CUBA
DATE
PAGES
SUBJECTS
•• I
c ASSASSINATI ON
CASTRO .
u MAFIA
Q) " l I
.-1 t I
I
'6 .
u "l ' . DOCUMENT TYPE
_, CLASSIFICATION
» RESTRICTIONS
I

_ CURRENT STATUS
1 DATE OF LAST REVIEW

CRITERIA
g , 'I l
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.
• I Box 333
·I t· ,Folder 2
-. '!If
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COMMENTS
07/23/64
2
PAPER, TEXTUAL DOCUMENT
u
OPEN IN FULL
0
02/07/94
Date:02/05/94
Page:l
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
[R] - ITEM IS RESTRICTED
:I
iJ
- . ,.. .
·,
•" .
;;"•
,,
.,
' '·
REPRODUCEiJ AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES
The Attorney General
1   ·,·_•.·-.
'(.'L>> .: Kt.CJA
- "' / -
Dir!)ctor, FBI / U 'S -
I J I
PLA::s OF CUBAN EXILES TO ASSASSINATE
S:CL::GT::D CTJBNf C-::>v:BR!i'lE:IT LEADER3
IHTEP..'l'AL SECURITY - CUBA
DATE ... I C
1
::_j,:)
1 Belmont
1 - Evans
July 23, 1964
1 Roson .;;
1 DeLoach ·-::
1 Mvhr
1
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1 - Sullivan
1 - Wannall OJ
1 - Nasca
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Reference is nade to previous information
the alleged existGnca of pl:ms involvtng or;j::>.n).zed crime
in tile U. S. and Cuban exiles to asGassinatc :Fidel Castro, Prine
Minister of Cuba, and other Cuban lc<Hlers. On July lu, 1964,
you were adv;isad, in part, that Tcofilo Dubun Solr.lan, a Cub:m
exile who nllce>edly is involved in this Llaintained U?Oil
reintorview that Garcia, another Cuban exile. \"Ja9 vrcs:;nt
cb.ring the discussion he had with Julio Lo!Jo of New York City and
that Garcia could verify that hs :nade no l'equests of Lobo for
fun<ls to carry out the above-mentioned nss:lSsination plan.
'-
,5
On July 17, !9G4, Eduardo Ga:ccia Uolina of New York City
advised that when·he first learned oi the plan in late January
or early February, 19G:1, he telcp:wnically contacted the Central
Intelligence Agency (Ciil) in 11ashington, D, c., fro:-1 :liami, Florida
and was told at that tirle tllat CIA uanted no part of the plan. Ha
stated that the plan was to hi:n by Babun and that the
detn1.ls were known to Babun
1
s employees·, Eliseo Goo<:!z Fernandez
and Oscar :r·ernandez Veiga,
,.
r:.
'i
REPRODUCELJ AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES
The Attorney General
The assassins, not Americans, would of Spanish nationality
who would' go to Cuba with the proper documents and under a ler.;iticate
cover of doinrr business with Cuba. C:une1·on had an unknown contact who
had contact. Y:i th an   St, Louis, Liissouri, police officer who had
in,lirect contact with t:w would-be assassins, Babun was very anxious
to sea this plan carried out and contacted Cubans for money to pay the
assassins, Garcia stated he did not recall the exact amount of noney
involved but it was about $100,000 to $15'J,OOO,
:.i ...
;·'
In M!'.y, 1904, Bnbun and his wife were in New Yorlt City on a
personal matter and while there Babun and Garcia went to see Lobo,
Dm·ing the discussions \'lith Lobo, Dabun told of the plan to elininate
tha CU!:an leac!cro. Lobo stated he would give serious thought to the
plan. Garcia stated that Dabun misinterpreted Lobo's statement and
Lobo to contribute tho entire amount or one-third in tho name of
Pabun uho would pay Lobo after they raturn!:!d to Cuba, Garcia stated
there was a discassion between Lobo and Babun about a contract and the
placing of tlla money in escrow but to his recollection those matters
I
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' were brought up by Lobo and not Pabun.
: }'
i Garcia stated tho.t tho name Jos13 "Pepin" Bosch never came to
:; • his attention in this matter although Babun may have contc.cted him.
.
We o.re conducting additional inquiries in this matter and the
pertinent results will be made available to you.
' .. 1 - The Deputy Attorney General
.,
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1 - Kr. J, Walter Yeaelay
: Assistant Attorney G11neral
·1 1- Ur. Herbert J. lo!iller, Jr.
' Assistant Attorney General
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NOTE: We are conducting investigation at request of Attorney General,
'C'Ii'Ssified "Secret" since it refers to information so classi:fied by CIA.
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RECC.l. FROM
M.AY ;:.<> 1916
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REPRODUCEDATTHENATlONALARCHIVES, An C..' v? ,?(;_,F
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'·'' .• -.- ....... A -'(-_;,r '-'\ - Vi)
.. . DATE5 -10-c/S i
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JFK ASSASSINATION SYSTEM
IDENTIFICATION FORM
AGENCY INFORMATION
AGENCY SSCIA
RECORD NUMBER 157-10002-10226
RECORDS SERIES
MEMORANDUM
AGENCY FILE NUMBER
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
'· DOCUMENT INFORMATION
ORIGINATOR
FROM
TO
,·'i TITLE
FBI
PLANS OF CUBAN EXILES TO ASSASSINATE SELECTED CUBAN LEADERS
. CUBA
DATE
PAGES
SUBJECTS
: ASSASSINATIONS
CASTRO
: . i
DOCUMENT TYPE
CLASSIFICATION
RESTRICTIONS
CURRENT STATUS
OF LAST REVIEW
07/31/64
2
PAPER, TEXTUAL DOCUMENT
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------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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· Page:l ·· ·-- · -··
JFK ASSASSINATION SYSTEM
IDENTIFICATION FORM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AGENCY INFORMATION
AGENCY SSCIA
RECORD NUMBER 157-10002-10227
RECORDS SERIES
MEMORANDUM
AGENCY FILE NUMBER
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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ORIGINATOR
FROM
TO
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DOCUMENT INFORMATION
FBI
OF CUBAN EXILES TO ASSASSINATE SELECTED CUBAN LEADERS
j I' 1
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DATE
PAGES
SUBJECTS
u ._CUBA
'. ASSASSINATION
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8 ,. tl DOCUMENT TYPE
·. } ! CLASSIFICATION
..., •• 1 ':, RESTRICTIONS
...! I CURRENT STATUS
DATE OF LAST REVIEW
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08/04/64
2
PAPER, TEXTUAL DOCUMENT
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02/07/94
[R] - ITEM IS RESTRICTED
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A!riol to SAC,  
nB: OF C1J',.jf :.1l E{ILI:S TO
- SEJJ:CTED CUE1J1 GOYEilli!Jcrr Ls..\.0=::3
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In addition, s'..lc. :lrtcl t1hetho::- Byron Caneron ''ho ai.. : c ·-:.-JJ J.7
is involved in t bi::; r--a tter h:.a to   .from <..: J
\'7t.etl1Cr t he \lith h i::::l b:t!l cOmil!Ct ed. Al s o
E"'urc11u of any :!.ci dition:ll lc:-,c!:i outot:.nd.int; and \"Jhcn· it i s
these b3 c overed.
completion ot nbovo·;-·SUb::lit re<:oimlendn.tioos ;-.1
to whether is warrnnted.
Tbis matter bo continuous and prcf erreci n.tt cQt i o; .
NOTE:
- Ws t·ns §gen .. invest:1glltio.n at request ot
Attp;pay- allc;;cd pbn.a to CUban
S • .hoodl\:::1 clct:0nt ::md Cuban ;1r c 1-:·: ol ..
We have- i 71 pertir:cct developed t o co
Attorney and other to
has to any between hoodluc
and Cubkn oxilc::J.
Miami Office requested wo dotermine ClA ot
coot ained in CIA com.."tlunic:l t ions <.l.J. t cd 4-8 und ·.: \1 e :-.L" : d
in this connection and information set forth  
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NYT, March 22, 1975
·c.I.A.A.ide QuittingloDefend Agency .
.
n.e Minister of and rrier.ds--rnany of!
W,t.,SHf'iGTOS, 't.!arch lata_J>res;t!ent Ratae! Lroni-!t!lem Hne ?f">:ljJit who coopera:et
ne· (•f L."tm ...... Tr'Jl:!!o or the _the   of
....     h:;t t:o_ tr.a::.ks.
j\gf:;lce Ay:r..cy
13
ff ..   DUIIa!let  

ltatson
fr(':.-.;e   9 10 urgantz.e for·iHatt1. . i tJ.fji:n.•ung til bacK away frcm.
t.:;::itcd 3:.a:.rs     TI;e o! :<wre<.l us. The and tn>!:
c!fic:tn L."l -i.n_ effort to !nteillgC'rh:e o:r.cc-rs do.::s r.ot .\.f:<:"CS hav_e the or.!y:
LfJe cr;>:)n;nt:or: a;,amst those.Yet tx!st. t.'.lt     h3-s:.t f<'w cha!;ngehthem. . .
at!A.:k -- r;;::co leuer under L':.at. V:c!or •. .-ru a:-.d •
I:wiU .A. 32 w:ars'headmg t0 2::il)   C.I.A. 11re former C.l.A,-
•t!d, "'-''er.:J-
1 1
;1!:::r:nM  

nH!<:M"s w1!h Wh8m he !S :l.C· r.l\t,_ wrltt':'n auca.l ex-
;::

ot Ci.'!ltroJI The ietter in of t..e
  that he \n<t'lidl'cl _ for Debates
lo e.a;-ly retltm:\'nt and '·As ch:t! o_l L.r.:ln-Amer;can'_ Phllli;J
5
W.lS )e--;v.
1_n uf re- ! n;,.vt heer. <>"!R the a;;e>tcY he
__   ct!Jcers   about the ..,_cd:ne_w:J.nted to _!iii. thP ::tap anc
  Stain '!ef""o'ICe5.. -of ;;t ·tC.t.. ... ::-:tcfldtd lO chal:r:-:;:e
\'Pf,il!i,'lJ i.1 and abrr;id. .. • to a of I
• 1h!'; •   He W•\l
fvr t·.•:o charges, and on a lc..:tu:e tour ;md d,J
bfim tl:e nonest h<n<' wntir..e: to fXiJI.l:n wLy 1
cy'1

