to be confined into a comfortable prison of endless entertainment and public selfdisclosure....

entertained into an ironic spiral of smug spiritual death.... i don't fear religion unified with politics..this is already failing..and ultimately will just be a side show relegated to rural communities..and even those will die out in time as their children continue to be willfully swallowed up by the virtual world.... no...what i fear is the union of the corporate state, multinational banking and the "national security" industry with the shiniest of political machines... i feel sorry for...and in a way intellectually resent the vapid posturing of those who continue to try and reduce our most pressing problems to the (yes) mindless purveyors of fundamentalist religion(s)...for me, there is no more tiresome argument... and perhaps..no more dangerous one...as it pits good people against each other for the most superficial of reasons...when the real threat comes from above..and it is ultimately completely disinterested in the issues of faith or lack their of...it is the religion of consumerism…and its passive colonization of our minds..the conscious and unconscious commercialization of "privacy" where the real battles lines of the future are being drawn....

Wagner’s term is coined in “Music of the Future,” an open letter to a French friend in which he provides an uncharacteristically succinct and lucid summary of his outlook on the dismal state and future prospects of operatic composition. The venera le !reeks of anti"uity, Wagner claims, achieved a union of the arts, ut over time the arts drifted apart and each art pursued its own ends. Wagner’s aspiration is to draw them together again, with music as the guiding light. #n his historical reckoning, Wagner understands $eethoven to have reached a pinnacle of instrumental%and particularly orchestral%music, and in his ninth symphony he pioneered a reunion of music and poetry. &f course, poets provided li rettos for operas, ut for Wagner this is like affi'ing a la el to a painting. (ather, the poet should play a central role in the desired reunion once it is understood that poetry has its highest destiny in music )Wagner charts two possi le courses for poetry* an alliance with philosophy or with music+. ,onventional operatic practice, with its fi'ation on arias, reduced the ulk of the music to so much filler. $y conflating melody with aria, the potential of opera had een stunted. Wagner proposes, accordingly, to e'tend the melodic activity invested in arias to the entire composition. $y doing so, he thinks, the role of the poet would e elevated*

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