The Aubin Academy Master Series

Revit MEP 2012

Paul F Aubin Darryl McClelland, LEED AP Martin Schmid, PE Gregg Stanley

The Aubin Academy Master Series: Revit MEP 2012
Paul F. Aubin, Darryl McClelland, LEED AP, Martin Schmid, PE, and Gregg Stanley © 2011 Paul F. Aubin ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. No part of this work covered by the copyright herein may be reproduced, transmitted stored or used in any form or by any means graphic, electronic, or mechanical including but not limited to photocopying, recording, scanning, digitizing, taping, Web distribution, information networks, or information storage and retrieval systems, except as permitted under Section 107 or 108 of the 1976 United States Copyright Act, Without the prior written permission of the publisher.

ISBN-13: 978-1466389359 ISBN-10: 1466389354 G3B Press c/o Paul F. Aubin Consulting Services P.O. Box 223 Oak Lawn, IL 60454 USA To learn more about titles by G3B Press, the book’s authors and other offerings by Paul F Aubin Consulting Services, please visit www.paulaubin.com. Updates are posted to the blog section of the site. Please use Contact link to send email.
Notice to the Reader Publisher does not warrant or guarantee any of the products described herein or perform any independent analysis in connection with any of the product information contained herein. Publisher does not assume, and expressly disclaims, any obligation to obtain and include information other than that provided to it by the manufacturer. The reader is expressly warned to consider and adopt all safety precautions that might be indicated by the activities described herein and to avoid all potential hazards. By following the instructions contained herein, the reader willingly assumes all risks in connection with such instructions. The publisher makes no representations or warranties of any kind, including but not limited to, the warranties of fitness for particular purpose or merchantability, nor are any such representations implied with respect to the material set forth herein, and the publisher takes no responsibility with respect to such material. The publisher shall not be liable for any special, consequential, or exemplary damages resulting, in whole or part, from the readers’ use of, or reliance upon, this material. The views expressed herein are solely those of the authors/presenters and are not those of Autodesk, Inc., its officers, directors, subsidiaries, affiliates, business partners, or customers.

Contents at a Glance

Preface ........................................................................................................ xiii SECTION I—INTRODUCTION AND METHODOLOGY Chapter 1—Conceptual Underpinnings of Revit MEP ................................... 3 Chapter 2—Revit MEP User Interface ...................................................... 43 SECTION II—CREATE THE BUILDING MODEL Chapter 3—Basic Project Setup .............................................................. 91 Chapter 4—Energy Analysis .................................................................. 141 Chapter 5—Mechanical Systems ........................................................... 183 Chapter 6—Piping Systems .................................................................. 265 Chapter 7—Electrical Systems .............................................................. 292 SECTION III—CONTENT Chapter 8—Family Editor and Connectors .............................................. 369 SECTION IV—COORDINATION AND OUTPUT Chapter 9—Coordination Tools .............................................................. 471 Chapter 10—Printing, Publishing and Exporting ..................................... 504 INDEX ................................................................................................ 523

iv | Contents at a Glance

From the Preface

WELCOME
This is a preview of The Aubin Academy Master Series: Revit MEP 2012. Contained in this preview is the complete text of Chapter 5. Contained here is an abbreviated version of the Preface which explains how to access the book’s datasets and some other pertinent information. If you enjoy this preview please consider visiting www.paulaubin.com to learn how you can purchase a copy of the complete book. Thank you for downloading this preview.

STYLE CONVENTIONS
Style Conventions used in this text are as follows: Text
Step-by-Step Tutorials Menu picks Dialog box and palette input On screen input File and Directory Names

AutoCAD MEP
1. Perform these steps.

Application menu > Save As > AutoCAD Drawing For the length, type 10'-0". For the length type: 10'-0". For the name input: Name. C:\MasterRME 2012\Chapter01\Sample Project.rvt

BIM MANAGER NOTE: Especially for BIM Managers—there are many issues of RMEP usage that are important for BIM Managers and adherence overall to office standards. In the text are notes specifically tailored to the BIM Manager titled “BIM Manager Note.” If BIM management is not within your interests or responsibilities, you can safely skip over these notes.

6 | Index

UNITS
This book is written in Imperial units. Metric datasets and references are not provided.

BOOK DATASET FILES
Files used in the tutorials throughout this book are available for download from www.paulaubin.com . Most chapters include files required to begin the lesson, and in many cases a completed version is provided as well that you can use to check your work. This means that you will be able to load the files for a given chapter and begin working. When you install the downloaded dataset, the files for all chapters are installed automatically. The files will install into a folder on your C: drive named MasterRME 2012. You are encouraged to install files in this location. Inside this folder will be a folder for each chapter. Note that in some cases a particular chapter or subfolder will not have any Revit files. This is usually indicated by a text file (TXT) within this folder. For example, the Chapter02 folder contains no Revit files, but instead contains a text document named; There is no dataset for Chapter 2.txt. This text file simply explains that this folder was left empty intentionally. Should updates be required, a notice will be posted to www.paulaubin.com/blog.
NOTE: Please note that the accompanying dataset contains only Revit files (RVT, RTE and RFA) and other related resource files necessary to complete the tutorial lessons in this book. The provided dataset does not contain the Revit MEP software. Please contact your local reseller if you need to purchase a copy.

To download and install the files, please do the following:
1. In your web browser, visit: www.paulaubin.com. 2. Click on the Books link at the top. 3. Click on the link for the book whose files you wish to access. Downloads will be listed in the “Downloads” section of the page. 4. There may be more than one item to download. Click each item and follow the instructions of your browser to download each one. 5. Run the WinZip EXE file and unzip the files to your C Drive.

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The default unzip folder is named C:\MasterRME 2012 on your hard drive. Unzipped files will utilize approximately 135 MB of disk space.

DATASET ACKNOWLEDGMENT
Portions of the dataset in Chapter 5 are provided courtesy of Titus. Several Titus models were downloaded and used in the tutorial. Thank you to Titus for providing this content to enhance the overall experience of the tutorial. You can learn more about Titus and the content that they have available for use in Revit at: http://www.titus-hvac.com/software/revit/Revit.asp

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU
We welcome your comments and suggestions regarding Aubin Academy Mastering Series: Revit MEP. You can send emails directly to the authors at: mep@paulaubin.com. Visit www.paulaubin.com to learn more about our books and other offerings. Paul’s services are available to architectural firms using AutoCAD Architecture, MEP, Revit MEP, and Architecture. Use the contact form to inquire about schedule and pricing.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS
Paul F. Aubin is the author of many CAD and BIM book titles including the widely acclaimed: The Aubin Academy Mastering Series: Revit Architecture, AutoCAD Architecture, AutoCAD MEP and Revit MEP titles. Paul has also authored video training both on his Web site and for lynda.com www.lynda.com/paulaubin. Paul is an independent architectural consultant who travels internationally providing Revit® Architecture and AutoCAD® Architecture implementation, training, and support services. Paul’s involvement in the architectural profession spans over 20 years, with experience that includes design, production, CAD management, mentoring, coaching and training. He is an active member of the Autodesk user community, and has been a top-rated speaker at Autodesk University (Autodesk’s annual user convention) for many years. This year Paul spoke at the Revit Technology Conference (RTC) in both the US and Australia. His diverse experience in architectural firms, as a CAD manager, and as an educator gives his writing and his classroom instruction a fresh and credible focus. Paul is an associate member of the American Institute of Architects. He lives in Chicago with his wife and three children.

8 | Index

Darryl McClelland, LEED AP has 26 years of practical design experience in MEP engineering. Although his primary focus was the design of mechanical systems, he spent 11 of those 26 years designing electrical and plumbing systems as well. He also ran his own engineering business for eight years. His design experience ranges from complex research laboratories and institutional facilities to medical and professional office buildings, and everything in between. He is a graduate of Purdue University and an active member of ASHRAE, ASPE, and a LEED AP. Martin J. Schmid, P.E. works with customers to implement best practices using AutoCAD MEP and Revit MEP. In his current role, in addition to customer interaction, he works with product design and product management to convey industry needs and trends. Mr. Schmid has also worked in various roles in a variety of architecture and engineering firms, including electrical designer, engineering coordinator, and application developer. In addition to product and industry expertise, Mr. Schmid applies the API’s of Autodesk’s products to automate processes and solve customer problems. Mr. Schmid has presented internally to coworkers, at Autodesk University, industry conferences, and as a consultant to design firms and 3rd party application developers. Gregg Stanley has over twenty two years experience in Mechanical Process Design focused on Water Wastewater treatment systems using Autodesk based solutions since Release 1.1. He has also been in the position as a BIM Manager responsible for developing and instituting company specific customized applications, standards and training. Mr. Stanley has written and presented several training classes on AutoCAD, AutoCAD MEP and Revit MEP both internally to co-workers, as an independent consultant and at Autodesk University and has designed and tested software for the engineering industry for the last 5 years.
The views expressed herein are solely those of the authors/presenters and are not those of Autodesk, Inc., its officers, directors, subsidiaries, affiliates, business partners, or customers.

Chapter 5

Mechanical Systems

INTRODUCTION
Now that you have created your project and performed your energy analysis, you are ready to begin designing your ductwork systems. Revit MEP (RMEP) offers several tools to help you design and document your project’s ductwork systems. This chapter will cover the fundamentals of how the ductwork tools in RMEP work. We will discuss settings that control the ductwork and workflow approaches when you are creating your ductwork systems. We will also explore ways to manage your ductwork systems more efficiently.

OBJECTIVES
In this chapter we will focus on ductwork and the related tools in an effort to learn how these tools can help you design your ductwork systems. Topics in this chapter will include: • Ductwork Settings. • Creating reflected ceiling plans to coordinate the location of your devices. • Basic ductwork options for placing and displaying your ductwork and their associated components. • Display behavior of your ductwork systems. • Tools for routing and sizing your ductwork system. • Graphical Warnings for Validating your ductwork systems. • Ductwork insulation and lining. • Ductwork Justification controls.

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MECHANICAL SETTINGS
Let’s begin by familiarizing ourselves with some of the ductwork settings in RMEP. These settings might have an impact on the ductwork you place in your project. Therefore, it is recommended that you configure these settings to meet your needs before you begin placing your ductwork. For example, the auto routing and ductwork sizing tools reference a prepopulated table list of available ductwork sizes in the software. That table contains half-inch increment sizes by default. Will half-inch increment sizes be acceptable in your ductwork configurations? If not, then you will want to exclude them through your Mechanical Settings. Configuring your settings first, and then saving your preferences in a company template file, will help you avoid addressing such issues late; especially when project completion might be your main focus at a later point in time. Once you have determined the best configuration for your ductwork settings, it is recommended that you save those settings in a Revit template file (RTE). This will ensure that your work is preserved and will allow you to start each project from a common point with your preferred settings. OPEN A PROJECT FILE The lessons that follow require the dataset files available for download as a companion to this book. If you have already downloaded and installed the files skip to step 3 to begin. If you need to install the files, start at step 1.
1. If you have not already done so, install the book’s dataset files. Refer to “Book Dataset Files” in the Preface for information on installing the sample files included with this book. 2. Launch Revit MEP from the icon on your desktop or from the Autodesk > Revit MEP 2012 group in All Programs on the Windows Start menu.

TIP: You can click the Windows Start button, and then begin typing Revit in the “Search” field. After a couple letters, Revit MEP should appear near the top of the list. Click it to launch to program.

3. On the QAT, click the Open icon.

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TIP: The keyboard shortcut for Open is (big “R”).

CTRL

+ O. Open is also located on the Application menu

 

In the “Open” dialog box, browse to the location where you installed the dataset files. Double-click on the MasterRME 2012 folder and then the Chapter05 folder.

4. Open the 05 MEP Commercial.rvt file. 5. Open the “Mechanical Settings” dialog box.

There are four ways that you can access the “Mechanical Settings” dialog.
   You can use the dialog launcher icon on the Home tab, on both the HVAC and Mechanical panels. On the Manage tab, on the Settings panel click the MEP Settings drop-down button and choose Mechanical Settings. Use the keyboard shortcut. Simply type: MS on your keyboard (see Figure 5.1).

FIGURE 5.1

Mechanical Settings within RMEP can be accessed in several different manners

This dialog contains many settings that will help you define your ductwork system in your project. Let’s review a few of the settings. Selecting Hidden Line allows you to modify settings that control the representation of your ductwork objects when they cross each other. Use the “Draw MEP Hidden Lines” checkbox to

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turn on and off the feature. The line style and various gap settings can also be configured. This setting applies when Hidden Line, Shaded, or Consistent Colors is selected from the View Control Bar (see Figure 5.2).

FIGURE 5.2

Visual Style for the View can be controlled through the Properties of the View or on the View Control View

NOTE: The use of the term “hidden line” is slightly different in each context here. When used in the view properties context, “hidden line” refers to the effect caused by 3D geometry in the foreground’s concealing other geometry behind it. In the context of the “Mechanical Settings” dialog, “hidden line” refers to the use of dashed lines (hidden lines) to represent such items that would be concealed in that view.

The Inside and Outside Gap setting will produce a gap between the crossed objects in views that are set to Medium or Fine (see Figure 5.3).

FIGURE 5.3

The inside and outside gap distances of crossed ductwork objects can be set in Mechanical Settings

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The Single Line setting will produce a gap between the crossed objects in views set to a Course detail level (see Figure 5.4).

FIGURE 5.4

Course detail level with gaps applied

Hidden Line settings apply to Duct, Pipe, Conduit and Cable Tray. Beneath Hidden Line are Duct Settings and Pipe Settings. We will only look at Duct Settings in this chapter. Chapter 6 will discuss piping including a brief discussion on pipe settings. On Duct Settings, you will see several settings that apply to the overall behavior and display of your ductwork, both Main and Branch ductwork. The first two settings allow you to control the size of fittings in single line views (Course level of detail). Air Density and Viscosity are used with the duct sizing tools. The remaining settings control the symbols used on duct labels. For example, by default rectangular duct separates the width and height sizes with an “x”, a round duct uses a “ø” symbol after the duct size, and oval duct separates the width and height sizes with a “/”. You can also add a suffix to the duct if desired (see Figure 5.5).

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FIGURE 5.5

Duct Settings control how annotation is applied and overall settings used in duct calculations

The Duct Connector Separator setting allows you to input a character or symbol that will be applied to the ductwork annotation tag for connectors (see Figure 5.6).

FIGURE 5.6

Ductwork connector tag with separator applied

If your office standards call for any changes, please feel free to make those edits now. Otherwise, the default settings will suffice for our exercise here. Selecting Conversion, beneath Duct Settings, allows you to specify an Elbow Angle Increment that will be applied to all routing solutions for your Main and Branch ductwork systems (see Figure 5.8).

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FIGURE 5.7

Elbow increments for ductwork systems can be specified to match standard industry sizes

Indented directly underneath Conversion is Main and Branch. Here you can apply additional settings to your Main or Branch Supply, Return, and Exhaust Air systems. After selecting either Main or Branch you can use the System Type: drop-down list to choose the desired System Type to further configure that particular ductwork system. Through the Duct Type drop down list you can select the type of ductwork that will be used for each system and its fitting connection type. In addition, you can also specify the ductwork system offset elevation (see Figure 5.8).

FIGURE 5.8

The type of ductwork, fitting connection, and offset elevation can be specified in Mechanical Settings

In addition to the Duct Type and Offset settings discussed above, after selecting Branch you can also set your Flex Duct Type and Length (see Figure 5.9).

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FIGURE 5.9

Flexible ductwork can be configured through the Mechanical Settings

NOTE: Remember that the System Type will appear at the top in a drop-down list, so be sure to choose the appropriate System Type before configuring your desired options.

Again, if your office standards call for any changes, please feel free to make those edits now. Otherwise, the default settings will suffice for our exercise here.
NOTE: When using the auto routing tools the Main and Branch Conversion settings will be available to you during that process.

The remaining three items beneath Duct Settings are Rectangular, Oval and Round. Each of those items shows a table that contains all the available sizes for ductwork that will be used with the ductwork sizing tools in RMEP. You can add a new size to the table or even delete sizes. In lieu of deleting sizes it might be best to leave the sizes in the table and simply deselect the size in the “Used in Size Lists” and/or the “Used in Sizing” column. This will help save time later having to re-create the sizes you deleted if they become needed later (see Figure 5.10).

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FIGURE 5.10

Sizes can be excluded from the ductwork sizing tools for particular shapes of ductwork

Again, if your office standards call for any changes, please feel free to make those edits now.
6. Otherwise, deselect all the 1/2” (.50) ductwork increments in both the “Used in Size Lists” and the “Used in Sizing” columns for Rectangular, Oval, and Round ductwork.

NOTE: The Rectangular, Oval, and Round “Used in Size lists” will be appear when the duct layout editor, duct modify editor, flex duct, and flex duct modify tools are being used. Any deselected items will not appear in those lists. Any deselected items in the “Use in Sizing” list will not be included in RMEP’s sizing tools when determining ductwork sizes based on system airflow.

This gives you a very brief look at the “Mechanical Settings” dialog. You will want to take some additional time to study each setting or experiment on your own with some of these options in an effort to determine what the most optimal settings will be for you or your company. As previously mentioned, once you have determined the best configuration for your

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ductwork settings it is recommended that you save those settings in a Revit template file (RTE).
7. Click OK in the Mechanical Settings dialog box. 8. Save your file.

TIP: It is always a good idea to take a quick look in the “Mechanical Settings” dialog before placing ductwork.

We are now ready to begin placing ductwork in our project.

CREATING A CEILING PLAN VIEW FOR COORDINATION
When air terminals are placed in a project their placement will need to be coordinated with other items like light fixtures, sprinkler heads, etc. To do this coordination in Revit a ceiling plan view can be created. Let’s define a ceiling plan view for Level 3 of our project.
1. On the View tab, on the Create panel, click the Plan Views drop-down and then click Reflected Ceiling Plan.

2. In the “New RCP” dialog, select Level 3. 3. Verify that the Scale is set to: 1/8"=1'-0" and then click OK.

A new reflected ceiling plan view named Level 3 opens onscreen. By default, the view is categorized beneath the Mechanical branch on the Project Browser. However, since the new view has not yet been assigned to a sub discipline, it appears as uncategorized in the Project Browser under the Mechanical > ??? branch.
4. On the Project Browser, expand the Mechanical > ??? > Ceiling Plans branch (see Figure 5.11).

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FIGURE 5.11

A newly created Reflected Ceiling Plan view appears in Project Browser

Let’s make a few adjustments to the view that we just created.
5. On the Project Browser, beneath Mechanical > ??? > Ceiling Plans, click to select Level 3.

On the Properties palette, Ceiling Plan: Level 3 will be listed in the filter drop-down at the top of the palette.
    For Underlay Orientation, choose: Reflected Ceiling Plan For Sub-Discipline, choose: HVAC. In the View Name field, append: – HVAC Ceiling Plan to the end of the view name. Shift your mouse focus away from the palette or click the Apply button to apply the changes.

6. When prompted to rename the corresponding level and views click No.

NOTE: If you were to click Yes in the message dialog, Revit will rename the level to match the new name, i.e., “Level 3 – HVAC Ceiling Plan”. You do not want to do this. This will cause you to perform a Coordination Review since the level names in the MEP host model no longer match the copy/monitored levels from the linked architectural model.

On the Project Browser you should see that our Ceiling Plan is no longer uncategorized (???) but rather is shown beneath the HVAC Sub-Discipline. With these changes, the view is beginning to take on a more appropriate look. However there is one more setting; View Range that requires adjustment. When placing the air terminals in your project you might find it necessary or beneficial to know the whereabouts of furniture, equipment, etc., as you are placing those devices. You can use the View Range to increase the extents of the view to help coordinate your placement relative to those objects.

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7. On the Properties palette, next to the View Range option, click the Edit button.  Change the Cut Plane Offset: to 1'-0" and then click OK.

Furniture, doors, and other items now display in the view making the coordination of air terminals with other project-related items easier to accomplish.
8. Save your file.

PLACING AIR TERMINAL DEVICES
Now that we have created our reflected ceiling plan to coordinate the placement of our air terminal devices with other project components, let’s begin placing our project’s air terminal devices.
1. Zoom in Region to the top left corner of the plan as indicated in Figure 5.12.

FIGURE 5.12

Zoom in on the work area

For this exercise, we will place an air terminal that is not currently loaded in the project. There are a couple ways to load Families into your projects. We’ll look at both in this chapter.
2. On the Insert tab, on the Load from Library panel, click the Load Family button. 3. Browse to the Mechanical Components\ Air-Side Components\ Air Terminals folder.

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4. Scroll down and click Supply Diffuser – Rectangular Face Round Neck.rfa and then click Open (see Figure 5.13).

FIGURE 5.13

Browse to and load a diffuser Family

BIM MANAGER NOTE: If you do not have access to the folders indicated, you may not have installed the Imperial library. Check your Revit installation or talk with your BIM Manager to be sure. Copies of the out-of-the-box Family files have been included with the book dataset files installed from the online companion. Feel free to browse to the book folder to load them instead.

The Air Terminal device is now loaded into our project file. Let’s place one in Office 3109.
5. On the Home tab, on the HVAC panel, click the Air Terminal button. 6. On the Properties palette, from the Type Selector, choose: 24x24 – 6 Neck diffuser (see the left side of Figure 5.14).

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FIGURE 5.14

You can select the loaded Family from the Type Selector on the Properties palette 7. On the Properties palette, change the Offset to: 9'-0".   Deselect the: Up, Right, Left, and Down Arrow checkboxes. For the Flow, type: 150 (see the right side of Figure 5.14).

8. Place the diffuser between the two set of lights in Office 3109 located in the upper left hand corner of the plan (see Figure 5.15).

Since the insertion point of the diffuser is the middle of the diffuser you will need to place the diffuser and then use your Align tool (AL) or Move tool (MV) (both on the Modify tab) to move the diffuser to the location shown and line it up with the grid. After using the Align or move tool right click and choose Cancel.

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FIGURE 5.15

Use the mechanical ceiling plan to coordinate the placement of ceiling diffusers

After placing the diffuser you realized that based on the volume of air associated with the diffuser that the diffuser really should have had an 8 inch neck. You do not need to erase the diffuser and replace it with another. You can simply select the diffuser and change the property to an 8 inch neck.
9. Select the diffuser that you just placed   On the Properties palette, from the Type Selector, choose: 24x24 – 8 Neck. Press
ESC

once or click the Modify tool on the ribbon (this clears the selection).