;;1 the D-::mmt-:st-nted w1:.h •he ba.s!C duem- the Ur.He-d St2.tcs r.e!'<ls an m-
ean rtepubl;c, Brl!;:j! .1nd ma of m;u,nr; e•ther .t general te!ligenc:e
rueta.: . ., D•     whlch reas.y.:r.es.- Mr. .sa;d he wacon-
Mr. co:bt told bui prosenes sec1.1nty, or_ a-ernrd.that people  
Mr.   'l":ou!d .like accountmtihe. wn still ·working far the:
__ tb bolt but   stlrtcd:
  when or opuanons rndhv1tli iJie efforts
it Y:as, I'.lAdlt dear that ilie'a;c-nts. :He "l to mako:.> it
   
    tc!d S!..U'

  do_uht that_ a· m.,r:cgerr..e.nt hu r!Ol had, nr.c,
- t!;lt     was particu1J:r1)' · >!cter-   ,wilt nut ilav't. ·a hand--_off.crn.iiy,--;
:ntned 1-0 t:!l\fend the atten:v·:5 the best, 1! not the on!y
1
unG'ff1<:1ally cr in th1s
os a pr·f\·.ile a.> he t•ocn thou;::h nn:i 1ts e!fnrts.",l
rwt Jn ,.,-::ile on u-,e de!.aii1 on: ',!r. Ph•Hirs sa1d would]
payrfl\1, mur:h of the,fOM'l&fl operat:c-n!'l s.et-ms   • $15.0"..,0 a )·ear as "-1
• vf tile C.!.A.•mnst lr:eHl!l.ble., A of our1retued tmploye   with1
hu foc:..J_s_('(j on :,is area of tl':e cc:d,his present 5<'1<:J.ry of $36,000_;
Jn L.lhn Amenc.t.' l'i::r pe:-:oa wul r.111ke fo-r prtttY'The assoca::tion, Will:
h;1.5 Oeen iir.kedJJ:le:;.a.y tQd,ay. A!'l !orlbe financed by SlO a. year1
'l1fltb.   .lf?!l.lnSt the-our p!tsent act!VJI.les, 1 to be used :or starr.ps,l
c;( the 12te ;Convmccd we llave no problem. i paper and s!milar but
ident s.,lvador Allende "ln the meanume. J?Ur C3pa-;not. fcx- salar.es.. He cx;>e-.::ts•
'2'nd of abroad are bemg dam·•to provid('_ for his own inc.cme
  plots   Prirr:e:•ged. r.1or'! and more of our:through fee:s. I
NYT, May 10, 1975
1"11£   YOilK .. sA·tvRDAY. MAi' 1(:, U/:S
v ·--·----------------------
Concerto. String Quartet 2. First Day of the
f Odysseus (baritone solo. chorus and urch.);
fe; Sonata in Two Movements (violin.
hat Time \-fay Cease (men's voices, piano).
ance, commd. by Jose LimOn), 1969; Can zona
o); Yellowstone. Yates and Yosemite (tenor
and). Compositions performed by orchs. under
Thor Johnson. Kubc/ik, Wallenstein. Reiner,
man and SJonimsky. Barati. Home: Bram:hport
L BEVERLY HATCHETT, journalist. author;
June 4, I 904; s. Harry Newton and Annie
U. Richmond. 1922·26: m. Syble Ruth Keeney.
, Beverly Michael. Reporter. Richmond (Va.)
26-lR. 32-36: information officer WPA.
; ass!. dir. information Dept. Ju-.ticc, 1940-44:
hgo. Hcrald-Ellaminer, 1945; mcm. staff
Timc!'i, 1945-7 I. Author: Dateline Washington,
csidcncy, 1966; From the Crash to the Blitz,
articles in mags., te:\:t books. contemporary
imcs. Home: Nonh Forest Beach Hilton Head
lNG EMERY. clergyman, housing ext:=c.; b.
; s. Porter W. and Dorothy A. (Fletcher) P.:
-46; A.B .. Va. Limon U .. 1950, B D .. Colgate
1953; postgrad. Dre·N l.!., m. Jane
22. 19%; chddren · Chann1ng Durward.
racy Jane, Jill Celeste, John Emery. lnstr.,
rdaincd to ministry United Ch. of Christ. 1952:
emple. 1961-70; pres. Housing
Chmn., DC. delegation Nat. Democratic
. Nat. committeeman, 1 ')68 Mem. adv. bd.
Nat Trust for Hist. Pre.,crvation. Non-Pr<,fit
ter for Community Change. Served with
m. Alpha Phi Alpha. Home: 380 I Jenifcr St
, 20015 Office: 1010 Vermont Av NW
5
S E:\IORY, life ins. co. e.1.ec.; b. Md .. Oct. 2.
and Estelle (Randall) P.; LL.B.. George
Ll.\.1., 19:6; m. Laura E. Ludwig, July H,
Life Ins. Co .. Washington. a.'ist. sec.,
19J6---, scc.-treas., 1943-48. pres ..
. com., al<io dir.; dir .. mem. e.1.ec. com.
.; dir. Am Fed. Sav<>. & Loan Assn .. Am. Life
surers Con f .. 1961; state v P- Am. Life Conv ..
hingtcm Bd. Trade, 1962-63. Gen. campaign
und, Nat. Capital area. 1959. pres., 1960-61.
rk-Winchcole Found.; finance com.
r Charter rm·m .. vice chmn. bd.
,b•"': •· .. ":.- ... : . . .:;::-- J;rr. Met. PC)Iice
d Children. Benjamin Franklin Found., Ucrlm,
nd., D<Jvis \1eml. Goodwill Industries; trustee
m. Am. Life Conv. (exec. bd. JQ69 --).Life
neil (treas.) KiwJ.nian. Clubs: Congressional
pitol Hilt. Arts. University (Washington);
. Home· 9010 Burning Tree Rd MD
St.:llflsin Av Washington DC 20016
.S FRANKliN, ecnn. cons.; b. 1'\clson. Pa.,
G. and Emi!y Catherine (Stcven'i) P; A.B.,
, 1945; Ph.D., Harvard. 19.14; LL.D., Colby
1952, Northeastern U .. 1953, Shaw U.,
:: LH.D .. U. Me., 1954; Litt.D .. Western New
I" Coli .. 1959, Morehouse Coli., Atlanta. 1963;
'c 22, 1932; children-- -Charles Franklin. Carol
lrt Coli .. Geneva, N.Y., 1933-34; instr. econs.
r.st. prof.. ]9J6-J9, pror.. 1939-44; nn leave of
rve as cons. counsumers div. Nat. Def. Adv.
exec. OPA. 1941-42, chief tire rationing div.,
tive supply rationing div.. 1943-44, dep.
11ng dept.. 1944; pres. Bates Coli., 1944-67.
Chmn .. dir. Central Me. Power Co., Augusta,
Jl. Life Ins. Co., W.T. Grant Co., Sperry &
or Group Mut. Funds, Allied Maintenance
Former puh. gov. Am. Stock Exchange. Pres.,
1954. Mem. Am. Marketing Assn .. Phi Beta
a. Author: Marketing, 1938; (with Jasper V.
Spending and Economic Reconvery. 1938,
U8, The American !\ieutrality Problem, 1939;
1) Retailing Principles and Methods, rev. edit.,
:iples and Methods, rev. edit., )fl73; (with
anufacturero;, rev. edit., 1951; A Tax Program
omtc Growth of Puerto Rico, 1958. Contbr.
ours. Address: Maple Hill Lane Auburn ME

