GkUNDlOS INDU51k¥

  PUMP HAND8DDk
CkUNDfD5 Management AJ5
Poul Due !ensens ve| 7
DK-88S0 8|erringbro
1el. +4S 87 S0 14 00
www.grundIos.com
8eing responsible is our IoundaIion
1hinking ahead makes iI possible
lnnovaIion is Ihe essence
9
6
S
6
3
2
S
8
 
1
1
0
4
 PUMP HAND8DDk
CopyrighI 2004 GkUNDlOS ManagemenI A]S. All righIs reserved.
CopyrighI law and inIernaIional IreaIies proIecI Ihis maIerial. No parI oI Ihis maIerial 
may be reproduced in any Iorm or by any means wiIhouI prior wriIIen permission Irom 
GkUNDlOS ManagemenI A]S.
Disclaimer
All reasonable care has been Iaken Io ensure Ihe accuracy oI Ihe conIenIs oI Ihis maIerial, 
however GkUNDlOS ManagemenI A]S shall noI be reliable Ior any loss wheIher direcI, 
indirecI, incidenIal or consequenIial arising ouI oI Ihe use oI or reliance upon any oI Ihe 
conIenI oI Ihe maIerial.
foreword
1he manuIacIuring indusIry places heavy demand on pumps, when iI comes Io 
opIimum operaIion, high reliabiliIy and low energy consumpIion. 1hereIore, 
GrundIos has developed Ihe Pump handbook, which in a simple manner deals 
wiIh various consideraIions when dimensioning pumps and pump sysIems. 
We have elaboraIed a handbook Ior engineers and Iechnicians who work wiIh 
design and insIallaIion oI pumps and pump sysIems, conIaining answers Io a 
wide range oI Iechnical pump specihc quesIions. 1he Pump handbook can eiIher 
be read Irom one end Io Ihe oIher or parIly on specihc Iopics.
1he handbook is divided inIo S chapIers which deal wiIh diIIerenI phases when 
designing pump sysIems. 
1hroughouI chapIer 1 we make a general presenIaIion oI diIIerenI pump Iypes 
and componenIs. Rere we also describe which precauIions Io adopI when dealing 
wiIh viscous liquids. lurIher, Ihe mosI used maIerials as well as diIIerenI Iypes oI 
corrosion are presenIed here. 1he mosI imporIanI Ierminologies in connecIion 
wiIh reading Ihe pump perIormance are presenIed in chapIer 2. ChapIer 3 deals 
wiIh sysIem hydraulics and some oI Ihe mosI imporIanI IacIors Io consider Io obIain 
opIimum operaIion oI Ihe pump sysIem. As iI is oIIen necessary Io ad|usI Ihe pump 
perIormance by means oI diIIerenI ad|usImenI meIhods, Ihese are dealI wiIh in 
chapIer 4. ChapIer S describes Ihe liIe cycle cosIs as energy consumpIion plays an 
imporIanI role in Ioday's pumps and pump sysIems.
We sincerely hope IhaI you will make use oI 1he pump handbook and hnd iI useIul in 
your daily work. 
SegmenI DirecIor  8usiness DevelopmenI Manager
Allan Skovgaard  Claus 8ærnholdI Nielsen
Chapter 1 Design cf pumps and mctcrs ......................7
Secticn 1.1 Pump ccnstructicn ............................................................ 8
1.1.1  1he centrifugaI pump .................................................................. 8
1.1.2   Pump curves  9
1.1.3   CharacIerisIics oI Ihe cenIriIugal pump  11
1.1.4   MosI common end-sucIion and 
  in-line pump Iypes  12
1.1.S   lmpeller Iypes (axial Iorces)  14
1.1.6   Casing Iypes (radial Iorces)  1S
1.1.7   Single-sIage pumps  1S
1.1.8   MulIisIage pumps  16
1.1.9   Long-coupled and close-coupled pumps  16
Secticn 1.2 1ypes cf pumps ...................................................................17
1.2.1   SIandard pumps  17
1.2.2   SpliI-case pumps  17
1.2.3   RermeIically sealed pumps  18
1.2.4   SaniIary pumps  20
1.2.S   WasIewaIer pumps  21
1.2.6   lmmersible pumps  22
1.2.7   8orehole pumps  23
1.2.8   PosiIive displacemenI pumps 24
Secticn 1.3 MechanicaI shaft seaIs ..................................................27
1.3.1   1he mechanical shaII seal's 
  componenIs and IuncIion 29
1.3.2   8alanced and unbalanced shaII seals  30
1.3.3   1ypes oI mechanical shaII seals  31
1.3.4   Seal Iace maIerial combinaIions 34
1.3.S   lacIors aIIecIing Ihe seal perIormance 36
Secticn 1.4 Mctcrs ....................................................................................  39
1.4.1   SIandards  40
1.4.2   MoIor sIarI-up  46
1.4.3   volIage supply  47
1.4.4   lrequency converIer  47
1.4.S   MoIor proIecIion  49
Secticn 1.5 liquids .......................................................................................53
1.S.1   viscous liquids  S4
1.S.2   Non-NewIonian liquids  SS
1.S.3   1he impacI oI viscous liquids on Ihe 
  perIormance oI a cenIriIugal pump  SS
1.S.4   SelecIing Ihe righI pump Ior a liquid 
  wiIh anIiIreeze S6
1.S.S   CalculaIion example  S8
1.S.6   CompuIer aided pump selecIion Ior dense and 
  viscous liquids  S8
Secticn 1.6 MateriaIs ................................................................................ 59
1.6.1   WhaI is corrosion!  60
1.6.2   1ypes oI corrosion  61
1.6.3   MeIal and meIal alloys 6S
1.6.4   Ceramics  71
1.6.S   PlasIics  71
1.6.6   kubber  72
1.6.7   CoaIings  73
Chapter 2 lnstaIIaticn and perfcrmance 
reading .............................................................................................................75
Secticn 2.1 Pump instaIIaticn  ............................................................ 76
2.1.1   New insIallaIion 76
2.1.2   LxisIing insIallaIion-replacemenI 76
2.1.3   Pipe ßow Ior single-pump insIallaIion  77
2.1.4   LimiIaIion oI noise and vibraIions  78
2.1.S   Sound level (L)  81
Secticn 2.2 Pump perfcrmance  ........................................................ 83
2.2.1   Rydraulic Ierms 83
2.2.2   LlecIrical Ierms  90
2.2.3   Liquid properIies 93
1abIe of Contents
Chapter 3 System hydrauIic .................................................... 95
Secticn 3.1 System characteristics  .................................................96
3.1.1   Single resisIances 97
3.1.2   Closed and open sysIems  98
Secticn 3.2 Pumps ccnnected in series and paraIIeI ...................101
3.2.1   Pumps in parallel 101
3.2.2   Pumps connecIed in series  103
Chapter 4 Perfcrmance adjustment 
cf pumps ..................................................................................................... 105
Secticn 4.1 Adjusting pump perfcrmance ..............................106
4.1.1   1hroIIle conIrol 107
4.1.2   8ypass conIrol 107
4.1.3   ModiIying impeller diameIer  108
4.1.4   Speed conIrol  108
4.1.S   Comparison oI ad|usImenI meIhods 110
4.1.6   Overall eIhciency oI Ihe pump sysIem  111
4.1.7   Lxample. kelaIive power consumpIion 
  when Ihe ßow is reduced by 20°  111
Secticn 4.2 Speed-ccntrcIIed pump scIuticns  .................... 114
4.2.1   ConsIanI pressure conIrol  114
4.2.2   ConsIanI IemperaIure conIrol  11S
4.2.3   ConsIanI diIIerenIial pressure in a 
  circulaIing sysIem  11S
4.2.4   llow-compensaIed diIIerenIial 
  pressure conIrol 116
Secticn 4.3 Advantages cf speed ccntrcI .................................117
Secticn 4.4 Advantages cf pumps with integrated 
frequency ccnverter ...............................................................................  118
4.4.1   PerIormance curves oI speed-conIrolled 
  pumps 119
4.4.2   Speed-conIrolled pumps in diIIerenI sysIems 119
Secticn 4.5 frequency ccnverter .................................................... 122
4.S.1   8asic IuncIion and characIerisIics 122
4.S.2   ComponenIs oI Ihe Irequency converIer 122
4.S.3   Special condiIions regarding Irequency
   converIers 124
Chapter 5 life cycIe ccsts caIcuIaticn  ....................... 127
Secticn 5.1 life cycIe ccsts equaticn ............................................ 128
S.1.1   lniIial cosIs, purchase price (C
ic
)  129
S.1.2   lnsIallaIion and commissioning cosIs (C
in
)  129
S.1.3   Lnergy cosIs (C
e
)  130
S.1.4   OperaIing cosIs (C
o
)  130
S.1.S   LnvironmenIal cosIs (C
env
)  130
S.1.6   MainIenance and repair cosIs (C
m
)  131
S.1.7   DownIime cosIs, loss oI producIion (C
s
)  131
S.1.8   Decommissioning and disposal cosIs (C
o
)  131
Secticn 5.2 life cycIe ccsts caIcuIaticn 
~ an exampIe ................................................................................................132
Appendix .........................................................................................................133
A)  NoIaIions and uniIs 134
8)   UniI conversion Iables  13S
C)   Sl-prehxes and Greek alphabeI  136
D)   vapour pressure and densiIy oI waIer aI 
  diIIerenI IemperaIures  137
L)   Orihce  138
l)   Change in sIaIic pressure due Io change 
  in pipe diameIer  139
G)  Nozzles  140
R)   Nomogram Ior head losses in 
  bends, valves, eIc  141
l)   Pipe loss nomogram Ior clean waIer 20´C 142
!)   Periodical sysIem 143
K)  Pump sIandards  144
L)   viscosiIy Ior diIIerenI liquids as a IuncIion 
  oI liquid  IemperaIure 14S
lndex ..................................................................................................................151
Chapter 1. Design of pumps and motors
Secticn 1.1: Pump ccnstructicn
1.1.1   1he cenIriIugal pump
1.1.2   Pump curves
1.1.3   CharacIerisIics oI Ihe cenIriIugal pump
1.1.4   MosI common end-sucIion and in-line  
  pump Iypes
1.1.S   lmpeller Iypes (axial Iorces)
1.1.6   Casing Iypes (radial Iorces)
1.1.7   Single-sIage pumps
1.1.8   MulIisIage pumps
1.1.9   Long-coupled and close-coupled pumps
Secticn 1.2: 1ypes cf pumps
1.2.1   SIandard pumps
1.2.2   SpliI-case pumps
1.2.3   RermeIically sealed pumps
1.2.4   SaniIary pumps
1.2.S   WasIewaIer pumps
1.2.6   lmmersible pumps
1.2.7   8orehole pumps
1.2.8   PosiIive displacemenI pumps
5ection 1.1 
Pump construction
1.1.1 1he centrifugaI pump
ln 1689 Ihe physicisI Denis Papin invenIed Ihe cenIriIugal 
pump and Ioday Ihis kind oI pump is Ihe mosI used around 
Ihe  world.  1he  cenIriIugal  pump  is  builI  on  a  simple 
principle.  Liquid  is  led  Io  Ihe  impeller  hub  and  by  means 
oI Ihe cenIriIugal Iorce iI is Ilung Iowards Ihe periphery oI 
Ihe impellers. 
1he  consIrucIion  is  Iairly  inexpensive,  robusI  and  simple 
and iIs high speed makes iI possible Io connecI Ihe pump 
direcIly  Io  an  asynchronous  moIor.  1he  cenIriIugal  pump 
provides a sIeady liquid Ilow, and iI can easily be IhroIIled 
wiIhouI causing any damage Io Ihe pump. 
Now  leI  us  have  a  look  aI  Iigure  1.1.1,  which  shows  Ihe 
liquid's  Ilow  Ihrough  Ihe  pump.  1he  inleI  oI  Ihe  pump 
leads Ihe liquid Io Ihe cenIre oI Ihe roIaIing impeller Irom 
where  iI  is  Ilung  Iowards  Ihe  periphery.  1his  consIrucIion 
gives  a  high  eIIiciency,  and  is  suiIable  Ior  handling  pure 
liquids. Pumps, which have Io handle impure liquids, such 
as  wasIewaIer  pumps,  are  IiIIed  wiIh  an  impeller  IhaI  is 
consIrucIed  especially  Io  avoid  IhaI  ob|ecIs  geI  sIocked 
inside Ihe pump, see secIion 1.2.S.
lI  a  pressure  diIIerence  occurs  in  Ihe  sysIem  while  Ihe 
cenIriIugal  pump  is  noI  running,  liquid  can  sIill  pass 
Ihrough iI due Io iIs open design. 
As you can Iell Irom Iigure 1.1.2, Ihe cenIriIugal pump can 
be  caIegorised  in  diIIerenI  groups.  kadial  Ilow  pumps, 
mixed  Ilow  pumps  and  axial  Ilow  pumps.    kadial  Ilow 
pumps  and  mixed  Ilow  pumps  are  Ihe  mosI  common 
Iypes  used.  1hereIore,  we  will  only  concenIraIe  on  Ihese 
Iypes oI pumps on Ihe Iollowing pages.
Rowever,  we  will  brieIly  presenI  Ihe  posiIive  displacemenI 
pump in secIion 1.2.8.
1he  diIIerenI  demands  on  Ihe  cenIriIugal  pump's 
perIormance,  especially  wiIh  regards  Io  head,  Ilow,  and 
insIallaIion,  IogeIher  wiIh  Ihe  demands  Ior  economical 
operaIion, are only a Iew oI Ihe reasons why so many Iypes 
oI pump exisI. ligure 1.1.3 shows Ihe diIIerenI pump Iypes 
wiIh regard Io Ilow and pressure.
lig. 1.1.2. DiIIerenI kinds oI cenIriIugal pumps
lig. 1.1.1. 1he liquid's Ilow Ihrough Ihe pump
kadiaI fIow pump Mixed fIow pump AxiaI fIow pump
lig. 1.1.3. llow and head Ior diIIerenI Iypes oI cenIriIugal pumps
1 2
2
4
4
6
6
10
1
10
1
2
4
6
10
2
2
4
6
10
3
2
4
6
10
4
H
[m]
D [m
3
Js]
2 4 6 10
2
2 4 6 10
3
2 4 6 10
4
2 4 6 10
5
MuItistage radiaI 
fIow pumps
5ingIe-stage radiaI 
fIow pumps
Mixed fIow pumps 
AxiaI fIow pumps 
8
1.1.2 Pump curves
8eIore  we  dig  any  IurIher  inIo  Ihe  world  oI  pump 
consIrucIion  and  pump  Iypes,  we  will  presenI  Ihe 
basic  characIerisIics  oI  pump  perIormance  curves.  1he 
perIormance  oI  a  cenIriIugal  pump  is  shown  by  a  seI 
oI  perIormance  curves.  1he  perIormance  curves  Ior  a 
cenIriIugal  pump  are  shown  in  Iigure  1.1.4.  Read,  power 
consumpIion, eIIiciency and NPSR are shown as a IuncIion 
oI Ihe Ilow.
Normally,  pump  curves  in  daIa  bookleIs  only  cover  Ihe 
pump  parI.  1hereIore,  Ihe  power  consumpIion,  Ihe  P
2
-
value,  which  is  lisIed  in  Ihe  daIa  bookleIs  as  well,  only 
covers  Ihe  power  going  inIo  Ihe  pump  -  see  Iigure  1.1.4. 
1he  same  goes  Ior  Ihe  eIIiciency  value,  which  only  covers 
Ihe pump parI (q = q
P
).
ln  some  pump  Iypes  wiIh  inIegraIed  moIor  and  possibly 
inIegraIed Irequency converIer, e.g. canned moIor pumps 
(see  secIion  1.2.3),  Ihe  power  consumpIion  curve  and  Ihe 
q-curve cover boIh Ihe moIor and Ihe pump. ln Ihis case iI 
is Ihe P
1
-value IhaI has Io be Iaken inIo accounI.
ln  general,  pump  curves  are  designed  according  Io  lSO 
9906  Annex  A,  which  speciIies  Ihe  Iolerances  oI  Ihe 
curves. 
-  O +]- 9°, 
-  R  +]-7°, 
-  P +9° 
-   -7°.
WhaI Iollows is a brieI presenIaIion oI Ihe diIIerenI pump 
perIormance curves.
Head, the DH-curve
1he  OR-curve  shows  Ihe  head,  which  Ihe  pump  is  able 
Io  perIorm  aI  a  given  Ilow.  Read  is  measured  in  meIer 
liquid  column  |mLCj,  normally  Ihe  uniI  meIer  |mj  is 
applied.  1he  advanIage  oI  using  Ihe  uniI  |mj  as  Ihe  uniI 
oI measuremenI Ior a pump's head is IhaI Ihe OR-curve is 
noI aIIecIed by Ihe Iype oI liquid Ihe pump has Io handle,
see secIion 2.2 Ior more inIormaIion. 
H
[m]