Now we will use the Copy tool (CO) to copy the diffuser that we just placed in Office 3109 to the three immediately below it (see the right side of Figure 5.16).
10. Select the diffuser in Office 3109.     On the Modify | Air Terminals tab, on the Modify panel, click the Copy tool. On the Options Bar, check the Multiple checkbox. Snap to the endpoint of the diffuser at one of the corners and copy it to the endpoint of the light fixture located in each of the three offices (see the left side of Figure 5.16). Press
ESC

once or click the Modify tool on the ribbon to cancel.

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FIGURE 5.16

Copying a defined diffuser to other locations

NOTE: You might need to zoom into certain areas more closely in order to select the desired snap location.

TIP: If you have difficulty snapping to a point, either a light fixture or the intersection of a ceiling grid, temporarily change your Visual Style to Wireframe.

Now that we have copied our supply air diffuser we can continue to make adjustments as required by the design.
11. Select the three diffusers you just copied to Office 3106, 3107, and 3108. You can click the first and then hold down the
CTRL

and click each of the others.

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Or you can click above and to the left of the first hold down the mouse and drag a box around all three and then release.

TIP: If you try this method, be careful not to accidentally select other elements. If you do, click the Filter button on the ribbon and deselect all checkboxes except Air Terminals and then click OK.

  

On the Properties palette, change the Flow to: 125. From the Type Selector, change the diffuser type to: 24x24 – 6 Neck. Press
ESC

once or click the Modify tool on the ribbon (this clears the selection).

12. Save your file.

To recap the process, we placed one diffuser and configured its Properties. We then copied it to other locations and modified the Properties to meet the requirements of the room that the copies would serve. We are now ready to begin placing our VAV (Variable Air Volume) boxes.

PLACING MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT
Let’s begin placing our mechanical equipment, in this case our VAV boxes. In the last two chapters we added and configured Zones for this Level. We will use the Zone configuration during the placement of our VAV boxes.
1. On the Project Browser beneath Mechanical > HVAC > Floor Plans, double-click to open the Level 3 – HVAC view.

Once this view is open you should immediately notice that the air terminals that we placed in our reflected ceiling plan are also visible in our HVAC plan. Based on our zoning configuration (established in Chapter 3) we will place our VAV boxes for our Offices. Like the diffuser above, we will need to load the VAV box Family into the project file. This one we will load from the dataset files that are included and that you download with this book.

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WANTED: A FAMILY THAT FITS YOUR PROJECTS NEEDS
Although RMEP comes with several different Families, your project might require a Family that RMEP did not come with. That is the case for the activities centered on the VAV box in this chapter. When faced with an issue like this you have several different options. You can scour the various content folders on your local office network. Most firms have folders full of Revit content items. Be sure to check with the BIM Manager or your IT support staff to find out where these resources reside. Autodesk Seek is an online service that contains content authored by Autodesk and a multitude of product manufacturers. Autodesk publishes standards and minimum requirements that manufacturers must meet before posting their content. However, all manufacturers do not interpret the requirements equally and you will certainly see varying degrees of quality in online content. In the same vein, many product manufacturers might have content available on their own web sites and there are plenty of third-party web sites out there providing both free and paid content offerings. Always be sure to do a quality check on such resources before using them in your projects. Some online offerings are quite good while others are quite poor. It is always best to try them first in a separate test project before using in your live project. Finally, you always have the option to build your own custom Family content. Creating such items is the subject of Chapter 8. For this exercise we will be utilizing a Titus VAV box with a hot water reheat coil. This VAV box will fit our needs for the exercise in this chapter quite nicely. This Family file is provided courtesy of Titus in the Chapter05 folder with the other dataset files for this chapter. You should already have this folder and its contents as it was part of the dataset provided for Chapter 5. Refer to “Book Dataset Files” in the Preface for information on installing the sample files included with this book.
2. On the Home tab, on the Mechanical panel, click the Mechanical Equipment button.

In the diffuser example above, we first loaded the Family from the Insert tab and then ran the Air Terminal command. As you can see when you run such a command the Load Family button is also available on the context ribbon. This method is a little quicker than the one shown above.

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From the Modify | Place Mechanical Equipment tab, on the Mode panel, click the Load Family button (see Figure 5.17).

FIGURE 5.17

You can load a Family directly from the Place Mechanical Equipment tab    Browse the C:\MasterRME 2012\Chapter05\Right Hand Control folder. Select the first Family in the list, hold down the SHIFT key, and click the last Family (this will select all of the Families in the folder). Click the Open button.

All of the Titus right hand control VAV boxes are now loaded into our project and we are ready to place one for Office 3109.
3. On the Properties palette, from the Type Selector, choose: Titus_DESV-HWC_RH-5in.    On the Properties palette, change the Offset to: 11'-0". Tap the
SPACEBAR

to rotate the VAV box as necessary.

Place it in Office 3109 and then press ESC twice.
ENTER

4. Double-click the VAV box annotation, change the Mark to: VAV-3109 and then press (see Figure 5.18).

TIP: If you want to make the label more legible, it has a small drag handle that you can use to move the tag.

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FIGURE 5.18

Place the VAV box and then rename it on the Tag 5. Press
ESC

to deselect.

Using the same process we’ll place a VAV box in Office 3107 that will serve Offices 3106, 3107, and 3108.
6. Zoom in on Office 3107. 7. On the Home tab, on the HVAC panel, click the Mechanical Equipment button again.    On the Properties palette, choose: 6" VAV Unit – Single Duct box. Use the Press
SPACEBAR

to rotate the VAV box and place it in Office 3107.

ESC

twice.
ESC

8. Double-click the VAV box annotation, change the Mark to: VAV-3107 and then press Figure 5.19).

(see

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FIGURE 5.19

Placing additional VAV boxes

NOTE: As you are placing an object in RMEP you can align elements with other elements that have already been placed.

9. Save your file.

The VAV boxes that we just placed came equipped with heating hot water supply and return piping connections. In Chapter 6 we will add pipe to those connections. In the next sequence, we will begin adding ductwork and creating our supply system.

DUCTWORK
Now that we have placed our air terminals and our VAV boxes we need to connect those two items together to form a system. There are two distinct ways we can do this. The first method is to simply use the ductwork tools built into in RMEP.

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The other method involves creating a system and then asking RMEP to propose possible solutions. RMEP will use a built-in algorithm to determine different possible routing solutions for your ductwork system. You can then select the best solution that fits your needs and modify the routing if necessary. Both methods can accomplish acceptable results. It will be up to you to determine which method is the best for you in each situation. Let’s review each method by starting with the simple ductwork tools first.

ADJUST ANNOTATION
Before we do, let’s move a few labels out of our way so we can place our ductwork more easily.
1. Zoom into Office 3109.

2. Select the VAV-3109 label.  Use the drag handle to move it to the left and below the VAV box and then press Figure 5.20). If you moved the labels already above, you can skip this step.
ESC

(see

FIGURE 5.20

Use the Drag handle to move items to make your view more legible

We can also move the Space tag if it is in the way. However, there is some behavior of the Space Tag that we should review first. Space Tags prefer to reside within the Space they denote. You can move them outside of the bounding Space but you will receive a warning message indicating that the tag is outside of its Space and that you should enable leaders or move the tag back within its Space (see Figure 5.21).

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FIGURE 5.21

To move a Space Tag out of its Space you must enable Leaders

All tags can use leaders. They are optional for most tag types. What this error message means is that Space Tags require leaders if the Space tag is moved outside the Space boundary.
3. Select the Space Tag for Office 3109 and on the Options Bar check the Leader checkbox.  Use the Drag handle on the Space Tag and drag the tag outside the Space (see Figure 5.22).

TIP: You can fine-tune the placement of the tag by adjusting the other shape handles on the tag leader or by pressing the arrow keys on the keyboard to nudge the tag slightly.

FIGURE 5.22

A Leader allows the Space Tag to be moved outside its Space

Repeat the same process in the steps above to move the VAV box label and the Space tag in Office 3107.
4. Repeat both procedures to move the tag on the VAV box in Office 3107 and to enable a leader and relocate the Space tag (see Figure 5.23).

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FIGURE 5.23

Moving annotations allows you to place objects more easily 5. Save your file.

PLACING DUCTWORK
We are going to complete the HVAC system for Office 3109 first.
6. Zoom in on Office 3109.

7. Select the VAV box coil.  Place your mouse over the Connector on the discharge side of the VAV box, right-click and choose: Draw Duct (see the left side of Figure 5.24).

FIGURE 5.24

Use the Drag grip to Draw Duct to complete your ductwork system  On the Properties palette, from the Type Selector select Rectangular Duct Mitered Elbows / Tees (see Figure 5.26).

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FIGURE 5.25

The type of ductwork and fittings can be selected as you are placing it in your project 8. Draw a horizontal duct segment to a point just passed the left of the supply diffuser and then press ESC twice (see the right side of Figure 5.24).

There are a couple of things that you should have noted here. First, we did not have to apply a duct size to the ductwork that we were placing. You can verify this by selecting the duct and looking at its properties on the Properties palette. This is because RMEP knows the discharge size of the VAV box and will use those dimensions unless we change them before we begin placing our ductwork. Had we changed the ductwork size to something different from the discharge dimensions of the VAV box RMEP would have automatically placed a transition between the ductwork and our coil. The second thing that you should have noticed is that our ductwork is a color blue. This is because a filter has been created for the supply air ductwork. We will review how to create filters later in this chapter in the “Create and Apply a Filter” topic. Now let’s add an end cap to our ductwork run that we just placed.
9. On the Home tab, on the HVAC panel, click the Duct Fitting button.  On the Properties palette, choose the Standard Rectangular Endcap from the Type Selector.

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FIGURE 5.26

Choose a Ductwork Fitting and apply it to the end of the duct run   Place your mouse at the end of our ductwork run and left click to place the endcap (see Figure 5.26). Press
ESC

twice to complete the operation.

There is something that you should have noticed after you placed your ductwork endcap. We did not have to apply a size to the endcap that we were placing. This is because RMEP knows the size of the ductwork we were connecting to and those dimensions became the default size of our endcap automatically. Now let’s connect our diffuser to our ductwork.
10. Select the ductwork connected to the VAV box and examine the Mechanical – Airflow Properties (see Figure 5.27).

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FIGURE 5.27

Ductwork flow values are available through the Properties

Note the offset height of the ductwork is 11'-0". This should be no surprise to us as this was the original offset elevation we entered when we placed our equipment. This information will come in handy as we make connections to this duct in the next few steps. Also notice that there is no airflow currently associated with this ductwork. We will come back and revisit the airflow in our ductwork after we connect our diffuser to the ductwork. A few other items worth noting is that the System Type has been set to Supply Air and the dimensions of the supply air ductwork that was just placed inherited the outlet (discharge) dimensions of the VAV box that we connected to.
11. On the Home tab, on the HVAC panel, click the Duct tool.  On the Properties palette, from the Type Selector, beneath Round Duct, choose Taps (see Figure 5.28).

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NOTE: The items in gray bars on the Type Selector are the Families and indented beneath each one is the Type or Types available for that Family. You cannot select the Family name, only one of the Types beneath it.

FIGURE 5.28

Choose a round duct Type from the Type Selector

Although it is not necessary in all situations, when placing ductwork it is best if you can give RMEP as much information as you can about the ductwork you want to place. This will help RMEP eliminate solutions that you do not believe are viable options for your design. In this case we are going to place a tap on our main. RMEP could place that tap on the side of the duct, the top of the duct, or even the bottom of the duct. In the steps below we want the tap on the side of the duct so we will input information that will help RMEP eliminate invalid options for us. Taking a couple of extra seconds to provide one or two pieces of additional input might help reduce some frustration of having to redraw objects.
 On the Options Bar from the Diameter drop-down choose: 8" and for the Offset: input: 11'-0".

When we queried our main duct above we noticed that the Offset of the duct was 11'-0". This is why we used that Offset dimension in order to help RMEP make the connection that we really want. Now that we have entered this Offset elevation it will be retained and we can use the drop down to select that particular offset for other ductwork next time. This function comes in handy when you want to set different elevations for your various ductwork systems. We used 8" for the Diameter: since that is the connection size of the diffuser that we placed in earlier steps.

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Pick a point on the duct main roughly in line with the center of the diffuser. Move vertically towards the diffuser stopping half way to the diffuser and then click to set your endpoint (see Figure 5.29). Press
ESC

twice.

FIGURE 5.29

A round ductwork tap off a rectangular ductwork main 12. Select the diffuser, place the mouse over the Connector, right-click, and then select Draw Flex Duct (see Figure 5.30).

FIGURE 5.30

Use the Connector on the diffuser to Draw Flex Duct  Drag your flex duct to the center point of the tap and connect the flex duct to the tap you just placed. Right-click and select Cancel (see Figure 5.31).

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FIGURE 5.31

A completed low-pressure ductwork system

We have completed our low-pressure ductwork system for this particular VAV box. But what have we really done? Let’s examine further. Recall from a few steps above that we selected our ductwork main before our diffuser was connected and reviewed a few Properties. At that time it showed no airflow. Now let’s see if there is a difference in this information now that we have connected a diffuser. Remember that we assigned a particular airflow to the diffuser when we added it to the model above.
13. Select the ductwork main connected to the VAV box and review the Properties (see Figure 5.32).

FIGURE 5.32

Updated airflow once RMEP objects are connected  Press
ESC

to deselect the duct.

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As you can see the Properties of the ductwork updated based on the object(s) connected to it. If you query the Properties of the VAV box you should note the same. Applying what you have learned thus far, select the diffuser and change the flow to 225 CFM. Observe the Properties of the ductwork and the VAV box again. Notice their change. Once you have finished that, reset your flow in the diffuser back to 150 CFM. Now let’s create another ductwork system but using a different process.
14. Save your file.

CREATING A SYSTEM
In the previous sequence, we placed the parts of our ductwork layout one piece at a time. An alternative approach is to use Revit MEP’s layout algorithms to generate multiple layout solutions for our ductwork. From the options presented, you will be able to choose your desired option and then let RMEP draw the selected solution for us automatically.
1.  Zoom in on the area around Offices 3106, 3107 and 3108. Select the diffuser in Office 3108 and from the Modify | Air Terminal tab, on the Create Systems panel, click the Duct button.

The Create Duct System dialog appears. This dialog gives you the opportunity to create a unique system name or RMEP will suggest a name for you.
 Click OK in the Create Duct System dialog.

A red dashed box will appear around the supply air diffuser that you selected.
2. On the Duct Systems tab, on the System Tools panel, click the Edit System button.

Notice that all items in the view gray out except the diffuser we selected. It is currently the only member of the System.
  On the Edit Duct System tab, on the Edit Duct System panel, make sure that the Add to System button is highlighted. In the view window, select the diffuser located in Office 3107.

Notice that it darkens to solid black to indicate that it is now part of the System.

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On the Edit Duct System tab, on the Edit Duct System panel, click the Select Equipment button.

This disables the Add to System button. Only one button on the Edit Duct System panel can be active at a time.
3. Select the VAV box located in Office 3107.   In the Select Connector dialog choose the rectangular (discharge) connector. Click OK.

The VAV box will change from a grayed out color to black to indicate that it is now part of the System.
4. On the ribbon, click the Finish Editing System button on the Mode panel of the Edit Duct System tab.

We have now created a system that contains two air distribution devices and one piece of equipment that serves them. Now let’s ask RMEP to generate some ductwork solutions for this System and review those solutions to find the best ductwork routing solution available to us. We will then be able to indicate our choice and have RMEP generate that solution for us.
  Select the diffuser in Office 3108 again. On the Duct Systems tab, on the Layout panel, click the Generate Layout button.

An initial routing solution should appear connecting the three objects that you specified as a Supply system just moments ago (see Figure 5.33).

FIGURE 5.33

RMEP proposes a possible ductwork routing solutions

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The Options Bar now becomes active displaying a Solution Type. The Solution Type dropdown contains three different types of solutions. They are Network, Perimeter, and Intersections (see Figure 5.34).

FIGURE 5.34

Multiple solution types are available when generating a ductwork layout

Each Solution Type is distinctively different. A Network Solution Type will generate a maximum of 6 possible solutions that will create a bounding box around the selected components, generate a main along the center line of the bounding box, and generate branches at a 90 degree angle from the main. A Perimeter Solution Type will generate a maximum of 5 possible solutions that will create a bounding box around the selected components, generate ductwork solutions along 3 of the 4 sides, and generate one solution on all 4 sides of the bounding box. An Intersections Solution Type will generate a maximum of 8 possible solutions based on fictitious lines extended from each component connector in the system, perpendicular lines extended from the connectors, and the intersection is the potential ductwork junction of the solution. You can use the arrow button next to the Solution Type to scroll through all the various different Solution Types (see Figure 5.35).

FIGURE 5.35

A proposed Network Solution Type

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NOTE: Your results may vary slightly from the image above depending on how the algorithm processed your selected components. If your results do very, find a solution that closely resembles the solution shown in the figure.

5. Select Intersections Solution 2 (see Figure 5.36).

FIGURE 5.36

Cycle through the many possible solutions  Click the Settings button on the Options Bar.

The “Duct Conversion Settings” dialog appears. On the left side of the dialog you have the option to select either your Main or your Branch ductwork. Selecting the Main option allows you to select the Duct Type of the Main through the drop-down menu and specify the height of the main. Selecting the Branch option allows you to select the Duct Type of the Branch through the drop-down menus and specify the height of the branch. In addition you can specify whether or not you would like to use a flexible ductwork connection to the air terminal and what the maximum length of the flexible ductwork will be. These settings default to and become overrides of the settings in the “Mechanical Settings” dialog as discussed in the “Mechanical Settings” dialog above.
 Select Main on the left side of the dialog.

6. On the right, for the Duct Type choose: Rectangular Duct: Mitered Elbows / Tees.  Input: 11'-0" as the offset (see the left side of Figure 5.37).

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FIGURE 5.37

Main ductwork settings

TIP: Before generating a ductwork layout take a few seconds to confirm the elevation of the objects you want to connect. This will help you avoid a ductwork generation that is not a viable solution and also avoid offsets in the ductwork that you do not want.

Select Branch on the left side of the dialog.

7. On the right, for the Duct Type setting choose: Round Duct: Taps.  Input: 11'-0" as the offset.

8. For the Flex Duct Type, choose: Flex Duct Round: Flex – Round.   For the Maximum Flex Duct Length, input: 6'-0" (see the right side of Figure 5.37). Click OK to accept the changes.

Before you ask RMEP to generate a ductwork layout you have the option to modify the proposed layout on the screen. Perhaps you would like to shift your main slightly or move a branch. It is better to do that before you generate the solution where possible.
NOTE: The colors of the paths provide necessary information that you need to be aware of before completing the layout. The blue color indicates a main, the green indicates a branch, and the yellow color indicates a potential failure of connection.

9. On the Generate Layout tab, on the Modify Layout panel, click the Edit Layout button.  Select the branch duct serving the diffuser in Office 3107. A move control will appear on the branch. Create the Building Model

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Using the move control, drag the branch duct up past the diffuser (see Figure 5.38).

FIGURE 5.38

Before generating a layout you can modify the layout to further fit your needs

NOTE: You may get a yellow segment after the previous modification. This does not mean an impending failure but it rather indicates a potential failure. Most of the time, such a connection will succeed. In your own projects, just pay attention to this and any warning that appear. You may need to modify the layout slightly to adjust for these in some cases.

On the ribbon, click the Finish Layout button.

A ductwork layout is automatically generated for you (see Figure 5.39).

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FIGURE 5.39

A ductwork layout automatically generated by RMEP

Notice that RMEP creates all of the required ductwork, fittings, taps, and flexible ductwork. Although RMEP completed our low-pressure ductwork system for this particular VAV box the one thing that RMEP did not add in this process is balancing dampers. You will need to manually place those once you are satisfied with your ductwork layout. Like we did above, let’s examine further. Recall from above that we modified the diffusers in this room to 125 CFM each. Let’s see what the flow is now in the ductwork connected to the VAV box.
10. Select the ductwork main connected to the VAV box (VAV 3107) and review the Properties (see Figure 5.40).

FIGURE 5.40

Updated airflow once RMEP objects are connected

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As you can see the Properties of the ductwork inherited the flow of the objects connected to it. If you query the Properties of the VAV box you should note the same. Applying what you have learned thus far, select the diffusers and change the flow to 200 CFM. Observe the Properties of the ductwork and the VAV box again. Notice their change. Once you have finished that, reset your flow in the diffuser back to 125 CFM.
 Press
ESC

to deselect to main duct.

11. Save your file.

As we have seen, RMEP can automatically generate a ductwork system while still offering you plenty of options to customize it. Next let’s see how we can modify our ductwork system.

MODIFYING DUCTWORK SYSTEMS
Half of the battle with any project is getting your initial design established. In the steps above we learned that RMEP can assist in these initial efforts. The other half of the battle is modifying and maintaining that information as the project progresses. In the previous steps, RMEP generated a ductwork system for 2 of the 3 offices that should actually be placed on a particular system (VAV box). The omission of the third office was done intentionally. This will give us the opportunity to learn a few modification procedures that you can use to modify your ductwork system once you have placed it your project. Let’s begin modifying the ductwork system to include the office that was omitted.

TIP: Some modifications to ductwork systems, after they have been placed, might cause the ductwork components to become disconnected from other components. In certain situations, depending on the extent of the modifications, it is easier to disconnect components, modify your ductwork system, and then re-connect those components to your ductwork system.

In order to accommodate the additional office on your ductwork system you have determined that you ductwork system should be moved to the other side of Office 3107 and 3108. Based on the current ductwork layout, and your initial thoughts towards the ductwork system modification, you should first disconnect the diffuser in Office 3107. From there you can begin to modify your ductwork system. The primary reason for taking this approach is that

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sometimes when items are moved you need to mirror other items. However, this can cause those items to become disconnected from the system to which they are connected and can therefore affect your overall ductwork calculations. To help you manage and identify potential disconnects in your ductwork system, as you are modifying or even placing ductwork, you can turn on Disconnect Warnings for your ductwork system. Refer to Check Duct System discussion later in this Chapter.
1. From Analyze tab click the Show Disconnects tool located on the Check Systems panel (see Figure 5.43).

FIGURE 5.41

System disconnects can be shown in RMEP to help you manage your systems more efficiently  Select Duct in the “Show Disconnects Options” dialog and then click OK (see Figure 5.42).

FIGURE 5.42

System Disconnects can be shown for duct systems, in addition to various other systems as well

At this point you should notice a Disconnect Warning marker on the inlet side of the VAV box serving Office 3107 and 3108. It is strongly recommended that if there are Disconnect

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Warning markers associated with your ductwork system you should address those right away, if you can.
2. In Office 3107, select the ductwork tap and holding down on the CTRL key select the flex duct serving the diffuser in this Office, and then press the DELETE key (see Figure 5.43).