)PHER HALLOWELL, assn. c.1.cc.; h. The
6, 1920 (parents Am. citizens); s. William
ton) P.; A.B .. Harvard. 1943: m. Mabel B.
  V1ct£?_ria A: Anc!_rcw
Wao,:erly Cnuntry. Humc:   SW Cardinell Dr Portland OR 97201
Office: Electric Bldg Porlland OR 97205
PfflLLIPS. CLifoiON J .• educator; b. Olean. N.Y .. Apr. 11. 1919:
s. Charles Clifton and Edith fGrcy) P.; B.A., Hiram CoiL. 1941; Th.B ..
Starr King Sch. Religious Leadership, JQ44; M.A., Harvard. 1950.
Ph.D. 1954; m Rachel Jacqueline \1artin. July 19. 1952:
children- -Peter Martin. Elame Ab1gail. Alc:(is Anne. Patience Cccily.
Civil edn. officer Dept De f.. Knhe. Jaran. 1946-49; faculty history De
Pauw lJ., 1954 . prof.. 1965 .c:hmn. dept. htstory. )q()Q-72. Served
with mf. AUS, ]944-46: PTO. Fulbright-Hayo; fellow Chinc\C
CIVIlization. Taiwan, summer 1962; lcctr. Am. Korea,
1968-69. Mem. Am. Hist. Assn . Assn. Asian Studies. Orgn. Am.
Hi.-.ltlrians. Ind. Hist. Soc. Author· Indiana in Transition: The
Emergence of an Industrial cl)ffinlonweJ.Ith. 1880-1920. I 968;
Proteqant America and the Pagan \\'orkl: The First Half Century <'f
the American Board of Comml'i"lnner.-. for Foreign Missiom.
1969. Home: 422 Anderson St Greencastle IN 46135
PHILliPS, DANIEL MILLER. lawyer: b. Cleve. Mar. 21. 1933; s.
Clovis H. and Lillian (Miller) P; o;tudent Wesleyan C .. \1iddletown,
Conn., 1951-SJ: B.S., Ohio State L;. !95R. J.D .. 1961: m. Joyce C
Hamtlton, July 26. 1 Q58: ch1ldren \-fce,2an \1.. Sarah H .. Anthony
J. Admitted to Chin bar. 1961. since prJ.cticcd in Toledo: mem. fum
Curphey & O'Connell. \')6! . partner. JQ67 · Lcl'lr.
Ohio Legal Center In st., I Q69- 70. Pres .. Toledo Cnttcn!on
Services, 1971-72. Served with Al.'S, Mcm Am .. Oh1o
(chmn. law com. 1971-7.q. Toledo cnrn. 1971 t.
Toledo Jr. fpre<;. 1970-71) bar ao;sn<;. Fedn. ln.-._ Cnun-;cf. Oh1o Def
Assn. <rres. 1971-72). Home: 3554 Rd fqkdo OH 4Jt>Ofl
Office: 425 L.OF Bldg Toledo OH
PHILLIPS, DAVID ATLF.E. fgn_ <,crviL·c 11fflcer: b. Ft. Worth. Oct.
Jl. 1922; s. Edwin Thoma., J!ld .\1ary Loui!.c (Young) P .. '>ludent
William and Mary Colt., 1940-41. Te•1.. Chmtian l' .. 1941-42. L'.
Chile. 1948-49; m. Helen Hausman Haasch. June 5. 1948 (di\. Dec.
1967); children --\1aria. D<J\·id At lee. Chriqopher. Atlct" Idee); m.
2d. Virginia Pedero;on Simmon<o. '-far :!H. 1Qh9. I ">on. Todd
stepchildren- Deborah. Bryan. W)nne Actnr. wrrter. 1942-4!'1;
editor, rub. South Pacific \.fail, Santiago. Chile. lcctr. on
Latm Am., 1954-57; propr. David A. Phlilipo; A.-.sos .. rub. relations,
Havana, Cuba. 1958-61; joined U.S. Fgn. Service, I 961; assigm·d
Meco;ico City, 1961-65. Santo Domingo. 1965-67,
1968-69; 1st sec. Am. embassy. Rio de Janeiro. Brazil. 1970-72.
Caracas, Venezuela, 1972; now mem statf Dt·pt. State. Washington.
1973---. Served with USAAF, Dccor<Jted Purple Heart. Air
medal. Democrat. Club: Caracas Country. Contbr. articles to travel
mags. Address; 8224 Stone Trail Dr Bcthr.::.,Ja \fD 20034
PHILliPS, DAVID SHELBY, -.ch. adminstr .. former gm-t. orcl.; b.
Grand Saline. Tn .. Oc:. 15. 1912: Da\id Shelby and Georgia P
(Clifford) P.; B.S., N. Tex. State L
1
.. Dentnn, tCJJ..l, MS., 19JR; m.
Glenna M. Lemon (div. July 1954,1; cht!,ircn . David Shelby. Ltlhan
G!yn. William lawrence; m. 2d. Glr>rio: Smith Bauknight, Sept.  
1955 T'chr .. supr., s<.:h. l>f.:;., C.-,-:·..! •::··: .. ,._ n .. rt:'ln ar.d Ft. Worth.
1934-40: 'i!Udent work officer Sat. Youth Admin<,trn_, FSt\. Allslln,
1940-42; chief admin.-.trv_ dJv. Bur. Census. Dept Commerce,
Washmgton, 1946-50: dir. admmstrv sen' ices div. OPS, Econ. Stblzn.
Agy., Washington, 1950-53; exec. tn asst. commr. adminstrn.,
dir. operating facilities div. Internal Revenue Service, Washmgton,
I I'J5J-56; asst. commr. bldgs. mgmt. Puh. Bldgs. Scrvkc. Gen. Services
Adminstrn .. Washington, 1956-59: regi,mal <tdminstr Gen. Services
/\drninstrn., Dallas, 1959-64, Wash1ngton. 1964-69; a:-;:;t. . .-.up!. for
.-.uprort services Fairfax County Pub Schs .. F:llffa.\. Va. 1972
Chmn .. Ft. Wonh-Dallas Fed. E.1.ec. Bd., 1962-64; chmn. S.W. D.C.
Employment Area Transp. Exec Com .. 1966-69. Bd. dirs. Belle
Haven Citizens Assn. Served from lt. (j.g.) to lt. corndr. LSNR.
I<J42-46. Episcopalian. Club: Belle Haven Country. Home: 6641
Wakefield Dr Alexandria VA 22.107
PHILLIPS, DOROTHY WILLIAMS, art ..:urator: b. Camden.!'.; Y.
Mar. 6. 1906; d. George Henry and Edna (Burkett) Williams; 8 A,
Wellesley Coli., 1928;student N.Y. U. Grad. lost. Fine Arts. !9JJ.J6,
L.'lnstitute d'Art & Archcologic. Sorbonnc, Paris, 'iummer 1935; m.
Ralph Edward Phillips, May 14. 1937: children . Diana (Mrs. Alain
Berrier), Leslie Ann Maurice E. \-fay). Deborah (\-frs. David
Chodoff). As\1. curator Egyptian depl. Met. Mu<,cum Art, S.Y.C..
1930-48; curator collection and re<>carch, editor. compiler misc.
catalogues for loan exhibitions of Am. art Corcoran Gallery Art,
Washington. 1959 -· Mem. e)(eC. bd. Japan br. lntcrnat. Social
Service. 1955-57. Carnegie fellow, 1935. Mem. Am. Assn. Museums.
Wash1ngton Prmt Club. Club'i: City Tavern (V.'ashmgton); Tokyo
College Women's fpres. 1950-53). Author Ancient Egyptian
Animals. 1948. Compiler. editor: A Catalogue of the Collection of
American Paintings. VoL I. II'J66. author. Vol. II. 1973 Contbr.
articles proft. jours. Home: 3310 Prmrcct St !\lW Washington DC
20007 Office: Corcoran Gallery Art 17th and E Sts :-.1\\' Washington
DC 20000
PHILLIPS, DUDLEY COOMBS. investment co e:\ec.; b.
Bartlesville, Okla .. July I 3, 1922; s. Dudley Collings and Mary
(Conmbs) P.; B.S .. U. .. 1947, LL.B .. 19.!9: student U. Denver;
m. Nan Eli1abcth Burg, Mar. 16, children Dudley Collier. Jan
Clare. Lvnn Elizabeth. Admilled to Okla. bar. )Q49. also :\:.Y. bar.
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III.   VECIANA. BLANCH
(114) On March 2, 19iCi. a stair in;estigator from the office of U.S.
Senator Richard S. Schweiker (Republican of Pennsyh·nnia) inter-
liewed Antonio Veciana Blanch. the founder and former leader of
Alpha. 66. nt his home in Miami.(J) At the time. Senator Scbweiker
was a member of the Senn.te Select Committee on Intelligence and co-
chairman of the Subcommittee on the John F. Kennedy _1\.ssassina-
tion. (£) The staff in>estiglttor told Yeciana. that he was interested in
the relationships between U.S. Government agencies and Cuban exile
groups; he did not specifically mc>ntion nn interest in the Keru1edy
n:sassination. (3) During the course of thn.t intemt>w, \ecinnn. re-
Ye::tled that from nbout mid-1!>60 through mid-19i3 he had bc>t>n
directed and ad;ised in his anti-Castro and anti-Communist ncti>ities
h:r an American he knew ns :Maurice Bishop. (4) Vecin.na snid t11at
Bishop hnd guided him in pln.nning nssnssination attempts on Premier
Fidel Cnstro in Ha.>nna in 1061 and in Chile in 19il; that Bishop had
dir<>cted him to organize Al pha. 66 in 1962; nnd that Bishop, when
hre:llcing their relationship in l!li3, had paid him $253,000 in cash
for his semces o•er the yen.rs. ( 5)
( lJ!i ) Y<>ciann re'l'cn.lcd further that at one with Bishop in
Dallas in late-Au!!Ust or September 1963, he saw with him a young
man he later recognized as Lee Harvey Oswald. (6}
(116) Yecia.na told Senator Schweiker's investigator that he had not
prenously disclosed that information to anyone. (7)
(11 i ) The committee took an intense interest in the Vecia.na allega-
Tions. From Senntor Schweiker, it obtained the complete files of his
office's investigation; ( 8) it also conducted additional intemews with
Yecin.na. nnd other witnesses who might have had knowledge of
Yecia.na or Bishop. Further, on April 25 and 26, 1978. Vecia.na was
questioned under oath before the committee in executive session.
(118) This effort developed the following general details of the
J·elationshiJ? between Veciana. and the Amencan he knew only as
?IIa.uriet> B1shop :
(ll!J) To the best of Vecia.na's recollection Maurice Bishop first
npproached him in Havana. in the middle of 1960. (9) At the time,
T" ecia.na. was employed in the Banco Fina.nciero, owned by Julio Lobo>
the "Sugar King'' of Cuba.. (10) Vecia.na himself was well known,
however. as president of the professional accountant's association. (11)
(120) \Tecuma said Bishop introduced himself with a. business card
whirh indicated he was mth a construction firm headqmtrtered in.:.
Bel;:rium. (If) Although vecinna initially assumed he was a. new
hank customer. Bishop's conversation with him soon focused on the
C'astro revolution. "He also made me aware of his concern regarding
the Cuban Government leaning toward Communism and tried to
impress on me the seriousness of the situn.tion." Veciana. recalleu.(J3)
(121} .Bishop then innted Veciana to llmch and during thul. and
(37)
38
subsequent lunches convinced Vecio.nn. to work against the Cnstro
"'overnment. Vecilllla admittedly did not need much connncing because
he himself had concluded only 30 days after the revolution that Castro
was n Communist.(14)
(122) Yecio.na snid he did nsk Bishop during their first meeting if
he worked for the '().S. Government. "He told me at the time." Yeciann.
testified, "that he was in no position to let me know for whom he was
work:i:nCY or for which agency he was doing this.'" {15) Bishop also said
he not tell Veciana whether or not it was Julio Lobo""W"ho SU!!·
,.ested he contact him. '·Supposedly Julio Lobo had very important
mth the u.S. GoT"ernment." Veciana. pointed out. (JC)
Yecio.na.. howe'l'er.later suspected that it might have been ru1other Yery
close friend. Rufo Lopez-Fresquet, who led Bishop to him. (Ji) Lopez-
Fresqnet. nlthon:rh then Castro's of Fino.nce., wns a coYert
n.nti-Castroite. ( 18)
(123) Once Yeciana. agreed to work with Bishop on anti-Castro
acth·ity. he wns put into n '·training progrnm."{1.9) Yecinnn clescrilX'd
this ns a '·2 to 3 'l':'eek'' prog-ram which consisted of nightly lectures. He
wns the only one in the pro!!r:un. which wns conducted by n man he
1.'1le\'l' only ns ';:\Ir. :\!elton." The ler.tures were held in an office in a
building, which Yeciana could recall ns bein,. on El \edado. n com-
mercial thorou!!hfare. He n.lso remembered tlte buildin!! housed the
offi.Aes of n. mining company '·with an Americ:m nn.me .. nnd, on the!
floor. n branch of the lle>rlitz School of (gO)
124:) Although Yecinnn said he was giYen some training in t he use
'of explosi,·es niid sabotage techniques. most of the program consistctl
of lessons in and wnrfnre. '·Bishop told me
scYeral times • • * thnt psychologicn.l wnrfnre <'ould help more thn•1
hundreds of solcliers. thousands of soldiers.'' Yeci:mr. testified. (!?1)
Yecinnn also snid: "The mnin purpose wns to train me to be nn
orgnnizer so I was supposed to iniriMe a type of action nnd other
'"'0\lld be the ones who wonld really carry it out.'' egg)
E!5) Following the trninin!!. Yeciann workc.>d with Bishop on
.e"'eral Yery effective psychological warfare operations. includi1:!! o
that resulted in the destabilization of the Cuban currt>nc'l'
and- the creation of public distrust in its 'l'alue.(.eS)
\ecinna became rhief of sabotft!!e for the ?lio'l'imit>nto ReT"oln-
<'ionnrio del Pueblo (:\1RP), nn ru1ti-Cnstro gronp head by Uanuel
a'·· (g.q.)
'(J.26) Before the Ameri<'nn Embassy in Cl1ba was closed in .Tnnu-
1961. Bishop snc-!!ested to Yl'<'inna that he c-o there and contnC't
c.ertnin officials for hl'lP in his nnti-C'astro actintv. \ecin.na said the
haml's sn:rgested b• Bishon were "Smith." "Sa.m· Kail." and a CL.\
!emplovee. Said Veciana: ":Mauri<'e BishoP suggested the no.n1es of
hese indindnals ht>cnnse we needed specific wennons to cnTTT out
he iobs and he told me that these were the people tha.t <'Oulcl help
e." (&5) \ecinna. howeYer. also snid that Bishop asked him not to
"Pal his nn.me to these people. (fG)
(12i) \ecinnll has ne\·er nssum<'d that Mam;ce Bishon was a trne
nnme. At one of their Parh· meetin!!S in Hn:vnnn., Vecinnn noti<'ed
!l p11c:sport which Bishop hnd in his O'()en briefcase. Examin-
mg 1t '\'\"hen Bishop left the room briefly, Veciana made a quick note
39
of it on a scrap of . \ eciana kept that scrap of paper and
showed it to-SeM:t.or weiker's investigator. The name on the
paper was rigault" ....7)
(128) A fe llis after the failure of the Ba:r of Pigs in:vasion
in .April 1!l61. Bishop called \ecilllla. to a meeung. to
4
ecinna: .. At that time Bishop decided that the onJy thmg left t.o
e dor.e wns to ha,•e llll attempt on Castro's life.'' (£8)  
· ecinna Limself did not participate in the attempt, he. recruited cl1e
llction men nnd or,..!::.uizecl the operation, renting the npnrr-
ment f1'01u \\web ilia shot '1\115 to be .fired. (!'9) The day before
nctuul unl'mpt. how<'''er. \eci::ma escnped from Cuba. by boat w1th
f1 his mothet·-m-law. in whose name the apartment had been (30}
His wife end chl!tlren had left a few months prior. According _to
Yetiana, it was Bisl10p who nr!!Cd him to len.,·e because. he smd,
agents were U<'comu1g suspicious of \ecinna:s octi,-Jties. (31)
( 1::!D) .Shortly n.fter he set tied in :'IIinmi, \ ecinna testified. Bishop
a gam contacted him. \ e<'inria snicl irwould hn •e been easy
nn,·onc to locate him in the close-knit Cuban erile communit'l' m
( SJ) The result of their reestablishing contact