[Z]
50
40
70
£fficiency
60
50
40
20
10
2
12
4
6
8
10
0
30
30
20
10
0
10
0
2
4
6
8
0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 D [m
3
Jh]
P
2
[kW]
NP5H
(m)
Power consumption
NP5H
lig. 1.1.4. 1ypical perIormance curves Ior a cenIriIugal 
pump. Read, power consumpIion, eIhciency and NPSR 
are shown as a IuncIion oI Ihe ßow 
lig. 1.1.S. 1he curves Ior power consumpIion and eIhciency will 
normally only cover Ihe pump parI oI Ihe uniI - i.e. P
2
 and q
P
P
1
P
2
H M

M P
D
H
[m]
50
60
40
30
20
10
0
0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80
D [m
3
Jh]
lig. 1.1.6. A Iypical OR-curve Ior a cenIriIugal pump, 
low ßow resulIs in high head and high ßow resulIs 
in low head
9
£fficiency, the q-curve
1he eIIiciency is Ihe relaIion beIween Ihe supplied power 
and Ihe uIilised amounI oI power. ln Ihe world oI pumps, 
Ihe eIIiciency q
P
 is Ihe relaIion beIween Ihe power, which 
Ihe  pump  delivers  Io  Ihe  waIer  (P
R
)  and  Ihe  power  inpuI 
Io Ihe shaII (P
2
 ). 
where.
µ is Ihe densiIy oI Ihe liquid in kg]m
3

g is Ihe acceleraIion oI graviIy in m]s
2

O is Ihe Ilow in m
3
]s and R is Ihe head in m. 
lor waIer aI 20
o
C and wiIh O measured in m
3
]h and R in m, 
Ihe hydraulic power can be calculaIed as .
As iI appears Irom Ihe eIIiciency curve, Ihe eIIiciency depends 
on Ihe duIy poinI oI Ihe pump. 1hereIore, iI is imporIanI Io 
selecI a pump, which IiIs Ihe Ilow requiremenIs and ensures 
IhaI Ihe pump is working in Ihe mosI eIIicienI Ilow area.