FIGURE 5.43

In certain situations it is best to delete components before modifying other connected components 3. Select the vertical main in Office 3107, select the Move tool (MV) from the Modify panel of the Modify | Ducts tab and move the Main to the other side of the Office (see Figure 5.42).

FIGURE 5.44

Ductwork can be manipulated after it has been placed in your project

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Press

ESC

to deselect to main duct.

Prior to this, we disconnected the low pressure branch from the main and the supply air diffuser. We did this because it will be easier for us to modify the connections to the main and the supply air diffuser. Let’s perform those tasks now.
4. Select the low pressure branch duct and once selected hover over the Drag grip on the left side of the duct, right-click and choose Draw Duct.   Connect the branch to the Main. Press
ESC

once.

Since we did not change the elevation of either duct the reconnection of the two ducts should be fairly easy. Now let’s connect the branch to the diffuser.
5. Select the low pressure branch duct and then grab the Drag grip on the open end and drag the duct closer to the main.  Press
ESC

once (see Figure 5.45).

FIGURE 5.45

Once ductwork modifications are finished air terminal can be reconnected to the system 6. Select the low pressure branch duct again and once selected hover of the Drag grip on the open end, right-click and choose Draw Flex Duct.

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Connect the branch to the diffuser. Press
ESC

once (see Figure 5.46).

FIGURE 5.46

After modification, ductwork systems can be reconnected to form a complete system again

Now that we have reconnected our ductwork system you should not have any Disconnect Warnings markers for this system with the exception of the one at the inlet of the VAV box. As we have done previously, let’s examine further. Recall from above that diffusers serving these two Offices are 125 CFM each. Let’s see what the flow is now in the ductwork connected to the VAV box.
7. Select the ductwork main connected to the VAV box (VAV 3107) and review the Properties (see Figure 5.47).

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FIGURE 5.47

If systems are reconnected correctly after modifications the flow before the modifications should equal the flow after the modifications  Press
ESC

to deselect to main duct.

Let’s turn off our Disconnect Warnings so they do not interfere with other portions of our exercises in this chapter.
8. On the Analyze tab, on the Check Systems panel, click the Show Disconnects tool.  In the “Show Disconnects Options” dialog, deselect Duct and then click OK.

9. Save your file.

CONNECT INTO
Continuing with the modification to our ductwork system, adding Office 3106 to VAV-3107, let’s add the diffuser in Office 3106 to the ductwork system we just modified.
1.   Select the diffuser in Office 3106 On the Modify | Air Terminal tab, on the Layout panel, click the Connect Into button. Select the main duct connected to VAV box 3107 (see Figure 5.48).

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FIGURE 5.48

Additional objects added to a completed system.

NOTE: The Connect Into tool does not give you the ability to modify your ductwork settings before the tool generates the ductwork for you. This tool is “hard coded” to use rectangular ductwork without a flex connection to the diffuser. In addition, the Connect Into tool is for straight runs only. This tool will not take into account any elbows that might be needed for the system. It may be necessary to modify certain components of the ductwork drawn with the Connect Into tool to match the remainder of your connections throughout your project. For example, changing all or a portion of this connection to flex duct would have to be done manually. We will leave it as generated for now. Feel free to experiment with changing it if you wish.

Later in this chapter, we will discuss how we can quickly and efficiently modify the rectangular ductwork just applied with the Connect Into tool to round ductwork (see Change Type).
2. Select the ductwork main on either side of the branch duct that was just connected into the main and review the Properties (see Figure 5.49).

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FIGURE 5.49

Updated airflow once RMEP objects are connected  Press
ESC

once.

As you can see the Properties of the ductwork inherited the flow of the object that was just connected to it. If you query the Properties of the VAV box you should note the same. Notice also that you get different flow values on the duct on the right than the one on the left. Even though we just connected this diffuser to the ductwork it is not part of the system that we created above. Let’s add it to our system.
3. Select the diffuser in Office 3107.   Click the Duct Systems tab. On the System Tools panel, click the Edit System button.

On the Edit Duct System tab, on the Edit Duct System panel, the Add to System button should be highlighted indicating that it is active.
4. Select the diffuser located in Office 3106.

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Once the diffuser has been selected it will change from a gray color to black indicating that it is now part of the system.
 On the ribbon, click the Finish Editing System button.

Later in this chapter we will review the system that we created in the System Browser tool which will give us a better understanding of the reasoning behind the creation of systems in RMEP.
5. Save your file.

ANNOTATING DUCTWORK
RMEP allows you to annotate objects in several different ways. You can annotate objects one at a time or you can annotate all objects of a particular type all at once. Let’s look at both methods.
1.   Zoom in on Office 3109. On the Annotate tab, on the Tag panel, click the Tag by Category button. Uncheck the Leader checkbox on the Options Bar.

2. Select the ductwork connected to the VAV box in the office to add the tag.  Press
ESC

once (see Figure 5.50).

FIGURE 5.50

You can annotate a single object using Tag by Category

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If you move the mouse around onscreen before pressing ESC you will notice that different tags appear as you highlight different objects. This is because the tool is responding to the category of the element under the cursor. While effective, it can be time consuming to place each tag manually. An alternative is to use the Tag All command. This tool will add tags to all objects automatically. You can then delete any that are not required. This can often be a more efficient procedure.
3. Zoom in on the area around Offices 3106, 3107, and 3108. 4. On the Tag panel, click the Tag All button.  In the “Tag All Not Tagged” dialog highlight Duct Tags and then click OK (see the left side of Figure 5.51).

You should notice that all your ductwork objects have now been annotated (see the right side of Figure 5.51). From here you can simply delete any tags you feel are not necessary.
5. Save your file.

FIGURE 5.51

Tagging all objects not previously tagged

RESIZING DUCTWORK
Applying what you have learned thus far, let’s add the high-pressure ductwork to the VAV boxes already placed.
1. Zoom in on Offices 3109, 3108, and 3107 (so you can see both VAV boxes).

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2. Select the VAV box in Office 3109.    Hover over the supply air inlet connector, right-click and choose: Draw Duct. Draw a 5" round duct to the center of Corridor 3113 and then straight down towards Office 3107; pick an ending point for the ductwork just before the door of Office 3107. On the Options Bar from the Diameter list: choose 6".

3. Continue straight down and click another point to terminate the ductwork just beyond Office 3107.  Press
ESC

twice to complete the command (see Figure 5.52).

FIGURE 5.52

Medium pressure ductwork from a VAV box

Now let’s place ductwork from the other VAV box and connect to the ductwork we just placed.
4. Select the VAV box in Office 3107, hover over the supply air inlet connector, right-click and choose: Draw Duct.  Connect to the ductwork located in Corridor 3113 and then press ESC twice (see Figure 5.53).

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FIGURE 5.53

Connect the second VAV box to the medium pressure ductwork system

We just connected two VAV boxes, each with different flows, together to begin forming our medium pressure ductwork system. We arbitrarily decided the size of the ductwork to which the VAV boxes are connected. Let’s use the flow characteristics of the ductwork to resize the ductwork we just placed. In order to see the change effectively, let’s first annotate the ductwork we just placed using the procedure from above.
5. On the Annotate tab, on the Tag panel, click the Tag All button.  In the “Tag All Not Tagged” dialog select Duct Tags and then click OK.

Our medium pressure ductwork has now been tagged.
Using a window selection to select all of the medium pressure ductwork. 6. Click and drag from a point above VAV box 3109 and drag a window down and to the right ensuring that all the medium pressure ductwork is selected (see Figure 5.54).

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FIGURE 5.54

Use a Window selection to highlight multiple objects

With this window selection we have selected all the ductwork and the annotation. The ductwork sizing tool will not work with the tags selected. Let’s use the Filter command to remove the annotation so that only the ductwork objects are selected.
  On the Modify | Multi-Select tab, click the Filter button. In the “Filter” dialog, deselect Duct Tags and then click OK (see Figure 5.55).

FIGURE 5.55

Use a Filter to further refine your selection

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Since we refined our selection to exclude everything but ductwork objects you should now see the ductwork sizing tool available through the Ribbon.
7. From the Modify | Multi-Select tab, on the Analysis panel, click the Duct/Pipe Sizing button (see Figure 5.56).

FIGURE 5.56

Ductwork can be sized via the ductwork sizing tool

The “Duct Sizing” dialog appears. It has two sections: Sizing Method and Constraints. Sizing Method—use the drop-down in the top left corner to size your ductwork based on Velocity, Friction, Equal Friction, or Static Regain. Friction and Velocity will activate the Only, And, or Or options. Selecting the Only radio button will size the ductwork according to just the parameter you choose from the drop-down. Selecting the And radio button will size the ductwork according to both the parameters input. Selecting the Or radio button will size the ductwork according to the least restive parameter input. Constraints—using the Branch Sizing drop-down in this section you can size your branch ductwork based on a Calculated Size Only, Match Connector Size, or the Larger of the Connector and Calculated size. Choosing Calculated Size Only will size the selected ductwork by the method indicated in Sizing Method. Choosing Match Connector Size will size the ductwork based on the size of the connector between the branch and the main. Choosing the Larger of Connector and Calculated will size the ductwork based on the larger of the 2, Calculated Size Only and Match Connector Size. This section also allows you to restrict the height and width of the ductwork if necessary.
    From the drop-down list at the top, choose: Velocity. Enter 1500 FPM in the velocity field next to the drop-down. Select the “And” radio button, enter 0.35 in–wg/100ft for the Friction. For the Branch Sizing select Match Connector Size and then click OK (see Figure 5.57).

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FIGURE 5.57

Ductwork sized based on Velocity and Friction

Notice that the 6" round ductwork that you placed has been modified to a 9" round duct (see Figure 5.58).

FIGURE 5.58

Annotation is automatically updated after ductwork is resized 8. Deselect all elements. 9. Select the 9" round duct and review the Velocity and Mechanical – Airflow Properties and note how the values are below the parameters you input (see Figure 5.59).

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FIGURE 5.59

Resized ductwork does not exceed the parameters input 10. Save your file.

ADDITIONAL DUCTWORK TOOLS
Now that we have placed and annotated our ductwork we can begin using some of the other tools that RMEP has to offer to further analyze our system and our project components. Let’s look at the System Browser first.

SYSTEM BROWSER
The System Browser displays a list of object connectors organized by discipline. The System Browser may also be used to view the list of Zones and associate Spaces in the project. The System Browser is a fantastic tool for determining which connectors have not been assigned to a system yet. It can be a floating window or it can be docked to an edge of the screen. You can access the tool on the Ribbon or by simply pressing the F9 key.
1. On the Analyze tab, on the System Browser panel, click the System Browser button.

You can leave the System Browser floating onscreen if you like. However, it is often better to dock it to the bottom of the application frame. Each discipline will be listed as an expandable folder icon. The Systems within these disciplines will be listed beneath each of these folders.
  Expand Mechanical > Supply Air > Mechanical Supply Air 1. Click the AutoFit all Columns icon (see Figure 5.60).

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FIGURE 5.60

The System Browser indicates what objects are connected to which system

There are several sub-menus for the System Browser. This sub-menu has several options. View—The View option has two areas. At the top, you can choose to sort the System Browser based on Systems or Zones. This determines the overall listing in the browser. Currently it is sorted by Systems which first includes a folder for each discipline that can be expanded to reveal each system within that discipline. You can also group by Zone instead. This will list all the Zones and then you can expand from there. The lower portion of the View submenu allows you to limit the browser to a particular discipline or show all disciplines. If you choose a particular discipline, like Mechanical for example, the overall discipline folder will no longer display and just the systems within that discipline will display. Give it a try if you like. Try different display options to get a sense how they function. Just be sure to revert back to by Systems and All Disciplines before continuing. Note also that you will have re-expand the down to the Titus equipment and resize the columns over again if you do change viewing options. AutoFit All Columns—these options make the columns more legible by fitting them to the longest item in the list as it is currently expanded. So be sure to first expand down to the item you wish to see before you use the auto fit options. You can also manually drag the width of columns at the top. Column Settings—Opens the “Column Settings” dialog where additional information can be displayed as additional columns for each of the General, Mechanical, Piping and Electrical categories. You can add columns for a variety of properties such as Flow, Size, Room Name,

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System Type, Loss Coefficient, Fixture Units, Fluid Type, Load Classification, etc. Open the “Column Settings” dialog and expand each item to see the complete list of options. Currently the System Browser only shows three Mechanical systems and zero systems for the other disciplines. This appears in parenthesis next to each discipline folder.
2. Use the drop down to change the System Browser View from All Disciplines to Mechanical (see Figure 5.63).  In the System Browser expand Unassigned > Mechanical > Supply Air (see Figure 5.61).

FIGURE 5.61

Objects that are not assigned to systems are placed beneath Unassigned in the System Browser    Expand Mechanical > Supply Air > Mechanical Supply Air 3 Titus_DESV-HWC_RH-6in. Expand Mechanical > Supply Air > Mechanical Supply Air 2. Click the AutoFit all Columns icon (see Figure 5.62).

FIGURE 5.62

When additional systems are added they are reflected in the System Browser

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You can also use the System Browser to locate or select elements. Select an item in the System Browser and then right-click. The menu that appears will allow you to Select, Show, Delete, or even see the Properties of the Object. If you choose Select or Properties, the result will be largely the same. The element will highlight in the current view window and the Properties palette will show its properties. If you choose Show, you will be able to select and zoom to the element or even open other views if the current view does not show the element.
NOTE: In the example above, the 2 VAV Boxes in our project will show unassigned connections if you change the View: discipline to Piping. This is due to the fact that there are 2 piping connectors that have not been assigned to a system yet.

The System Browser is an effective tool for helping you track which objects have connectors that have not yet been assigned to systems.
3. Save your file.

SYSTEM INSPECTOR
The System Inspector allows you to query components of your system to view their properties and flow characteristics.
1.  Select the ductwork connected to VAV-3109 in Office 3109. On the Modify | Air Terminal tab, on the Analysis panel, click the System Inspector button.

A floating ribbon panel will appear in the upper corner of the view window.
 On the floating System Inspector panel click the Inspect tool.

Flow arrows will appear onscreen within the ductwork system (see Figure 5.63). The red arrows indicate the path through the system with the greatest pressure drop.

FIGURE 5.63

Color-coded flow arrows indicate air flow direction and the greatest static pressure of the selected ductwork Section II

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2. Place your mouse slightly to the left of the VAV box on the selected ductwork that you just selected and left click.

A System Inspector Flow Information tag will be placed for your review (see Figure 5.64).

FIGURE 5.64

A red System Inspector Flow tag means greater static pressure 3. Place your mouse slightly to the left of the diffuser branch ductwork but do not click the ductwork yet.

Notice that another System Inspector Flow Information tag has appeared (see Figure 5.65). This one is blue in color. The blue color indicates a portion of the system which is not in the critical path.

FIGURE 5.65

Multiple System Inspector Flow tags can be viewed at once. 4. Now click the location to the left of the diffuser on the selected ductwork.

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Notice the previous tag disappears and the new one appears. Only one System Inspector Flow Information tag can be placed at a time (see Figure 5.66).

FIGURE 5.66

Only one System Inspector Flow Information tag can be placed in your project at a time

You should also note that these are not permanent tags. Once you click Finish or Cancel in the Floating System Inspector panel the System Inspector Information tags will disappear. If you want a permanent tag to remain, you will have to build a custom tag Family for this purpose and attach it to the object. The Family Editor is discussed in Chapter 8.
 From the floating System Inspector panel click Finish.

The System Inspector tool can help you gain a further understanding of the characteristics of your ductwork systems.
5. Save your file.

COLOR FILL LEGEND
Applying a Color Fill Legend can help you visually identify characteristics of an object based on the Properties of the object. For example, after you place ductwork in your project you would like to verify that you did not exceed a particular velocity in the ductwork. However, you do not want to select each object and review the Properties of the object nor do you want to use the System Inspector to inspect every piece of ductwork. This is where a Color Fill Legend can come in quite handy.
1.  Zoom all to fit. You can use the tool on the Navigation Bar or simply type ZA. On the Analyze tab, on the Color Fill panel, click the Duct Legend button.

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Pick a point in the upper left hand corner of the Drawing Area to place the Duct Legend. In the “Choose Color Scheme” dialog that appears, select: Duct Color Fill – Velocity from the Color Scheme list and then click OK (see Figure 5.67).

FIGURE 5.67

You can select the Color Fill that you wish to place

Now that the Color Fill Legend has been placed, you can zoom in again so that you can visually inspect the colors of the Legend and compare those colors to the colors now applied to your ductwork (see Figure 5.68).

FIGURE 5.68

Once the Color Legend is applied the objects will change colors to match the Legend

NOTE: Currently fittings and equipment cannot have a fill pattern applied to them.

What if we want to apply a different Legend to view the flow of the ductwork? Let’s review how we can edit the Color Fill scheme to accomplish this.
2. Select the Color Fill Legend onscreen.

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On the Modify | Duct Color Fill Legends tab, on the Scheme panel, click the Edit Scheme button. The Edit Color Scheme dialog will appear (see Figure 5.69).

FIGURE 5.69

Color Fill Legends can be adjusted to fit your project needs

In the Schemes area at the right of the dialog, you can select the Category that you wish to apply the Color Fill Legend to. You can use the icons at the bottom to Duplicate, Rename, or Delete Schemes. The Scheme Definition area allows you to define your scheme’s characteristics. The Title field is the actual title that will appear onscreen on the legend. This does not have to be the same as the name of the Scheme on the left. From the Color list, you choose the property that you would like the scheme to denote. Nearly all properties of the category you selected are available in this list. So the possibilities for color scheme variations are nearly limitless. In the current scheme (Duct Color Fill – Velocity), the color is assigned to the Velocity property and configured By range. We can configure a scheme to color-code each unique value found in the model using the By value radio button, or to color them based on a range of values like this example. If you choose By value, Revit builds the list for you from the actual values used in your model. If you choose By range, you need to decide what ranges are meaningful. To edit the ranges, select them in the list and then use the Add and Remove value icons. These can be a little tricky. If you select a value in the middle of the list and then click the Add value icon, it

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will split the range and insert a new value in the middle. If you click the last item, it will add onto the range. You can also click in the “At Least” field and edit the values as required. Fill patterns default to solid colors and the colors are initially chosen by Revit. However, you can edit any of the default fill patterns or colors.
3. From the Schemes list select Duct Color Fill – Flow and then click OK.

The Color Fill Legend is updated and the colors of the ductwork are adjusted to the new scheme. Now let’s apply another Color Fill Legend to our View.
NOTE: You can place multiple Color Fill Legends in the same View. However, you can only have one Color Fill Legend active for objects. For example, the Color Fill Legends above apply to the ductwork objects. You can apply the Velocity or the Flow Legend but you cannot apply both since they reference the same object.

4. On the Analyze tab, on the Color Fill panel, click the Color Fill Legend tool.   Pick a point beneath the previous legend to place the Color Fill Legend. In the “Choose Space Type and Color Scheme” dialog select: HVAC Zones and then click OK (see Figure 5.70).

FIGURE 5.70

Color Fills can be applied to Room, Spaces, and Zones 5. Zoom out a little if required.

The Color Fill Legend was placed and populated. However, no Color Fill representation appeared for the Zones of our project even though we added Zones in an earlier chapter. The reason for this can be found in the Visibility/Graphics dialog of the View.
6. On the View tab, on the Graphics panel, click the Visibility/Graphics button (or type VG).

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On the Model Categories tab, check the box next to HVAC Zones to turn on their visibility (see Figure 5.71).

FIGURE 5.71

Check the Visibility/Graphics to ensure that Color Fill Legends appear

NOTE: The Color Fill Legend for the HVAC Zones is now visible in our View. To remove the color fill from the view, you can reverse the previous steps or actually remove the color scheme from the view properties. You might expect that simply deleting the Legend will remove the Color Fill from the View as well. This is not the case. If you delete a Color Fill Legend the Legend is removed from the View but the Color Fill of the objects in the view remains. Placing a color fill legend like we did above actually enables the color scheme property of the view and places the legend.

7. Select the Duct Color Fill – Flow Legend onscreen.   On the Modify | Duct Color Fill Legends tab, on the Scheme panel, click the Edit Scheme button. In the “Edit Color Scheme” dialog, from the Schemes list at the left, select (none) and then click OK (see Figure 5.72).

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FIGURE 5.72

To delete the Legend and remove the fill apply (none) to the view   Press the
DELETE

key to delete the Legend.

Repeat the process to remove and delete the Zones Color Fill scheme and legend.

The Color Fill Legends and the Color Fills have now been removed from the view.
8. Save the file.

Let’s look at another tool that helps us modify our ductwork systems in RMEP.

CHANGE TYPE
The Change Type tool allows you to quickly change the type of ductwork for a multi-selection of ductwork. For example, in the Connect Into exercise above we connected a supply air diffuser to an existing ductwork system that had been previously placed. As mentioned, the Connect Into tool is “hard wired” to draw rectangular ductwork. However, in certain cases that might not be the desired solution. Let’s look at how we can modify the rectangular ductwork branch serving Office 3106 to a round ductwork branch.
1.  Zoom to VAV box VAV-3107 and the supply air diffuser serving Office 3107. Using a Window box select the rectangular branch ductwork serving Office 3107 and the tee connected to the main ductwork (see Figure 5.73).

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FIGURE 5.73

Select the ductwork components of the branch ductwork to change types 2. From the Filter panel of the Modify | Multi-Select tab, click Filter.  Deselect Duct Tags in the Filter dialog and then click OK (see Figure 5.83).

FIGURE 5.74

Use the Filter tool to only include the ducts and duct fittings of the branch you need to change  From Edit panel of the Modify | Multi-Select tab click Change Type (see Figure 5.83).

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FIGURE 5.75

The Change Type tool allows you to change the type of ductwork for a branch run 3. In the Properties dialog select Round Duct Taps (see Figure 5.83).

FIGURE 5.76

Select the type of ductwork for your branch ductwork  Press
ESC

to deselect the items.

The rectangular branch ductwork is now round ductwork (see Figure 5.77).

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FIGURE 5.77

Change Type tool allows you to quickly change ductwork types for branch ducts 4. Save the file.

Let’s look at another tool that helps us define our ductwork systems in RMEP.

INSULATION AND LINING
Ductwork insulation and/or lining can be applied to ductwork to further delineate your ductwork system. Let’s look at how we can apply either of those items to a section or to an entire duct run.
1.  Select the 12”x8” main duct section connected to VAV-3107. From the Duct Insulation panel of the Modify | Ducts click Add Insulation (see Figure 5.78).