)
of .-\.lpha G6 which, according to Yeciana, was B' p's
thesis ""!IS _that Cuba _had to. be liberated
Gttbnr1S, .. \ ecwnn. testified. ( \ ecuma established himself a.s the
ci,·ilinn chief :md principal fundraiscr for Alpha GG and recruited
the former head of th!l St•cond )\" arionn.l Front of the Escnmbre
(SXFE}, Eloy Gutierrez Jienoyo. n.s the militllry chief. (35) ::\Ienoyo
b:Hl n. re>p!ttation amonr; C'nuan exiles of being socialistic and Bishop
had l.omc doubts about his bttt \-et inun in!:ii:;ted that :\IenoYv
toulll be tn:steu. Besides. he· soicl, "if he did not work out right .We
<:ot:ld g<:t rid of 111m.'· (SC) Yecinnn. said that Menoyo was not aware
o; the of .Mnuricc Bishop.
{130) Alpha 66 became one of the most active of the anti-Castro exile
groups. buying gw1s and boats, recntiting and training commn:trlos,
nnd <'ondurting JlUllH'ron.: raids on Cuba. (3i) At one peint. Yeciai1a
procJnirned a. ''"ar chest of $100,000 and announced thnt nll the major
exile organizations were backing Alpha GO's ell'orts. He nlso said pub-
licly that nil the planni.ng was being done by leaders "I don't e,·en

 
31) Accordin"' to \eciana, the Inan behind all of Alpha. 66'!: stt·nt-
.. wns ll!a_urice Bishop. O;er perio. d of their nssocinriot;,
ec1ana estunated be met mth Bishop more than 100 times. (39) \eel-
a. however, claimed be had no way of getting in touch with Bishop
d that all the meetings were by Bishop, a. procedure
;Bishol? established early in _their relationship. (40) To set up a meet-
mg, B1shop would call Vecmna. by telephone, or, if Yeciana was out
of town, call a. third person whom \eciana trusted. someone who
always knew his locntion.(4J) \eciana said that this third person
never met Bish<?P but "lme''" that Bishop and I were part:ners m this
fight because this person shared my anti-Communist feelin!!s."(.&!?)
(132) Besides contacts with Bishop in Ha".ana and Mianli, Veciann.
also had meetings -with him in Dallas, Washington, Las nnd
Puerto Rico and in Caracas. Lima. and Ln. Paz in South Amenca.
(133) v eciana specincally recalled some meetings with Bishop be-
..
40
of their special nature. For instance, shortly after reestablishing
<:ontnct with him in Minmi, Bishop took V ecia.na. to a.n office in the
Pan American Bank Building in the downtown section of the city. (44)
\ eciana did not recall the exact floor of the building nor if there
any name on the office door. (45) Bishop unlocked the office with a key
and. in the presence of two men who were in the office, asked him to
sign a piece of paper and take part in a "commitment" ceremony.(46)
"It was like a pledge of my loyalty, a secret pledge," \eciano. testified.
"I think they wanted to impress on me my responsibilitv and my
commitment to the co.use." (47) \'eciano. could not identifv the two
men who were present with Bishop at this ceremony, nor did be recall
if he was introduced to them. "They were like spectators," he said. (48)
( 13-l) From Aue11st   unt i1 .Tune Y pcinnn. worked in T-:1. Pnz,
Boli•ia. as a bn.nkirur ad•iser to Bolida's C'entrnl B:mk.U9) His con-
tracts were financed bv the U.S. A:rcnry for Internationn.l
mcnt. (50) nnd his office wns located in the pnssoort of the
American Embnssy. (51) Vedona belicvPd that -was instntmen-
inl in his getting the AID job. beco.ttse he himself was surprised thnt
the A2'encv -would hire n. 1.-no-wn '••crrorist" and enfi-Cnstro ncti-
Yist. (.;.e) The records indicnted that\ was hired by the Agency
CT'l'll thon!!h his application was never sifmed. ( .:}.j)
(135) "''Vhile supposedly employed ns n b:mkin!! nd'l"iscr in Boli,·in.
\eciana. actually did very little such work. but. inste:td wns    
mostlT" in anti·Castro nnd adi,·itiec; with Bishon. (:i.& )
AmOill! the op<>rntions insti!!att>rl b,· Dicohop at the time was an nttempt
to assnssinnte Castro in Chile in Hlil. (5.i )
to \ecin.nn, that nhortPd r>ttt>mnt <'\'!'T'-
-innll:> h•n to the of his with Rishop.(:il)) _\1-
thon!!h Bishop diJ-eded t.he onerntion nnd nroriderl Yecinn11 with
intelligence informntlon,(57) Vt>cinn:t. himc;rlf rPcrniterl anti-Castro
·Cuban in Cnrncns to tnkP n:trt in the nttempt. (.58) 1\ithont
11is kno,vledge. Vecinna said. thl'St> n.isocintes introduced a. new rlemrnt
into the plnn. n. scheme to blame the assassination on certain Russinn
agents in Cnracns. (/59) The associn.tes f'\t>n pro<lnr<'d phon\' docnments
and photographs. ( 60) "'\Vhen Bishop later founrl ont about this un-
authorized part of the scheme. hP -wn.s Pnremelv uost>t :mil nrrnserl
\ eciana. of beiru! part of it. (61) Although' \ecinn.n told Rishop he had
no knowledge of 1t, Bishop apparently did not. believe him and even-
·htn11v suggested that their relationship be terminated. (62)
{137) On July 26. 1973, Bishop arranged for Veciona to meet with
him in the parkin!! lot of the Fla!!'ler Dog Track in :Miami. ( 63) When
\eciana. arrived, Bishop -was wRiting for him with two voung-er mt'll ..
in an automobile. ( 64) At tha.t time Bishop l!li.Ve Vecia.Da a. sui tense
later n.scertnined, contained S2.'i3.000 in cASh. ( Oti)
SiJ('ce, at   their J:elationshlp. Vec:iana bad
Bishop's offer to pay him for his work with him, the lump sum nay- ./
mht..:s'l'as meant .over the
f1aR) ThP m I ue Antonio
\ ecinnn. n.nd Ma.nricl.' Bishop is. of courc;e. predicated on\ P.cinna's ron-
tention that he sa-w Bishop -with Ll.'e Harrev Oswald in Dnllns a few
months he fore the assassinn.tion of .T ohn F. KPnnPd:r.
1
{189) Veciana could not specifically pinpoint tho date of tbn.t meet-
-----

