Proceedings of Seminar on “The Companies Bill 2013& Corporate Social Responsibility”

11th October 2013, Hotel Fortune Select Exotica, Vashi, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra India

Organized By

General Carbon Advisory Services Pvt. Ltd.
5th floor, Great Social Building 60, Sir Pherozeshah Mehta Road, Fort Mumbai, Maharashtra 400001, India Only for private circulation

******************** For additional copies of the proceedings or for more information Please visit our website www.general-carbon.com or write to us at info@general-carbon.com

General Carbon Advisory Services Pvt. Ltd. 5th floor, Great Social Building 60, Sir Pherozeshah Mehta Road, Fort, Mumbai, Maharashtra- 400001, India Tel: +91 22 2266 3201/3301

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The General Carbon Advisory Services Pvt. Ltd is thankful to RSM Astute Consulting Group for their support and involvement in the fruitful conduct of the seminar on the Companies Act 2013 and Corporate Social Responsibility. The seminar would not have been possible without the time and energy put forth by the panelists: Shri. K.H. Viswanathan, Executive Director with RSM Astute Consulting Group, Dr. M. Thiripal Raju, Director, Indian Institute of Capital Markets, Shri.Paresh Tewary, Chief Sustainability Officer for JSW, Group, Ms. Shubha Srinivasan, Head, National CSR Hub, TISS, Shri. G Udaya Bhaskar, Senior Vice-President, Reliance Industries and Mr Zakir H Molla, Chief Manager CSR, HPCL. We appreciate and thank participants and representatives of various companies for their active and insightful participation during the discussion sessions: Mahindra, Galaxy, Centre for Advance study in Microfossils, Bajaj Electricals Ltd, Essar Projects, RSM Astute Consulting Group, Cipla, JM financial, Thermax, SEBI, Bajaj Electricals Ltd, Samuchit Enviro Tech Pvt. Ltd, Hindustan Construction Co. Ltd, Blue Dart, INTELESCO, RPG Enterprises, Tata Consultancy Services, Godrej, Eureka Forbes, EU chambers of Commerce in India, J.K. Investo Trade India Ltd, ACC Limited, Suresh Surana & Associates LLP, Bayer Material Science, Sovereign Tech Engineering Services Pvt Ltd, Just Bespoke Advisory LLP, Axis Bank Foundation, Acuity Law, Bharat Bijlee, Infrastructure Today, Welspun, Ambuja Cement, Bureau Veritas, Indian Urban , Wartsila, Raymond Ltd, Somaiya College, Landscapers and Paradigm Shift. In closing we would like to recognize the special efforts of General Carbon team for contributing enthusiastically towards organizing the seminar and bringing together an informative compilation of the proceedings of seminar on the companies’ act 2013 and CSR. The Varhad Group,

General Carbon Advisory Services Pvt. Ltd. October 2013

CONTENTS
Executive Summary Introduction to the Companies Act 2013 & CSR Panel Discussion on Companies Act 2013 & CSR provisions Presentation: o o o o Clean Energy Clean Water programme- A Robust UN monitored CSR Action We Cherish People - JSW Group CSR at Ambuja Cements Ltd Sustainability Software Tools- ISustain, WeSustain and AlgoEngines

Appendices  Appendix I : Seminar Programme  Appendix II: About General Carbon Advisory Services Pvt. Ltd

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY A one day seminar was organized by General Carbon Advisors, on 11th October 2013 at the Hotel Fortune Select Exotica, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra, India on the contemporary and key issue of Corporate Social Responsibility in the new Companies Act, 2013. CSR in India has been interpreted and practiced in variety of ways including philanthropic contributions. With the introduction of the New Companies Act 2013, CSR has now found a new dimension in Indian context for the companies. The seminar brought about clarity in understanding the finer points of the CSR rules, with discussions specifically focusing on ideas for activities and projects that fulfill a company’s CSR obligation as per the Act and Draft Rules. The seminar also dwelt on guiding principles in the rules mentioned and its implications. Eminent panelists like Shri. K.H. Viswanathan, Executive Director with RSM Astute Consulting Group, Dr. M. Thiripal Raju, Director, Indian Institute of Capital Markets, Shri.Paresh Tewary, Chief Sustainability Officer for JSW, Group, Ms. Shubha Srinivasan, Head, National CSR Hub, TISS, Shri. G Udaya Bhaskar, Senior VicePresident, Reliance Industries and Mr Zakir H Molla, Chief Manager CSR, HPCL discussed the new legislation and felt that this will align the Indian business practice with global standards of CSR practice, enhancing the standards of corporate governance and transparency and would draw money and more importantly other resources such as managerial capacities from business to contribute towards inclusive development. Further, General Carbon demonstrated improved stoves “Chulika” & water purifier’s programme that is approved by UNFCCC and MoE&F which companies can adopt using the corporate social investment mandated by the new companies act. The programme and technology will help combat global warming and hence generate UNFCCC approved carbon credits, prevent deforestation and deliver health benefits to the community. The JSW and Ambuja’s who have already invested into this initiative have shared their exciting experience. Many businesses exhibited interest in adopting this programme. Further, software tools for management of sustainability function in a business organization like iSUSTAIN, WEsustain and Algo Engines were demonstrated.