FIGURE 5.78

Ductwork insulation and/or lining can be added after the duct has been selected  Change the Thickness to 2” and click OK (see Figure 5.79).

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FIGURE 5.79

Insulation thickness can be set for your ductwork  Press
ESC

to deselect the item.

The ductwork insulation should now be applied to your ductwork (see Figure 5.83).

FIGURE 5.80

Ductwork insulation applied to ductwork

NOTE: In Figure 5.80 the ductwork insulation appears as a continuous line type as opposed to a hidden or dashed line. This is due to a known limitation that Hardware Acceleration must be enabled. Depending on your system configuration Hardware Acceleration may not be possible to enable. You can enable Hardware Acceleration from the Graphics tab of the Options.

2. Select the 12”x8” main duct section connected to VAV-3107 again.  From the Duct Insulation panel of the Modify | Ducts click Remove Insulation (see Figure 5.81).

FIGURE 5.81

Insulation can be removed from ductwork

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Click Ok in the Remove Duct Insulation dialog. Press
ESC

to deselect the item.

The ductwork insulation has now been removed from your ductwork. Let’s take what we have learned with the ductwork insulation and apply our knowledge to the ductwork lining tool. Let’s add lining to the 12”x8” main ductwork branch.
3. Select the 12”x8” main duct section connected to VAV-3107.

Before applying the duct lining to the ductwork observe the Properties of the ductwork noting the Velocity and Friction loss of the ductwork.
  From the Duct Insulation panel of the Modify | Ducts click Add Lining. Change the Thickness to 2” and click OK.

Note the change in the Velocity and the Friction loss of the ductwork.

FIGURE 5.82

Once ductwork lining is applied the Properties of the ductwork are modified accordingly

Now let’s remove the ductwork lining that we just applied in the same manner as we did with the ductwork insulation.
4. From the Duct Insulation panel of the Modify | Ducts click Remove Lining.   Click Ok in the Remove Duct Insulation dialog. Press
ESC

to deselect the item.

5. Save the file.

Let’s look at another tool that helps us analyse our ductwork systems in RMEP.

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CHECK DUCT SYSTEM
The Check Duct System tool allows you to verify that each component is assigned to a system and is properly connected. From the Analyze tab, on the Check Systems panel, click the Check Duct Systems button (see Figure 5.83).

FIGURE 5.83

Duct systems can be checked to determine if they are disconnected

Once the Check Duct Systems tool is active, Warnings markers, and their associative web lines, will indicate where there are potential failures in your ductwork system that will require you to address (see left side of Figure 5.84).

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FIGURE 5.84

Duct Systems Warnings can be expanded to identify the specific failures in the system

The Warning Markers indicate a System that is not well connected, a Flow or Demand configuration mismatch, and/or a Flow direction mismatch. Clicking a Warning marker will force the Warning dialog to appear indicating any warnings that you need to address. There are some small icons on the right side of the Warning dialog. The arrow icons let you scroll to the next and previous warnings in situations where there are multiple warnings. If you want to learn more about a particular warning, you can click the Expand Warning Dialog icon (see right side of Figure 5.84). From there you can select a particular Warning to have RMEP show you were that Warning is in your project, obtain more information on the issue, delete the item in question, or export the Warnings to HTML file for review by the project team.

DUCT SYSTEMS
Earlier in this chapter we placed supply air ductwork in our project. For the most part RMEP was intelligent enough to determine the type of ductwork system, supply, return, or exhaust, that we were placing based on the object we were connecting to.

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There are three ductwork systems that are standard out of the box. However, what happens if your project has more than those three systems? Let’s review how we can address this issue.
1. In the Project Browser expand Families, expand Duct Systems, and then expand Duct System. Under Duct System, select Supply Air, right-click and choose Type Properties (see Figure 5.85).

FIGURE 5.85

Duct Systems can be modified through Families 2. Click the Graphical Overrides Edit button and in the Line Graphics dialog click the Color: button and select Blue for the color of the supply air ductwork (see Figure 5.86).

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FIGURE 5.86

Components of a Duct System are modified through the Type Properties  Click OK in the Colors, Line Graphics and Type Properties dialog.

Note that all the items that are associated with your supply air system are now visually displayed in a blue color. Now let’s add a new Duct System to our project. Let’s assume that we have a laboratory exhaust system in our project. The first thing that you should do is determine which of the three Duct Systems are the closest to the new system that you want to create. In this case, it is fairly easy since we are creating a new exhaust Duct System. We will select the Exhaust Duct System to use as the foundation to create our new Laboratory Exhaust System.
3. Under Duct System select Exhaust Air, right-click and then choose Duplicate (see Figure 5.87).

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FIGURE 5.87

New Duct Systems can be created from existing Duct System Families 4. Select the newly created exhaust system, Exhaust Air 2, right-click and choose Rename (see Figure 5.88).

FIGURE 5.88

Once new Duct Systems are created they can be renamed  Type Lab Exhaust Air and then press
ENTER.

5. Save your file.

Once your new system has been created, you can edit the Type Properties to select a new color for the system so you can visually distinguish that system in Drawing Area. Let’s look at another way that we can visually identify items in our project.

CREATE AND APPLY A FILTER
Earlier in this chapter we placed ductwork in our project. After we finished placing it, we changed the color of the ductwork through Duct Systems. Doing this, changed the color of all the components associated with the Supply Air Duct System. However, we need to visually delineate our system components even further.

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We can do this through Filters. Filters are applied to the view and when applied, a Filter overrides the graphical display of elements in a view based on some criterion that they share in common. Let’s look at how we can apply a Filter to our mechanical equipment.
1.  Open the “Visibility/Graphics” dialog (VG). Click the Filters tab.

The Filters tab shows you the Filters that have been applied to this view. To understand how Filters work, let’s add a new Filter.
 At the bottom of the dialog, click the Edit/New button

The “Filters” dialog will appear.
2. In the “Filters” dialog beneath the Filters list at the left, click the New icon.  In the “Filter Name” dialog, input: Titus Equipment and then click OK (see Figure 5.89).

FIGURE 5.89

Create a new Filter

A Filter can have any name you like but you should choose something descriptive to help you identify what its intended use is.

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The center dialog, Categories, shows a list of Revit categories. You can assign a Filter to one or more categories. If you want to choose categories from Revit Architecture or Structure, check the “Show categories from all disciplines” checkbox. For this Filter, we will choose just a single category, but we could actually use the Check All button to select all categories. Since the criterion we are going to apply will be looking for the name “Titus,” we could successfully apply this across multiple categories.
 In the Categories list, check Mechanical Equipment.

The Filter Rules area on the right allows you to set up as many as three criteria to apply to elements of the category or categories you selected. The criteria can be any property available to those elements.
  In the Filter Rules area, from the Filter by drop-down, choose: Family Name. Beneath that, choose contains from the drop-down list.

As you can see, there are many options including equals, does not equal, begins with, and contains. Feel free to experiment with other options later.
3. In the text field, type: Titus and then click OK to dismiss the “Filters” dialog (see Figure 5.90).

FIGURE 5.90

Rules can be applied to Filters

We have created a new Filter. This means that we have essentially created a database query. In other words, in this case, we have created a query that when applied to the current view will search for any Mechanical Equipment whose Family Name contains the word “Titus.” Our

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next step is to tell the view to use this query and, when it finds such an item, to display it with overrides that we choose.
Closing the “Filters” dialog should have returned you to the “Visibility/Graphic Overrides” dialog. If for some reason it did not, please type VG to reopen it. 4. In the “Visibility/Graphic Overrides” dialog, beneath the list of items, click the Add button.  In the “Add Filters” dialog select Titus Equipment and then click OK (see Figure 5.91).

FIGURE 5.91

Once created, the Filter can be added to your View’s Visibility/Graphics Overrides   Next to Titus Equipment, in the Projection Lines column, click the Override button. In the “Line Graphics” dialog that appears, click the button next to Color and then choose a color such as Orange (see Figure 5.92).

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FIGURE 5.92

Filters can be added to your view’s Visibility/Graphics Overrides  Click OK three times to complete the settings, close all dialogs and apply the effect.

The Titus Equipment Filter has now been applied to the view making the Titus VAV boxes appear in orange. Zoom in to the offices if necessary to see the effect.
5. Save your file.

This Filter is a simple example, but you imagine that if you wanted to quickly identify the manufacturer of your equipment, or some other criterion quickly and visually, that the Filters offer a great deal of power and flexibility to do so. Once you have a Filter defined, you can add it to the Visibility/Graphics of multiple views. You do not need to redefine the Filter.

DUCT SYSTEM CALCULATIONS
As you place your ductwork and associate flow to your ductwork system components RMEP performs certain calculations “behind the scenes”. Depending on the size of your project these calculations could bog down the performance of your model. If you do not plan to use the calculation portion of RMEP you can simply turn the calculation functionality off. This can be done through the Type Properties of the Duct System. From there you will have three choices in the Calculations drop down: All, Flow only, and None (see Figure 5.93).

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FIGURE 5.93

Duct System calculations can be adjusted to increase model performance

RENDERING DUCT SYSTEMS
Occasionally, you might find yourself in need of a rendering of your project for presentation purposes. RMEP allows you to apply material to your Duct Systems. Material can be applied through the Type Properties of the Duct System (see Figure 5.94).

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FIGURE 5.94

Materials can be applied to Duct Systems for rendering purposes

DUCT RISE/DROP SYMBOL
You can choose the Duct Rise/Drop symbol for each Duct System Type. This can be done through the Type Properties of the Duct System (see Figure 5.95).

FIGURE 5.95

Rise/Drop symbols can be control on system level through the Duct System

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NOTE: The visibility of the Rise/Drop symbols can be controlled for a particular View using the Visibility\Graphic Overrides (VG) through the Ducts Model Categories (see Figure 5.96).

FIGURE 5.96

Once the Duct System symbols have been defined for your Duct System you can control those for a particular View through Visibility\Graphic Overrides

DUCT JUSTIFICATION CONTROLS
In the exercise above, we performed a simple layout to learn concepts. Not all project layouts are that simple. Most are complex than that and require offsets in the ductwork system. As you are placing your ductwork you can use the Justification Controls to keep your ductwork flat on top, flat on bottom, etc. To do this, simply click the Justification tool once you begin placing your ductwork (see Figure 5.97).

FIGURE 5.97

Justification controls can be used to offset your ductwork as you are placing it

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INHERIT ELEVATION AND SIZE
A few other handy ductwork tools are the Inherit Elevation and the Inherit Size tools. These tools are located on the Modify | Place Duct contextual tab and are available once you begin placing ductwork (see Figure 5.98). The Inherit Elevation tool inherits the elevation of the element being snapped to while the Inherit Size tool inherits the size of the element being snapped to.

FIGURE 5.98

The elevation or size of a duct can be inherited from a duct that has already been placed in your project

PLACEHOLDER DUCTWORK
If you are uncertain about the overall size of your ductwork, yet you still need to show ductwork placement or a routing path, you can use placeholder ductwork to accomplish either of those tasks. Placeholder Ductwork will “stand in” for your actual ductwork until you are ready to replace it. Once you have determined the size of your ductwork, you can convert your placeholder ductwork to ductwork objects. This avoids the need to delete the placeholder ductwork and redraw it. While we have not included a tutorial on placeholder ductwork here, to learn more about the placeholder functionality, please refer the “Boiler Room Piping SemiAutomatic Approach” topic in Chapter 6. This topic covers the placeholder functionality with piping. Its application in ductwork works the same way. You can therefore apply what you learn to placeholder ductwork.

PREPARE TO CLOSE YOUR PROJECT FILE
Most firms have procedures for the preferred way to close and save files. This ensures that anyone opening a file will see predictable results onscreen. It is a good idea to get in the habit of performing a few extra steps before saving and closing the file at the end of a work session.
1.    Before closing the file, perform the following steps. Zoom all to fit. On the Project Browser, expand Legends and then double-click to open the Save Page views. Close hidden windows.

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Many firms will create a simple drafting or legend view as a “save page.” Such a view will have just some text on it indicating the preferred steps to perform before saving and closing.
2. Save your file.

SUMMARY
We have discussed many ductwork tools and other tools that can help you manage your ductwork systems. We explored how and why you should set your Mechanical Settings before you begin placing your ductwork. We learned how to place ductwork automatically through the auto generation tool in RMEP. We also learned how to place ductwork manually without the auto generation tool. We also explored the System Browser and many other analysis tools.           Use the Mechanical Settings to control the hidden line behavior and gaps for overlapping ductwork systems. Use a Reflected Ceiling Plan view to better coordinate the placement of air terminals with other project-related components. Place air terminals, mechanical equipment, and ductwork to create a supply air system. Place elements manually piece by piece or use the automatic routing feature in RMEP to create solutions for you. Create systems to take advantage of the automatic routing features. Many possibilities exist to analyze your design and show data in your systems graphically. Revit can color-code your systems based on various properties and display a legend onscreen defining each color. Color schemes can also be added to color-code the Zones in the project. Use Filters as an additional way to override graphical display and visually analyze data onscreen. The System Browser and Check Duct Systems tools provide useful ways to identify and modify critical information in your model and its elements.

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Chapter 6

Piping Systems

INTRODUCTION
The piping tools in Revit MEP (RMEP) are similar to ductwork tools explored in the previous chapter in many ways. As such, even if designing ductwork is not your area of expertise, you may want to review the topics in the previous chapter anyhow and apply those skills to piping. For example, the concept of Disconnect Warnings is covered under the topic “Modifying Ductwork Systems” and “Connect Into” in the previous chapter. The annotation features covered under the topics of “Annotating Ductwork” and “Color Fill Legend” applies equally to piping. The “System Browser”, “Change Type” and “Insulation and Lining”, topics also apply. Several other topics are also applicable such as “Check Duct System”, “Duct System Calculations”, “Rendering Duct Systems”, and “Inherit Elevation and Size”. This gives us quite a bit of overlap between ductwork and piping. In fact, many topics also apply to Cable Tray and Conduit. The focus of this chapter will therefore be slightly different than the last. In this chapter we will review the tools that can help you to generate your layouts. We will specifically showcase the layout tools with piping examples, but the approaches covered in this chapter can also be directly applied to Cable Tray, Conduit, and Ductwork. In this chapter we will cover the basics of setup, systems as well as creating layouts. RMEP provides placeholder elements as the basis of initial layout. This allows the layout to be easily created during initial concept design and converted to 3D elements once the design has been approved. There a few different approaches to MEP systems layout. Layout can be accomplished completely automatically through the Generate Layout tool that creates an initial system layout, semi-automatically through the Connect Into tool, or manually by determining your layout “on the fly” and drawing each segment. Each method can provide similar results. Each method was also explored in the previous chapter with ductwork layout, so if you completed that chapter, you will notice some similarities herein. The intent of this chapter is to demonstrate each method using the same equipment arrangement. We will utilize the Pipe placeholder elements during initial creation of each layout. Once the layout is created, the layout will be modified using the placeholder grip functionality then utilize the change type to convert placeholder elements to 3D piping. The lessons learned in this chapter can be directly applied to Ductwork as well. RMEP also provides powerful editing and parametric functionality to assist with the finalization of a

266 | Piping Systems

systems layout. These editing tools will be discussed in an effort to show you how you can utilize the power of Revit editing to accomplish your desired layout.

OBJECTIVES
In this chapter we will explore the layout of piping using the different methods of creating pipe runs, (Generate Layout, Connect Into, and manual routing) and associated editing tools and creation of pipe systems, review pipe settings and creating a new pipe type. We will discuss: • Create a new Pipe system. • Create a new Pipe Type. • Utilizing Placeholder layout tools to create initial layouts • Use the grip tools on Placeholder pipes to modify the layout • Converting Placeholder elements to 3D Piping. • Utilizing Generate Placeholder to create and edit the initial layout. • Leveraging edit tools to modify and update layouts to meet your design needs.

PLUMBING & PIPE SETTINGS
Plumbing and piping settings are located in the same dialog as Mechanical Settings. To access the “Mechanical Settings,” dialog click the dialog launcher icon in the lower right-hand corner of the Plumbing & Piping panel on the Home Tab, or type MS to access via the keyboard shortcuts. The “Mechanical Settings” dialog was covered extensively at the start of Chapter 5. Figure 5.1 in Chapter 5 shows how to access the dialog. The Hidden Line settings are common to all disciplines. Duct Settings were discussed in Chapter 5. Pipe Settings are similar. Use annot. Scale for Single Line Fittings—whether the Pipe fittings will utilize the Annotation Scale in Single Line mode as well as the Annotation Size (plotted) based on the plot scale. Pipe Size Suffix—this suffix will be automatically added when a Pipe Size is used, such as in tags or on the Properties Palette (see Figure 6.2).

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FIGURE 6.1

Mechanical Settings dialog – Pipe Settings

Pipe Connector Separator —this is used in Tags and Schedules with the Pipe Connector Size parameter. This symbol will be added between each connector size, for example a 6" Tee would report a 6" – 6" – 6" Tee if the Pipe Connector parameter is specified. Pipe Connector Tolerance—is a global tolerance to allow each pipe fitting connector to “deflect” up to the specified value, in this case 5 degrees to allow connections to be made during layout and remain connected during modifications. The connector tolerance is primarily used with gravity piping layouts. Pipe Rise / Drop Annotation Size—is similar to the Single Line Fitting annotation size which controls the display of a Rise / Drop symbol when in a 1 line display. The scale of the Rise / Drop symbol, regardless of pipe size will appear as the size indicated relative to the plot scale.

BOILER ROOM PIPING—SEMI-AUTOMATIC APPROACH
This exercise will focus on the Generate Layout tool to create the pipe layout. The Boiler Room Exercise project contains two copies of the Boiler room and the associated equipment. We will be using the left most arrangement for this exercise. OPEN A PROJECT FILE The lessons that follow require the dataset files available for download as a companion to this book. If you have already downloaded and installed the files skip to step 3 to begin. If you need to install the files, start at step 1.

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3. If you have not already done so, install the book’s dataset files. Refer to “Book Dataset Files” in the Preface for information on installing the sample files included with this book. 4. Launch Revit MEP from the icon on your desktop or from the Autodesk > Revit MEP 2012 group in All Programs on the Windows Start menu.

TIP: You can click the Windows Start button, and then begin typing Revit in the “Search” field. After a couple letters, Revit MEP should appear near the top of the list. Click it to launch to program.

5. On the QAT, click the Open icon.

TIP: The keyboard shortcut for Open is (big “R”).

CTRL

+ O. Open is also located on the Application menu

 

In the “Open” dialog box, browse to the location where you installed the dataset files. Double-click on the MasterRME 2012 folder and then the Chapter06 folder.

6. Double-click the 06 Boiler Room.rvt file. You can also select it and then click the Open button. 7. Zoom in Region (ZR) on the left room/equipment layout. 8. Select the two pumps and two boilers using a crossing or window (see Figure 6.2).

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FIGURE 6.2

Selecting Equipment  On the Modify | Mechanical Equipment tab, on the Create Systems panel, click the Piping button (see the left side of Figure 6.3).

FIGURE 6.3

Creating a system 9. In the “Create Piping System” dialog, select the drop list for the System type and select Hydronic Return. This will automatically create a system named Hydronic Return 1 (see the right side of Figure 6.3).     Check the box Open in System Editor and click OK. The Select Connector dialog will appear, select “Connector 1: Undefined: Round 4”: Water/Other Liquid In” and click OK. In the second “Select Connector” dialog, select Connector 1 again. On the ribbon, select the finish button

What we have told Revit is that we have logically associated the inlet side of the pump to the return side of the boilers. The result will be a set of dashed lines that appear around the equipment indicating that they are part of the Hydronic Return system (see Figure 6.4).

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FIGURE 6.4

Revit MEP displays the logical system 10. On the ribbon, click the Generate Placeholder Layout button.

Tip: If the equipment is not selected, you can hover over any one item and press the reselect the system.

TAB

key to

The Generate Placeholder tool automatically generates proposed paths to provide solutions based on the connector’s size, location, and the associated Generate Layout settings. The available solutions are accessible on the Options Bar (see Figure 6.5).

FIGURE 6.5

Generate Layout commands on ribbon

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When you select Generate Placeholder an initial solution will appear and the solution types and other options will be available on the Options Bar. You can scroll through the initial options by using the arrows in the Options Bar. Access the settings by clicking the Settings button.
  Click the right arrow on the Options Bar to review the different solutions. With the Solution Type set to Network, stop at solution 5.

11. On the Generate Layout tab, on the Modify Layout panel, click the Edit Layout button (see Figure 6.6).

This will allow you to modify the Layout of solution 5.

FIGURE 6.6

Choose a layout and then use the Edit Layout tool to modify it 12. Select the right line drawn on top of the two boilers (see the left side of Figure 6.7). A move handle will appear (see the middle of Figure 6.7).  Click and hold the move handle on the blue line above the upper boiler and drag to the left (see the right side of Figure 6.7).

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FIGURE 6.7

Editing the layout to locate the Suction header  Repeat the move on the green line above the lower boiler to align with the previous move (see the right side of Figure 6.7).

The pipe path has been updated for all connections. The colors of the paths provide important information that you need to be aware of before completing the layout. The blue color indicates a pipe main, green indicates a branch, and yellow indicates a potential failure of connection due to lack of space to apply the fittings. The upper pump connection to the main has a small yellow line which indicates a possible failure. By utilizing the Generate Placeholder layout control we can complete the edit of the layout and address the issue using the placeholder grip functionality to adjust the layout to better setup the solution for sizing.
13. On the Generate Layout tab, on Generate Layout panel, click the Finish Layout button.

A warning will appear indicating the potential problem if you decide to convert the layout to a traditional pipe type at this point “The placeholder curve is not long enough to support the required fittings for placeholder convert”. We can ignore this warning for now.
14. Select the placeholder pipes connected to the upper pipe (see Figure 6.8)

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FIGURE 6.8

Edit the layout to move the upper pipe location 15. Drag the pipe away from the pump (see Figure 6.8)

Before converting the placeholder pipes to 2 line pipes with fittings, we will continue to edit the layout to provide enough room for the fittings once the pipe is resized and converted.
16. On the View tab, on the Create panel, click the Section tool.

TIP: You can also find the Section tool on the QAT.

  

Pick above and to the left of the upper pump. Pick below the bottom pump to create a vertical section. Use the depth control on the section box to extend beyond the header if needed.

17. Right-click and choose Go to View (see Figure 6.9).

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FIGURE 6.9

Create a section 18. On the View tab, on the Windows panel, click the Tile button.