ing with Bishop He believed it -was in late August {)ver the
years that he knew Bishop, Vec:huut had at leASt fi>e meetings -with him
in Dallas. (68) The meettn.g at which Oswald wns present took place
in the lobby of a large office building in the downtown section of the
citl", perhaps_a bank or an insurance building -with a blue fucade or
lobby.(69) When Veciana arrived for the meeting. Bishop wa:s_there
talking with Oswald. Ye<:iana. does not recall whetlter he was mt.ro-
duced to Oswald by name, but said he did not lul\·e n.ny com·ersatton
with him. (70) Oswald remained with Blsbop and V eciana. only for n.
brief time as tbev walked to-ward a nearby coffee shop. Oswald then
departed and BiShop and Veciana continued their meeting a.lone.(7'1)
(140} \-eciana testified that be the young rna!'! with
Bishop as Lee Harvey Oswald after seemg photographs of him fol-
lowing the Kennedy assassination. There wns no clonbt
in his mind that the man wns Oswald. not just someone who resembled'
him. Vecinna. pointed out that he had been trained to remember the·
physical characteristics of people nnd thn.t if it was not Oswald it
his "exact" double. (73)
(141) Veciana.'s next meeting with Bishop in :Miami about 2'
months after the assassination of President Kennedy. (7 .4) A.ltlton!!h
they discussed the assassination in general, \eciana did not specifi -
cally ask him nbout Oswald. "I was not. to make the mistake of
rrenin.g myc;elf involved in something that did not concern me," he
festified. (7:i ) Also. he said. uThnt wns a very difficult situation been use
I wns afrnid. \Ye both understood. I thRt he k:nrw tlt:tt I
'ms knowledgeable of that n.nd I learned that the best wnv is not to
)mow. not to aet to know thin!!S that don't concern you, so I respected
tha rules :md I dirln't mention that ever."(76)
'(142) Bishop himself. ho-wever, did suggest to Veciana the possibil -
of some involvement. At the time there were newspaper that I
Os-wnld had met with sot\'leCiiDans
sllid thRt Bishop \\':LS awnre thnt he had a re1afive, Guiller!ho Ruiz.
who -wns n     officer in Castro's intelligence semce stationed
in 'Mexico City. (77) Bishop told Veciann tbnt if he could get in touch
with Ruiz, he would pay Ruiz a large amount of money to say publicly
that it was him nnd his wife who had met with Oswald. (78) \'eciana
n!!l'eed to make the attt>mpt to rontact Ruiz been use. ns he testifiPd. "I
knP-w that Ruiz -would be tempted with money: he liked money."(7.9)
Yeciann. however. wns neYer successful in contnctin!! Ruiz. and whpn
he mentioned it to Bishop n, couple of mrmths later. Bishop tolrl him to
forget it. (80) That was the lnst time Veciana ever spoke about thq
Kl.'nnedy o.ssassina.tion or Lee Hnrvev Oswald to Bishop. and. ht
tt>stified. he ne\'er told anyone about seeing Oswald until questioned by
Senntor Schweiker·s investigntor. (81) -
\(143) In nsc:essing \l.'ciann's testimcm\. the committee made an nt-
l<'mpt to t>vnluate his :rcnt>ral credibility nnd. concurrent);, tnk<' thP
necessary steps to detE>rmine if there "WilS a Maurice Bishop or someone
me and. if tl1ere wns. with -whom he -was nssociatPd.
(144) The t1 · and cirrumc:tanccs of thnt initiRl inter'l'it>w with
Yrciana bv S"nator . h-weiker·s     is n fn.rtor in dett>nnin-
inc: his crt>dihility. (8B) Two -weeks prior ot the \eciiiJla hncl
been released from the Federal penitentinry in Atlanta after ser•ing
,.
42
27 months on n nnrrotics conspiracy com;ction. (8$} \ ecinnn. although
hn.l'"ing sen'ed hls time, insisted he was innocent, but claimed that the
cnse ngo.inst rum wns so well fabricated that the Federal prosecutor
11ctunlly belie>ed he was guilty. (84) According to S('nator Schweiker's
im·('sti!:rntor. \ecinna appeared confused nnd frightened by the situ-
ation in "llhich he found himc:elf. but said he belie,·ed that in some wa>
his legal probl('ms were related his preYious n.ssocintion with
Bishop, although h(' did not know exactly how. ( 85) The investigator
that Veciana felt that by re,enling- his association with
Bishop to an official representath·e of the U.S. Government. he would
be pronding himself with an element of security. (86) Much later,
howe>er. \ eciana. apparently changed his position and decided thnt
C'nstro agents. not Bishop, wert' responsible for his dnt" arrest. (87)
This charge was inronsisrent with infonnation prondJ to the com-
mittee b> one of Vecia.nn's closest associates. who said that \eciana.
told him" that he thou!!ht the CL-\. framed him because he wanted to
"!\head with another plot to kill Castro. (88) This associate, Prof. Rnfo
Lopez-Fresquet, C'nstro"s fonn('r Uinister of Finane(', howe\er. said
11e wns not n.ware tbnt Veciana hnd had anv nssocintion with anvone
lik(' M:anrice Dishop nnd that he. himself, could not identifv
Rishop. ( 89) ·
{145) The c<.•mmitwe condnct<'d numerous inteiTiews of other hy
nnti-Ca .. •;tro nssocintes or fonncr associates of \ eciana. not onh· :tS part
of its effort..c; to locate Rishon hut also to fnrther nid in assess1n!! Yeci-
nna' credibilih" C'rl'nE>rnlly \eciana's reputation for honestv n.nd int<'g-
rity wns excellent. A former :tssociate. who worked mtl1 him when
Yecinna wns chief of s:tbotn!!"C for the MRP in Hamna. said ··Yecinnn
wns the straightest. nbsoluti!y trnstworthy. most honest person I eY('r
met. I would trust him e..."'plicitly." (90) Still. not one of his associ-
at('s-neither thoc;e who 'I'I'Orked ' nth him in nnti-Cnstro ncti,;t, in
Cubn nor those who were associated with him in Alpha. 6&-snid they
were nware of nny American dirE>cting \eciana or of anyone who hnd
thP characteristics of 1\Iaurice Bishop.
(146) )\e;ertheless, there were many aspects of \ecinna"s story thnt
the endence does corroborate. Veciann"s claim. for im;tanre. that he
was thE> principnl or!!nnizer of the attempt on Castro's life in HaYnnn
in October 1P61. was documented in n. Cuban newspaper report nt the
time. (.91) Early in their relntionship in Miami. Bishop asked Yecinnn
to monitor the activities of an anti-Castro operation called "Cellula
Fantnsmn." (9!) Veciana said he attended a few meetin_gs of the !!Tonp
and described the operation as a mission o•er
which involnd known soldier-of-fortnne Frank Fiorini Stur!!is.. (93)
vecinna said be did not know why Bishop won1d have been in'"terested
in the operation. but the committee renewed files which confirmed the
t-xistenre and mission of tb(' group. and the imolvement of Frank
Fiorini Stunris at the time. (94)
( 147) "While Veciana was still in Cuba. among those a.t the American
Ernba.ssy Bishop suggested he contact for aid in anti-Castro operations
was a Col. Sam Ka.il. (95) The committee ascertained that there was a
Col. Samuel G. Ka.il at the American Embassy in Havana in 1960 at
the time V eci8.D1l said he contacted him. Kail, now retired, was located
and interviewed in Dallas.
43
(148) Colonel :Kail served n.s the U.S. Army attache o.t the U.S.
Embassy in Havana. from June 3, 1958, until the day the Embassy
closed, January 4, 1961. ( 96) His primary mission n.s a military attache
wn.s that of intelligence. (97) La._ter, in February he was
ferred to where he was m char!!e of the urut that debr1efed
ne'>ly arrived Cuban refu!!"ees. .Although he reP.orted directly to the
Chief of Army in -n-asbington, Ka.il sa.id he assum.ed his
unit was actually functioning for the "I suspect they p8.1d our
bills," he said. (98) . . .
(1-19) Ka.il said that prior w the American Embassy closmg 1.n
Hn.vnna there was o. "constllnt stream" of Cubans coming through his
office with anti-Castro schemes, includin" assassination plans.
for .Ametican n.ssistnnce in the form o"/. weapons or guarantees ot
escnpinrr. ' ·"-e had hordes and hordes of people tlu·ough there all the
time." said. For that reason, he said, he did not specifically remem-
ber Yecinno. .-isiting him. "I think it would ben. miracle if I could
recall him," he said, but does not discount the possibility that he did
meet him. (99)
( 150) Kail said, however, agents of the CL\. '>ould frequently use
the names of other Embassy staff personnel in their outside contact3
without notifying the staff individual it was being done. (100) It hap-
pened "a. number of times"; he said that a Cuban would come in and
ask to see Colonel Knil nnd, when introduced to him. tell him that he
wns not the Colonel Kail he hnd met outside the   Knil
said he would then ha,·e the Cuban point out the CL\. agent who harl
used his name. (lOB)
(151) Kail smd he wn.s not fnmiliar with n )Iam·ice nor hall
he e,·er hem·d of anyone using that name. (109)
( 152) Another aspect of Vecia.na's stOry that the committee examined
closely was his alleged in>oh·ement in the assn.ssinntion attempt on
Castro in Chile in 1971. In a report ¥i"en to Senator: )JcGo,·ern
in 1975. Cnstro pro;ided informnuon detailing the plot and ncr.usecl
··counterre,·olutionaries from Alpha fin·· as coconspirat6t-s. (JO.D \" ('Ci-
ana himself. however. was not specifically mentioned. X e,·t-ttheless.
the committee probed the anti-Castro Cuban in :Miami
and found that \eciana"s im·oh
1
emE>nt in the plot "·as kno'l'l'n by many
of the active eriles. Max Lesnik. editor nnd publisher of Replica. the
most prominent Spanish-language weekly publication in the commu-
nity, said he was aware of Yeciana"s involvement in the nssn.ssinntion
attempt n.t the time. (J05) He said. howe,·er. that Yecinnn told him
that it was "his own plan.'" and did not mention the im·oh·ement of n
)!aurice Bishop. {106) Lesnik could not identify Bishop but said he
always did think that Yecinna. must have had '·some high GoYernment
contacts. probably CIA."(107)
(153) ThE> committee also attempted to confirm Yecianns'-Tole in the
Chile plot hy locating two other anti-Castro Cubans alletredl; in;olved""
with him. Thev were inter;iewed in Caracas. btit. because
are not U.S. citizens, they could not be subpenaed for sworn
statements.
( 154) One of those named was Lucilo Penn. A C'nhan-born aracinnte
of .Auburn university in Georgia. Penn is now a \"enezuelan citizen
, and a sales manager for a large chemical firm. He hns li'l'ed in \cne-
zue1a since 1061. {108)
"'
t Jl
44
(155) P cna. any in. the assaS!:.i -
nation plot m Chile, he admitted to knowmg V emana smce 1964: _or
. 1965," when he was actiYe in Alpha 66's '·Plan Omega," a plot to m·
vade Cuba. from a base in the Dominican Republic. (109) He said he
first met Vecinna through a friend, Secundino Alverez, who was the
Caracas chapter lender of .Alpha. 66. {110) (Ah-erez was among those
named by vecinna as also being involved in the Chile plot.) (111) Penn
adrojtted he had been in contact with veciana during the period the
Chile plot was being planned but, he said, their meetings were only
casual, usually at matches which \ecin.na promoted.(11g)
Pens. also admjtted that \eciana may have discussed the possibility
of assassina.tina Castro with him during one of these encounters at
the boring ma.fches. "I think he asked some help in raisin_g  
Pena said, "but that's all I know about that.'"(113) Penn denied nny
1.-nowled!!e or invol;ement in any plot to blame Russian agents for the
planned 'Castro assassination in Chile. "I am not the to do thnt
kind of counterintelligence work," he said. "I am too open and
honesl"(JJ4)
(156) Pena. however. admittNl to J..:nowing, perhnps since 1!>63. Lnis
Posnda. another anti-Castro C'ubr.n in C'arA<'-"S, who Veciana claims
was in,·olved in thP plot to kill Castro in C'hile. (115)
(l:'i7) The committee inteniewed L11is Posada in the \-PnezuelPn
political prison. Cunrtel Snn Carlo", in Caracas. Posndlt had bPPn
arrested in October Hl76, alon!! with well-1--no,vn anti-Castro Cub:m
terrorist Orlando Rosch, and indicted for being in>olved in the bomh-
ina of a C'ubRna. AirlinPs planP in which pPrsons were kill Pd. (1 16)
(1:'i8) hnd E'arlier bPen linked with plots against
C'nban c>fficinls in Chile, two who disnppeared in .August
1976. {117)
(159) Posnda's background as a military and intelliaence operative
is eclectic. He was a member of Brig-n.de 2506. but he did not take part
in the Bay of Pigs landing. (118) In 1963. he joined the U.S.
and was commissioned n first lieutenant. ( 119) He resi,!med his com-
mission in 1964. ( 1130) He went to Venezuela in Hlo7 anrl shortlv after-
wards joined the Venezuelan secret police. called DIRIP, the Direcrion
de los Servicios de :v Pre"Vencion. 1 1131) From 1971 to 1973,
he w11s chief of operations of the Dinsion of SecuritT for
DISIP, which included He resi!pled "from
DTRIP in and went to WnshinM:on. D.(\ to tnkP training from
whnt he tPrmed "a priYate COmpnnv" in the field of liP oetertion·. (  
He tl1en returned tn Cararnc; to open his own nrir11te dE'tE'cti>e aaPnc>.
( l(\0) Posada told committee investig-ators that be was not involnrl
in the Cn.stro assassination nttE'mpt in ChilE' in 1971. ( He R.dmitted
thnt he knew Yecinna but sajd he onlv met him twice. once in Miami
and once in C'arncas at the boxing- matrhes. He said he did talk
to \ ecinna about the time the Chile plot was being planned, but Ve-
cinna neYer mentioned nnlthine- to him about it. ( 1£6)
(161) Another aspect of Veciann.'s allegations that were of interest
to the committee was Bishop's SU!!gestion of developing a misinforma-
tion scheme in"Volvin$!" a Castro intelligence agent and Oswald. (1£7)
\" ecinna said that Bishop knew that a relative of his was in the Cuban
45
Intelligence serYice a.ssigned to Mexico City at the time of the Ken-
nedy assassination. (1£8) Accoriling to \eCiann, a news story was cir-
cula.ting immediately after the assassination that Oswald had met n.
couple on the Mexican border while on his way to City prior
to the assassination. (1g9) Bishop, Yeciana said, he attempt
to "et in touch with his relati>e and offer him a bnbe to say that it
he and his wife who met Oswald in .:Mexico. (130) Yecinna S.'l.id he
was never able to get in touch mth hjs relati>e about it and eventu:illy
Bishop told him to it. (131) .
(162) Yeciana·s relntn·e, Orestes Guillermo Ruiz Perez, was, m fact,
a relati,·e by marriage, the husband of a first cousin to Yeciana. (13:3)
Yeciann. wd he first Jearned of Ruiz's affiliation with Castro's intelli-
service shortly after Cnstro took power. He and Ruiz were wnlk-
in a Hu.,·ana park when they were stopped and searched by Castro·s
police. Ruiz was found to be carrying a gtm and was taken nwny. Con-
cerned, ,-eciana immediately placed a call to a close friend inside Ca;-
tro·s goYernment, Minister of Finance Rufo Lopez-Fresquet. Lopez-
Fresquet told ,-eciana not to worry about Rillz because Ruiz was actu-
ally working for the intelligence service. (133) ·
(Hi3) Although Rillz was a Castro ngent and C9mmunist he warned
Yecinna. thnt he -was being observed ,·islting the American Embassy in
Ha.,·ana and told him to be carefu1.{134) That was why Yeciana later
thought that he might be able to tum Ruiz into an anti-Castro agent.
Some time after the Kennedy assassination, Yeciana said he was ap-
proached by another anti-Castro Cuban named Robert Yale. (135)
Yale asked Yeciana to attempt to contact Tiuiz a.bout possibly becoming
an asset for the CIA. {136) Ruiz, at the time, was stationed in Spain,
and when Y eciana found a friend, Roblejo Lorie, who was traveling to
Spain, he asked him to carry a letter to Ruiz. Lorie gave the letter to
Ruiz but, according to veciann., Ruiz tore the letter up in front of
Lorie and told hinl that he did not want to haYe any contact with
Veciana because he knew Yeciana ''was working for the Cll."(1S7")
(104) The committee was able to interview Orestes Guillermo Ruiz
in Ha,·ann.(198) Ruiz acknowledcred that he was related to Yeciana
through marria:?e. (139) He srud tl1at '·eyeryone in Cuba" knows th:1t
Vecinna is associated with the Cli and was in,·olved in assassination
attempts on Castro. (140) He said, howeYer, aside from what he read
in the American newspapers, he has no knowledge of \eciana·s RS..."'-
ciation with hlnurice Bishop or who .Maurice Bishop could be. (141) He
said he was never contacted by Yeciana nbout Oswald(J4£) and, in
fact. has not seen\ eciRnlt since 1959.
(165) Ruiz expressed disdain for Veciana, said he considered him
a coward(144) and '·a person you cannot belien." He said Yeciana
hRd persoDD.lity problems and was under psychiatric care from the
time he was 16 years old until he was 21. (145) Ruiz said that..uanother .:.
counterre,·ol utionary," a cousin of veciana's who is a doctor "in
or Chicago" and whose name is Jose Veciana, could attest to Veciann's
psychiatric problems because he had adrised the family about
them.(146)
(166) Committee investigators located Dr. Jose Veciana in 1\fnrtin.
Tenn., where he was chief of pathology at Volunteer General Hospital.
He confirmed that he is a first cousin to Antonio Yecinna and that he
4 3-!JH-i!l---4
4G
had }GlO'I'ffi him when he was a child in Havana. (11,.7) Dr. V eciann said
he has never known his cousin to have personality problems or to haYe
e,·er been under psvchiatric care. He said he himself has never pro-
Yided \ eciana. any psychiatric advice nor offered it to his family. (148)
He said he beliend that Veciana. must be of sound mental condition
Lecause he knows that Yecinna had to undergo •'igorous tests in his
rise in tl1e banking business. (149)
{161) Yecia.na himself denied Ruiz' allee:J-tions that he had had psy-
chiatric problems as a young man. .t1is mother confirmed his
denial. (1o0)
TIIE SEARCII FOR BISUOP
(168) One of the factors utilized in the committee's efforts to locate
:\Inurice Bishop was the description of him pro"-ided by Yeciana.
1\nen he first met him in 1960, Veciana said, Bishop was about 45
,·ears old, about 6 feet. 2 inches tall, weighed o,·er 200 pounds. and was
3thletically built. He had eyes, light bro'm hair. nnd a light
complexion.{151) Yeciann said, howe,·er, that Bishop appeared to
spend much time outdoors or in sunny climate because he was usually
well tanned and there was some skm discoloration, like sun spots,
under his eyes. (15E) He appeared to be meticulous about his dress and
usually concerned about his and diet. (159) In the latter years
that Veciana knew him, Bishop oegan using glasses for readin!!.(154)
(169) Shortly after he revealed his Bishop relationship to Senator
Schweiker's investigator, Veciana aided a professional artist in de•cl-
oping a composite sketch of Bishop. Schweiker's office pro•ided the
committee w1tll a copy of the sketch. \eciana told the committee that
he considered the artist's composite sketch of Bishop a "pretty good"
resemblance. (155)
(170) Prior to the committee's effons. Senator Schweiker's office,
as well as the Senate subcommittee be headed, looked into certain as-
pects of Veciann.'s allegations. Schweiker, for instance, reqttested the
Bel!!ia.n Embassy to conduct a record check for information about a.
pasSport issued tinder the name of '·Fri!!ault." The Belgian Embassv
said that, without additional identifying it could not
help. (156) In addition, Schweiker's investigator showed Vecinna.
numerous photographs of indi,-iduals who may haYe used the name
of Bishop, among them Oswald's friend, Georrre de hlohrcnschildt,
who was then a teacher at Bishop College in Dallas. The results were
negative. (157)
(171) It was Senator Schweiker who focused the committee's atten-
tion to Da-Md Atlee Phillips, former chief of theW' estern Hemisphere
Di•ision of the CIA. Deputy Directorate of Operations, as perhaps
hanng of Maurice Bishop. Immediately after receiving the
Bishop sketch, ;::,chweiker concluded that Phillips. who had earlier
testified before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence Acti,·ities,
bore a strong resem blnnce to the sketch.
(172) When Vecinna was shoWD a photograph of David Phillips
br Schweiker's he did not pro,·ide an absolutely con-
clusive response. (158) For that reason. it was decided that Vecia.na
be given the opportunity to obsen-e Phillips in person.(J59)
Schweiker arranged for Ycciana to be present at a luncheon meeting
47
of the of Retired Intelligence Officers in Reston. \&., on
September 17, 1976. (160) Phillips was one of the founders the
association. Vecia.na. was introdnced to Phillips prior t.<r the
luncheon. (161) He was introduced by name but not by affiliation ll'ith
Alpha 66 or involvement with anti-Castro ncti,·ity. (Hie) According-to
Schweiker's investigator. there was no indication of recognition on
Phillips' part. (169) Following the luncheon, \ecinna had the ap-
portunity to speak with Phillips in Spa.nish.(164) Veciana asked
PhilJips if he was in HaYnna in 1960 and if he knew Julio Lobo. (165)
Phillips answered both questions affirmati•ely and then asked Vecinna
to repeat his name.(J66) Veciana did and then asked, "Do you know
my nlll'Tle?" Phillips said he did not.(1C7) Phillips was asked if Ve-
ciana wns on Schweiker's stn.tf. (168) He was told that he was not. but
that \ecinna was helping Sclmeiker in his im·estigation of the Ken-
nedy assassination. (169) Phillips declined to be interviewed by Sena-
tor Schweiker:s investigator, but said he would be happy to speak with
any Congressman or congressional representative '·in Congress."{170)
Following the encounter of Yeciann and Phillips. Schweiker's investi-
g-ator nsked Veciana if Dn•id Phillips was Bishop.(171)
Vecinna said he was not.   .
( 1   Schweiker's inYestigntor expres..coed some doubt about\ ecia.na:s
crrdibiliry on the point, howe,·er. because of \ eciana:s renewed in-
terest in his nnti-Castro operations and his expressed dr-
sire to recontact Bishop to help him. {173) In addition, Schweiker's
investi,!!ntor doubt that Daxid Phillips, who was once in
<:h:tr!!e of Cuban operations for the CL.\. and whose career was deeply
rnt":ined in anti-Castro opera.tions, could not reco:rnize the name of
Yecia)lll ns being the founder nnd Yociferous public spokesmnn for one
e largest and most ncti,·e anti-Castro Cuban groups, .Alpha
(174) ' -- ---
(174- )J}le-·coirimitrer considered other fnctors in
inC!U<'ITitg his principnl area of expertise nnd oprrations unti} 1
( /i.·l) In HlGO. when Yeciaua said he first met Bishop in Havana.
Phillips was sen-ing ns n coYert opet·ati,·e in HnYana. (176) From
1!lG1 to l!lfill. PhiJlips wns ('hief of Covert Action in another releYant
<'Ountrr. When Oswald Yisited the Cuban Consulate in Mexico
City in 19G3. Phillips was also in charge of Cuban operations for
CL<\.. in same cotmtry. Phillips had earlier lived in and had numer-
. · ret'evant countrv.(177) He had
_ ees 'of gcileriiT relevance. (178)
(175) The committee de•eloped other information that further gHe
support to an interest in Phillips in relation to Bishop. In Miami. its
investirrators inten-it>wed R former c.-ueer ngent for the CLL\... who for
present purposes will be called Ron Cross. From September 1960 until
Kovember 1962. Cross was n case offiCPr a.t the CIA's -.fi!/W A 1l£
sta.t.ion, the operational base which coordinated the Agency:s activities
with the anti-Castro exiles. (179) He handled one of the largest and
stctiYe anti-Castro groups. (180) At the time that Cross was at
the :Miami JM/W A \"E station, Da,-fd PhilJips was responsible for
c-ertain aspects of the CLA..'s anti-Castro operntions. Cros.c:; coordinated
· these operations with Phillips, who would occnsionallv visit the
.TMfW AVE station from Washington. (181) Generally, however,