INAUGURAL SESSION
WELCOME NOTE The seminar started with a welcome note by Dr. Rambabu, CEO, General Carbon Advisory Services Pvt. Ltd. Dr. Rambabu introduced the programme and welcomed the panelists, speakers and guests to the deliberations through the day. He further introduced issues and concerns regarding new Companies Act 2013 and said “The corporate sector in India has been involved in Community Development activities but with the bill, the companies will now require to follow a structured process and disclosure norms”. An Audio Video presentation on the Act and rules and provisions in the act of 2013 - CSR was displayed. In this, the participants were duly informed and reminded of the text in the act and the draft rules. Dr. Rambabu ended his brief address by welcoming all the panelists and participants for active participation in thoughtful discussions and deliberations during the course of the day.

Photograph: Dr. Rambabu, CEO, General Carbon at the inaugural session

SESSION PROCEEDINGS
The Companies Act, 2013 has been assented by the President of India on 29th August 2013 and published in Official Gazette on 30th August 2013. The Act empowers the Central Government to bring into force various sections from such date(s) as may be notified in the Official Gazette. The proceedings of the seminar “The Companies Act 2013 and CSR” are prepared keeping the provisions of the 2013 Act and does discuss the provisions of the Rules keeping in mind that these are in draft stage and are subject to change once the feedback of the stakeholders is received by the Ministry of Corporate Affairs (MCA) and incorporated in the final rules. Panel Discussion was divided into four rounds     Round - I : Overview of the CSR provisions in the companies act 2013 Round - II : Can CSR integrate economic, environmental and social objectives with the company’s operation growth Round - III: Collaborative CSR Efforts Round - IV : Conclusion Remarks

Photograph: Panelists (from Left to Right: Shri. K.H. Viswanathan, Director with RSM Astute Consulting Group, Shri.Paresh Tewary, Chief Sustainability Officer for JSW Group, Ms. Shubha Srinivasan, Head, National CSR Hub, TISS, Dr. Rambabu, CEO, General Carbon, Mr Zakir H Molla, Chief Manager CSR, HPCL , Dr. M. Thiripal Raju, Director, Indian Institute of Capital Markets, Shri. G Udaya Bhaskar, Senior Vice-President, Reliance Industries

ROUND - I: Overview of the CSR provisions in the Companies Act 2013:
Dr. Rambabu, CEO, General Carbon, as a moderator of the panel, provided a brief account of the CSR provisions (section 135) in the newly enacted Companies Act. He invited the panelists to focus on the key questions of how the provisions came into existence and the desirability and applicability of it. Why was the need to have CSR as a mandatory provision? How the current rules if implemented can improve stakeholder trust and long term shareholder value and economic development in India. Shri. G Udaya Bhaskar, Senior Vice-President, Reliance Industries, said with the act of 2013 it would be interesting to see how businesses use the new provision of CSR rules in the interest of business and society. He also wanted the panel and participants to deliberate whether Government has relinquished its responsibility with the new provision of CSR and wondered if CSR mandate can work in a soft legal(penalty not specified) path. He further quoted an example of an survey carried out by IIM, Kolkotta on CSR Indexing, a base line study for about 200 companies of which more than 150 companies contribute to CSR and out of these companies about 68 companies have their own trust working on CSR and focus on health, education and women empowerment. Dr. M. Thiripal Raju, Director, Indian Institute of Capital Markets, said as far as the desirability of the act is concerned, the law is definitely required and it has come probably late. He mentioned that there is a need for companies to make their business sustainable for long term and for that the society and stakeholders have to be healthy. Mr Zakir H Molla, Chief Manager CSR, HPCL, said, once the law is made mandatory, it no longer becomes just responsibility but it becomes accountability, creating benefits to the society at large. Ms. Shubha Srinivasan, Head, National CSR Hub, TISS, said that the challenge of the provision of rules and act is identifying credible and competent implementing agencies or NGOs and how companies can engage with them. She mentioned that CSR hub at TISS, is empanelling 235 NGOs of various verticals. She said as far as the act is concerned it’s too early to argue whether the act will have viable benefits, as of now the act covers the quantitative aspect (expenses and projects) and would be good to see inclusion of