Power consumption, the P
2
-curve
1he relaIion beIween Ihe power consumpIion oI Ihe pump 
and  Ihe  Ilow  is  shown  in  Iigure  1.1.8.  1he  P
2
-curve  oI  mosI 
cenIriIugal pumps is similar Io Ihe one in Iigure 1.1.8 where 
Ihe P
2
 value increases when Ihe Ilow increases.
NP5H-curve (Net Positive 5uction Head)
1he  NPSR-value  oI  a  pump  is  Ihe  minimum  absoluIe 
pressure  (see  secIion  2.2.1)  IhaI  has  Io  be  presenI  aI  Ihe 
sucIion side oI Ihe pump Io avoid caviIaIion. 
1he  NPSR-value  is  measured  in  |mj  and  depends  on  Ihe 
Ilow,  when  Ihe  Ilow  increases,  Ihe  NPSR-value  increases 
as  well,  Iigure  1.1.9.  lor  more  inIormaIion  concerning 
caviIaIion and NPSR, go Io secIion 2.2.1.
50
60
70
80
40
30
20
10
0
0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70
D [m
3
Jh]

[Z]
8
10
6
4
2
0
0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 D [m
3
Jh]
P
2
[kW]
lig. 1.1.7. 1he eIhciency curve oI a Iypical cenIriIugal pump 
 lig. 1.1.8. 1he power consumpIion curve oI a Iypical 
cenIriIugal pump
10
0
2
4
6
8
0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 D [m
3
Jh]
NP5H
[m]
q
p
 =
P
H
 
P
2
=
µ 
.
 g 


.
 H
P

 lig. 1.1.9. 1he NPSR-curve oI a Iypical cenIriIugal pump
P
H
 = 2.72 
.
 D 
.
 H [W]
10
5ection 1.1 
Pump construction
1.1.3 Characteristics of the 
centrifugaI pump
1he  cenIriIugal  pump  has  several  characIerisIics  and  in 
Ihis  secIion,  we  will  presenI  Ihe  mosI  imporIanI  ones.
LaIer  on  in  Ihis  chapIer  we  will  give  a  more  Ihorough 
descripIion oI Ihe diIIerenI pump Iypes. 
-  1he number cf stages
Depending  on  Ihe  number  oI  impellers  in  Ihe  pump,  a 
cenIriIugal  pump  can  be  eiIher  a  single-sIage  pump  or  a 
mulIisIage pump.
-  1he pcsiticn cf the pump shaft
Single-sIage  and  mulIisIage  pumps  come  wiIh  horizonIal 
or  verIical  pump  shaIIs.  1hese  pumps  are  normally 
designaIed  horizonIal  or  verIical  pumps.  lor  more 
inIormaIion, go Io secIion 1.1.4.
-  SingIe-sucticn cr dcubIe-sucticn impeIIers
Depending on Ihe consIrucIion oI Ihe impeller, a pump can 
be IiIIed wiIh eiIher a single-sucIion impeller or a double-
sucIion impeller. lor more inIormaIion, go Io secIion 1.1.S.
-  CcupIing cf stages
1he pump sIages can be arranged in Iwo diIIerenI ways. in 
series and in parallel, see Iigure 1.1.10.
-  Ccnstructicn cf the pump casing
We disIinguish beIween Iwo Iypes oI pump casing. voluIe 
casing  and  reIurn  channel  casing  wiIh  guide  vanes.  lor 
more inIormaIion, go Io secIion 1.1.6. 
lig 1.1.10. 1win pump wiIh parallel-coupled impellers
11
1.1.4 Most common end-suction and in-Iine pump types
£nd-suction pump  =  1he Iiquid runs directIy into the impeIIer. InIet and outIet have a 
    90° angIe. 5ee section 1.1.9
In-Iine pump  =  1he Iiquid runs directIy through the pump in-Iine. 1he suction pipe and the discharge 
    pipe are pIaced opposite one another and can be mounted directIy in the piping system
5pIit-case pump  =  Pump with an axiaIIy divided pump housing. 5ee section 1.2.2
HorizontaI pump  =  Pump with a horizontaI pump shaft
VerticaI pump  =  Pump with a verticaI pump shaft
5ingIe-stage pump  =  Pump with a singIe impeIIer. 5ee section 1.1.7
MuItistage pump  =  Pump with severaI series-coupIed stages. 5ee section 1.1.8
Long-coupIed pump  =  Pump connected to the motor by means of a fIexibIe coupIing. 1he motor and 
    the pump have separate bearing constructions. 5ee section 1.1.9
CIose-coupIed pump  =  A pump connected to the motor by means of a rigid coupIing. 5ee section 1.1.9
HorizontaI               
CIose-coupIed CIose-coupIed
£nd-suction
5ingIe-stage
Long-coupIed
MuItistage
12
5ection 1.1 
Pump construction
13
MuItistage
HorizontaI J VerticaI
5ingIe-stage
Long-coupIed CIose-coupIed CIose-coupIed
In-Iine
5pIit-case 
5ingIe-stage
Long-coupIed
HorizontaI  
14
1.1.5 ImpeIIer types (axiaI forces)
A  cenIriIugal  pump  generaIes  pressure  IhaI  exerIs  Iorces 
on boIh sIaIionary and roIaIing parIs oI Ihe pump. 
Pump  parIs  are  made  Io  wiIhsIand  Ihese  Iorces. 
lI  axial  and  radial  Iorces  are  noI  counIerbalanced  in  Ihe 
pump, Ihe Iorces have Io be Iaken inIo consideraIion when 
selecIing Ihe driving sysIem Ior Ihe pump (angular conIacI 
bearings in Ihe moIor). ln pumps IiIIed wiIh single-sucIion 
impeller,  large  axial  Iorces  may  occur,  Iigures  1.1.11  and 
1.1.12.  1hese  Iorces  are  balanced  in  one  oI  Ihe  Iollowing 
ways.
·  Mechanically by means oI IhrusI bearings. 1hese Iypes  
  oI bearings are specially designed Io absorb Ihe axial    
  Iorces Irom Ihe impellers
·  8y means oI balancing holes on Ihe impeller,  
  see Iigure 1.1.13
·  8y means oI IhroIIle regulaIion Irom a seal ring 
  mounIed on Ihe back oI Ihe impellers, see Iigure 1.1.14
·  Dynamic impacI Irom Ihe back oI Ihe impeller, see 
  Iigure 1.1.1S
· 1he axial impacI on Ihe pump can be avoided by eiIher
   using double-sucIion impellers (see Iigure 1.1.16). 
lig. 1.1.11. Single-sucIion 
impeller
lig. 1.1.12. SIandard pump wiIh 
single-sucIion impeller
lig. 1.1.13. 8alancing Ihe axial Iorces 
in a single-sIage cenIriIugal pump 
wiIh balancing holes only
lig. 1.1.14. 8alancing Ihe axial Iorces 
in a single-sIage cenIriIugal pump 
wiIh sealing gap aI discharge side and 
balancing holes
lig.  1.1.1S.  8alancing  Ihe  axial  Iorces  in 
a  single-sIage  cenIriIugal  pump  wiIh 
blades on Ihe back oI Ihe impellers
lig. 1.1.16. 8alancing Ihe axial 
Iorces in a double-sucIion 
impeller arrangemenI
Axial Iorces
5ection 1.1 
Pump construction
1.1.6 Casing types (radiaI forces)
kadial  Iorces  are  a  resulI  oI  Ihe  sIaIic  pressure  in  Ihe 
casing.  1hereIore,  axial  deIlecIions  may  occur  and  lead 
Io  inIerIerence  beIween  Ihe  impeller  and  Ihe  casing.  1he 
magniIude and Ihe direcIion oI Ihe radial Iorce depend on 
Ihe Ilow raIe and Ihe head.
When  designing  Ihe  casing  Ior  Ihe  pump,  iI  is  possible 
Io  conIrol  Ihe  hydraulic  radial  Iorces.  1wo  casing  Iypes 
are  worIh  menIioning.  Ihe  single-voluIe  casing  and  Ihe 
double-voluIe  casing.  As  you  can  Iell  Irom  Iigure  1.1.18, 
boIh casings are shaped as a voluIe. 1he diIIerence beIween 
Ihem is, IhaI Ihe double-voluIe has an guide vane. 
1he  single-voluIe  pump  is  characIerised  by  a  symmeIric 
pressure  in  Ihe  voluIe  aI  Ihe  opIimum  eIIiciency  poinI, 
which  leads  Io  zero  radial  load.  AI  all  oIher  poinIs, 
Ihe  pressure  around  Ihe  impeller  is  noI  regular  and 
consequenIly a radial Iorce is presenI. 
As  you  can  Iell  Irom  Iigure  1.1.19,  Ihe  double-voluIe  casing 
develops a consIanI low radial reacIion Iorce aI any capaciIy.
keIurn channels (Iigure 1.1.20) are used in mulIisIage pumps 
and  have  Ihe  same  basic  IuncIion  as  voluIe  casings.  1he 
liquid  is  led  Irom  one  impeller  Io  Ihe  nexI  and  aI  Ihe  same 
Iime,  Ihe  roIaIion  oI  waIer  is  reduced  and  Ihe  dynamic 
pressure  is  IransIormed  inIo  sIaIic  pessure.  8ecause  oI  Ihe 
reIurn  channel  casing's  circular  design,  no  radial  Iorces  are 
presenI. 
1.1.7 5ingIe-stage pumps
Generally,  single-sIage  pumps  are  used  in  applicaIions, 
which  do  noI  require  a  IoIal  head  oI  more  Ihan  1S0  m. 
Normally,  single-sIage  pumps  operaIe  in  Ihe  inIerval  oI 
2-100 m.
Single-sIage  pumps  are  characIerised  by  providing  a  low 
head relaIive Io Ihe Ilow, see Iigure 1.1.3. 1he single-sIage 
pump comes in boIh a verIical and a horizonIal design, see 
Iigures 1.1.21 and 1.1.22.
1S
DJDopt 1.0
VoIute casing
DoubIe-voIute
casing
k
a
d
i
a
I
 f
o
r
c
e
 