48
Cross worked with Phillips: direct assistant at the station, who used the
cover name of Doug Gupton.
(176) In his book about his role in the Bny of Pi!!S operation, former
CIA officer E. Howard Hunt used a pseudonym w1len referring to tl1e
chief of the operation. (J8B) The chief of propngnnda was Dn,·id
Phillips. Hunt cnlled him ··Knight.'" (183)
(177) When asked by the committee if he was familiar with anyone
using the cover name of Bishop at the JM/ \\"A \"E stauon, Cross said
he was "almost positin" that Dnnd Phillips hnd used the cover name
of Maurice Bishop. (184) He said he was ··fairly sure"' that Hu:1t
himself had used the cover name of Knight.(185) Cross said, howe>er.
that the reason he was certain that Phl.llips used the nnme of Bishop
was because he recalled sometimes discussing field and ngent problem:s
with Phillips' assistant, Dou2 Gupton, and Gupton often sayin!!.
'·' Vell, I guess Mr. Bishop will have to talk with him:· Cross said:
"And. of course, I knew he was ref erring to his boss, Da,·id Phillip,:·
(186}
(178) The committee ascertnined that the coYer name of Doug Gnp-
ton was used at the J).lf'\"A. \E stntion a former CIA employee.
(179) The committee stnff interviewed Doug Gupton on August 22.
1978. at CIA headquarters. (18i) Gupton snid he worked for the CL\.
from December 1951 until his retirement. (188) Gupton confirmed thnt
he was in charge of a special operations staff nt the Miami .DI/
WA v"E St:ltion and that his immediate superior wns lJn,·id Phillips.
(189) Gupton acknowledged that Ron Ct·oss (cO\·er nnme) was a case
officer whowor kedforhimandthnthesaw · - ·tilybnsis. 1!11J)
Gupton said he did not recall whether . Hownrd ndd
Phillips e,·er used t he nnme of 191) He s:1
call Phillips ever using the name of )· \\'ben told
abom Ct·oss· recollection of him refening to Phillips ns .. :\l r. Bishop."'
Gupton said: "\\ell. maybe I did. I don't rememller.'"(199) He also
said. however. that he ne,·er beard the nnme of Bishop while he was
stationed in Miami. (194) \\l1en shown the sketch of Dishop. he said it
did not look like am·one he knew.(195)
(180) E:\:plaining his ' 'orking re]n.tionship with Dn,;d Phillips,
Gupton snid he was in contact with him i.n \\ashington uy
telephone and cable. and that Phillips ,·isJted }liami "quite often."·•
( 190) Gupton said. howeYer. that there were two sets of operations.
His set of operations wns run out of Uiami and he kept Phillips in-
formed of them. Phillips ran another set of operntions personally out
of Wnshin,oton nnd. Gupton said. Phillips did not keep him bnefed
about them.(19i) Gupton nlso snid he knew thnt Phillips used manY
of his old contacts from Hanma in his personnl operations. (198) ·
(181} D:n;d A.tlee Phillips testified before the committee in execu-
tive session on April 25. 1978. He said he ne,·er used the nnme :\innrice
Bishop.(J99) He said he did not know of nn:-one in the CLt\.
the name Maurice He said he had seen Antonio \ecinna
only twice in his life. the second time the momin2 of his hearin!! before
the committee when Yeciana. who hnd testified earlier. emerrrell
fro!ll the bearing room while he. Phillips, was in the hnllwn:v. ulf)l)
Plullips said the first he met \ eciann wns nt a lltl.!ctin,; of the
Association of Former Intelligence Officers in Reston. He snid
4!)
i:hat Veciana. was brou:rht to that meeting b.' an investigator . from
Senator Schweilier·s office but, snid Phillips., Ycciana was not mtro-
duced to him by name but only as "the He said Yeciana.
him some questions in Spanish. but nt the time he did not
who \ecia.na was or why Senator Schweiker's office had sent him to
the meeting. (P04-) .
(182) Phillips also testified that he hnd ne>er used the name Fngault
nnd had never used n Belgian passport. ( !?0-5)
Phillips wns sl1o"-n the sketch of Bishop but could not
identify it as anyone he knew. He snid, '·I t looks like me."
(200)
(184) In sworn testimonv before the committee in executi>e session
on April 2G. Hl78 .• \ntonio \rcinna snid thnt DnYid Atlec Phillips is
not the person he as ) laurice Bisl10p. (fOi) He said. howe,·er,
rhnt there was a '·phYsicn 1 similnrir:·. ··(gOB)
(155) On ) Larch 2. 1978. the committee requested the CIA to check
all its files and index references pertaining to :\lnurice Bishop.
On )larch 31. 1978. t!le CIA informed the committee that its Office of
the I nspector General, its Office of the General Counsel, its Office of
Personnel. nnd the Deputy Directorate of Operations had no record
of n. )Laurice Bishop. (910)
(1 C::Cl) On August 10. 1!>7". B. H .. n for mer operative of the
C'IA. was interriewed by the committee in a specinl closed session.
(211) B. H. was nCB .. ngent from Hl:i:2 to Hl70.(B1g) Between 1960
:mel HlS-:1: he was assigned to Cnbnn operations.(!?13} As such. he testi -
fit>cl, he wns inYohed in .. opernt1ons with Da>id Atl"e
Phillips. He characterized Phillips as .. an excellent intelligence offi·
err" and "a personal fri end."' (914-)
(187) \\hen asked if he knew nn indi,·idunl named )lnurice Bishop,
D. H. said:
'·.\.gain. )lr. Bishop wns in the or!:llnizntion but I had no per59nnl
day-to-da:- open relationship with him. Phillips. yes; Bishop, no. I
knew them both."(9J5)
(188) Althon:!h he couldn't d«"scribe Bishop's phvsical characteris-
tics. D. H. snid he hnd seen him "two m· three times·'·(.eJ6) in the "hall·
"nys or cafeteria .. (Eli) . at CIA henclqunrters in Langle;r. B. H. said
he thought Bishop in thE' Western Hemisphere Division(g18)
nnd that he hnd a position "higher thnn me."'(£19) He could not be
more specific. The h'I"O or three times he saw BLc;hop, he said. was be·
1\'l"een 1960 n.nd 196-! when he himself wns in Cuban operations, al-
though. he said, he did not know if Bishop worked in that area
al;;o.(ggo)
(189) Asked how. if he did not personally know Bischop, he knew
the per.::on he snw at CIA. heaclqnnrters '"ns )laurice Bishop. B. H . .
!'aid : "Someone might hnve said. 'Thnt i5 Bishop.' and it was -
different from Dave Phillips or Joseph Langosch guys that I know."
  -
(190) When shown the sketch of Maurice Bishop, however, B. H.
could not identify it as anyone he recognized.
(191) On August 1 'i, 1978. the cornillittee deposed John A. McCone,
the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency from October 1961
until April 30, 1965.