This will tile the plan and section view windows side by side (see Figure 6.10).

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FIGURE 6.10

Tile views to see plan and section together onscreen Adjust the zoom in both windows. 19. In the section, zoom in on the right (lower in plan) pump and select the vertical pipe.  Click and drag the pipe to the left approx. 6" (see Figure 6.11).

NOTE: If you drag the pipe too far you will receive an error that the pipe is now drawn in the wrong direction.

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FIGURE 6.11

Select the pipe and drag it away from the pump 20. In the plan view, move the section line to the right (past the header) to look at the boilers.

FIGURE 6.12

Update the section location to change the section view

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When you move the section, you will see that we have a similar situation with the vertical pipes at the boilers.
21. Repeat the process of moving the vertical pipes connected to the boilers away from the boilers (see Figure 6.13).

FIGURE 6.13

Select the vertical pipes and drag them away from the boilers 22. In the plan view, hover your mouse over a pipe in the layout to pre-highlight it.  Press the
TAB

key.

Revit will highlight a series of connected Placeholder pipes.
  Press
TAB

again and repeat until all pipes in the system highlight.

When they are all highlighted, click to select all of the pipes (see Figure 6.14).

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FIGURE 6.14
TAB

to select the branch in a pipe network up to a piece of equipment 23. On the Options Bar, from the Diameter drop-down list, choose: 4" (see Figure 6.15).

FIGURE 6.15

Resizing pipes using the Options Bar

The placeholder pipes are now in the correct location and sized appropriately, we can now run the Convert Placeholder command to finish the layout.

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24. Use 

TAB

to select the pipes again.

On the Modify | Pipe Placeholders tab, on the Edit panel, click the Convert Placeholder button.

Provided that there is enough room for the fittings, the placeholder pipes will be converted to pipes and fittings as defined by the pipe type.

FIGURE 6.16

Convert the placeholder pipes to actual pipes and fittings

This sequence began with the Generate Placeholder tool to help us create an initial path. We then edited the layout to refine the paths and completed the layout to place the Placeholder pipes. We then further refined the layout to accommodate resizing the pipe to a larger diameter and then converted the Placeholder pipes to pipes and fittings based on the defined pipe type. This approach showcases what we will term a “semi-automatic layout” using both the automatic creation tools and then leveraging Revit’s ability to adjust existing elements rather than erasing and recreating them.

BOILER ROOM PIPING—MANUAL APPROACH
This exercise focuses on using the Pipe command and editing tools to create the pipe layout. The Boiler Room exercise file contains three copies of the boiler room and its associated equipment. We will be using the right arrangement for this exercise.
25. Close any section views you have open and maximize the plan view.  In the plan view, zoom to fit.

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280 | Piping Systems 

Zoom in region on the equipment room and layout on the right (see Figure 6.17).

FIGURE 6.17

Exercise two equipment layout

The equipment arrangement for this exercise is a three-pump, three-boiler arrangement. The goal is to create a two-operating, one-standby system.
26. Select the uppermost pump.  Right-click on the upper connector handle and then choose Draw Pipe Placeholder (see Figure 6.18).

FIGURE 6.18

Starting the pipe command from equipment

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When the Draw Placeholder Pipe command is begun from this control, it inherits the size and elevation of the Family connector.
   Route the pipe 1'-0" away from the pump, and then click to create the segment. On the Options Bar, change the Offset to: 7'-0". (You can type it in or choose it from the list). Pick a point horizontally to the right (see Figure 6.19).

FIGURE 6.19

Change the Offset of the pipe on the Options Bar and draw additional segments 27. On the Options Bar, from the Diameter list, choose: 6".  Pick a point towards the bottom pump (see Figure 6.20).

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FIGURE 6.20

Change the Diameter and continue adding pipe  On the ribbon, click the Modify tool (or press ESC twice) to end the command.

28. Select the lower pump, right-click on the upper connector, and then choose: Draw Pipe Placeholder.     Route the pipe 1'-0" away from the pump. On the Options Bar, change the Offset to: 7'-0". Pick a point horizontally to the right towards the 6" pipe, but do not connect it. On the ribbon, click the Modify tool (or press ESC twice) to end the command.

29. On the Modify tab, on the Modify panel, click the Trim/Extend to Corner button (see Figure 6.21). 30. Click the 2 placeholder pipes individually (see Figure 6.21).

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Click the pipe coming from the pump first. Click the vertical 6" pipe next.

FIGURE 6.21

Use the Trim/Extend to Corner command to clean up the layout

With the Trim/Extend to Corner command, you select one linear element such as the pipe we have onscreen and join it to another in a corner configuration. This command can either trim or extend the elements it is joining depending on the existing configuration. Be sure to pay attention to the onscreen cues and click the side of the line or pipe that you wish to keep; not the side you want to trim away.
 Click the Modify tool (or press ESC twice) to complete the command.

31. Select the Middle pump, right-click the top connector control, and then choose: Draw Placeholder Pipe.   Draw a pipe 1'-0" away like the others. Change the Offset to: 7'-0" again and then pick a point on the vertical pipe perpendicular to the horizontal pipe (see Figure 6.22).

The new pipe will connect to the other.

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FIGURE 6.22

Pump Suction layout complete

The suction header is complete using Placeholder piping. Next we will use the same methods to create a suction header.
32. Select the upper pump, right-click on the 3" suction (lower) connector, and choose: Draw Pipe Placeholder.       On the Options Bar change the size to: 4". Pick a point 1'-0" straight down. On the Options Bar, change the Offset to: 8'-0". Pick a point horizontally to the right of the suction header. Draw another pipe straight down towards the bottom pump. Click the Modify tool on the ribbon to complete the command.

33. Select the bottom pump, right-click on the 3" connector.

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Change the size to: 4" and then pick a point 1'-0" straight down. Change diameter to 6" and then change the offset to: 8'-0". Pick a point horizontally towards the vertical pipe, but do not connect. Click the Modify tool to complete the command.

34. On the Modify tab, on the Modify panel, click the Trim/Extend to Corner tool.   Pick the pipe from the bottom pump first. Pick the vertical pipe second (see Figure 6.23).

FIGURE 6.23

Create the top and bottom pump discharge piping 35. Select the Middle pump, right-click, choose: Draw Pipe Placeholder, change the diameter to 4”, and then draw a pipe 1'-0" straight down.  Change the Offset to: 8'-0" and then pick a point on the vertical pipe perpendicular to the horizontal pipe.

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The new pipe will connect to the other.
36. Select the Pipe Placeholder command on the Home Tab Plumbing and Piping panel.

Snap to the end of the lower corner of the suction piping.
 Click the bottom + control to convert the elbow to a tee (see Figure 6.24).

FIGURE 6.24

Connecting to the layout  Draw a pipe straight down, and then to the bottom right-hand corner of the room.

37. On the Options Bar, change the Offset to: 30'-0" and then click the Apply button.

The pipe is now drawn vertically. In a multi-level project, you would be able to go to the upper levels and connect to the pipe to continue the Boiler piping run.
 Click the Modify tool or press ESC to compete the Pipe Placeholder command.
TAB

38. Use the TAB key method to select the first run of pipe, (you may need to press times as necessary to select the piping connected to all three pumps). 

multiple

On the ribbon, click the Convert Placeholder button to complete the layout (see Figure 6.25).

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FIGURE 6.25

Connecting to the layout

The Piping for the pumps still needs to be connected to the boilers. You can use the skills that you just learned to continue this layout and connect to the boilers. A completed version of the project is provided with the dataset files for this chapter in the Chapter06 folder.

GRAVITY PIPING LAYOUT
This exercise also utilizes the Placeholder Piping elements to create a sloped pipe layout. We will focus on editing the layouts and utilizing the slope tools to apply a slope to the layout.
39. From the Chapter 6 folder open the file named 06 Sloped Piping Layout.rvt.

The Sloped Piping Layout project file contains a flat placeholder pipe layout for floor drains. This exercise builds on the skills learned above regarding generating placeholder layouts. Similar steps were performed here to create the floor drain layout included in the file. In this

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sequence, we will explore the steps necessary to apply a slope to the pipe runs and convert the placeholder pipes to real piping.
40. Select the Placeholder Piping layout using the
TAB

select method (see Figure 6.26).

FIGURE 6.26

Select the drainage system Pipe Placeholder layout

The placeholder pipes have a grip functionality to allow for quick edits to refine the layout without the issues traditionally associated with layouts that contain existing fittings. The grips can be used to manipulate the layout.
 Click the Modify tool (or press ESC) to cancel the selection.
TAB

Use the

key to select the entire pipe run.

41. Hover over any pipe to highlight it and then press the TAB key. Press again as necessary until all pipes are highlighted and then click the left mouse button to select.   On the Modify | Multi-select tab, click the Filter button. Uncheck Plumbing Fixtures (Leave Pipe Placeholders checked) and then click OK.

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Once the Plumbing Fixtures are deselected, the Slope Tool appears on the ribbon. 42. On the Modify | Multi-select tab, click the Slope Tool.  On the Slope Editor tab, change the slope to 1/8" / 12" (see Figure 6.27).

FIGURE 6.27

Choose the desired Slope Value  On the Slope Editor tab, click the Finish button.

The placeholder pipes will have the slope applied. A warning will appear that the pipe exiting the building has an open connection. This is expected (see Figure 6.29).

FIGURE 6.28

A benign warning appears when sloping the placeholder piping; it can be ignored 43. To verify the slope has been applied, open the section along the left side wall. You can right-click on the Section mark and choose Go to View or simply double-click it.

The pipes appear pitched following the new slope settings (see Figure 6.29).

FIGURE 6.29

Opening the Section View reveals the new pitch applied to the Pipes

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44. Close the Section to return to the plan view. 45. Use the  
TAB

key to select the entire pipe layout again

On the ribbon, click the Filter button. Deselect the Plumbing Fixtures and then click OK.

46. On the Modify | Multi-select tab, click the convert Placeholder button.

The entire pipe run is now converted to the associated pipes and fittings assigned to the type (see Figure 6.30).

FIGURE 6.30

Converted Placeholder to 2 line pipe result

This exercise explored how to leverage placeholder pipes for a sloped piping layout and utilize the slope tool to apply the slope value. Please keep in mind you do need to provide enough distance for fittings in any layout. The placeholder elements will provide warnings when conditions exist that may not allow for fittings to be placed.

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SUMMARY
The goal of this chapter was to help you understand the different methods of layout available in Revit MEP. We showcased piping here, but the techniques apply equally to piping, duct, conduit and cable tray. The Generate Layout command is a useful tool to create an initial layout that can then be edited to meet your needs. The manual layout tools and editing commands allow you to fine-tune your layouts as the design progresses.  Create systems by selecting the equipment and then you can use the Generate Placeholder Layout tool to have Revit MEP suggest a number of automatic solutions. Before confirming the layout, you can edit the “stick figure” layout to better meet the requirements of your design. Use alternate views such as sections to make adjustments to the layout easier. Use the TAB key during selection to toggle to alternate selections such as branches and other connected series of elements. Selecting multiple pipes and fittings allows you to quickly change the size of the whole system. An alternative to the automatic generation method is to manually lay out pipes and fittings. You can use the Trim/Extend and Move commands to adjust the layouts. Use the Options Bar to make adjustments to pipe sizes and Offsets. Utilize Placeholder elements to create sloped piping layouts by applying the slope to a placeholder layout. You can easily convert Placeholder elements to 2 line pipe and fittings.

        

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Chapter 7

Electrical Systems

INTRODUCTION
A key differentiator of information model based workflows vs. traditional drafting methodologies is the functionality enabled by capturing design data during the process. Electrical systems in Revit MEP (RMEP) consist of associations between electrical connectors on components such as lighting fixtures and receptacles, and circuit objects which are associated with electrical equipment, such as branch circuit panels. These connectors enable the designer to embed electrical power characteristics with components, circuit the components to panels, and ultimately report total connected and demand load in panel schedules. In addition to electrical devices and electrical equipment, RMEP provides Wires for annotating circuits with tick marks, as well as Conduit and Cable Tray objects for modeling such objects for coordination in three-dimensional space with other trades. Electrical load functionalities in Revit MEP are for AC power systems, such as for lighting, receptacles, and mechanical equipment. Low voltage system connections, such as for fire alarm, communications, and the like, do not presently support electrical voltage and load characteristics.

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OBJECTIVES
In this chapter you will learn how to place and annotate electrical components. We will explore the electrical discipline tool set in detail including the following: • Learn how to place electrical equipment and model distribution systems • Learn how to place devices • Investigate how to modify annotation symbols within a Family definition • Learn how to circuit elements (including mechanical equipment) • Learn how to annotate with wires • Placing Electrical Equipment and Defining Distribution Systems • Document designs using panel schedules

OPEN A PROJECT FILE The lessons that follow require the dataset files available for download as a companion to this book. If you have already downloaded and installed the files skip to step 3 to begin. If you need to install the files, start at step 1.
1. If you have not already done so, install the book’s dataset files. Refer to “Book Dataset Files” in the Preface for information on installing the sample files included with this book. 2. Launch Revit MEP from the icon on your desktop or from the Autodesk > Revit MEP 2012 group in All Programs on the Windows Start menu.

TIP: You can click the Windows Start button, and then begin typing Revit in the “Search” field. After a couple letters, Revit MEP should appear near the top of the list. Click it to launch to program.

3. On the QAT, click the Open icon.

TIP: The keyboard shortcut for Open is (big “R”).

CTRL

+ O. Open is also located on the Application menu

In the “Open” dialog box, browse to the location where you installed the dataset files.

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Double-click on the MasterRME 2012 folder and then the Chapter07 folder.

4. Select the 07 MEP Commercial.rvt file. 5. Click Open.

PLACING ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT
In this topic we will explore how to place electrical equipment. Once the equipment is placed, we can then create logical connections between the equipment using the circuiting functionality. We will use the System Browser to verify connections.
NOTE: It is not necessary to place electrical equipment before placing devices; you can create device and lighting layouts, add your distribution equipment later, followed by circuiting if you wish.

1. 

On the Project Browser, navigate to Views > Electrical > Power > Floor Plans. Double-click the Level 3 – Power view to open it.

2. On the Project Browser, navigate to Families > Electrical Equipment. 3. Expand Electrical Equipment. Observe the equipment that is pre-loaded from the default template. Notice that there are a variety of types (sizes/ratings) for each of the following families:     Dry Type Transformer - 480-208Y120 - NEMA Type 2 Ethernet Switch Lighting and Appliance Panelboard - 208V MLO Lighting and Appliance Panelboard - 480V MLO

For our project, we don’t necessarily need the transformer to be a Type 2, so we will change that to Type 1.
4. Right-click on Dry Type Transformer - 480-208Y120 - NEMA Type 2 and choose Rename.  Change the number 2 after the word Type to 1.

The Panelboards that are pre-loaded are recessed/flush mount type panels. In the following steps, we will load some surface mount panels.

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5. On the Home tab, on the Electrical panel, click the Electrical Equipment button.  On the Modify | Place Equipment tab, on the Mode panel, click the Load Family button.

Revit should open to the Imperial Library folder automatically. If it does not, it could be that your copy of Revit MEP was installed with different options than the typical U.S. default. Copies of Families noted here are included with the dataset files from the student companion. You will find them in the MasterRME 2012\Library folder. Feel free to use the provided versions instead of those noted in the following steps.
6. In the Imperial Library folder, browse to Electrical Components\Electric Power\Distribution folder.   Hold down the
CTRL

key.

Select Lighting and Appliance Panelboard - 208V MCB – Surface and Lighting and Appliance Panelboard - 480V MLO – Surface and then click Open.

7. On the Properties palette, from the Type Selector choose: Lighting and Appliance Panelboard - 480V MLO – Surface : 250A and then input the following values:      Elevation: 6'-0". Panel Name: H3. Max #1 Pole Breakers: 42. Mains: 225A. Distribution System: 480/277 Wye.

8. Place the panel in the room next to the elevators approximately where shown in Figure 7.1.

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(The Electrical – Loads grouping is shown collapsed in the figure for clarity)
FIGURE 7.1

Configure the properties of the panel and then place an instance in the electrical closet

Note that a tag is placed directly over the panel that shows the panel name. We will move this tag later.
9. Press the
ESC

key to end the command.

10. On the Modify | Place Equipment tab, on the Modify panel, click the Copy button.    Using the
CTRL

key, select the Panel and the Tag and then press

ENTER.

Pick a move start point near the panel. Drag the cursor straight down, and pick again when the temporary dimension shows 2'-0" (see Figure 7.2).

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FIGURE 7.2

Copying a panel using a temporary dimension  Hold the SHIFT key down and then click on the copied tag to deselect it (leaving the panel selected).With the panel still selected, from the Type Selector choose: Lighting and Appliance Panelboard – 208V MCB – Surface : 225A.

11. Set the Distribution System to: 120/208 Wye. 12. Change the Panel Name to: L3. 13. On the Project Browser expand Families > Electrical Equipment > Dry Type Transformer 480-208Y120 - NEMA Type 1.  Select the 75 kVA type and drag it into the model canvas.

14. On the Properties palette, configure the following: 15. Beneath the Constraints grouping, set the Offset to: 7'-0". 16. Beneath the Electrical – Loads grouping, from the Secondary Distribution System, choose: 120/208 Wye. 17. Beneath the General grouping, change the Panel Name to: T-L3. 18. Beneath the Electrical – Circuiting grouping, set the Distribution System to: 480/277 Wye and the Max #1 Pole Breakers to: 3.

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FIGURE 7.3

Third floor electrical room equipment layout  Pick to place the transformer in the electrical room approximately where shown in Figure 7.3.

The Panel Name for a transformer does not refer to the name of the panel the transformer is fed to or fed from. This Panel Name property is a common property to all Electrical Equipment, and thus, actually refers to the name of the Transformer itself. There are other properties on the Transformer that are general Electrical Equipment properties that don’t necessarily apply to Transformers, such as Mains.
NOTE: If you wanted to double tap the transformer and feed two panels, you could set the Max #1 Pole Breakers setting to 6 for two 3-phase connections.

On the ribbon, click the Modify tool or press ESC twice to end the command.

19. One by one, pick and drag the tags to locations approximately as shown on the right side of Figure 7.3.

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CIRCUITING EQUIPMENT
In this topic, we will interconnect the transformer and panels. The functionality for connecting panels and transformers is the same functionality utilized to circuit devices and lighting fixtures to panels. The basic procedure is always similar to the following: Begin by selecting the object(s) to be circuited. On the ribbon, create a system using the Power button and the Electrical Circuits tab appears when you do this. There you click the Select Panel tool and finally onscreen select the equipment (panel or transformer) that feeds the selected objects. Using this procedure, we will now connect Panel L3 to T-L3.
1. Select panel L3. Be sure to select the panel and not the tag.  On the Modify | Electrical Equipment tab, on the Create Systems panel, click the Power button.

The Electrical Circuits ribbon tab will appear and become active.
2. On the Electrical Circuits tab, on the Systems Tools panel, click the Select Panel button. 3. On the Options Bar, from the Panel drop-down list, choose T-L3 (you could also pick it directly onscreen in the model canvas).

NOTE: if you are unable to select the transformer, make sure the (primary) Distribution System and Secondary Distribution System are set on the transformer as instructed previously.

You could use a similar procedure to connect T-L3 to H3, however, we will demonstrate a slightly different procedure instead.
4. Select transformer T-L3. Again, make sure to select the transformer and not the tag.     Right-click on the square connector control as shown in Figure 7.4. Choose Create Power Circuit. On the Electrical Circuits tab, on the System Tools panel, click the Select Panel button. Pick panel H3 in the model.

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Press

ESC

to deselect the transformer and complete the command.

FIGURE 7.4

Create a circuit by right-clicking on a power connector

Both panels are now connected to the transformer.

CHECKING CONNECTIONS IN SYSTEM BROWSER
As we saw in Chapter 5, System Browser provides a tree-like view of all the systems in a project. For each electrical equipment component, it lists the circuits associated with the component, and under each circuit, it lists each component connector that is connected to it, whether it be another equipment Family, or a device such as a lighting fixture or receptacle.
1. On the View tab, on the Windows panel, click the User Interface drop-down button and then choose System Browser.

NOTE: System Browser is useful to identify if and how system components are interconnected. However in large project models, leaving it open can slow down performance when editing the model. As such, it is recommended that you only have the System Browser open when necessary.

2. Right click on Electrical (2 systems) and select Expand All.

This will reveal how the various components are interconnected (see Figure 7.5). The columns you see may be slightly different than what is shown in the figure, you can configure what columns are displayed by clicking on the Column Settings button.

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FIGURE 7.5

System Browser showing Level 3 Equipment connections

As noted above, it is a good idea to get in the habit of closing the System Browser when you are finished with it. In a model this size, there would not be much impact in leaving it open, but in your real projects, it is a good idea to open it, perform your required tasks and then close it.

CREATE THE MAIN SERVICE ENTRANCE
1. On the Project Browser, beneath Views > Electrical > Floor Plans, double-click the Level 1 –

Power view to open it.
2. Zoom in on the area just north of the stairs, between grid lines C & D. 3. On the Home tab, on the Electrical panel, click the Electrical Equipment button.  On the Properties palette, from the Type Selector, choose Dry Type Transformer – 480208Y120 – NEMA Type 1: 500 kVA.

4. Verify that the Level is: Level 1 and change the Offset to: 0'-6". 5. For the Panel Name, type: UTILITY. 6. Set the Secondary Distribution System to: 480/277 Wye. 7. Press the 
SPACEBAR

once to rotate the transformer 90 degrees.

Place the transformer approximately where shown in Figure 7.6.

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FIGURE 7.6

Place a transformer near the service entrance on the Level 1 view

A little later in this chapter, we will discuss how to create a distribution system, and set the (primary) distribution system on the transformer.
Remain in the Place Equipment command. 8. On the Modify | Place Equipment tab, on the Model panel, click the Load Family button.   Browse to the Electrical Components\Electric Power\Distribution folder. Select the Circuit Breaker Switchboard.rfa file and then click Open.

9. On the properties palette, from the Type Selector, choose: Circuit Breaker Switchboard: 24"x26".   Verify that the Level is: Level 1 and that the Offset is: 0'-6". Set the Panel Name to: SB and for the Distribution System, choose: 480/277 Wye.

10. Place the switchboard (SB) approximately where shown in Figure 7.7.

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FIGURE 7.7

Place a switchboard near the service entrance on the Level 1 view 11. On the Project Browser, double-click to open the Level 3 – Power view. 12. Select panel H3.    On the Modify | Electrical Equipment tab, on the Create Systems panel, click the Power button. On the Electrical Circuits tab, on the System Tools panel, click the Select Panel button. On the Options Bar, from the Panel drop-down, choose: SB.