qualitative aspect (benefits to the community and business) once the act becomes notified. She also mentioned that the provision of the rules should trickle down to the beneficiaries. Shri. Paresh Tewary, Chief Sustainability Officer, JSW Group said, the act 2013 specifically shifts focus from charity to responsibility and accountability, from inputs to outcomes, from spend to impact and towards inclusive growth. With the act coming into being corporates might gain by developing their current and future markets, measurable inputs to public welfare at large and stakeholders; and in turn the county will gain. Shri. K.H. Viswanathan, Director, RSM Astute Consulting Group raised a question whether the CSR provisions in the Companies Act 2013 shifts a part of its responsibility to corporate, in order to improve delivery efficiency by effectively using managerial and other resources of the corporate. He also suggested that the companies can use such CSR budgets to further indirectly and in the long term to propel their business. He further stated that if the connect is established as to how the act will benefit the company and society, then the implementation and the act in itself will be a grand success and without this connect the act will be a mere compliance and form filling exercise. If this is achieved then it will be great revolution in Corporate India. He highlighted that as the Government machinery may find it difficult to administer to all the corporates in India which are earning profits of more than 5 crores, it may be prudent to take up the administration of the provisions in phases. Also better guidance on where to spend and what constitutes CSR is desired.

Key Issues
  The new Companies Act has a distinctive definition of CSR and the activities listed in the Schedule 7 of the Act. The CSR provisions in companies act is desirable and has in fact come a little late. The results of these provisions can be very beneficial if the provisions are implemented in spirit not just by words.  The text in the act and rules links CSR to “stakeholder value”, “triple bottom line” and “shared value”. Barring a few places, the act and the rules does not state that CSR project cannot benefit business (indirect and long term)

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The companies need to undertake the CSR initiatives as projects and the outcome is to be measurable and board is responsible for monitoring. CSR is not charity or philanthropy anymore in Indian context. CSR activities need to be reported in the annual report of every company that would in turn be made available in public domain. Execution efficiency of community development efforts of the public and private would improve as the corporate will bring in managerial and other resources It may be prudent to take up the administration of the provisions in phases.

ROUND – II: Can CSR integrate economic, environmental and social objectives with the company's operations and growth?
The session focused on the guiding principle of Draft CSR Rules 2013 which states that "CSR projects/programmes of a company may also focus on integrating business models with social and environmental priorities and processes in order to create shared value. Socially responsible companies use CSR to integrate economic, environmental and social objectives with the company's operations and growth. Dr. Rambabu, CEO, General Carbon, suggested that the panel may focus on providing answers to     What is the implication of the guiding principle in the draft rules that mention triple bottom line” and “shared value” while talking of CSR? Does it mean that the CSR projects can be designed to derive long term and indirect business benefits? Can we take some examples of projects that use CSR to integrate economic, environmental and social objectives with the company's operations and growth? What constitutes CSR expenditure? Cite cases of CSR activities that can/cannot be included under the 2% CSR spend -that can be considered as going beyond the normal course of business? Shri. G Udaya Bhaskar, Senior Vice-President, Reliance Industries, said in the present scenario, if the profit is zero or negative business house has no obligation to spend on CSR. CSR provisions in the companies act 2013 make provision for business, community