50
(192) During the course of the deposition, the following questions
and answers were recorded:
Q,. Do you know or did you know :Maurice Bishop¥
A. Yes.
Q,. \Yas he nn agency
A.. I believe so.
Q,. Do you know what his duties were in 1963¥
A.Xo.
Q. For instance, do you know whether Bishop
worked in the \Yestem Hemisphere Division or whether he
worked in some other di 'l"ision of the CL-\ Y
A.. I do not 1.-now. I do not recall. I knew at that time but I
do not recall.
Q,. Do you 1.-now whether Bishop used
pseudonyms?
A. Xo; I do not know that. (Q29)
(Hl3) In Yie'' of the information in the interriews
B. H. lllld former Director the committee asked the CIA to
renew its file search for anY files or inde:s: references pert!tinin!! to
Bishop. It also uskec.l for a. written statement :hom the CIA.
whether nn indiddunl using either the true name or
donym ot )Iam·ice Bi:Jwp has e\·er Leen associated in any capacity
"·ith the CL-\.(!225)
( 19-!) A. reply was on SeJ?tember 8. 1918, from the CI..:\:s
Office of Legislatin Counsel indicaung that all nne name fil C's. alins
tiles and pseudonym file:. were again checked anc.l: aguin, pro,·ec.lnega-
ti,·e. ··Xo person with !:>uch n name has a coimectiou with CL\.,·· s:till
the reply. (g36) Added the ··Quite frankly. it is our Lelief-
from our earlier check, reulforced by tlus one-that such a. man did
not exist. so fnr CL-\ connections are concerned.:·"' (931)
(195) Additional etlorts to locate :\lam·ice Bishop were made by the
committee u1 file to the Fetleral Burl!au of lnYestigation. (::!::!8)
and to the Department of Defense. (229) Both pro,·ed negathe.
(196) Although file re,·iews of Bishop praYed negnti,·e, the
0 0n Ocrouer l!l, l!li8. the ('OmmlttPC"s chief coun-<el rPCell·e!l n lettt.>r from the
prind)lal coordinoror In the Ottice of C'ounsel. snill.
in part: .. This is to addse thot I lal\·e :Ur. McCone nnd n
em)lloyee concerning their rt>COllt-crion,; about uu alleged Cl .A. em)1io.ree
us i ng the nnmP of Maurice BisiHIJI. • • •
•·we nssembled pbotogrn)lhs of the pPrsons w'llh the surnnme of Bishop had
employment rt>lntionsbi)JS u! l<OIDP with CIA. during the lUOO·s, t o see If either
Mr. hlcCone or the employPe rPCogn.ize one of them. .
··:Mr. :UcCone did nor fE-el It lll'<'t''-"nry to re,·l(.'w those plloto:;rnphs, statiu:;
that I should Inform you thnt be hnd been in error. • • •
··The eiDJ>Ioyee continues to recall n person of whom he knew who wns known
ns hlaurtce Bishop. Be cnnnor srnte the or:;ani7.11tionnl connection or responslbill·
ties of the lndft"idunl, not 1..-nowlng him personally. nod feels that the 11erson In
question wns pointed out rn him oy someone. a secretary. Be Is unahle.
to recognize any of the )lboto;rraphs mentloued abo,·e. • • •
••Jn summary. hlr. hl<.oCone withdraws his statements on this point. The
empiOYeee continues to recall such a nome. but the nature of his recollection is
not '"en,- clear or precise. We still helle'"e that there is no eddence of the
ence of 8nl'b a perMn so fur ns there being a CU. con.nectlon. • • •" (J. F. K.
Document Xo. Ol2i22. )
ill
committee learned that Army intelligence had an operational interest
in Antonio Vecia.na during one period. (197) \eciana was
in the Army Information Source Registry from o,·ember   Ulltil
July 1966. (e3J)
(198) The nature of the contact with \eciann appeared to. be
limited to artemptincr to use him as a source of intelligence lllforruntlOu
about .Alpha 66 acti\·ities, with Yecillllil, in turn. seeking to obtain
weapons anu funds. (f.Y£) \ ecilllla acknowledged and detailed tO
committee these contacts with Army intelli!!ellce and said that, aside
fi·om keeping Bishop informed of them, they had no relationship with
hls acti rities with Bishop. (!!J3) . . .
(199) Given the Army·s acknowledgement of an mterest m \ectnnn.
and Al   m_ade the nS?umption that • CIA
also ha m I eciann and Jus Alpha
..9£ its pt!h·nsh·e role in anti-Castro operations duriJ1g the 19oo·s.
(200) In a reYiew of its own files on )larch l.:i, lUiS. the Cll
that Yeciana had contacted the Agency three times--in lJecemLer
19GO; July 1962; and April 19GG-for assistanc-e in plots against
Castro. (£84) According to the CU .. : ··Oilicers listened to \ eciann,
expressed llO interest, Offered nO encouragement anc). Jll!Yer recontacted
him on this matter. There bas been no Age.ncy relationship wi
T eciana. '' (E95)
Tile 0 t le - e s es basically
confinned the stated concl usions about the meetings with \eciana
in l!>GO and 19GG. A re1-ie"· of the files pertaining to 1962, howe,·er,
re,·enlcd that on JuJy 1, 196:2, \eciana receired $500 h·om a wealthy
Puerto Rican financier and industrialist with whom the CL'-\. had n.
longstanding operational relationship. (£36) Although the files do
not es:plicitly stnte whether the money originated with tl1e CIA. or
the industrialist, and e'l"en though during this same period the Agency
was using the Puerto llicnn. it appears tlmt in \eciana'scase the money
was prm·ided by tl te industrialist. and not. by the Agency.
(:!02) Finally. to locate or idC'nr!fy .:\I:mrice Bishop. the committee·
issued a press n•lense on .July 30, l!liS and made a.Yailable to the medin.
the composite sketch of Bishop. The sketc.h was part of a release of
seTeral other items. including two sketches and three photographs.
The committee warned that it should not be assumed that the release
indicn.t<•cl the committee believes tl1e person in the sketch wns in'l"o)'l"ed
in the Kennedy assassination, only that in.fonnation resulting- from
possible citizen recom1ition of the sketch mig-ht "shed additional lirrht
on the assassination." The committee asked that anvone who had infor-
mation contnr.t tlte committetl by mail. not by telephone. (f37)
(203) By KoYember 1. 19i8. the committee receiYed from the !!en-
era] public n total of four written responses relating- to the Bishop
sketrh. The three photographs were identified. the two sketcl1es were
not. (!298)
(204) Ko definiti'l"e conclusion could be reached about the credibilit-r
of Antonio Yeciana.:s allegations regardin_g his relationship with
a. Maurice Bishop. Additionalh·. no definiti-re conclusions could be
drawn as to the irlentit; or affiliations of Bishop. if such an indh·idnnl
existed. ·while no eddence was found to discredit \ eciana ·s testimonY.
there was some eYiuence to support it, although none of it was con-

52
dush'e. The a\ailable documentary record was sufficient to indicate
that the U.S. Government's intelligence community had a keen interest
in Antonio Veciana during the early 1960's and that he was willing
to receive the financial support he needed for the military operations
of his anti-Castro groups from those sources. From the files of these
ag-encies, it thus appears reasonable that an association similar to the
alleged )faurice Bishop story actually existed. But whether
contact was really named .Maurice Bishop, or if he was. whether he did
all of the things Yeciana claims, and if so, with which U.S. intc11igence
rt!!"encv he was associated. cou1d not be detrrminrd. X o corroboration
fOund for Yeciana 's alleged meeting with Lee Harvey Oswald.
Submitted by:
G.!d..:Tox ,T. Foxzr,