COPY EQUIPMENT TO A LEVEL
Now, we will copy the electrical equipment from Level 3 to Level 2.
Remain in the Level 3 – Power floor plan view and zoom in on the electrical room if necessary. 1. Select the panels, transformer, and all three tags using a window selection (left to right) as shown on the left side of Figure 7.8.

Be careful not to accidentally select the Space. An easy way to verify is with the Filter tool. At the bottom of the screen, on the right side of the Status Bar, the quantity next to the Filter icon should read: 6. You can also click the Filter icon and verify that only Electrical Equipment and Electrical Equipment Tags are included in the selection.
 On the Modify | Multi-Select tab, on the Clipboard panel, click the Copy to Clipboard button.

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FIGURE 7.8

Select equipment on Level 3, then copy and paste it aligned to Level 2   On the Project Browser, double-click to open the Level 2 – Power view. On the Modify | Multi-Select tab, on the Clipboard panel, click the Paste drop-down button and then choose Aligned to Current View (see the right side of Figure 7.8).

2. One by one, double-click on each of the tags, and change the 3 to 2. This will rename the equipment.

When you copy components that are assigned to systems, such as in this case when copying electrical equipment that is already circuited, the newly created elements are not circuited. The same holds true if you were to copy circuited receptacles, lighting fixtures, or the like. The new copies will not be associated with the circuit assigned to the original devices. You will need to assign them manually to the required circuits.

LEVEL 2 ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT – SELF EXERCISE
Following the procedures covered in the previous topics, connect L2 to T-L2, T-L2 to H2, and H2 to SB. The results should be as indicated in the System Browser shown in Figure 7.9.

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FIGURE 7.9

System Browser showing connections between equipment on Level 2

The “Inside the System” blog contains a post describing how to incorporate an Automatic Transfer Switch into your Distribution System. You can find the post at this URL: http://inside-the-system.typepad.com/my_weblog/2010/03/automatic-transfer-switches.html.
3. Save your file.

CREATE LIGHTING VIEWS
In this topic, we are going to circuit the lighting fixtures that we copied from the architectural model back in Chapter 3. To get started, we will add a ceiling plan view showing the lights.
4. On the View tab, on the Create panel, click the Plan Views drop-down button and choose Reflected Ceiling Plan.  In the “New RCP” dialog, select Level 3.

NOTE: In some cases, when you run this command, the level you want will not be listed. In this case, uncheck the “Do not duplicate existing views” checkbox at the bottom.

Verify that the Scale is set to: 1/8" = 1'-0" and then click OK.

The new view shows up in Project Browser under Views > Mechanical > ??? > Ceiling Plans named simply: Level 3. Let’s rename it and categorize it properly.
5. On the Project Browser, expand the Views > Mechanical > ??? > Ceiling Plans branch.  Select Level 3 and then press F2.

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In the “Rename View” dialog that appears, change the name to: Level 3 – Lighting and then click OK.

A message will appear asking if you would like to rename the corresponding level and views. Clicking Yes in this dialog would rename the level currently named: “Level 3” to “Level 3 – Lighting” and would also potentially rename several floor plan views as well. Since the name of the level helps establish common building datum, typically you don’t want to rename the levels at this prompt and rather we should leave them as defined by the Architect.
 In the rename message, click No.

The view now displays the new name in the Project Browser, but still appears in the wrong branch. The easiest way to fix this is to apply a View Template. As we saw in Chapter 3, a View Template is a saved collection of view settings and properties that can be applied to any view. Typically items like the visibility/graphic override (VG) settings, scale, level of detail, and desired Project Browser category are among the settings captured and applied with a View Template.
6. Right-click on Level 3 – Lighting and choose: Apply View Template.  In the “Apply View Template” dialog, from the Names list, select Electrical Ceiling and then click OK.

The View moves in Project Browser to a new branch named: Views > Electrical > Lighting > Ceiling Plans.
7. Use the Zoom to Fit (ZF) command to see the whole view.

Note that the ceiling grid, walls, and other elements are not visible. Some view settings need to be modified to make them appear.
8. On the Properties palette, make sure Ceiling Plan: Level 3 – Lighting is selected in the dropdown directly beneath the Type Selector (see Figure 7.10)  Set the Underlay Orientation to: Reflected Ceiling Plan.

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FIGURE 7.10

Change the underlay orientation for the Level 3 Lighting ceiling plan

Note that the door swings don’t show up in the current view, which may make it difficult to properly locate light switches. This is because the Cut Plane (in the View Range) is above the door headers by default. We can use the following procedure to modify the view range.
9. Scroll down in the Properties palette near the bottom.  Next to View Range, click the Edit button.

10. Change the Cut plane Offset to: 3'-0" and then click OK (see Figure 7.11).

FIGURE 7.11

Lower the cut plane in the “View Range” settings

By moving the cut plane down to 3'-0" the view now cuts through the doors, and we see the swing geometry. This will also allow us to later see switches that are placed at 3'-6".

TIP: In a Reflected Ceiling Plan, generally you see what is above the Cut plane elevation. In a floor plan view, generally you see what is below the Top of the range.

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MODIFYING LIGHTING FIXTURE TYPES
In this topic, we will modify the types of some lighting fixtures.
1.  Select one of the 2x4 lighting fixtures. Since the fixture was copied from the architectural model, the Monitored icon (like a heart monitor) is displayed next to the element (see the right side of Figure 7.12). With the fixture selected, scroll to the bottom of the Properties palette and take note of the Electrical – Circuiting data (see the left side of Figure 7.12).

The fixture is defined as 120V/1ph, 80 VA. We want to set this to a 277V, and will need some fixtures to be 2-, 3-, and 4-lamp.

FIGURE 7.12

Electrical-Circuiting properties in the MPP (left) Monitor icon and connector control on lighting fixture (right)

Use the following procedure to change all the 2x4 lighting fixtures to 277V.
2. With the fixture still selected, right-click in the modeling canvas, and choose Select All Instances > Visible in View.

This will select all instances in the current View, even if they are outside the extents of the screen due to zoom level. The Properties palette indicates that the selected fixture type is: Troffer Light – 2x4 Parabolic: 2x4(2 Lamp) – 120 V. As the lighting designer, you realize that the fixtures should not be parabolic, so you want to change the type.
3. From the Type Selector, choose: Plain Recessed Lighting Fixture: 2x4 – 277.

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FIGURE 7.13

Modified and original fixtures after the copy operation

Note that the modification results in the fixtures being misplaced due to differing origins; additionally, the rotation of the fixtures is no longer consistent (see Figure 7.13).
 On the Quick Access Toolbar (QAT) click the Undo icon to revert the fixtures back to their original type.

Instead of swapping the types, we will instead rename the family, and then modify the family to create a 3-Lamp type.
4. On the Project Browser, scroll down and expand: Families > Lighting Fixtures.   Select Troffer Light – 2x4 Parabolic and then press F2. Replace the word “Parabolic,” with Lensed. The resulting name will be: Troffer Light – 2x4 Lensed. 5. Expand the Troffer Light – 2x4 Lensed Family.   Right-click on the 2'x4'(2 Lamp) - 120 V type and choose Duplicate. Input the name: 2'x4'(3 Lamp) – 277 V and then press
ENTER.

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With the new type 2'x4'(3 Lamp) - 277 V selected, you will see its properties on the Properties palette, but all of the values will be grayed out. To edit them, we must edit the Type Properties.
    Right-click on the 2'x4'(3 Lamp) – 277 V type and choose Type Properties. Change the Ballast Voltage to: 277. For the Lamp setting choose: T-8. Set the Apparent Load to: 96 VA and then click OK.

We have created a new 3 Lamp type. Now let’s apply it to our existing light fixtures.
6. Select one of the fixtures in the model canvas.  Right-click and choose: Select All Instances > Visible in View.

7. On the Properties palette, from the Type Selector, choose the 2'x4'(3 Lamp) - 277 V type.

You will get a Coordination Monitor alert indicating the types of fixtures are not equivalent. This means that fixtures no longer match the Architect’s fixtures. You can safely ignore this warning. Warnings that appear in the lower right corner of the screen and appear with a yellow tinted background indicate situations that may be of concern, but do not prevent you from continuing. It is always a good idea to read all warnings before dismissing them, but in this case it is safe to ignore the message.

FIGURE 7.14

Select a different fixture type in the MPP

All the 2x4 fixtures in the view are now 3 Lamp 277 V.
8. Press
ESC

to deselect all the fixtures.

9. Select the four fixtures in the room in the lower left corner of the building. 10. On the Modify | Lighting Fixtures tab, on the Create Systems panel, click the Power button.

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This will create a circuit connecting the selected fixtures.
   On the Electrical Circuits tab, on the System Tools panel, click the Select Panel button. On the Options Bar, from the Panel list, select H3. On the Convert to Wire panel, click the Arc Wire button.

Creating wiring is optional. Wiring is annotative, and is not required to maintain connectivity between elements on a circuit. Creating wiring after connecting to a panel will also place a homerun; if you create wiring before specifying a panel for the circuit, no homerun is created.
11. Save your file.

LIGHTING SWITCHES
Next, we will add switches to the drawing. It would be possible to copy/monitor the lighting switches; however, in this case, we will manually place them.
12. On the Home tab, on the Electrical panel, click the drop-down portion of the Device split button, and then choose Lighting.   On the Properties palette, from the Type Selector, choose Lighting Switches: Single Pole. Set the Elevation to 3'-6".

13. Place a switch in the approximate location of each of the Architect’s switches throughout the entire level (see Figure 7.15).

NOTE: The lighting switches may try to host to the Architect’s lighting switches instead of the wall if you are too close to the switch. Just make sure to zoom in close and pick a point on the wall. You can also use the TAB key to toggle to an alternate location. You can always adjust the position later.

FIGURE 7.15

Place switches in the host model

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HIDE THE ARCHITECT’S ELECTRICAL FIXTURES
After you have placed all of the lighting switches, you can turn off the ones in the Architect’s file. To do this, you edit the Visibility/Graphic Overrides (VG) of the current view.
1.    Type VG to open the “Visibility/Graphic Overrides” dialog. Click the Revit Links tab. Next to the Commercial-Arch.rvt file, click the By Host View button. In the “RVT Link Display Settings” dialog, at the top click the “Custom” radio button (see the left side of Figure 7.16).

FIGURE 7.16

Hide a nested category in the linked Revit model using Custom VG settings for the Revit Link   Click the Model Categories tab and then from the Model categories drop-down list at the top, choose <Custom>. Uncheck Electrical Fixtures and then click OK twice.

All of the light switches in the Architect’s file will now be hidden in this view.

BUILD A CUSTOM SWITCH FAMILY
To accommodate bi-level lighting, we will modify the switch Family to define a two gang switch. We will then replace the switches in the offices with this modified Family.
2. On Project Browser, expand Families > Lighting Devices.

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Right-click on the Lighting Switches Family and choose Edit.

This will open the Family in Family Editor.
3. From the Application menu, choose Save As > Family.  Save the file as Two Gang Bi Level Switch in the Chapter07 folder.

The reason for saving the Family at this point is to ensure that it has a new name so we don’t overwrite the original lighting switch Family already loaded in the project. The folder where you save the Family is not important, but typically you will want it to be either the same folder as the project files or on the server in an appropriate “library” folder.
4. On the Project browser, expand Families > Annotation Symbols.   Select Lighting Switches Annotation and press F2 to rename it. Change the name to: Two Gang Bi Level Switch Annotation.

5. Right-click on Two Gang Bi Level Switch Annotation and choose Edit.

This launches another instance of the Family Editor with the Two Gang Bi Level Switch Annotation Family loaded.
6. Zoom in on the Switch at the intersection of the two green dashed reference planes.   On the View tab, on the Graphics tab, click the Visibility/Graphics button (or type VG). On the Annotation Categories tab, check Reference Lines and the click OK.

We can now see that this switch was defined with a lot of constrained geometry. When we attempt to edit the switch geometry, we will receive messages indicating that: “Constraints are not satisfied.” For our purposes, this is fine as the constraints aren’t needed to control the geometry of the switch in this case.
7. Select all the elements with a window selection (see Figure 7.17).

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FIGURE 7.17

Edit the geometry of the Switch annotation Family  Press the right arrow key to nudge all the geometry slightly. You will receive an Error indicating that Constraints are not satisfied as shown on the right side of Figure 7.17.  Click the Expand >> button.

You will see the details of the constraint indicating constraints between Lines and dimensional constraints. Selecting an Error will highlight the affected elements in the view. The constraints in this case are basically trying to keep the line in the switch aligned with the vertical reference plane.
 Click the Remove Constraints button.

8. Continue to nudge the switch until it is completely on the right of the vertical reference line.  Press
ESC

or click the Modify tool to deselect all the objects.

9. Zoom in on the switch geometry.  Hold down the CTRL key and select the two arcs and the line segment that make up the switch annotation.

10. On the Modify | Lines tab, on the Modify panel, click the Copy button.   Pick the base point at the endpoint of the line in the switch geometry. Move the mouse to the left (maintaining a straight horizontal movement), then pick a point to place the copy (see Figure 7.18).

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FIGURE 7.18

Completed switch family annotation 11. On the Home tab, on the Detail panel, click the Line tool.    On the Modify | Place Lines tab, on the Draw panel, click the Start-End-Radius arc icon. Pick two points horizontally across the top of the switches, and then pick an intermediate point to define the radius. Press
ESC

to end the Arc command.

12. Delete the text label (the number 2).

If you wish, you can return to VG and turn off Reference Lines and Dimensions. Continue to adjust the geometry if necessary until it is similar to Figure 7.18.
13. On the Family Editor panel, click the Load into Project button.

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In the “Load into Projects” dialog, check only the Two Gang Bi Level Switch.rfa file and then click OK. When prompted that the Family Already Exists, click Overwrite the existing version (see Figure 7.19).

FIGURE 7.19

Load the modified annotation Family back into the Switch Family 14. On the Home tab, on the Properties panel, click the Family Types button.  In the “Family Types” dialog, click the Name drop-down list.

Note that there are several types. All of these types appear here because we copied this Family from the general Lighting Switch Family. We can delete the types we don’t need.
15. Select Circuit Breaker and then, on the right, click the Delete button.   Repeat for all types except Single Pole. Click OK when finished.

16. Save the file. 17. On the Family Editor panel, click the Load into Project button.  This time, check the 07 MEP Commercial.rvt file, and then click OK.

18. On the Project Browser, double-click the Level 3 – Lighting view if it is not already current.   In the northwest corner office (Office 3109 – refer to the view Level 3 – HVAC if necessary), select the switch you placed previously next to the entry door. On the Properties palette, from the Type Selector, choose Two Gang Bi Level Switch: Single Pole.

19. Update the switches in the other three offices on the west side..

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Now that we have several switches, let’s edit the circuit we created earlier to add the switches to the circuit
20. Select one of the 2x4 lighting fixtures on the circuit created earlier.  On the Electrical Circuits tab, on the System Tools panel, click the Edit Circuit button. Verify that the Add to Circuit button is enabled.  One by one, click to select each of the switches.

NOTE: As you select the switches, their color changes from grey to black indicating they are part of the circuit being edited.

After you have selected the switches, click the Finish Editing Circuit button.

21. On the View tab, on the Windows panel, click the Switch Windows drop-down button and then choose one of the Two Gang Bi Level Switch.rfa views.   From the Application menu, choose Close. If prompted to save, click Yes.

22. On the View tab, on the Windows panel, click the Switch Windows drop-down button and then choose the Two Gang Bi Level Switch Annotation.rfa view.   From the Application menu, choose Close. When prompted to save, click No.

We don’t need to save the annotation family because it is embedded in the lighting device switch family.

SWITCH SYSTEMS
Switch Systems are used to annotate what switch controls which lighting fixtures. A Switch System is basically a relationship between one or more lighting fixtures and a single switch. Switch Systems are not intended to logically encapsulate a lighting control design, such as with 3-way, 4-way relays, or digital lighting controls; however, it is possible to annotate such systems using conventional drafting techniques within Revit. Before continuing this topic, make sure you have placed a switch in the model for each of the switches that were shown in the linked architectural model.

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1.

Zoom in on the conference room (see Figure 7.20)

We will be defining switch systems, and adding the switch tags (a, b, c).

FIGURE 7.20

Switch systems in the conference room 2. Select the four lighting fixtures on the right side of the room. 3. On the Modify | Lighting Fixtures tab, on the Create Systems panel, click the Switch button. 4. On the Switch Systems tab, on the System Tools panel, click the Select Switch button. 5. Select the right-most switch at the room entrance. 6. Repeat the above procedure by selecting the three linear fixtures, create the switch system, and then select the middle switch. 7. Repeat one last time to create a system for the left four fixtures associated with the left-most switch.  Press the
ESC

key to exit the switch systems command.

8. Select the left-most switch, and in the properties palette, set the Switch ID to: a.  Assign the Switch ID b and c to the middle and right switch respectively.

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We will create the switch tags later in this chapter. Next we will look at electrical fixtures and switch to the Level 3 – Power view to do so.

ELECTRICAL FIXTURES
In this topic, we will layout and circuit general purpose receptacles. However, first we need to modify our view settings to hide the lighting fixtures.
1.  On the Project Browser, open the view Level 3 – Power. On the Properties palette, click the Edit button next to Visibility/Graphics Overrides or just type VG.

2. On the Model Categories tab, scroll down and uncheck the following: 3. Lighting Fixtures 4. Lighting Devices 5. HVAC Zones 6. At the bottom of the dialog, check the “Show categories from all disciplines” box.   Select Walls and in the Detail Level column at the far right, choose Coarse. Repeat for Windows (see Figure 7.21).

FIGURE 7.21

Configure graphical overrides for the Level 3 – Power plan

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Setting the windows and walls detail level to Coarse simplifies the drawing. Next, we will modify the display of the linked model to turn off the display of the architect’s switches as we did previously for the Level 3 – Lighting view.
7. Follow the process outlined above in the “Hide the Architect’s Electrical Fixtures” topic to hide the Electrical Fixtures in the linked model. 8. Click OK to confim changes to the Visibility Graphics settings, and return to the model. 9. On the Home tab, on the Electrical panel, click the Device drop-down and then choose Electrical Fixture (see the left side of Figure 7.22).

On the Modify | Place Devices tab, the Placement panel is displayed as this is a face hosted Family. By default, Place on Vertical face is selected, this is what we want as we will be placing these devices on the surface of our walls (see the right side of Figure 7.22).

FIGURE 7.22

Switch systems in the conference room   Click the Tag on Placement button to disable it. On the Properties palette, set the Elevation to: 1'-6". On the Properties palette, the Type Selector should indicate Duplex Receptacle: Standard.

There are a few settings in the Properties palette that affect the location of the receptacle as it is being placed (see the left side of Figure 7.23). Schedule Level defaults to the level associated with the view, in this case Level 3. Offset in the context of face hosted content refers to how far off of the surface the component will be placed (see the right side of Figure 7.23). For example, when placing on a floor, the offset is the elevation. When placing on the ceiling, the offset is how far down from the ceiling the component will be placed. When placing on a wall, the offset defines how far off the wall the component will be placed (and thus is rarely used for wall-based elements.)

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FIGURE 7.23

Differentiating between elevation and offset for various host face conditions

This receptacle family is predefined as 120 V, single pole, 180 VA. We will see how to make additional types to accommodate for different power requirements below. The Panel and Circuit Number fields will be automatically populated when the device is circuited. Mark is automatically assigned as a unique number to each receptacle. Edited by indicates who last modified the device instance, and isn’t applicable during placement. Finally, Comments may be used to include a note about the device instance. As you move your cursor in the modeling canvas, the receptacle will snap and orient to various geometry in the model, including furniture, door/window openings, and gridlines. For the following steps, make sure you are snapping to walls.
10. Place one receptacle on each wall of the northwest most office (see the left side of Figure 7.24).   Continue placing receptacles in each of the next three offices moving south, however, do not place a receptacle on the outside curtain wall. Press
ESC

to cancel the command.

11. Zoom to the area shown in the middle of Figure 7.24. 12. Select one of the receptacles you placed previously.  On the Modify | Electrical Fixtures tab, on the Create panel, click the Create Similar button.

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FIGURE 7.24

Receptacle layouts   On the properties palette, set the Elevation to: 3'-6". Place receptacles as shown in the work space in the middle of Figure 7.24.

13. Pan/zoom to the area shown in the right side of Figure 7.24.    Change the Elevation to: 1'-6". Place receptacles as shown in the right side of Figure 7.24. Press
ESC

to complete the command.

When moving hosted components, such as receptacles, you can only move them along the plane of the host. If you wish to move to a new host, such as a different wall, then you can use the following procedures to do so.
14. Select the receptacle indicated on the right side of Figure 7.24.    On the Modify | Electrical Fixtures tab, on the Work Plane panel, click the Pick New button. Pick the new location as indicated in the figure. Press
ESC

to complete the command.

CIRCUIT THE RECEPTACLES
When you circuit components, you can select multiple uncircuited objects, and then create the circuit. After you create the circuit, you select the panel that you want the circuit connected to. Finally, you can draw wires to annotate the circuit.
15. Select the 6 receptacles in the south corner office (see the right side of Figure 7.24 above).   On the Modify | Electrical Fixtures tab, on the Create Systems panel, click the Power button. On the Electrical Circuits tab, click the Select Panel button.

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From the Panel drop-down list on the Options Bar, select panel L3.

16. On the Convert to Wire panel, click the Arc Wire button.

There is also a control in the model canvas that you can click as shown in Figure 7.25.
17. Deselect all objects and then select the homerun wire.  Use the vertex edit controls to adjust the wire as appropriate (See Figure 7.25).

FIGURE 7.25

Canvas wire controls

WIRE TAGS
After you have the wires in place, you can tag the homeruns to indicate what panel and circuit they connect to.
1.     On the Annotate tab, on the Tag panel, click the Tag by Category button. On the Options Bar, uncheck the Leader box. Pick on the homerun wire to tag it. Pick the tag’s move control, and drag it near the homerun arrow. Press
ESC

twice to end the tag command.

The tag, by default, only shows the circuit number. Complete the following steps to modify the tag definition to also show the panel name.
2. Select the homerun tag that you just placed.  On the Modify | Wire Tag tab, on the Mode panel, click the Edit Family button.

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Select the label (the text showing Circuits).