development and environmental protection to be connected and integrated. He said the good thing of Companies Act 2013 CSR rules is that, it is directly linked to business activity and CSR being not exempted can create long term shared value. He cited an example of an idea that was floated a year and half year ago about a project on degraded forest areas greening through corporates, with the focus of working together with Government on Green India Mission. Most of the CSR projects focus on education and mobile health clinics. If projects on environmental sustainability are considered in depth by government and corporates together, they can also add direct benefits to the company and society at large. Dr. Rambabu, said does product stewardship programme can be included in shared value projects, he stated that such programmes can be business projects but not Business As Usual Projects (BAU) and such projects can touch the bottom of the pyramid. Dr. M. Thiripal Raju, Director, Indian Institute of Capital Markets, said, “CSR expenditure contributes to increase in profits and GDP. Citing an example, he said, “good health of the employees increases productivity, improves GDP, which considered at micro level can be a CSR initiative”, a direct benefit to the company and a direct benefit to the society. At macro level, problems the country is facing is poverty, health, sanitation and water and the purpose of the business is to address these social problems pooling in their resources. Shri. Paresh Tewary, Chief Sustainability Officer, JSW Group said, Credibility of the business with reference to utilization of this 2% would be critical to the extent of boards responsibility on its deployment – where, for whom, and reporting. He said that the law would help bring in execution efficiencies of corporates in a participatory approach towards development of India which in turn contributes towards corporate citizenship, equity and growth. He supported the contention by Dr. Rambabu by quoting that act & rules 2013 looks beyond 2% spend and desirability and applicability to the kind of projects qualifying for CSR would be the key issue. Shri. K.H. Viswanathan, Director with RSM Astute Consulting Group said we cannot have CSR objectives outside the business objectives, they coexist with each other. He cited examples of Colgate, Parle-G and Bisleri packaged drinking water initiatives. He mentioned Colgate started a social initiative in the African Continent by distributing toothpaste and tooth powder free of cost to the tribal population to improve the hygiene level and what

started as a social initiative had a clear business objective and it succeeded. Similar was the case with PARLE-G and Bisleri where the objective was to ensure a packaged promotional aid to go to the bottom of the pyramid with the real intention of business. Ms. Shubha Srinivasan, Head, National CSR Hub, TISS, cited an example of awareness programme on nutritional requirements for poor section of the society create shared value and can be quantifiable. Such programmes not just aim at business but also address social problems and the impact can be measured which will be an advantage for the company. Mr Zakir H Molla, Chief Manager CSR, HPCL, said, “If Business grows, community grows and the profit ploughs back to business. He said whatever is done through CSR is not always philanthropy, there should be a strategic intent to it. In simplified terms he said, “CSR by Business is a foresight”, citing example of his company HPCL which worked on providing community kitchen services where villagers come and perform their day to day activity and requirements as per need, where in no trees are cut, providing a perfect example for being environmentally sustained and raising profit to company. One of the participants Mr. Sudhir Sinha, Corporate Head Communications, Cipla during the Q&A suggested that companies should find innovative ways and means as to how to really spend the amount on CSR annually and align it with mitigation of negative impacts of their business activities, as schedule VII is limited.

Key Issues
The key points from the operating provisions of the CSR rules 2013 were discussed:   ‘Net Profit’ for the section 135 and these rules shall mean net profit before tax as per books of accounts and shall not include profits arising from branches outside India. 2% CSR spending would be computed as 2% of the average net profits made by the company during every block of three years. For the purpose of First CSR reporting the Net Profit shall mean average of the annual net profit of the preceding three financial years ending on or before 31 March 2014.  CSR activities may generally be conducted as projects or programmes (either new or ongoing) excluding activities undertaken in pursuance of the normal course of business of a company.

Some ideas: “CSR by Business is a foresight” “CSR may align with mitigation of negative impacts of business activities “ “CSR expenditure contributes to increase in profits and GDP- good health of the employees increases productivity, improves GDP, which considered at micro level can be a CSR initiative”

The CSR Committee constituted under sec. 135(1), shall prepare the CSR Policy of the company which shall include: a. Specify the projects and programmes that are to be undertaken. b. prepare a list of CSR projects/programmes which a company plans to undertake during the implementation year , specifying modalities of execution in the areas/sectors chosen and implementation schedules for the same.

CSR projects/programmes of a company may also focus on integrating business models with social and environmental priorities and processes in order to create shared value.