lig. 1.1.18. Single-voluIe casing                  Double-voluIe casing
lig. 1.1.22. verIical single-sIage 
in-line close-coupled pump
lig.  1.1.21.  RorizonIal  single-sIage 
end-sucIion close-coupled pump
kadiaI forces lig. 1.1.17.  Single-sucIion 
impeller
lig. 1.1.19. kadial Iorce Ior single- and double-voluIe casing
lig. 1.1.20. verIical mulIisIage
in-line pump wiIh reIurn 
channel casing
keIurn channel
lig. 1.1.2S. Long-coupled pump 
wiIh basic coupling
lig. 1.1.26. Long-coupled pump wiIh spacer coupling 
16
1.1.8 MuItistage pumps
MulIisIage  pumps  are  used  in  insIallaIions  where  a  high 
head is needed. Several sIages are connecIed in series and 
Ihe Ilow is guided Irom Ihe ouIleI oI one sIage Io Ihe inleI 
oI  Ihe  nexI.  1he  Iinal  head  IhaI  a  mulIisIage  pump  can 
deliver  is  equal  Io  Ihe  sum  oI  pressure  each  oI  Ihe  sIages 
can provide.
1he  advanIage  oI  mulIisIage  pumps  is  IhaI  Ihey  provide 
high head relaIive Io Ihe Ilow. Like Ihe single-sIage pump, 
Ihe  mulIisIage  pump  is  available  in  boIh  a  verIical  and  a 
horizonIal version, see Iigures 1.1.23 and 1.1.24.
1.1.9 Long-coupIed and cIose-coupIed 
pumps
lcng-ccupIed pumps
Long-coupled  pumps  are  pumps  wiIh  a  Ilexible  coupling 
IhaI  connecIs  Ihe  pump  and  Ihe  moIor.  1his  kind  oI 
coupling  is  available  eiIher  as  a  basic  coupling  or  as  a 
spacer coupling.
lI Ihe pump is connecIed Io Ihe moIor by a basic coupling, 
iI  is  necessary  Io  dismounI  Ihe  moIor  when  Ihe  pump 
needs service. 1hereIore, iI is necessary Io align Ihe pump 
upon mounIing, see Iigure 1.1.2S.
On  Ihe  oIher  hand,  iI  Ihe  pump  is  IiIIed  wiIh  a  spacer 
coupling,  iI  is  possible  Io  service  Ihe  pump  wiIhouI 
dismounIing  Ihe  moIor.  AlignmenI  is  Ihus  noI  an  issue, 
see Iigure 1.1.26.
CIcse-ccupIed pumps
Close-coupled  pumps  can  be  consIrucIed  in  Ihe  Iollowing 
Iwo  ways.  LiIher  Ihe  pump  has  Ihe  impeller  mounIed 
direcIly  on  Ihe  exIended  moIor  shaII  or  Ihe  pump  has  a 
sIandard moIor and a rigid or a spacer coupling, see Iigures 
1.1.27 and 1.1.28.  
lig. 1.1.24. RorizonIal mulIisIage 
end-sucIion pump
lig. 1.1.23. verIical 
mulIisIage in-line pump
lig.  1.1.27.  Close-coupled  pump  wiIh 
rigid coupling
8asic coupIing 
type
Long-coupled 
pump wiIh 
Ilexible coupling
Close-coupled 
pump wiIh 
rigid coupling
5pacer coupIing 
(option)
lig. 1.1.28. DiIIerenI coupling Iypes
5ection 1.1 
Pump construction
17
lig. 1.2.1. Long-coupled sIandard pump
lig. 1.2.2. 8are shaII sIandard pump
lig. 1.2.3. Long-coupled spliI-case pump
lig. 1.2.4. SpliI-case pump 
wiIh double-sucIion impeller
1.2.1 5tandard pumps
lew inIernaIional sIandards deal wiIh cenIriIugal pumps. 
ln  IacI,  many  counIries  have  Iheir  own  sIandards,  which 
more  or  less  overlap  one  anoIher.  A  sIandard  pump  is 
a  pump  IhaI  complies  wiIh  oIIicial  regulaIions  as  Io  Ior 
example Ihe pump's duIy poinI. WhaI Iollows, are a couple 
oI examples oI inIernaIional sIandards Ior pumps.
·  LN 733 (DlN 242SS) applies Io end-sucIion cenIriIugal    
  pumps, also known as sIandard waIer pumps wiIh a    
  raIed pressure (PN) oI 10 bar.
 