In cr.:st/gator.
(J) Inteniew of Antonio Yeciana Blanch, :Mar. 2, 1D7G, House Select Commit·
tee on Assassinations, p. 1 (J. F. K Document 012927) (hereinafter Yeciaua
inten·iew).
L?) ''The Investigation of the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy:
Performance of the Intelligence Agencies, BookY," Final Report of the Select
Committee to Study GMernmental Operations lVith Respect to Intelligence
Acti;ities, 94th Gong., 2d sess. (Washington, D.C.: U.S. GoYernrnent !Jrintiug
·Offi.ee. 187Gl (Senate Rept Xo. (herdnafH•r Inrelli,;:-eHce Committee
Her1ort, Book V).
(Jl :'!Iemorandum to Mar. 3,1976, House Select Committee on A.ssassi·
nntions (J. F. K. Document 012924).
See ref. 1, Veciana interview, p. 4.
( ,; ) Ibid., see also pp. 1, 2, 5, 6.
(lil Id.atp. 7.
r;) I<l. at p. 37.
·(S} Letter from Benfl.tor Richard S. Scbweiker. Dec. 14, 1r!7G, House Select
Committee on Assassinations (J. F. K. Document 000521),
(,9) See ref. 1, Veciana interview, p. 4.
( 10) ''Sugar King a Many-Sided Man," New York Time£, July 20, 19:J8.
(JJ) Ee>:ecuth·e     of Antonio Yeciana Blanch, Apr. ::!0. H.l78,
lle:tring before tbe Eou>:e Select Committee on Assassinations, p. 4 (hereinafter
Yto>daua session testimony).
(12) I d. at p. G.
(13) Id.atp.i.
·(1.0 Id.atp.5.
U-:i} I d. at Jl. S.
fl6) I d. at p. 9.
(17".\ Staff memorandum. Jn.n. 17, 1077, House Select Committee on .A.ssassina-
(J. F. E:. Document 012922).
US) "My 14 ?lfonths ·with Castro," Rufo Lopez-Fresquet ("\Yorld Publishing
Co.), p. 111.
(lf!) See ref.11, Veciana testimony, executive session, p. 10.
(20) I<l. atp.ll.
(21) Id.atp.12.
(22·) Ibid.
(23) ld.atp.15.
c"2.1) Id.atp.14.
(2.; I Id. at p. lS.
(26) Id.atp.19.
f27) Immunized testimony of Antonio Veciana Blanch, Apr. 26, 1978, Hearings
. before the House Select Committee on Assassinations, p. 68 (hereinafter Veciana
iu1ruunized testimony).
f 28) See ret. 11, Veciana executive session testimony, p. 2L
L:?.G) See.xef. 1, Veciana. inteniew, p. 2.
·(SO) Ibid.
53
(31) See ref. 11, Veciana executive session testimony, pp. 21, 59.
(82) IC..atp.22.
(Sd) Id.atp.2G.
(84) Id.atp.20.
(35) Id. at p. 2.J.
(BG) I d. at p. 24.
I 37) L'.S. News & World Report, Oct. 29, 19C2, p. 40.
i 38) Kew York Times, Sept. 14, 1962, p. 13.
(3£1) See ref. 27, Yeciana im.muniz.ed testimonr, p. 72.
( 40) See ref.ll, Yeciana executive session testimony, p. 27.
(41) See ref. 27, Yecia.na immunized testimony, p. 88.
( 42) Ibid., p. 89,
r 43) Outside contact report, Aug. 30, 1978, House Select Committee on As:-;ns:;i.
(J. F. K. Document 011267).
(H) See ref. 11, Yeciana executive session testimony, :p. 26.
L)0 1 I d. at p. 28.
(.4fi) Jd. at p. 27.
(J,i) I d. at p. 28.
1-18) Ibld.
(.1,.9) Id. at p. Sf!.
(50) Telegrnm. Department of.St.ate ( J. F. K. Document 012020).
(.51) Ibid.; !';Pe nl!--:0 r'ef. 11. YPciana executive session testimony, pp. 38 aud 40.
(52) SPe ref. 1. Yeciana interriew. p. 5.
(53) Telegram, Department of State (J. F. K. Document Q12U20),
(54) See ref. 1. Ve-cinna inteniew, p. 5.
(55) Bee ref. 11. Yeciann exe('uti.-e session testirnonf. p. n.
(5fi) See ref.1, Yeciana inteniPw.
(57) See ref. 27, Yecianu immunhed testimony, p. 53.
i S.O?e rPf. 11. "\'eci:nm executh·e session testimony, p. 4::!.
i .;.rn Jd. at n. -iR.
(UO) See ref.l, Yeci:ma inteniew, p. 9.
( 01) I hid.
( U2) See inten-iew of Antonio VecianP. Bl:mch.
u;:n Ibid. ?llnr. 11. 1U7G. House Sele<!t Committee on Assassinations (J, F. K.
Document 012929).
W4) Ibid.
( G5) See ref. 25. Veciann immunized te;;timOllJ", p. 73.
(GG) .See ref. C2, Yeciana inter•iew, JL 3.
(Cf) Jd.ntp.4.
I GS) See ref. 11, Yecinna execntire session testimony, p. 19.
(69) !Lid; see ref. I, Yecinna inten-iew, p. 7.
(70) Ibid.
( 71) See re:f. 11, 'Veciana testimony, pp. !'!4, 25.
1721 I d. at p. 21.
(73) See reL 1, Veciana inter;-iew, p. 7.
(74) See ref.ll, Ye<!iana executi-ve testimons, p. 31.
(15) Jd. at pp. 28. 3G.
(";G) Id. at pp. 29, 30.
(77) Td.atp.28.
(78) Id.atp.29.
(79) Ibid.
(80) Id. at p. 37.
( 81) Ibid.
(82) See ref.l, Yeciana interriew.
(83) Ibid.
(84) Memorandum to Marston, Mar. 4, 1976, House Select Comm:ttee on As·-
sas.c;ination!:', p. 1 ( J. F. K. Document 012923).
( 85) See ref. L Yeciana interview, p. 10 .
( 8G) See ref. 84.
( 87) See ref.ll, Yeciana executive session testimony. p. 9.
(88) Staff interview w-ith Lopez-Fresquet, :11ay 19, 197i, House Select Commit·
tee on Assassinations, p. 13 (J. F. K Document 001512).
(f)9) Id.atp.9.
(90) Memorandum, July 27, 1976, Bouse Select Committee on Assassinations;-
p. 2 (J. F. K. Document 012919).
• . ...
54
(91) "Rei"Oiucl6n," 1'\ol". 7, 1961, p.l.
19!) See reL 1, Vecln.na interl"lew, p. 6.
193) Ibid.
(9-f) CIA memorandum to FBI, Sept. ll, 1902 (Rorke pamphlet attachment).
(9J) See reL 11, \eclono executive session testimony, p.lS.
(96) Sta.tr memorandum, Kalllnterl"lew, July 24., 1978, Bouse Select Committee
on .usnsslnntlons, p.1 (J. F. K. Document 010307).
(97) Ibid.
!!18) Id. at p. 5.
(l/9) Id. at p. 2.
(100) Ibid.
(101) Ibid.
(10!) Ibid.
tlOS J I d. at p. 4.
(Jil.f J Cnsrro report, House Select Committee on Assnsslnntlous (J. F. E:.
Document 000593).
1105) St.alf memorandum of Max Lesnik intervie'«", May 30,1078, Bouse Select
Com mitt('(> on Assassinations, p. 4 (J. F. K. Document 008888).
(106) Ibid.
(107) Ibid.
1108) St.alf memorandum of Lncllo Penn lnterl"ie'«", June 1!!, lOiS, Bouse Select
Committee on A.ssn.ssinatlons ( J. F. K. Document 000270).
(109) Ibid.
(110) Ibid.
1111) See rH. 2i. \eclnua Immunized testimony, p. 54.
(112) See reL 108.
(113) Ibid.
(11-4) lbld.
!115 J lbld. : !:ee nlso ref. 2i. Yeclann Immunized te!:timony, p. r..t.
ll16J Miami Bernld, Oct. 16.1976, p. 8.
!117) FBl file Xo. 2-2173. section 6. serials 231.
1118) Stnlf memorandum on Posada intervle'«", June li. lOiS, Bous!! SPIP.ct
C'OUJmlttee on Assnsslnatious, p.l (J. F. K. Document 009412).
tii!Jl lrt. at p. 2.
(J!UJ) Ibid.
Il.old.
(1!2) Illlcl.
  Ibid.
( J2.f) ]bid.
t l!JJ ld. nr p. 1.
11261 I cl. nt p. 3.
t127) Sel' re!.ll. Yeclnnn Executil"e Sl'ss!on Testimony, pp. !!S-30.
1 1!8) See reL l, \eclana interview, p. 8.
(1!9) Ibid.
(1301 Ihid.; see re!.ll, Yeclnnn executil"e session testimony, p. 28.
(131) Ibid. •
(13!) Stnlf Interview of Orestes Guillermo Rolz, Au:;. 23, 1978, Bouse Select
Committee on A.ssn.ssinatlons, pp. 1, 7.
(13J) Outside C'ontoct Report. Aug. 30, 1978, Bouse Select Committee on Assas-
sinatlons. p.l (J. F. K. Document011267).
(134) lnter\"le'«" notes. Mar. 16. 1978, Bouse Select Committee on Assassina·
tlon,, p. 5 (J. F. K. Document012928).
IJJJ) Ouuolde Contact Report. Ang. 30,1978, Bouse Select Co1Dll11ttee on Assas·
sinatlons. p. 2 (J. F. K. Document Oll2G7).
( 136) Iblcl.
(137) Ibid.
( 138) See ref. 132.
IJJ!I) lei. nt p. 7.
(J.jO) ld. at p. 1:!.
(J.j/l Id. nt p. 13.
Ibid.
11.f3l Icl. at p . i .
( l.t.f) lei. Rt p. Sl.
(J.j.i) Icl. nt p. ll.
(146) Ibid.
0;)
(147) Outsidl' Contact Report. Sept. 12, 1978, Boose Select Comrllittee on
(J. F. K. Document 011465).
(1,f8) Ibid.
(J,fS)Ibld.
(150) Outside contact report. Aotr. SO. lOiS, Boose Select Committee on Assns-
p.l (J. F. K. Document 011267).
(151) See ref. 2i, Veciana lmmonized Testimony, pp. GS-66.
(15!) See ret. 62, Veclnna internew, p. 4.
(153) Ibid.
fl.i,f) Ibid.
•( 155} See ref. 27, Veclana Immunized Testimony, p. 87.
(156) Letter from Senator RichArd S. Scll'«"ei.ker. Dec. 14, 1976, Bouse Select
l('ommittee on Assassinations, p. 3 (J. F. K. Document OO<hi21).
( 1J1) Memorandum, Aug. 6, 1976, Bouse Select Committee on Assassinations,
p. 2 1 J. F. K. Document 012921).
1 158} Memorandum to Gustal"son. Sept. 20, 1976, Bouse Select Committee on
(J. F. K. Document 013455) .
.(},')9) Ibid.
I Hill) Ibid.
•IJfiJl Jrt. at p. 2.
11G2) Ibid.
·(JGS) Ibid.
I 16.11 I <!. at p. 3.
I JG5) Ibid.
·(JGG) Ibid.
·!1G7) Ibid.
I lfi8l Ihid.
( 11:!1) Ihid.
I 170} Jloid.
1111) ]hid.
I 172) Ihid.
1 17-11 1 tl. n t p. 4.
1/7.+ 1 T!l. nt p. S.
rr:.il \'eclnua e:s:ecutll"e session testimony.
( /7G) Jhid.
( 1":7) D:tl"id Phillips. Nightwatcll. Mbeneum. 19ii, p. 5.
1178) Jhid.
117!Jl Rtotf interrit>'«". Jan. lfl. llliS. Bousl' Select Committee on AMSllssinutlons,
-pp. 1. 3 I J. F. K. Document 004721) .
UM) lcl. nt p. 2.
11,1\Jl Td. nt p . .J.
( 78!?) E. Bo'«"ard Bunt, Gi11e U& Tlli& Dov (Populnr Library, i9i4), p. 26.
(183) Ibid.
1 1 of interl"iew, Feb. 4, 19iS, p. 1 (J. F . K. Document 005063) .
r t.c:..; 1 I d. nt p. 2.
(I (Ui) Ibid.
r t .l\11 inter\"iP'«" of Don!! Gupton. Aug. 28. 197S. Bouse Select Committee
-on • (J. F. K. Document 002101).
I Ill.'{) Thiel.
(18!1) Jhld.
(I !Ill) Ibid.
U!l71 I<l. nt p. 2.
(19Zl !hid.
I 1 !J3) Ibid.
09-f) Jllld.
-< J!l.; l Ihid.
(1!1/il Ibid.
o( 1 !11) Ibid.
(1981 Ihld.
I 199) Executive session testimony of Dnid Atlee Pbllllps (cla.ss:l1led). Apr. 25,
1lli8. hearings before the House Select Co1Dll11ttee on Assassinations, p 89.
.
1 :!rJ/ 1 I d. nt p. SO.
(202) Ihid.
(203) Ibid.