CSR Policy of the company should provide that surplus arising out of the CSR activity will not be part of business profits of a company

ROUND – III: Collaborative CSR Efforts:
The round III emphasized on discussing how Companies can collaborate or pool resources with other companies to undertake CSR activities and any expenditure incurred on such collaborative efforts would qualify for computing the CSR spending. Dr.RamBabu, invited the panelists to provide their opinion on “collaborative CSR efforts” and focus on providing answers to    Who can play leading role in such joint efforts…….governments (recent Chhattisgarh government plans)? Civil society? Consultants? Industry associations? Provide examples of existing programmes where these CSR investments can go? Can CSR funds be invested into social ventures or funds for impact investing?

Dr. G Udaya Bhaskar, Senior Vice-President, Reliance Industries, said Environmental

sustainability projects with focus on private-public partnership including the local communities such as greening and recycling projects under joint efforts (public private & private – private) needs to be taken up as a part of CSR investment. Citing an example for

recycling, he said Reliance Industries recycles the PET bottles and 10% of their requirements come from recycling. Dr. M. Thiripal Raju, Director, Indian Institute of Capital Markets said business expenses may be booked under CSR and this is not desirable. He raised a question whether spending on R&D is CSR or not? It may constitute new drug/food supplement development addressing nutrition problems. He further suggested that the projects focusing on Education and health needs to be addressed by the corporates and CSR investments can go in education and health programmes. Ms. Shubha Srinivasan, Head, National CSR Hub, TISS said, community interest and stakeholder interest should be one; the purpose of shared value in CSR should be quantifiable. The aspirations from the act will be in terms of greater impact rather than mere outcome and greater social transformation apart from economic growth. She said social accountability can be structured by indicators and activities like self help groups and women empowerment is quantifiable as a part of CSR. Mr Zakir H Molla, Chief Manager CSR, HPCL said if he would have to think of an example of project where CSR investment can go, he added skill development would be an ideal project benefiting community at large. Shri. Paresh Tewary, Chief Sustainability Officer, JSW Group said, mid-day meals, toilets, sanitation are good examples of project mode initiatives that companies can adopt as CSR focus. Shri. K.H.Viswanathan, Director, RSM Astute Consulting Group addressed the tax issues of the act. He mentioned that it would be ideal to have partnerships between the Government and Corporates rather than partnerships between corporates so that there will be efficient use of funds.

Key Issues
 Analysis of CSR spend of around 45 companies, a survey cum study carried out by General Carbon concluded that 73% corporates are spending less than 2% of their net profits on CSR.  Environmental sustainability projects with focus on private-public partnership including the local communities such as greening and recycling projects under joint

efforts (public private & private – private) that needs to be taken up as a part of CSR investment. It would be ideal to have partnerships between the Government and Corporates rather than partnerships between corporates.

ROUND – IV: Concluding Remarks:
Round IV included concluding comments from Dr.Rambabu and the panel Panelists felt that the good practice for the companies is to develop and deploy programmes that generate value for the company and also to the other stakeholders. Important compass in this voyage will be value elements of social, economic and environment. A crucial question raised during the concluding session was on “Ethics”. As an example environmental or health damages of products or the basic business viz., businesses in tobacco and alcohol or weapons or an FI financing non renewable energy generation or pesticides etc. General feeling on this issue was, that the CSR requirements, need not be judgmental and should be more objective and pragmatic. One of the participants from Wartsila said, “CSR activity should have direct and immediate benefit and shared his view on product innovation and product stewardship”. Another well appreciated suggestion was need of sector wise framework to be included in Schedule VII of activities. The panel discussion provided insightful discussion with seamless exchange of thoughts between the panelists and participants expecting that the Companies act 2013 – CSR provision would facilitate business-friendly regulation, improve corporate governance norms, enhance accountability and raise levels of transparency.

ANNOUNCEMENT
A special announcement was made by Dr. Rambabu, CEO, General Carbon about RSM Astute acquiring stake in GC. Dr. Rambabu said “GC is excited to be associated with a leading and respected brand like RSM Astute. With the changing regulatory landscape on Sustainability and Energy areas along with the increased global action there will be an opportunity to leverage on the strengths of both RSM Astute Consulting Group and GC. General Carbon Advisory Services Pvt. Ltd will hence forth be called as RSM GC Advisory Services Pvt. Ltd. Mr. K.H. Viswanathan, Director, RSM Astute Consulting Group, said “with the new Company law and SEBI regulations on Corporate Social Responsibility, RSM GC will witness a significant growth ahead in its environmental and sustainability consulting practice. RSM Astute Consulting is the Indian member of RSM International, the seventh largest network of independent audit, tax and advisory firms in the world. With a team of 1,100 people in India, RSM Astute Consulting Group offers services in internal audit and risk management, taxation, corporate advisory and structuring, operations consulting, financial process outsourcing, information technology (IT) solutions, labour law compliance review and risk management.