·  LN 228S8 (lSO 28S8) applies Io cenIriIugal pumps, also
   known as sIandard chemical pumps wiIh a raIed    
  pressure (PN) oI 16 bar, see appendix K.
1he  sIandards  menIioned  above  cover  Ihe  insIallaIion 
dimensions  and  Ihe  duIy  poinIs  oI  Ihe  diIIerenI  pump 
Iypes. As Io Ihe hydraulic parIs oI Ihese pump Iypes, Ihey 
vary according Io Ihe manuIacIurer - Ihus, no inIernaIional 
sIandards are seI Ior Ihese parIs.
Pumps, which are designed according Io sIandards, provide 
Ihe end-user wiIh advanIages wiIh regard Io service, spare 
parIs and mainIenance. 
1.2.2 5pIit-case pumps
A  spliI-case  pump  is  a  pump  wiIh  Ihe  pump  housing 
divided axially inIo Iwo parIs. ligure 1.2.4 shows a single-
sIage  spliI-case  pump  wiIh  a  double-sucIion  impeller. 
1he  double-inleI  consIrucIion  eliminaIes  Ihe  axial 
Iorces  and  ensures  a  longer  liIe  span  oI  Ihe  bearings. 
Usually,  spliI-case  pumps  have  a  raIher  high  eIIiciency, 
are  easy  Io  service  and  have  a  wide  perIormance  range. 
5ection 1.2 
1ypes of pumps
5ection 1.2 
1ypes of pumps
18
1.2.3 HermeticaIIy seaIed pumps
lI comes as no surprise IhaI a pump's shaII lead-in has Io be 
sealed. Usually, Ihis is done by means oI a mechanical shaII 
seal,  see  Iigure  1.2.S.  1he  disadvanIage  oI  Ihe  mechanical 
shaII seal is iIs poor properIies when iI comes Io handling 
oI  Ioxic  and  aggressive  liquids,  which  consequenIly  leads 
Io  leakage.  1hese  problems  can  Io  some  exIenI  be  solved 
by using a double mechanical shaII seal. AnoIher soluIion 
Io Ihese problems is Io use a hermeIically sealed pump. 
We  disIinguish  beIween  Iwo  Iypes  oI  hermeIically  sealed 
pumps. Canned moIor pumps and magneIic-driven pumps. 
ln  Ihe  Iollowing  Iwo  secIions,  you  can  Iind  addiIional 
inIormaIion abouI Ihese pumps.
Canned motor pumps 
A canned moIor pump is a hermeIically sealed pump wiIh 
Ihe moIor and pump inIegraIed in one uniI wiIhouI a seal, 
see Iigures 1.2.6 and 1.2.7. 1he pumped liquid is allowed Io 
enIer Ihe roIor chamber IhaI is separaIed Irom Ihe sIaIor 
by a Ihin roIor can. 1he roIor can serves as a hermeIically 
sealed barrier beIween Ihe liquid and Ihe moIor. Chemical 
pumps  are  made  oI  maIerials,  e.g.  plasIics  or  sIainless 
sIeel IhaI can wiIhsIand aggressive liquids.   
1he  mosI  common  canned  moIor  pump  Iype  is  Ihe 
circulaIor  pump.  1his  Iype  oI  pump  is  Iypically  used  in 
heaIing  circuiIs  because  Ihe  consIrucIion  provides  low 
noise and mainIenance-Iree operaIion.
lig. 1.2.S. Lxample oI a sIandard pump wiIh mechanical shaII seal
Liquid
AImosphere
Seal
lig. 1.2.7. CirculaIor pump 
wiIh canned moIor
MoIor can
lig. 1.2.6. Chemical pump wiIh canned moIor
MoIor can
Magnetic-driven pumps
ln  recenI  years,  magneIic-driven  pumps  have  become 
increasingly  popular  Ior  IransIerring  aggressive  and  Ioxic 
liquids. 
As  shown  in  Iigure  1.2.8,  Ihe  magneIic-driven  pump  is 
made  oI  Iwo  groups  oI  magneIs,  an  inner  magneI  and 
an ouIer magneI. A non-magneIizable can separaIe Ihese 
Iwo groups. 1he can serves as a hermeIically sealed barrier 
beIween  Ihe  liquid  and  Ihe  aImosphere.  As  iI  appears 
Irom  Iigure  1.2.9,  Ihe  ouIer  magneI  is  connecIed  Io  Ihe 
pump  drive  and  Ihe  inner  magneI  is  connecIed  Io  Ihe 
pump  shaII.  Rereby  Ihe  Iorque  Irom  Ihe  pump  drive  is 
IransmiIIed Io Ihe pump shaII. 1he pumped liquid serves 
as  lubricanI  Ior  Ihe  bearings  in  Ihe  pump.  1hereIore, 
suIIicienI venIing is crucial Ior Ihe bearings.
19
lig. 1.2.8. ConsIrucIion oI magneIic drive
lig. 1.2.9. MagneIic-driven mulIisIage pump
Can
lnner magneIs OuIer magneIs
Can
lnner magneIs
OuIer magneIs
20
lig. 1.2.10. SaniIary pump
lig.1.2.11. SaniIary selI-priming side-channel pump
1.2.4 5anitary pumps
SaniIary  pumps  are  mainly  used  in  Ihe  Iood,  beverage, 
pharmaceuIical  and  bio-Iechnological  indusIries  where  iI 
is imporIanI IhaI Ihe pumped liquid is handled in a genIle 
manner and IhaI Ihe pumps are easy Io clean.
ln order Io meeI process requiremenIs in Ihese indusIries, 
Ihe  pumps  have  Io  have  a  surIace  roughness  beIween 
3.2  and  0.4  µm  ka.    1his  can  be  besI  achieved  by  using 
Iorged  or  deep-drawn  rolled  sIainless  sIeel  as  maIerials 
oI  consIrucIion,  see  Iigure  1.2.12.  1hese  maIerials  have  a 
compacI pore-Iree surIace Iinish IhaI can be easily worked 
up Io meeI Ihe various surIace Iinish requiremenIs.
1he main IeaIures oI a saniIary pump are ease oI cleaning 
and ease oI mainIenance.
1he  leading  manuIacIurers  oI  saniIary  pumps  have 
designed Iheir producIs Io meeI Ihe Iollowing sIandards.
                 
£H£DC  -  £uropean Hygienic £quipment Design Croup
DHD   -  DuaIified Hygienic Design
3-A    -  5anitary 5tandards:
    3A0J3A1: IndustriaIJHygienic 5tandard 
    ka s 3.2 µm
    3A2: 5teriIe 5tandard 
    ka s 0.8 µm
    3A3: 5teriIe 5tandard 
    ka s 0.4 µm
Sand casIing
Precision casIing
kolled sIeel
lig.1.2.12. koughness oI maIerial surIaces
5ection 1.2 
1ypes of pumps
1.2.5 Wastewater pumps
A  wasIewaIer  pump  is  an  enclosed  uniI  wiIh  a  pump 
and  a  moIor.  Due  Io  Ihis  consIrucIion  Ihe  wasIewaIer 
pump  is  suiIable  Ior  submersible  insIallaIion  in  piIs. 
ln  submersible  insIallaIions  wiIh  auIo-coupling  sysIems 
double  rails  are  normally  used.  1he  auIo-coupling  sysIem 
IaciliIaIes  mainIenance,  repair  and  replacemenI  oI  Ihe 
pump.  8ecause  oI  Ihe  consIrucIion  oI  Ihe  pump,  iI  is 
noI  necessary  Io  enIer  Ihe  piI  Io  carry  ouI  service.  ln 
IacI,  iI  is  possible  Io  connecI  and  disconnecI  Ihe  pump 
auIomaIically  Irom  Ihe  ouIside  oI  Ihe  piI.  WasIewaIer 
pumps  can  also  be  insIalled  dry  like  convenIional  pumps 
in verIical or horizonIal insIallaIions. Likewise Ihis Iype oI 
insIallaIion  provides  easy  mainIenance  and  repair  like  iI 
provides  uninIerrupIed  operaIion  oI  Ihe  pump  in  case  oI 
Ilooding oI Ihe dry piI, see Iigure 1.2.14. 
Normally, wasIewaIer pumps have Io be able Io handle large 
parIicles. 1hereIore Ihey are IiIIed wiIh special impellers IhaI 
make iI possible Io avoid blockage and clogging. DiIIerenI 
Iypes oI impellers exisI, single-channel impellers, double-
channel  impellers  Ihree  and  Iour-channel  impellers  and 
vorIex impellers. ligure 1.2.1S shows Ihe diIIerenI designs oI 
Ihese impellers.
WasIewaIer pumps usually come wiIh a dry moIor, which 
is  lP68  proIecIed  (Ior  more  inIormaIion  on  lP-classes, 
go  Io  secIion  1.4.1).  MoIor  and  pump  have  a  common 
exIended shaII wiIh a double mechanical shaII seal sysIem 
in an inIermediaIe oil chamber, see Iigure 1.2.13.
WasIewaIer pumps are able Io operaIe eiIher inIermiIIenIly 
or conIinuously depending on Ihe insIallaIion in quesIion. 
 