3. On the properties palette, click the Edit button next to Label.    In the Category Parameters list, double-click on Panel (see item 1 in Figure 7.26) Beneath the Label Parameters list, click the Move Parameter Up icon to place the Panel parameter before Circuits (see item 2 in Figure 7.26). In the Panel row, Suffix column, click in the field and add a dash by pressing the minus key (see item 3 in Figure 7.26).

FIGURE 7.26

Wire tag label settings  In the Circuits row, set the Spaces value to: 0 (see item 4 in Figure 7.26) and then click OK.

4. On the ribbon, click the Load into Project button.  When prompted, select Overwrite the existing version.

5. Select and drag the tag to relocate it if necessary.

After editing a Family on the fly as we have done in this chapter a few times, it is always a good idea to close the Family file(s) when you are done editing them. Above we switched windows using the tool on the View tab. The Switch Windows tool is also located on the QAT.
6. On the QAT, click the Switch Windows drop-down button and choose Wire Tag.rfa – Sheet -.   From the Application menu, choose Close. When prompted to save, click No.

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The tag is embedded in our project file, so we don’t need to save it. However, if you wish to use this tag in other projects, you should perform a Save As, give it a descriptive name, and locate the new file on your server in an appropriate library folder.
7. Save your file.

DEFINE A SPECIAL PURPOSE RECEPTACLE
In this exercise, we are going to modify a device for a special condition. Let’s make one of the receptacles in the corner office for a coffeemaker (see the location indicated in Figure 7.27). This coffeemaker receptacle will have a load greater than the typical duplex receptacle. To set this receptacle up for a coffeemaker, we will modify the family, adding a new type with a larger load.
1. Select the receptacle on the right side of the south wall in the corner office (see Figure 7.27). The linked furniture family makes it a bit tricky to select the receptacle. You can either select it by picking near the wall, or by using a window selection.

FIGURE 7.27

Select a receptacle to make for a coffeemaker (Tags will be added later but are shown in the figure for clarity)  On the Properties palette, click the Edit Type button. In the “Type Properties” dialog, make sure the Type is set to Standard.

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Click the Duplicate button. For the name input: Dedicated Coffee Maker Receptacle, and then click OK. Set the Load to: 1000 VA and then click OK.

2. With the receptacle still selected, click the Electrical Circuits tab.    Click the Edit Circuit button. Click the Remove from Circuit button. Click the coffeemaker receptacle (again, remember you need to use a window select, or select near the wall).

The receptacle will dim to indicate it is no longer part of the circuit.
 On the ribbon, click the Finish Editing Circuit button.

3. Select the coffeemaker receptacle again, and on the ribbon click the Power button to create a new circuit.   On the Electrical Circuits tab, click the Select Panel button and then choose Panel L3. Press
ESC

(or click the Modify tool) to end the circuit command.

Notice that the wires require some updating. We can edit these directly onscreen using the control handles.
4. Select the wire from the coffeemaker receptacle and drag the square control at the detached end (see the left side of Figure 7.28).  Use the small round control at the middle to fine-tune if necessary.

This has become the homerun for the new coffeemaker receptacle and circuit. To edit the other wire, you have to drag the square move vertex control at the open end and release it when the snap is indicating the insertion point of the other receptacle. It might take a few tries to get it to work, but you will know when it was successful because the wire will cleanup with the receptacles automatically instead of showing an arrow at the end.
5. Use the Move Vertex (square end) control on the other wire to drag and attach it to the receptacle across the room (see the right side of Figure 7.28).

NOTE: When editing the wire that was connecting the coffeemaker to the receptacle on the bottom right, make sure to select the square grip control. If you use the round grip, you will end up with multi-circuit homeruns.

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FIGURE 7.28

Edit the wires using the control handles (Tags will be added later but are shown in the figure for clarity) 6. Tag the homerun using the method discussed previously.  Press
ESC

or click the Modify tool to exit the tag command.

The completed office is shown in Figure 7.29.

FIGURE 7.29

Executive office with dedicated coffeemaker circuit and wire annotation (left) and general purpose receptacles in upper offices with circuit tags (right) Tags will be added later but are shown in the figure for clarity Create the Building Model

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7. Select the 6 receptacles in the next two offices to the north.

TIP: The easiest way to do this is to window select around both offices, then on the ribbon, click the Filter button, and uncheck all except Electrical Fixtures.

 

On the Modify | Electrical Fixtures tab, on the Create Systems panel, click the Power button. Click the Select Panel button and then on the Options Bar, select L3 from the Panel list.

This time, instead of showing wires, we will tag the devices.
8. On the Annotate tab, click on the Tag panel title to expand it.    Click the Loaded Tags button. Scroll down to Electrical Fixtures click in the Loaded Tags column and then choose Electrical Device Circuit Tag from the drop-down. Click OK to dismiss the dialog.

The default tag settings use a tag that shows the panel the device is connected to. We modified this default to tag the circuit the device is connected to.
9. On the Annotate tab, on the Tag panel, click the Tag by Category button.  Click a receptacle in one of these two offices to tag it. Once the tag is placed, a move control associated with the tag appears.   Click and drag the move control to move the tag to a more appropriate position (see the right side of Figure 7.29). Continue tagging each of the receptacles and positioning tagsas necessary.
ESC

10. Press

or click the Modify tool to exit the tag command when finished.

11. Repeat the entire process for the next two offices north of these.

DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS
Distribution systems are used to control how electrical connectors are connected to circuits. They provide a mechanism to ensure that a 120 V device isn’t inadvertently connected to a 277 V circuit. We will now investigate some of the settings in the project to see where the distribution systems come from.

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1.

On the Manage tab, on the Settings panel, click the MEP Settings drop-down button and choose Electrical Settings.

2. On the left side of the dialog, select Voltage Definitions.

You will notice that the template file we started from gave us several voltage definitions from which to get started (see Figure 7.30).

FIGURE 7.30

Voltage Definitions control the range of voltages that are allowed to connect to a circuit with a particular rating

Each voltage definition “Name” has an associated value, minimum, and maximum. These voltages are used to ensure that when you connect an electrical power connector to a circuit, that the voltage of the circuit is appropriate. Commonly a device will be rated at a particular voltage, for example, the light bulb in a typical desk lamp indicates 110 V. You will find varying voltages on hard wired objects such as electronic ballasts and mechanical equipment. You can define the connector in the Revit Family to use the nominal (i.e., matching the Value column in the voltage definition) or, you can specify a value within the minimum/maximum range, and Revit will still allow the connector to connect to a circuit with the Value specified voltage.
3. In the “Electrical Settings” dialog, click the Add button.

A new line 6 will appear with the name “New voltage 1.”
  Change the name of New Voltage 1 to: UTILITY. Set Value, Minimum, and Maximum all to: 12000.

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4. On the left side of the dialog, select Distribution Systems.

FIGURE 7.31

Distribution systems are used to define the characteristics of panels and transformers

In a typical building in the US, there are two common voltage systems present, 120/208 Wye (sometimes referred to as 208/120), and 480/277 Wye (sometimes referred to as 277/480). In a residential building project, or in special cases in other building types, there may also be a 120/240 volt system. Phase is either Single or Three depending on the distribution you will be designing for. For a three phase system, the configuration may be set to Wye or Delta and Wires may be set to 3 or 4; for a Single phase system, the Configuration is set to None. Finally, the voltages, L-L (Line to Line) and L-G (Line to Ground) are set as appropriate.
5. Click the Add button, change the name of “New name 1” to: UTILITY, and then set the following: 6. Phase: Three. 7. Configuration: Delta. 8. Wires: 3. 9. L-L Voltage: UTILITY (this is the list of Voltage Definitions to which we just added UTILITY). 10. Click OK to accept the settings and close the dialog. 11. On the Project Browser, open the view Level 1 – Power. 12. Select the Transformer.   On the Properties palette, click the Edit Type button. Set the Primary Voltage to: 12000 and then click OK.

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13. On the Properties palette, scroll down to Distribution System (beneath the Electrical – Circuiting grouping), and set it to: UTILITY. 14. Select the switchboard.    On the Modify | Electrical Equipment tab, on the Create Systems panel, click the Power button. On the Electrical Circuits tab, on the System Tools panel, click the Select Panel button. Click on the transformer onscreen to connect the switchboard to the UTILITY transformer.

If you prefer, you can also choose UTILITY from the Panel drop-down list on the Options Bar as we have done previously.
15. Save your file.

CONDUIT
In this topic, we will route some conduit for the utility transformer and the switchboard. Let’s begin with a look at the project settings related to conduit.
1. On the Manage tab, on the Settings panel, click MEP Settings drop-down button and choose: Electrical Settings.

2. On the left side of the dialog, expand Conduit Settings (if necessary), and then click on Size.

The Standard drop-down list (at the top right) contains a list of conduit materials. Selecting a material from the list will populate the table portion of the window with information about the material’s trade size, interior diameter (ID), and outside diameter (OD). The minimum bend radius is the default bend radius that will be applied when routing conduit elbows. When routing and modifying elbows, you can set the bend radius larger than this, but you can’t set it smaller. Finally, the Used in Size Lists option will determine if the conduit size is available for placing and modifying conduit segments of this particular material. We will accept all of the defaults for these settings for this exercise. Feel free to explore them further with an eye toward modifications that you might require in your typical project work.
3. On the left, beneath Conduit Settings > Rise Drop, select Single Line Symbology.

Familiarize yourself with the settings. If necessary, refer to the online help for more information on these settings. Repeat for the Two Line Symbology settings.

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4. When you are done exploring the settings, click OK.

Next we will setup a 3D view to route conduit from the bottom of the transformer and switchboard.
5. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click the Default 3D View icon (small 3D house). 6. On the Properties Palette, verify that the drop-down at the top indicates: 3D View:{3D} and then configure the following:     Set the Discipline to: Electrical. Set the Sub-Discipline to: Power. Change the View Name to: 3D Electrical Distribution. Click the Edit button next to: Visibility/Graphics (this is the same as typing VG) (see Figure 7.32).

FIGURE 7.32

After creating a 3D view, configure its properties to appear in the correct location in Project Browser and to show only limited categories 7. In the “Visibility/Graphic Overrides” dialog, check the “Show categories from all disciplines” box.   Directly above this, click the All button. Uncheck the first item on the list (Air Terminals).

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This will also uncheck everything else, since we have all categories selected.
8. Click the None button to deselect all categories.  Check the boxes for Conduits, Conduit Fittings, and Electrical Equipment only and then click OK.

9. Type ZF to zoom the window to fit the geometry shown. 10. Select both the UTILITY transformer and the switchboard (see the left side of Figure 7.33).

TIP: Use a crossing window, click and drag from right to left and just touch the edges of each object to select them.

Click the Bottom-Left-Front corner of the ViewCube (see the middle of Figure 7.33).

This will orient your view to the bottom of the equipment, and zoom into them, so we can route the conduit.

FIGURE 7.33

Orient the view to enable selection of the connector   Select just the transformer. Right click on the bottom connector control, and choose Draw Conduit from Face (see the right side of Figure 7.33)

11. Click and drag the circle conduit connector location to the location shown on the left side of Figure 7.34. The exact location is not important.

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FIGURE 7.34

Position conduit start point approximately where shown (left) conduit with and without fittings (right)  On the Surface Connection tab, click the Finish Connection button.

12. On the Properties palette, from the Type Selector choose: Conduit with Fittings: Rigid Nonmetallic Conduit (RNC Sch 80).

There are two Families of conduit: Conduit with Fittings, and Conduit without Fittings. The primary difference between the two is how Revit draws elbows. When using the with fittings Family, there is a line separating the conduit segment from the elbow. The without fittings family suppresses this line, making it appear as though the elbow is made of a continuous bent segment of conduit (see the right side of Figure 7.34). Another difference between with and without fittings conduit (and cable tray) families is that the without fittings runs can be scheduled to determine the run length. This is done using the Conduit Run and Cable Tray Runs categories when creating the schedule.
   On the Options Bar, set the Diameter to: 4". Set the Offset to: -4'-0". On the Options Bar, click the Apply button.

The start point of the conduit should snap to the new negative location and appear directly beneath the connector location. We are going to add a single horizontal segment at this elevation. It can be a little tricky to understand what is happening onscreen, because until you draw the next segment, RMEP does not draw the vertical. This is because we need two segments, for it to know how to draw the corner and fitting/bend.
  Move your mouse directly to the north (from the vantage point of this view, that will be down and to the left) (see the left side of Figure 7.35). Press
ESC

twice to end the conduit command.

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FIGURE 7.35

Position conduit start point approximately where shown (left) conduit with and without fittings (right) 13. Select the transformer again, right-click the round connector on the bottom again, and choose Draw Conduit from Face.    Drag the connection circle to the opposite side of the transformer and then click the Finish Connection button. Keep the same settings on the Options Bar, and draw a horizontal segment due south towards the switchboard (see the left side of Figure 7.36). Click the Modify tool or press
ESC

twice.

14. Repeat the process once more from the switchboard this time.  Route the conduit due north in the direction of the transformer, but do not try to connect them together yet; run them parallel to each other (see the right side of Figure 7.36).

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FIGURE 7.36

Route conduit toward the switchboard (left) and back toward the transformer (right)  Click the Modify tool or press ESC twice. For the next several operations, refer to the numbered elements indicated in Figure 7.37 15. On the Modify tab, on the Modify panel, click the Align tool.   For the alignment reference element, select the conduit marked 2 (coming from the switchboard). For the entity to align, select the conduit marked 3 (from the transformer pointing south).

FIGURE 7.37

Use numbered elements to assist with final manipulations (left) result on the right

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The equipment is anchored to the conduit, and thus, when you align the conduit, it moves the equipment. If you have precise equipment locations, you will need to be more exacting where you start the conduit connectors on the bottom of the equipment.
 Click the Modify tool or press ESC twice.

16. Select the conduit segment marked 3 and the elbow marked 4.  Press the
DELETE

key to erase the two selected objects.

17. On the Modify tab, on the Modify panel, click the Trim tool.  Click on the conduit labeled 1 first and then the conduit labeled 2 second.

The two will join with a new fitting at their connection.
 Press the
ESC

key twice to end the Trim command.

18. Hover over the conduit marked 1, when it pre-highlights, press TAB to highlight the run, then click to select the run.  Hover over the conduit marked 5, press then click.
TAB

to highlight the run, hold down the CTRL key, and

You should now have both runs selected. Be sure to hold down the CTRL key before you click.

TIP:

SHIFT, CTRL, and TAB all assist with selection. However, you hold down the CTRL or SHIFT to add or remove elements from the selection respectively. You do not hold down TAB. Press and release the TAB key to cycle the selection to other options such as selecting a conduit run showcased here.

19. On the Properties palette, for the Service Type input: BELOW GROUND and then click the Apply button.  In the model canvas, press the
ESC

key to deselect the conduit.

20. On the Project Browser, open the Level 1- Power floor plan view. 21. On the Properties palette, next to View Range, click the Edit button.  Set the View Depth Offset to: -4'-6" and then click OK (see Figure 7.38).

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FIGURE 7.38

Edit the View Range and lower the View Depth

This will make the two horizontally running conduits that are below ground appear in the view.
  On the Properties Palette, set the Detail Level to: Fine. Click the Apply button.

This will make the conduits appear in two-line display in their actual thickness. They are displaying however in solid lines. Since they are below ground, they should be displayed as a dashed line. We could simply edit the Visibility/Graphic Overrides and change conduit to a dashed line style, but this would change any conduit in this view to dashed. Instead we can apply the effect to just the items below ground.
22. On the Properties Palette, next to Visibility/Graphics Overrides, click the Edit button.   Expand the Lines category, select the <Beyond> item, and then click the Override button in the Projection/Surface Lines column. For the Pattern, choose Hidden 1/16" and then click OK twice.

The conduit segments now show with a hidden line. The when you edit the View Range as we did above and lower the View Depth below the Bottom of the primary range, all elements occupying the space within the View Depth zone will display using the <Beyond> line style. By making that style display as a hidden line style in this view’s Visibility/Graphic Overrides, any element below ground like our conduits will display using a hidden line (see Figure 7.39).

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FIGURE 7.39

Underground conduit shown with a hidden line in plan 23. On the Annotate tab, on the Tag panel, click the Tag by Category button.   On the Options Bar, make sure the Leader box is checked. Tag each of the straight conduit segments and then press command.
ESC

twice to complete the

24. Select one of the tag instances.   On the ribbon, click the Edit Family button. On the Properties palette, uncheck the Rotate with component box.

The rotate with component option is useful when the tag is placed along the length of the object, such as with conduit, cable tray, duct and pipe. However, in this case, since we are using a leader, the rotated text is not desirable.
25. On the ribbon, click the Load into Project button.  When prompted, select Overwrite the existing version.

Notice that the tags now orient upright.
  On the QAT click the Switch Windows drop-down button and choose Conduit Size Tag.rfa Sheet. From the Application menu, choose Close, you do not need to save.

The family is embedded in our project file, so we don’t need to save it.

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CONDUIT—SELF EXERCISE
Route a conduit from the bottom of the switchboard to the bottom of panel H3. It is up to you to determine routing that makes sense with the building architecture. Add tags to the new conduits in the Level 1 – Power view.
HINT: Return to your 3D Electrical Distribution view for this task. Use the Draw Conduit from Face option to draw from the bottom of the H3 Panel down to the level of the switchboard. Draw another from the switchboard down and then use the Trim too to clean up.

CIRCUITING MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT
In this exercise we will circuit a mechanical equipment component. The procedure is the same as circuiting devices or panels. We will first adjust the visibility of the mechanical equipment. It is not possible to circuit a mechanical equipment that exists in a linked model, however, you can use the Copy/Monitor functionality to copy mechanical equipment from a linked model, and then circuit it in the host model.
1. Open the Level 3 – Power view.

2. Type VG and then in the “Visibility/Graphic Overrides” dialog, turn on the display of Mechanical Equipment, and check the box in the Halftone column. 3. Select the mechanical equipment in the corner office at the southwest corner of the building, (see Figure 7.40).

FIGURE 7.40

Circuited mechanical equipment shown in the electrical power plan

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The VAV box has an electrical connector, and provides the ability to circuit directly to the unit.
4. On the Modify | Mechanical Equipment tab, on the Create Systems panel, click the Power button.    On the Electrical Circuits tab, on the System Tools panel, click the Select Panel button. On the Options Bar, from the Panel list select: L3. On the Convert to Wire panel, click the Arc Wire button.

5. Use the control handles on the the homerun wire to adjust its length and shape as shown in Figure 7.40. 6. Tag the homerun and the press
ESC

to end the tag command.

OTHER DEVICE TYPES
In this topic, we will lay out some low voltage devices. The concepts presented here apply to Communication, Data, Fire Alarm, Lighting, Nurse Call, Security, and Telephone. Each of these device types are defined as a separate category, so you can easily isolate or combine them onto plans as desired by manipulating the view Visibility/Graphics settings. To get started, we will first create a Telecom plan for the third level.
1. On the Project Browser, on the Electrical > Power > Floor Plans branch, right-click on the Level 3 – Power view and choose Duplicate View > Duplicate. The copied view will be named Copy of Level 3 – Power and will become active.  Rename the view to: Level 3 – Telecom.

2. On the Properties palette, set the Sub-Discipline to: Telecom.

Since Telecom has not yet been defined, you can’t select if from the drop-down list. The dropdown list in such fields simply remembers previously input values. Therefore, simply type it in to add it.When you type it in, this will become a new branch on the Project Browser. In the Telecom plan, we want to see the locations of the receptacles to coordinate the telecom device placement, however, we want to screen the receptacles to have them fade into the background.
3. Click the Edit button next to Visibility/Graphics.  In the Electrical Fixtures row, check the box in the Halftone column and then click OK.

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4. On the Home tab, on the Electrical panel, click the Device drop-down button and then choose Telephone.    On the Ribbon, deselect the Tag on Placement option if it is on. On the Properties palette, verify that the Family is: Telephone Outlet – Data: Plain. Verify the Schedule Level is: Level 3, and the Elevation is: 1'-6".

5. In the five offices on the west side of the building, place an outlet next to each receptacle closest to the desk.  Press
ESC

to exit the command.

6. Select one of the power receptacles.  Type VH to hide the category of the selected objects (Electrical Fixtures).

This is a shortcut to opening the Visibility/Graphic Overrides dialog again and unchecking Electrical Fixtures.

CABLE TRAY
In this topic, we will lay out some cable tray. A good place to start is to inspect some of the settings for Cable Tray.
1. On the Manage tab, on the settings panel, click MEP settings drop-down and then choose Electrical Settings. On the left side, select Cable Tray Settings.

Familiarize yourself with the available settings. Select the other nodes under Cable Tray Settings (Rise Drop, Single Line Symbology, Two Line Symbology and Size) to inspect the other settings. Click the Help button for more information on the available settings.
NOTE: The list of available tray sizes. The values here may be used as the height or the width of the tray. The Used in Size Lists options allows you to disable the selection of a particular size from the lists in the Properties palette and the Options Bar.

Click Cancel to close the “Electrical Settings” dialog.

2. On the Home tab, on the Electrical panel, click the Cable Tray button. 3. On the Properties palette, from the Type Selector, choose: Cable Tray with Fittings: Ladder Cable Tray.

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There are two shapes of tray, ladder and channel (see Figure 7.41). Although there are other types of tray (solid bottom, trough, wire mesh, and single rail), these are all represented using the channel type. Only ladder tray has a different representation.
NOTE: If you happen to purge all tray types of a particular shape (i.e., all ladder or all channel types), you can re-import them into your model from another project using Transfer Project Standards (Manage tab).

FIGURE 7.41

Cable tray shown in fine, medium, and coarse detail, with and without fittings

There are two Families of cable tray: Cable Tray with Fittings, and Cable Tray without Fittings (see the right side of Figure 7.41). The primary difference between the two is how Revit draws elbows. When using the with fittings Family, there is a line separating the cable tray segment from the elbow. The without fittings family suppresses this line, making it appear as though the elbow is made of a continuous bent segment of cable tray.
4. On the Properties palette, verify or configure the following settings:

    

Reference Level: Level 3. Offset : 9'-0". Rung Space: 9". Width: 12". Height: 4".

5. Click a point in the middle of the corridor near the top between the two doors.   Click the next point where the corridor turns and the final point just in front of the conference room entry (see the left side of Figure 7.42). Press
ESC

once to finish the cable tray run.

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FIGURE 7.42

Create the first run of Cable Tray down the length of the corridor 6. Click on the vertical tray run parallel with the small utility room north of the reception space. This will insert a tee fitting, and allow you to continue routing the tray.   Route a horizontal segment to the small utility room (see the right side of Figure 7.42). Press
ESC

twice to finish the cable tray command.