Photograph: The team of GC and RSM during the announcement of RSM Astute acquiring stake in GC

PRESENTATION – I
CLEAN ENERGY & CLEAN WATER PROGRAMME - ONE MILLION RURAL HOUSEHOLDS BY 2015 – Ms. Bitsy Vincent, Vice President, General Carbon Ms. Betsy Vincent, Vice President, General Carbon shared during her presentation that globally about one - third of the total human-induced warming effect due to GHGs comes from Agriculture and Land Use Change, in India 28% of total GHG emissions are contributed by agriculture and forestry. She mentioned the key challenges ahead include:       Inability to monitor / control wide spread dispersed nature of emissions Poverty Low access to and inability to implement clean technologies Lack of knowledge, leading to low levels of awareness and participation Increased dependence on forests – illegal logging, dwindling agricultural income leads to man nature conflicts Limited financial ability so far of educational institutes, governments, not for profit sectors to upscale pilots and have large impacts.

Photograph: Ms. Betsy Vincent, Vice President, General Carbon during the presentation on “Clean Energy & Clean Water Programme”

GENERAL CARBON’S CLEAN ENERGY & CLEAN WATER INITIATIVE   Launched in 2012 20, 000 households in Rajasthan, Gujarat and Maharashtra are being provided “Clean Energy – Clean water “through: 1. Innovative and Efficient technologies 2. Partnerships with Business and Voluntary Sector 3. Climate and CSR Finance are Sustainably combined ▪ The presentation addressed The “Clean energy and Clean Water “program having a dual impact of reducing Green House Gas (GHG) emissions and improved community health with exhibits of energy efficient stoves and water purifiers. General Carbon facilitates project developer’s work with existing representative community organizations, where possible. Where none exist, communities are encouraged to organize themselves into an association for the purposes of participating in the project of Clean Energy and Clean Water programme.

PRESENTATION – II
JSW GROUP CSR – “We Cherish People” – Ms. Vidya Gorakshkar, JSW GROUP “CHULIKA” improved stoves project partnering General Carbon, JSW, MAVIM & Area Resource Centres of MAVIM was key highlight of the presentation. The validation process by Bureau Veritas field visit followed by the UNFCCC registration process for improved stoves spearheaded by General Carbon was explained. JSW group mentioned it was learning experience during the course of project and said, “There is a need for not be just giving away goods concept but also build a system of checking the usage, reporting, repair & maintenance.”

Photograph: Ms. Vidya Gorakshkar, JSW GROUP during the presentation “We Cherish People”

PRESENTATION – III
CSR @ AMBUJA CEMENTS LTD – Mr. Sunil Rana, Program Co-ordinator, AMBUJA CEMENTS LTD. Mr. Sunil Rana presented Ambuja Cements Ltd mission of “Value for All” with main focus on energized society and healthy environment being key parameters in the present context. He said the road towards sustainability includes:    Initial stage - demand driven and philanthropic mode Second Stage - Need for a more strategic mode Present Stage – Engagement with community for long term sustainability

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT INITIATIVES:      Natural Resource Management (Water & Land) Livelihood (Agro based, Skill based) Human Development (Health, Education, Women & Youth, Infrastructure) Mason Training Project Affected People (PAPs)

A major intervention of improved stoves with a project scope of 10000 households in Gujarat and Rajasthan States was shared during the presentation.

Photograph: Mr. Sunil Rana, Program Co-ordinator, Ambuja Cements Ltd, CSR @ Ambuja Cements Ltd

PRESENTATION - IV
SUSTAINABILITY SOFTWARE TOOLS Mr. Akash Mokhriwale, Manager -Sustainability, General Carbon Mr. Akash emphasized on the benefits of sustainability IT tools, which include:        Reduce risk of incorrect data More analysis time and less spreadsheet work Increases employee productivity Notifications, alerts Instant report generation Secured data Forecasting and target-setting

The main highlight of the presentation which received remarkable appreciation from the panelists and participants was on demonstration of sustainability ERP solutions: “WeSustain, i Systain and “Algo Engines”.   “WeSustain”, a German based firm offers IT tool for Enterprise Sustainability Management. iSystain, a Austrailian based company offers solutions related to health, safety environment and CSR management processes.