lig. 1.2.14. WasIewaIer pump Ior dry insIallaIions
lig. 1.2.1S. lmpeller Iypes Ior wasIewaIer
vorIex 
impeller
Single-channel 
impeller
Double-channel 
impeller
21
lig.1.2.13. DeIail oI a sewage pump 
Ior weI insIallaIions
1.2.6 ImmersibIe pumps
An immersible pump is a pump Iype where Ihe pump parI 
is  immersed  in  Ihe  pumped  liquid  and  Ihe  moIor  is  kepI 
dry.  Normally,  immersible  pumps  are  mounIed  on  Iop  oI 
or  in  Ihe  wall  oI  Ianks  or  conIainers.  lmmersible  pumps 
are  Ior  example  used  in  Ihe  machine  Iool  indusIry  Ior 
example  in  spark  machine  Iools,  grinding  machines, 
machining  cenIres  and  cooling  uniIs  or  in  oIher  indusIrial 
applicaIions  involving  Ianks  or  conIainers,  such  as 
indusIrial washing and IilIering sysIems.
Pumps  Ior  machine  Iools  can  be  divided  in  Iwo  groups. 
Pumps  Ior  Ihe  clean  side  oI  Ihe  IilIer  and  pumps  Ior  Ihe 
dirIy  side  oI  Ihe  IilIer.  Pumps  wiIh  closed  impellers  are 
normally used Ior Ihe clean side oI Ihe IilIer, because Ihey 
provide a high eIIiciency and a high pressure iI necessary. 
Pumps  wiIh  open  or  semi-open  impellers  are  normally 
used  Ior  Ihe  dirIy  side  oI  Ihe  IilIer,  because  Ihey  can 
handle meIal chips and parIicles. 
lig. 1.2.16. lmmersible pump
22
5ection 1.2 
1ypes of pumps
1.2.7 8orehoIe pumps
1wo  Iypes  oI  borehole  pumps  exisI.  1he  submerged 
borehole  pump  Iype  wiIh  a  submersible  moIor,  and  Ihe 
deep  well  pump  wiIh  a  dry  moIor,  which  is  connecIed 
Io  Ihe  pump  by  a  long  shaII.  1hese  pumps  are  normally 
used in connecIion wiIh waIer supply and irrigaIion. 8oIh 
pump  Iypes  are  made  Io  be  insIalled  in  deep  and  narrow 
boreholes and have Ihus a reduced diameIer, which makes 
Ihem longer Ihan oIher pump Iypes, see Iigure 1.2.17.
1he  borehole  pumps  are  specially  designed  Io  be 
submerged  in  a  liquid  and  are  Ihus  IiIIed  wiIh  a 
submersible  moIor,  which  is  lP68  proIecIed.  1he  pump 
comes in boIh a single-sIage and a mulIisIage version (Ihe 
mulIisIage  version  being  Ihe  mosI  common  one),  and  is 
IiIIed wiIh a non-reIurn valve in Ihe pump head. 
1oday, Ihe deep well pump has been more or less replaced 
by  Ihe  submerged  pump  Iype.  1he  long  shaII  oI  Ihe  deep 
well  pump  is  a  drawback,  which  makes  iI  diIIiculI  Io 
insIall and carry ouI service. 8ecause Ihe deep well pump 
moIor  is  air-cooled,  Ihe  pump  is  oIIen  used  in  indusIrial 
applicaIions  Io  pump  hoI  waIer  Irom  open  Ianks.  1he 
submersible  pump  cannoI  handle  as  high  IemperaIures 
because  Ihe  moIor  is  submerged  in  Ihe  liquid,  which  has 
Io cool iI. 
lig. 1.2.17. Submersible pump
23
1.2.8 Positive dispIacement pumps
1he posiIive displacemenI pump provides an approximaIe 
consIanI  Ilow  aI  Iixed  speed,  despiIe  changes  in  Ihe 
counIerpressure. 1wo main Iypes oI posiIive displacemenI 
pumps exisI.
·  koIary pumps
·  keciprocaIing pumps
1he  diIIerence  in  perIormance  beIween  a  cenIriIugal 
pump,  a  roIary  pump  and  a  reciprocaIing  is  illusIraIed 
Io  Ihe  righI,  Iigure  1.2.18.  Depending  on  which  oI  Ihese 
pumps you are dealing wiIh, a small change in Ihe pump's 
counIerpressure  resulIs  in  diIIerences  in  Ihe  Ilow.
1he  Ilow  oI  a  cenIriIugal  pump  will  change  considerably, 
Ihe  Ilow  oI  a  roIary  pump  will  change  a  liIIle,  while  Ihe 
Ilow  oI  a  reciprocaIing  pump  will  hardly  change  aI  all. 
8uI,  why  is  Ihere  a  diIIerence  beIween  Ihe  pump  curves 
Ior  reciprocaIing  pumps  and  roIary  pumps!  1he  acIual 
seal  Iace  surIace  is  larger  Ior  roIary  pumps  Ihan  Ior 
reciprocaIing pumps. So, even Ihough Ihe Iwo pumps are 
designed  wiIh  Ihe  same  Iolerances,  Ihe  gap  loss  oI  Ihe 
roIary pump is larger. 
1he pumps are  Iypically designed wiIh Ihe IinesI Iolerances 
possible  Io  obIain  Ihe  highesI  possible  eIIiciency  and 
sucIion capabiliIy. Rowever, in some cases, iI is necessary 
Io  increase  Ihe  Iolerances,  Ior  example  when  Ihe  pumps 
have  Io  handle  highly  viscous  liquids,  liquids  conIaining 
parIicles and liquids oI high IemperaIure.   
PosiIive  displacemenI  pumps  are  pulsaIe,  meaning  IhaI 
Iheir volume Ilow wiIhin a cycle is noI consIanI.
1he variaIion in Ilow and speed leads Io pressure IlucIuaIions 
due Io resisIance in Ihe pipe sysIem and in valves. 
O
R
R
2 3
1
3
2 1
lig. 1.2.19. ClassiIicaIion oI posiIive displacemenI pumps
5impIex
DupIex
5impIex
DupIex
1ripIex
MuItipIex
lig. 1.2.18. 1ypical relaIion beIween 
Ilow and head Ior 3 diIIerenI pump Iypes. 
1) CenIriIugal pumps 
2) koIary pumps
3) keciprocaIing pumps
24
5ection 1.2 
1ypes of pumps
keciprocating
kotary
PIunger
Diaphragm 5team             DoubIe-acting
Power
5ingIe-acting
DoubIe-acting
Cear
Lobe
CircumferentiaI piston
5crew
Vane
Piston
fIexibIe member
5crew
5ingIe rotor
MuItipIe rotor
Positive 
dispIacement 
pumps
+
Dosing pumps
1he  dosing  pump  belongs  Io  Ihe  posiIive  displacemenI 
pump Iamily and is Iypically oI Ihe  diaphragm Iype. Diaphragm 
pumps  are  leakage-Iree,  because  Ihe  diaphragm  Iorms 
a seal beIween Ihe liquid and Ihe surroundings. 
1he diaphragm pump is IiIIed wiIh Iwo non-reIurn valves 
-  one  on  Ihe  sucIion  side  and  one  on  Ihe  discharge  side 
oI Ihe pump. ln connecIion wiIh smaller diaphragm pumps, 
Ihe diaphragm is acIivaIed by Ihe connecIing rod, which is 
connecIed  Io  an  elecIromagneI.  1hereby  Ihe  coil  receives 
Ihe exacI amounI oI sIrokes needed, see Iigure 1.2.21.
ln  connecIion  wiIh  larger  diaphragm  pumps  Ihe 
diaphragm  is  Iypically  mounIed  on  Ihe  connecIing  rod, 
which  is  acIivaIed  by  a  camshaII.    1he  camshaII  is  Iurned  by 
means oI a sIandard asynchronous moIor, see Iigure 1.2.22.
1he  Ilow  oI  a  diaphragm  pump  is  ad|usIed  by  eiIher 
changing  Ihe  sIroke  lengIh  and]or  Ihe  Irequency  oI  Ihe 
sIrokes.  lI  iI  is  necessary  Io  enlarge  Ihe  operaIing  area, 
Irequency  converIers  can  be  connecIed  Io  Ihe  larger 
diaphragm pumps, see Iigure 1.2.22.
¥eI,  anoIher  kind  oI  diaphragm  pump  exisIs.  ln  Ihis  case, 
Ihe  diaphragm  is  acIivaIed  by  means  oI  an  excenIrically 
driven  connecIing  rod  powered  by  a  sIepper  moIor  or  a 
synchronous  moIor,  Iigures  1.2.20  and  1.2.23.  8y  using  a 
sIepper moIor drive Ihe pump's dynamic area is increased 
and  iIs  accuracy  is  improved  considerably.  WiIh  Ihis 
consIrucIion iI is no longer necessary Io ad|usI Ihe pump's 
sIroke  lengIh  because  Ihe  connecIion  rod  is  mounIed 
direcIly on Ihe diaphragm. 1he resulI is opIimised sucIion 
condiIions and excellenI operaIion IeaIures.
So  IhereIore,  iI  is  simple  Io  conIrol  boIh  Ihe  sucIion 
side  and  Ihe  discharge  side  oI  Ihe  pump.    Compared  Io 
IradiIional  elecIromagneIic-driven  diaphragm  pumps 
which  provide  powerIul  pulsaIions,  sIepper  moIor-driven 
diaphragm  pumps  make  iI  possible  Io  geI  a  much  more 
sIeady dosage oI addiIive.
lig.1.2.21. Solenoid spring reIurn
1.2.22. Cam-drive spring reIurn
1.2.23. Crank drive
lig. 1.2.20. Dosing pump
+
2S
Chapter 1. Design of pumps and motors
Secticn 1.3: MechanicaI shaft seaIs 
1.3.1   1he mechanical shaII seal's componenIs 
  and IuncIion
1.3.2   8alanced and unbalanced shaII seals
1.3.3   1ypes oI mechanical shaII seals
1.3.4   Seal Iace maIerial combinaIions
1.3.S   lacIors aIIecIing Ihe seal perIormance
5ection 1.3
MechanicaI shaft seaIs
lrom Ihe middle oI Ihe 19S0s mechanical shaII seals 
gained ground in Iavour oI Ihe IradiIional sealing meIhod 
- Ihe sIuIIing box. Compared Io sIuIIing boxes, mechani-
cal shaII seals provide Ihe Iollowing advanIages. 
-  1hey keep IighI aI smaller displacemenIs and vibraIions 
  in Ihe shaII
-  1hey do noI require any ad|usImenI
-  Seal Iaces provide a small amounI oI IricIion and Ihus,    
  minimise Ihe power loss
-  1he shaII does noI slide againsI any oI Ihe seal's    
  componenIs and Ihus, is noI damaged because oI 
  wear (reduced repair cosIs).
1he  mechanical  shaII  seal  is  Ihe  parI  oI  a  pump  IhaI 
separaIes  Ihe  liquid  Irom  Ihe  aImosphere.  ln  Iigure  1.3.1 
you  can  see  a  couple  oI  examples  where  Ihe  mechanical 
shaII seal is mounIed in diIIerenI Iypes oI  pumps.
1he ma|oriIy oI mechanical shaII seals are made 
according Io Ihe Luropean sIandard LN 127S6. 
8eIore choosing a shaII seal, Ihere are cerIain Ihings 
you need Io know abouI Ihe liquid and Ihus Ihe 
seal's resisIance Io Ihe liquid.
-  DeIermine Ihe Iype oI liquid 
-  DeIermine Ihe pressure IhaI Ihe shaII seal is exposed Io
-  DeIermine Ihe speed IhaI Ihe shaII seal is exposed Io
-  DeIermine Ihe builI-in dimensions
On Ihe Iollowing pages we will presenI how a mechanical shaII 
seal works, Ihe diIIerenI Iypes oI seal, which kind oI maIerials 
mechanical  shaII  seals  are  made  oI  and  which  IacIors  IhaI 
aIIecI Ihe mechanical shaII seal's perIormance.  
28
lig. 1.3.1. Pumps wiIh mechanical shaII seals
1.3.1 1he mechanicaI shaft seaI's 
components and function
1he mechanical shaII seal is made oI Iwo main componenIs. 
a roIaIing parI and a sIaIionary parI, and consisIs oI Ihe parIs 
lisIed  in  Iigure  1.3.2.  ligure  1.3.3  shows  where  Ihe  diIIerenI 
parIs are placed in Ihe seal.
-  1he sIaIionary parI oI Ihe seal is Iixed in Ihe pump    
    housing. 1he roIaIing parI oI Ihe seal is Iixed on Ihe    
    pump shaII and roIaIes when Ihe pump operaIes.
-  1he Iwo primary seal Iaces are pushed againsI each oIher    
  by Ihe spring and Ihe liquid pressure. During operaIion    
  a liquid Iilm is produced in Ihe narrow gap beIween Ihe 
  Iwo seal Iaces. 1his Iilm evaporaIes beIore iI enIers Ihe    
  aImosphere, making Ihe mechanical shaII seal liquid IighI,
  see Iigure 1.3.4.
-  Secondary seals prevenI leakage Irom occurring      
  beIween Ihe assembly and Ihe shaII.
-  1he spring presses Ihe seal Iaces IogeIher mechanically.
-  1he spring reIainer IransmiIs Iorque Irom Ihe shaII Io    
  Ihe seal. ln connecIion wiIh mechanical bellows shaII    
  seals, Iorque is IransIerred direcIly Ihrough Ihe bellows. 
   