7. Hold down the CTRL key and select the elbow and horizontal tray segment at the bottom of the plan running into the conference room.    On the Options Bar, from the Width list, choose: 6". On the Properties palette, set the Rung Space to: 6". Press
ESC

key to deselect the components.

8. On the Properties palette, click the Edit button next to Visibility/Graphics Overrides (or type VG).    In the Detail Level column for Cable Trays and Cable Tray Fittings, set the value to: Fine. Expand Cable Tray Fittings and uncheck the Center Line subcategory. Expand Cable Trays and uncheck the Center Line subcategory (see Figure 7.43).

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FIGURE 7.43

Override Cable Tray to display in Fine for the view  Click OK to close the “Visibility/Graphic Overrides” dialog.

The tray now has a distinct ladder representation (see the right side of Figure 7.43).
9. On the Annotate tab, on the Tag panel, click the Tag by Category button.   Select each of the straight cable tray segments to tag them (see Figure 7.44). Press
ESC

to exit the tag command.

FIGURE 7.44

Tag the Cable tray layout 10. Open the Level 3 – Power view.  Open the “Visibility/Graphics Overrides” dialog (VG) for this view.

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Turn off the display of Cable Tray, Cable Tray Fittings, and Telephone Devices and then click OK.

11. Repeat in the Level 3 – Lighting view.

TIP: If you prefer, you can select a Cable Tray element, a Cable Tray Fitting element, and a Telephone Device onscreen and then type VH to hide the category instead.

LIGHTING FIXTURE ANNOTATIONS
Before we tag the lighting fixtures, we will need to assign a fixture type to each type used. The easiest way to do this is to use a lighting fixture schedule. We will also need to load a tag that will display the fixture type.
1. On the Analyze tab, on the Reports & Schedules panel, click the Schedule/Quantities button. In the “New Schedule” dialog select Lighting Fixtures (Lighting Devices refers to switches and the like). For the name type: Lighting Fixture Quantity Schedule. Verify that Schedule building components is selected and then click OK.

  

2. From the Available fields list, double-click: Type Mark, Family and Type, and Count.    Click the Sorting/Grouping tab. Set Sort by to: Type Mark, and Then by to: Family and Type. Uncheck “Itemize every instance” and then click OK.

There should be five unique Families and Types listed.
3. In the Type Mark column, assign each type a unique letter, A through E, as shown in Figure 7.45.

FIGURE 7.45

Lighting Fixture Quantity Schedule

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Now, when we tag the fixtures, the Type Mark will already be assigned.
4. Open the Level 3 - Lighting view. 5. Select one of the receptacles onscreen.   Type VH to hide the Electrical Fixture category. On the Annotate tab, click on the Tag panel titlebar to expand it, and then click the Loaded Tags button.

6. Click the Load button.   Browse to: the Imperial Library\Annotations\Electrical folder. Select the Lightning Fixture Tag.rfa file, and then click Open.

7. Back in the “Tags” dialog, scroll down to: Lighting Fixtures.  In the Loaded Tags column choose: Lighting Fixture Tag: Standard and then click OK.

8. On the Annotate tab, on the Tag panel, click the Tag by Category button. 9. Uncheck the Leader box on the Options Bar.  Tag each of the fixtures. Use the move control in the model canvas to move the tag after tagging each fixture.

FIGURE 7.46

Lighting fixture layouts with tags  Press the
ESC

key to exit the tag command.

10. Double click one of the D tags.  Change the value to: D3, and then press
ENTER

(See the left side of Figure 7.46).

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When prompted that you are changing a type parameter, click Yes to accept the change.

Note that all D-type fixtures are now tagged D3 throughout the plan.
11. On the Project Browser, under Schedules/Quantities, double-click the Lighting Fixture Quantity Schedule.

Note that the Type Mark for the D fixture has been updated to D3. Changing a type parameter applies to all instances of that element.
12. Open the Level 3 - Lighting view. 13. Select the four lighting fixtures in the secretarial room.

The secretarial area is the open area in the center of the plan to the right of the corridor. If necessary, open the Level 3 – HVAC plan which contains room labels to locate the correct area. Earlier in this chapter we created some alternate fixture types for our 2x4 lighting fixture. Let’s swap one of those in for the lights in the secretarial area now.
14. On the Properties palette, change the fixture type to: Troffer Light – 2x4 Lensed: 2'x4'(2 Lamp) – 277 V.

You will receive a warning indicating: “Coordination Monitor alert : Types of fixtures are not equivalent.” We can ignore this for now.
15. Switch back to the Lighting Fixture Quantity Schedule view.

Since this type was not previously used in the model, it did not appear on the schedule, nor had we assigned it a Type Mark value.
16. Set the Type Mark for Troffer Light - 2x4 Lensed: 2'x4'(2 Lamp) - 277 V to: D2.  Switch back to the Level 3 – Lighting plan view.

Note the fixture tags for the secretarial room lighting have been updated accordingly (see Figure 7.47).

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FIGURE 7.47

Update the Type Mark for the newly assigned fixtures in the secretarial area 17. Tag the fixtures in the conference room.  Move the tags to a more legible location (See Figure 7.48… the lower case letters in parenthesis will be added later).

FIGURE 7.48

Lighting fixture type tags with switch IDs

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As we have seen in a few other instances, you can easily modify the tag Family to report nearly any property you wish to display. Let’s define a lighting fixture tag that also shows the switch IDs and use it in the conference room.
18. Select one of the lighting fixture tags in the conference room.    On the Ribbon, click the Edit Family button. From the Application menu, choose: Save As > Family. Browse to the Chapter07 folder, name the file: Lighting Fixture Tag with Switch ID and then click Save.

19. Select the Label (the text showing 1i).   On the Ribbon, click the Edit Label button. In the Category Parameters list, double-click Switch ID.

This will add the Switch ID parameter to the Label.
   In the Label Parameters list, in the Switch ID row, set Spaces to: 0. Type an open parenthesis in the Prefix field and a closed parenthesis in the suffix field (see Figure 7.49). Change the Sample Value to: a and then click OK.

The goal here is to put the Switch ID in parenthesis after the fixture type, such as: E(b).

FIGURE 7.49

Label parameters for the lighting fixture and switch ID tag 20. On the Home tab, on the Properties panel, click the Family Types button.    From the Name drop-down list, choose Boxed. On the right side of the dialog, beneath Family Types, click the Delete button and then click OK. On the ribbon click the Load into Project button.

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21. On the QAT, click the Switch Windows drop-down button and choose: Lighting Fixture Tag with Switch ID.rfa - Sheet.   From the Application menu, choose Close. When prompted to save, click Yes.

22. On the Project Browser, double-click to open the Level 3 – Lighting plan view.  In the conference room select all of the lighting tags.

TIP: Window all the tags, then click the Filter button, uncheck everything except Lighting Fixture Tags.

23. On the Properties Palette, from the Type Selector, choose: Lighting Fixture Tag with Switch ID: Standard (see the right side of Figure 7.48). 24. On the Annotate tab, expand the Tag panel, and click Loaded Tags.   Next to Lighting Devices Choose: Light Switch Tag: Standard and then click OK. Tag each of the switches at the conference room entrance.

With the switch labels appearing next to both the switches and the lights, it is clear which switch controls each fixture.

PANEL SCHEDULES
Panel schedules are used to report circuiting information, provide a way to document panel and circuit properties in your construction documents, and they provide a demand load calculation summary for each panel.
1. On the Analyze tab, on the Reports & Schedules panel, click the Panel Schedules button.

2. Click the Select All icon at the bottom left corner of the dialog, and then click OK. 3. On the Project Browser, under Panel Schedules, double-click: H3, L3, and SB to open them.

Observe that the formatting of the H3 and L3 schedule are the same. These two schedules were generated based on the Branch Panel template. SB was generated based on the Switchboard template. (See Figure 7.50).

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FIGURE 7.50

L3 Panel Schedule (top) and SB Switchboard schedule (bottom)

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The panel schedule views are live views of the data associated with the model. You can edit the values in certain fields such as Mounting, Enclosure, A.I.C. Rating, Mains Type, MCB Rating, Circuit Description, Notes, and the trip rating of breakers. Other fields are populated based on the electrical system the panel is connected to (Volts, Phases, Wires), the location of the panel (Location), and what the panel is connected to (Supply From). The loads on the circuits in the A, B, and C columns are based on the devices connected to the circuits, and the load summary and totals at the bottom of the schedule are based on the load classification assigned to the device connectors and associated demand load settings.

MODIFY A PANEL SCHEDULE TEMPLATE
In this section, we will modify the panel schedule template to include an additional bit of information about the branch circuit panels, namely, whether or not the panel includes an isolated ground bus.
1. On the Manage tab, on the Settings panel, click the Panel Schedule Templates drop-down and then choose Edit a Template.

2. Verify the defaults:   Template Type: Branch Panel Panel Configuration: Two Columns, Circuits Across

3. From the Templates list, choose Branch Panel (Default) and then click Open. 4. On the Manage tab, on the Settings panel, click the Project Parameters button.      In the “Project Parameters” dialog, click the Add button. For the Name type: Has Isolated Ground Bus. Set Discipline to: Common, for the Type of Parameter choose: Yes/No and from Group parameter under choose: Electrical. Make sure the Instance radio button is selected. From the Categories list, check Electrical Equipment and then click OK (see Figure 7.51).

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FIGURE 7.51

Configure a Project Parameter 5. Back in the “Project Parameters” dialog, make sure “Has Isolated Ground Bus” is selected and then click OK. 6. Back in the Panel Schedule Template window, click in the cell under Wires (see Figure 7.52). 7. Type the text: Isolated Ground Bus:    With the cell still selected, on the Modify Panel Schedule Template tab, click the Edit Font button. Check the Bold checkbox, and then click OK. Click the Horizontally Align drop-down button and choose: Right.

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FIGURE 7.52

Text and parameter to be added to the panel schedule template 8. Click in the cell to the right of the text you just entered.   On the Parameters panel, click the Choose Category drop-down, and choose Electrical Equipment. From the Add Parameter list, under Electrical, choose Has Isolated Ground Bus (see Figure 7.53).

FIGURE 7.53

Select parameter from the add parameter list 9. On the Template Editor panel, click the Finish Template button. 10. On the Project Browser, under Panel Schedules, double-click H3 to open it.

Note that the Isolated Ground Bus is not displayed on the panel schedule. Unlike a Family type, modifying a template does not automatically update associated panel schedules. To update schedules after you modify a template, you utilize the Apply Templates function. This is the same paradigm as when modifying a view template.
11. On the Manage tab, on the Settings panel, click the Panel Schedule Templates drop-down and then choose Manage Templates.  In the “Manage Panel Schedule Templates” dialog, click the Apply Templates tab.

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Make sure Template type is set to Branch Panel, Panel configuration is set to Two Columns, Circuits Across, and Apply templates is set to Branch Panel (Default).

When creating schedules, or applying templates to existing schedules, the Part Type setting in the electrical equipment Family definition determines what Template type you can use.
TABLE 7.1—ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT PART TYPE (SET IN FAMILY EDITOR) AND ASSOCIATED PANEL SCHEDULE TEMPLATE TYPE

Electrical Equipment Part Type
Panelboard Switchboard Other Panel

Panel Schedule Template Type
Branch Panel Switchboard Data Panel

This indicates that our panels H3 and L3 are Panelboards, SB is a Switchboard.
12. In the Panel schedules list, hold down the CTRL key, and select H3 and L3.   Click the Update Schedules button. When prompted about Text in panel schedules can be lost, click Yes and then click OK.

The schedule now shows Isolated Ground Bus. Unlike some other parameter types, note that you can’t change the value of a Yes/No parameter in a Panel Schedule. To set the value of the isolated ground bus setting, you need to select the panel in the model, and modify it on the Properties palette. You can also edit it on a standard (non-Panel) schedule.

CREATE AN ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT SCHEDULE
In this topic we will create an electrical equipment schedule, which will provide a single concise list of all equipment used in the project. This allows you to make quick changes in one location.
1. On the Analyze tab, on the Reports & Schedules panel, click the Schedule/Quantities button.

2. From the Category list, select Electrical Equipment and then click OK.   From the Available fields list, double-click Panel Name, Has Isolated Ground Bus, MCB Rating, Number of Phases, Number of Wires and Neutral Rating. Add additional fields as you wish, and then click OK.

Note that the default value for the Has Isolated Ground Bus is a grey check, indicating it is not configured yet; it is neither yes nor no.
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3. Check the boxes as indicated in Figure 7.54

FIGURE 7.54

Electrical equipment schedule 4. Reopen Panel Schedule H3, and note that it now indicates Yes for Isolated Ground Bus.

ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION BASICS
Revit MEP's support for panel to panel connections provides the ability to compute a total connected and demand electrical load for an entire project within a single Revit model file. Thus, all loads in the entire project, whether consisting of one main panel and one branch panel, or many of panels consisting of multiple distribution panels and branch circuit panels, may be connected using circuiting methods described previously. This enables the electrical designer to account for every load in the project. Load Classifications are used to compute electrical loads using some common demand/diversity rules. This functionality provides solutions to some load calculations that are difficult to manage, even in a spreadsheet. For example, keeping track of the largest motor load, or applying a different demand factor depending on the quantity of connected loads, such as kitchen equipment (NEC 220.56) or elevators (NEC 620.14) can be cumbersome when spanning multiple panels using traditional spreadsheet methods. Many electrical designers use spreadsheets to tabulate the connected and demand load. Using Revit MEP's functionality eliminates the error-prone process of transcribing loads. In a traditional spreadsheet/CAD workflow, if a load is added to a circuit on plan, this has to be accounted for on the spread sheet. Likewise, if a load is removed from plan, it must be removed from the spreadsheet. If a light fixture type that requires 2 lamps changes instead to 3, this must be changed on every circuit in the spreadsheet, whereas with Revit MEP this only needs to be changed in one place (the Family Type) and this change ripples throughout the entire distribution system.

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In the next topic, we will explore the different types of demand factors that may be applied to Load Categories in Revit MEP.

LOAD CLASSIFICATIONS AND DEMAND FACTORS
Each power connector in a Family is assigned a voltage and number of poles. This is used to control what panels the connector may be connected to. Additionally, the connector is assigned a load and load classification. You may create any load classification you need to categorize your loads. Each Load Classification is associated with a Demand Factor, which is a rule used to apply demand factor calculations to the total load for each load category connected to a panel.
1. On the Manage tab, on the Settings panel, click the MEP Settings drop-down and choose Load Classifications.

The Load classification types list the load classifications pre-populated in the model. You can use the icons at the bottom of the list to create, duplicate, rename, and delete classifications. The demand factor list is used to associate the load classification with a demand factor rule. You can click the browse button to edit demand factor rules. The last setting, “Select the load class for use with spaces” is used to associate the load category with the Lighting or Power class for the purposes of heating and cooling loads. Lighting and Power loads on spaces are associated with a schedule that determines how much of the load contributes to space heat gain.
2. Click the browse button next to Demand factor.

The demand factor types list contains a demand factor rule for each load category by default. You can associate multiple load categories with the same demand factor if you wish. The calculation method box lists three options: Constant—used when the load has a constant factor, such as continuous loads applied at 125%. As an example load scenario, let's consider lighting loads. Lighting loads may be considered continuous loads, and as such, need to be rated at 125% of the actual load. The default

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Lighting Load Category Definition is defined as a constant value, with a 1.25 Demand Factor (see Figure 7.55).
3. In the Demand factor types list at left, select: Lighting.

FIGURE 7.55

Lighting demand factor settings

An example of this is depicted in Figure 7.56. Panel LP1 has a Connected load (C:) of 10 kVA. Panel LP2 has 6 kVA of lighting load. The total connected load that DP1 sees is 16 kVA. Applying the 1.25 Demand Factor results in a total demand of 20 kVA at panel DP1. You can verify the logic for the other panels.

FIGURE 7.56

Lighting load example

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By Quantity—this option has two sub options: Total at one percentage and Incrementally for each range.
Total at one percentage—This is used similar to how demand is computed for kitchen equipment per NEC 2008 article 220.56 and elevators per NEC 2008 article 620.14.
4. From the Demand factor types list, select Elevator (see Figure 7.57).

FIGURE 7.57

Elevator demand factor settings

As an example let's consider the distribution shown in Figure 7.58. Panel DP1 has three elevators connected to it, resulting in a demand factor of 0.90. Assuming that each elevator requires 10 kVA, the connected load would be 30 kVA, but the demand would be 0.90*(30 kVA) = 27 kVA. MDP sees 7 elevators, and thus receives a 0.77 factor. Again, with elevators at 10 kVA each, 0.77*(70 kVA) = 53.9 kVA.

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FIGURE 7.58

Elevator load example

Incrementally for each range—This is used similar to how demand is computed for Farm Loads per NEC 2008 article 220.103.

By Load—this option also has two sub options: Total at one percentage and Incrementally for each range.
Total at one percentage—This is similar to the by quantity option, but no demand factor definitions use this by default.
5. Select Receptacle (see Figure 7.59).

FIGURE 7.59

Receptacle demand factor settings

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Incrementally for each range—This is used similar to how demand is computed for various lighting loads per NEC 2008 article 220.42, and receptacle loads per 220.44.

FIGURE 7.60

Receptacle load example

For receptacle loads in the US, commonly the Demand Load is calculated according to these simple rules:
  100% for the first 10,000 VA 50% for load above 10,000 VA

For example, if a panel has 50,000 VA of receptacle load, this would result in the calculation:
 10,000 VA+ 0.5*(50,000 VA-10,000 VA) = 30,000 VA.

Or, as a general simplified equation that you may find in a spreadsheet:
 =IF(RECEPTACLELOAD>10000, RECEPTACLELOAD/2+5000, RECEPTACLELOAD).

In Revit MEP, this is implemented as a simple table in the default Receptacles Load Category Definition as shown in Figure 7.59. The flexibility afforded by the load categories, demand factors, and panel schedule templates is intended to provide you with the ability to quantify the electrical loads within a single Revit project file, and generate schedules that represent the information commonly found on construction documents.

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As with other settings within Revit, once you have established your Panel Schedule Templates, Load Classifications, and Load Categories within a pilot project, you can copy these settings to other projects using Transfer Project Standards. You can also transfer Load Category and Demand Factor settings from a project into family definitions. Load Categories and Demand Factors defined within a Family are automatically populated into a project file when the Family is loaded into the project.
6. Click Cancel to exit the Demand Factors window. 7. Click Cancel to close the Load Classifications window.

ELECTRICAL SETTINGS
You should familiarize yourself with the electrical settings in the project. These are found on the Manage ribbon tab, on the Settings panel. Click the MEP Settings drop-down and choose Electrical Settings. Click on each of the nodes to see the available properties for Wiring, Wire Sizes, Correction Factors, Grounding Conductors and Wiring Types. Refer to the online help for more information on each of these. The product documentation includes information on circuit lengths are estimated (search for “Wire Length Calculation”), how wires are sized, voltage drop, and other valuable information.

FIGURE 7.61

Wire settings in electrical settings

Let’s create an Electrical Circuit Schedule showing Voltage Drop.
1. On the Analyze tab, on the Reports & Schedules panel, click the Schedule/Quantities button. Create the Building Model

364 | Electrical Systems  

From the category list on the left, select Electrical Circuits and then click OK. From the available fields list on the left, double-click on Panel, Circuit Number, Rating, Length, Voltage, # of Hot Conductors and Voltage Drop.

2. In the middle of the dialog, click the Calculated Value button.  For the Name, enter: CalcVoltage. Make sure the Formula radio button is selected.   From the Discipline list, choose: Electrical. From the Type list, choose: Electrical Potential.

3. In the Formula field, input: if(# of Hot Conductors = 3, Voltage * sqrt(3), Voltage) and then click OK (see Figure 7.62).

FIGURE 7.62

Create a calculated value field for the schedule 4. Click the Calculated Value button again.  In the Name box, enter: VD%. Make sure Formula is selected.   Set Discipline to: Common and the Type to: Number. For the Formula input: Voltage Drop / CalcVoltage * 100 and then click OK

5. Click OK to close the “Schedule Properties” dialog and create the schedule (see Figure 7.63).

Using this schedule along with the product documentation can help you understand why wires are being sized the way they are within the project.
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FIGURE 7.63

Electrical Circuit Schedule showing Voltage Drop information

Revit MEP will size wires according to the circuit Rating and account for voltage drop. Additionally, ground conductors will be upsized proportionally. Refer to the RMEP product documentation for more information.
6. On the Project Browser, expand Legends and double-click the Save Page view.   On the QAT, click the Close Hidden Windows button. Save and close your file.

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SUMMARY
        In this chapter we have taken an extensive look at how to model electrical systems in Revit MEP. RMEP includes tools for lighting fixtures, power devices, low voltage devices, cable tray, and conduit. To connect electrical equipment and define a distribution system, create a system, then choose a Panel. By modifying Family definitions, we can customize tags and annotation elements to better suite our desired onscreen analysis and documentation needs. Annotation Families nested inside model Families, such as switches, can also be modified to suite our project standards. You can annotate circuiting using device tags and wires. Wires can be added quickly as you build the circuit and edited later using the control handles. You can create new views, or duplicate and modify existing ones. This coupled with customized Visibility/Graphic Override settings allows for a great deal of flexibility in your documentation. By using Panel Schedules, Revit MEP facilitates documenting connected and demand load. You learned about load categories and demand factors, and how they contribute to determining the demand load.

 

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Index

You can search this book online. An index is not included in the printed book pages. However, please visit www.paulaubin.com and visit the Books page. There you can find the page for this book. The complete text of the book is searchable from this page using the Google Books technology. Simply input your keyword search and you will be taken directly to the listing on Google Books with all the relevant search terms highlighted and page numbers from the actual book will be listed.

Visit paulaubin.com and browse the books page

After locating the specific book page, scroll down and input your search query

10 | Index

The search will open in the book’s page on Google Books with each search term highlighted Page numbers for the physical book will be listed and you can click on the highlighted entries to preview the page

Visit: www.paulaubin.com | 11

LEARN MORE:
To learn more about The Aubin Academy Master Series: Revit MEP and how to purchase, please visit: http://paulaubin.com/books/the-aubin-academy-master-series-revit-mep-2012/

12 | Index

ALSO AVAILABLE:

To learn more about: The Aubin Academy Master Series: AutoCAD MEP visit: http://paulaubin.com/books/the-aubin-academy-master-series-autocad-mep-2012/

The Aubin Academy Master Series: Revit Architecture visit: http://paulaubin.com/books/the-aubin-academy-master-series-revit-architecture-2012/