Algo Engines, an Indian IT solution provider, has introduced a sustainability performance management solution that provides both cloud based and on-premise installation. Built with PAT, RPO and domestic reporting requirements in mind, this solution offers carbon, energy, incident and CSR program management.

Photograph: Mr. Akash Mokhriwale, Manager – Sustainability, General Carbon during the presentation on “Sustainability Software Tools”

Snap shot of Sustainability Software Tools Presentation

SEMINAR PARTICPATING ORGANIZATIONS A total of 40 organizations attended the seminar with 54 participants representing their respective companies. The organizations include: Mahindra, Galaxy, Centre for Advance study in Microfossils, Bajaj Electricals Ltd, Essar Projects, RSM Astute Consulting Group, Cipla, JM financial, Thermax, SEBI, Bajaj Electricals Ltd, Samuchit Enviro Tech Pvt. Ltd, Hindustan Construction Co. Ltd, Blue Dart, INTELESCO, RPG Enterprises, Tata Consultancy Services, Godrej, Eureka Forbes, EU chambers of Commerce in India, J.K. Investo Trade India Ltd, ACC Limited, Suresh Surana & Associates LLP, Bayer Material Science, Sovereign Tech Engineering Services Pvt Ltd, Just Bespoke Advisory LLP, Axis Bank Foundation, Acuity Law, Bharat Bijlee, Infrastructure Today, Welspun, Ambuja Cement, Bureau Veritas, Indian Urban , Wartsila, Raymond Ltd, The Varhad Group, Somaiya College, Landscapers and Paradigm Shift.

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APPENDIX - I PROGRAMME Seminar on “Companies Act 2013 & CSR” Oct 11th 2013, Friday Fortune Select Exotica Hotel, Plot No. 16, Sector 19 D Vashi, Navi Mumbai
09:30 - 10:00 hrs 10:00 - 12:00 hrs Panelist:Mr. G Udaya Bhaskar Dr. M T Raju Mr. Zakir H. Molla Ms.Shubha Srinivasan Mr. Paresh Tewary Mr. K.H.Viswanathan Dr. Ram Babu 12:00 - 12:15 hrs 12:15 - 12:30 hrs 12:30 - 13:15 hrs 13:15 - 13:30 hrs 13:30 - 14:30 hrs 14:30 - 15:30 hrs : Tea : Announcement : Discussion on “Clean Energy and Clean Water” Programme” : Presentation on CSR perspectives : Lunch : Presentation on “CSR Software Tools” WE Sustain i Systain Algo Engines : Tea : Reliance Industries : Indian Institute of Capital Markets : Hindustan Petroleum Corporation Limited : Tata Institute of Social Sciences : JSW : RSM Astute Consulting : General Carbon Advisory Services Pvt Ltd : Tea : Panel Discussion on “Companies Act and CSR”

15:30 - 16:00 hrs

APPENDIX - II ABOUT US
General Carbon Advisors provide strategic, financial and technical advice in renewable energy, energy efficiency and sustainability to clients in manufacturing and service sectors. We are a leading advisor with expertise across electricity renewable energy, energy efficiency, sustainability assets, carbon markets and carbon offset project development. General Carbon Advisors assist clients to manage their sustainability, energy and environmental functions effectively. General Carbon Advisors facilitates clients to assess and harness the opportunities from emerging regulations in Renewable Purchase Obligations (RPOs)/ Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) and Energy Efficiency Certificates for the clients. We are preferred partners for many businesses in India and Southeast Asia for managing sustainability transformation. With active participation in policy formulation and experience with developing strategies for efficient sourcing of energy and environmental commodities, we are the chosen partners for leading corporations. It offers to many clients across India, South East Asia, Africa and Europe wide range of carbon offset services including - CDM project development, PoA development, carbon finance advisory and due diligence services. We provide energy and sustainability strategic advice to guide leading corporations in development and deployment of their energy, sustainability and climate strategy. General Carbon Advisors leverage its potent combination of technical & financial resources to deliver value to clients. We are “Delivering Sustainable Value.”