5eaI gap
During  operaIion  Ihe  liquid  Iorms  a  lubricaIing  Iilm 
beIween  Ihe  seal  Iaces.  1his  lubricaIing  Iilm  consisIs  oI  a 
hydrosIaIic and a hydrodynamic Iilm.
-  1he hydrosIaIic elemenI is generaIed by Ihe pumped  
  liquid which is Iorced inIo Ihe gap beIween Ihe seal Iaces.
-  1he hydrodynamic lubricaIing Iilm is creaIed by     
  pressure generaIed by Ihe shaII's roIaIion. 
lig. 1.3.4. Mechanical shaII seal in operaIion
Lubrication fiIm
Liquid force
5pring force
Vapour
£vaporation
begins
lig. 1.3.3. Main componenIs oI Ihe 
mechanical shaII seal
kotating part
5tationary part
5haft
Primary seaI
5econdary seaI
Primary seaI
5econdary seaI
5pring
5pring retainer
MechanicaI shaft seaI Designaticn
Seal face (primary seal)
Secondary seal
Spring
Spring retainer (torque transmission)
Seat (seal faces, primary seal)
Static seal (secondary seal)
Potating part
Stationary part
lig. 1.3.2. 1he mechanical shaII seal's componenIs 
29
1.3.2 8aIanced and unbaIanced shaft seaIs
1o  obIain  an  accepIable  Iace  pressure  beIween  Ihe 
primary seal Iaces, Iwo kind oI seal Iypes exisI. a balanced 
shaII seal and an unbalanced shaII seal.
8aIanced shaft seaI
ligure  1.3.6  shows  a  balanced  shaII  seal  indicaIing  where 
Ihe Iorces inIeracI on Ihe seal. 
UnbaIanced shaft seaI
ligure  1.3.7  shows  an  unbalanced  shaII  seal  indicaIing 
where Ihe Iorces inIeracI on Ihe seal.
 
Several  diIIerenI  Iorces  have  an  axial  impacI  on  Ihe  seal 
Iaces.  1he  spring  Iorce  and  Ihe  hydraulic  Iorce  Irom  Ihe 
pumped liquid press Ihe seal IogeIher while Ihe Iorce Irom 
Ihe  lubricaIing  Iilm  in  Ihe  seal  gap  counIeracIs  Ihis.  ln 
connecIion  wiIh  high  liquid  pressure,  Ihe  hydraulic  Iorces 
can be so powerIul IhaI Ihe lubricanI in Ihe seal gap cannoI 
counIeracI Ihe conIacI beIween Ihe seal Iaces. 8ecause Ihe 
hydraulic Iorce is proporIionaIe Io Ihe area IhaI Ihe liquid 
pressure  aIIecIs,  Ihe  axial  impacI  can  only  be  reduced  by 
obIaining a reducIion oI Ihe pressure-loaded area.
1he Ihickness oI Ihe lubricaIing Iilm depends on Ihe pump 
speed,  Ihe  liquid  IemperaIure,  Ihe  viscosiIy  oI  Ihe  liquid 
and  Ihe  axial  Iorces  oI  Ihe  mechanical  shaII  seal.  1he 
liquid is conIinuously changed in Ihe seal gap because oI 
-  evaporaIion oI Ihe liquid Io Ihe aImosphere
-  Ihe liquid's circular movemenI
ligure  1.3.S  shows  Ihe  opIimum  raIio  beIween  Iine 
lubricaIion properIies and limiIed leakage.  As you can Iell, 
Ihe opIimum raIio is when Ihe lubricaIing Iilm covers Ihe 
enIire seal gap, excepI Ior a very narrow evaporaIion zone 
close Io Ihe aImospheric side oI Ihe mechanical shaII seal. 
Leakage due Io deposiIs on Ihe seal Iaces is oIIen observed. 
When using coolanI agenIs, deposiIs are builI up quickly by 
Ihe evaporaIion aI Ihe aImosphere side oI Ihe seal. When 
Ihe  liquid  evaporaIes  in  Ihe  evaporaIion  zone,  microscopic 
solids  in  Ihe  liquid  remain  in  Ihe  seal  gap  as  deposiIs 
creaIing wear. 
1hese  deposiIs  are  seen  in  connecIion  wiIh  mosI  Iypes 
oI  liquid.  8uI  when  Ihe  pumped  liquid  has  a  Iendency 
Io  crysIallise,  iI  can  become  a  problem.  1he  besI  way  Io 
prevenI  wear  is  Io  selecI  seal  Iaces  made  oI  hard  maIerial, 
such as IungsIen carbide (WC) or silicon carbide (SiC). 
1he narrow seal gap beIween Ihese maIerials (app. 0.3 µm 
ka)  minimises  Ihe  risk  oI  solids  enIering  Ihe  seal  gap  and 
Ihereby minimises Ihe amounI oI deposiIs building up. 
Pressure
Liquid Pump pressure
5tationary
seaI face
kotating 
seaI face   
Vapour Atmosphere
£ntrance
in seaI
£xit into
atmosphere
5tart of
evaporation
1 atm
lig. 1.3.6. lnIeracIion oI 
Iorces on Ihe balanced 
shaII seal
lig. 1.3.7. lnIeracIion oI 
Iorces on Ihe unbalanced 
shaII seal
A
5pring forces
HydrauIic forces
Contact area of seaI faces
8
A 8
HydrauIic forces
Contact area of seaI faces
lig. 1.3.S. OpIimum raIio beIween Iine lubricaIion 
properIies and limiIed leakage
30
5ection 1.3
MechanicaI shaft seaIs
31
1he balancing raIio (K) oI a mechanical shaII seal is deIined 
as Ihe raIio beIween Ihe area A and Ihe area (8) . K=A]8
K = 8alancing raIio
A = Area exposed Io hydraulic pressure
8 = ConIacI area oI seal Iaces
lor  balanced  shaII  seals  Ihe  balancing  raIio  is  usually 
around K=0.8 and Ior unbalanced shaII seals Ihe balancing 
raIio is normally around K=1.2.
1.3.3 1ypes of mechanicaI shaft seaIs
WhaI  Iollows  is  a  brieI  ouIline  oI  Ihe  main  Iypes  oI 
mechanical  shaII  seals.  O-ring  seal,  bellows  seal,  and  Ihe 
one-uniI seal - Ihe carIridge seal.
0-ring seaIs
ln  an  O-ring  seal,  sealing  beIween  Ihe  roIaIing  shaII  and
Ihe roIaIing seal Iace is eIIecIed by an O-ring (Iigure 1.3.9). 
1he O-ring musI be able Io slide Ireely in Ihe axial direcIion 
Io  absorb  axial  displacemenIs  as  a  resulI  oI  changes 
in  IemperaIures  and  wear.  lncorrecI  posiIioning  oI  Ihe 
sIaIionary seaI may resulI in rubbing and Ihus unnecessary 
wear on Ihe O-ring and on Ihe shaII. O-rings are made oI 
diIIerenI Iypes oI rubber maIerial, such as N8k, LPDM and 
lKM, depending on Ihe operaIing condiIions.
8eIIcws seaIs
A  common  IeaIure  oI  bellows  seals  is  a  rubber  or  meIal
bellows  which  IuncIions  as  dynamic  sealing  elemenI 
beIween Ihe roIaIing ring and Ihe shaII.
kubber beIIcws seaIs
1he bellows oI a rubber bellows seal (see Iigure 1.3.10) can 
be made oI diIIerenI Iypes oI rubber maIerial, such as N8k,
LPDM  and  lKM,  depending  on  Ihe  operaIing  condiIions.
1wo  diIIerenI  geomeIric  principles  are  used  Ior  Ihe
design oI rubber bellows.
· lolding bellows
· kolling bellows.
lig. 1.3.8. Wear raIe Ior diIIerenI balancing raIios
1emperature (
o
C)
0 20 40 0 80 00 20 40
Wear rate comparative
k = 1.15
k = 1.00
k = 0.85
lig. 1.3.9. O-ring seal
lig. 1.3.10. kubber bellows seal
Advantages and 
disadvantages cf
0-ring seaI
Advantages:
SuiIable in hoI liquid and 
high pressure applicaIions
Disadvantages: 
DeposiIs on Ihe shaII, 
such as rusI, may prevenI 
Ihe O-ring shaII 
seal Irom moving axially
Advantages and 
disadvantages cf
rubber beIIcws seaI
Advantages: 
NoI sensiIive Io deposiIs, 
such as rusI, on Ihe shaII
SuiIable Ior pumping 
solid-conIaining liquids
Disadvantages: 
NoI suiIable in hoI liquid and 
high pressure applicaIions
kubber beIIows seaI with foIding 
beIIows geometry
32
MetaI beIIcws seaIs
ln  an  ordinary  mechanical  shaII  seal,  Ihe  spring  produces 
Ihe  closing  Iorce  required  Io  close  Ihe  seal  Iaces.  ln  a 
meIal  bellows  seal  (Iigure  1.3.11)  Ihe  spring  has  been 
replaced  by  a  meIal  bellows  wiIh  a  similar  Iorce. 
MeIal  bellows  acI  boIh  as  a  dynamic  seal  beIween  Ihe 
roIaIing  ring  and  Ihe  shaII  and  as  a  spring.  1he  bellows 
have  a  number  oI  corrugaIions  Io  give  Ihem  Ihe  desired 
spring Iorce.
Cartridge seaIs
ln a carIridge mechanical shaII seal, all parIs Iorm a compacI 
uniI on a shaII sleeve, ready Io be insIalled. A carIridge seal 
oIIers many beneIiIs compared Io convenIional mechanical 
shaII seals, Iigure 1.3.12.
fIushing
ln  cerIain  applicaIions  iI  is  possible  Io  exIend  Ihe 
perIormance  oI  Ihe  mechanical  shaII  seal  by  insIalling 
Ilushing,  see  Iigure  1.3.13.  llushing  can  lower  Ihe 
IemperaIure  oI  Ihe  mechanical  shaII  seal  and  prevenI 
deposiIs  Irom  occurring.  llushing  can  be  insIalled  eiIher 
inIernally  or  exIernally.  lnIernal  Ilushing  is  done  when  a 
small  Ilow  Irom  Ihe  pump's  discharge  side  is  bypassed 
Io  Ihe  seal  area.  lnIernal  Ilushing  is  primarily  used  Io 
prevenI  IurIher  heaI  generaIion  Irom  Ihe  seal  in  heaIing 
applicaIions. LxIernal Ilushing is done by a Ilushing liquid 
and is used Io ensure Irouble-Iree operaIion when handling 
liquids IhaI are abrasive or conIain clogging solids.
lig. 1.3.11. CarIridge meIal 
bellows seal
Advantages and
disadvantages cf cartridge 
metaI beIIcws seaI
Advantages:
NoI sensiIive Io deposiIs,
such as rusI and lime on 
Ihe shaII 
SuiIable in hoI liquid and 
high-pressure applicaIions
Low balancing raIio leads 
Io low wear raIe and 
consequenIly longer liIe
Disadvantages: 
laIique Iailure oI Ihe 
mechanical shaII seal may 
occur when Ihe pump is noI 
aligned correcIly
laIique may occur as a 
resulI oI excessive 
IemperaIures or pressures
lig. 1.3.12. CarIridge seal
Advantages of the 
cartridge seaI:
·   Lasy and IasI service
·  1he design proIecIs Ihe  
  seal Iaces
·   Preloaded spring
·   SaIe handling
lig 1.3.13. llushing device oI a 
single mechanical shaII seal
5ection 1.3
MechanicaI shaft seaIs
33
DoubIe mechanicaI shaft seaIs
Double  mechanical  shaII  seals  are  used  when  Ihe  liIe 
span  oI  single  mechanical  shaII  seals  is  insuIIicienI  due 
Io  wear  caused  by  solids  or  Ioo  high]low  pressure  and 
IemperaIure.  lurIher,  double  mechanical  shaII  seals  are 
used in connecIion wiIh Ioxic, aggressive and explosive liquids 
Io proIecI Ihe surroundings. 1wo Iypes oI double mechanical 
shaII  seals  exisI.  1he  double  seal  in  a  Iandem  arrangemenI 
and Ihe double seal in a back-Io-back arrangemenI.
DcubIe seaI in tandem
1his  Iype  oI  double  seal  consisIs  oI  Iwo  mechanical  shaII 
seals  mounIed  in  Iandem,  IhaI  is  one  behind  Ihe  oIher, 
placed in a separaIe seal chamber, see Iigure 1.3.14.
1he seal Iype is used when a pressurised double mechanical 
shaII  seal  mounIed  in  a  back-Io-back  arrangemenI  is  noI 
necessary.
 
1he  Iandem  seal  arrangemenI  has  Io  be  IiIIed  wiIh  a 
quenching liquid sysIem which 
 
-  absorbs leakage
-  moniIors Ihe leakage raIe
-  lubricaIes and cools Ihe ouIboard seal Io prevenI icing
-  proIecIs againsI dry-running 
-  sIabilises Ihe lubricaIing Iilm
-  prevenIs air Irom enIering Ihe pump in case oI vacuum
1he pressure oI Ihe quenching liquid musI always be lower 
Ihan Ihe pumped liquid pressure.
1andem - circuIaticn
CirculaIion  oI  quenching  liquid  via  a  pressureless  Iank,  see 
Iigure  1.3.14.  Ouenching  liquid  Irom  Ihe  elevaIed  Iank  is 
circulaIed by Ihermosiphon acIion and]or by pumping acIion 
in Ihe seal.  
1andem - dead end
Ouenching liquid Irom an elevaIed Iank, see Iigure 1.3.1S. No 
heaI is dissipaIed Irom Ihe sysIem.
1andem - drain
1he  quenching  liquid  runs  direcIly  Ihrough  Ihe  seal  chamber 
Io be collecIed Ior reuse, or direcIed Io drain, see Iigure 1.3.16.
lig. 1.3.16. 1andem seal arrangemenI wiIh quench liquid Io drain

Duench Iiquid
Pumped Iiquid

Duench Iiquid
Pumped Iiquid

Pumped 
Iiquid
lig.  1.3.1S.  1andem  seal  arrangemenI  wiIh  quench  liquid  dead 
end
lig. 1.3.14. 1andem seal arrangemenI wiIh quench liquid 
circulaIion 
34
1.3.4 5eaI face materiaI combinations
WhaI  Iollows  is  a  descripIion  oI  Ihe  mosI  imporIanI 
maIerial  pairings  used  in  mechanical  shaII  seals  Ior 
indusIrial  applicaIions.  1ungsIen  carbide]IungsIen 
carbide,  silicon  carbide]silicon  carbide  and  carbon]
IungsIen carbide or carbon]silicon carbide.
1ungsten carbideJtungsten carbide  
(WCJWC)
CemenIed  IungsIen  carbide  covers  Ihe  Iype  oI  hard  meIals 
IhaI  are  based  on  a  hard  IungsIen  carbide  (WC)  phase  and 
usually  a  soIIer  meIallic  binder  phase.  1he  correcI  Iechnical 
Ierm is cemenIed IungsIen carbide, however, Ihe abbreviaIed 
Ierm IungsIen carbide (WC) is used Ior convenience. 
CobalI-bonded (Co) WC is only corrosion resisIanI in waIer iI 
Ihe pump incorporaIes base meIal, such as casI iron. 
Chromium-nickel-molybdenum-bounded WC has a 
corrosion resisIance equal Io LN 14401.
SinIered  binderless  WC  has  Ihe  highesI  corrosion 
resisIance.  Rowever,  iIs  resisIance  Io  corrosion  in  liquids, 
such  as  hypochloriIe,  is  noI  as  high.  1he  maIerial  pairing 
WC]WC has Ihe Iollowing IeaIures.
-  LxIremely wear resisIanI
-  very robusI, resisIs rough handling
-  Poor dry-running properIies. ln case oI dry-running, Ihe    
  IemperaIure increases Io several hundred degrees Celsius   
  in very Iew minuIes and consequenIly damages Ihe O-rings.
lI  a  cerIain  pressure  and  a  cerIain  IemperaIure  are 
exceeded,  Ihe  seal  may  generaIe  noise.  Noise  is  an 
indicaIion  oI  poor  seal  operaIing  condiIions  IhaI  in  Ihe 
long  Ierm  may  cause  wear  oI  Ihe  seal.  1he  limiIs  oI  use 
depend on seal Iace diameIer and design.
1o a WC]WC seal Iace pairing, Ihe running-in wear period 
where noise is Io be expecIed may lasI 3-4 weeks, alIhough 
Iypically, no noise occurs during Ihe IirsI 3-4  days.
DcubIe seaI in back-tc-back
1his  Iype  oI  seal  is  Ihe  opIimum  soluIion  Ior  handling
abrasive,  aggressive,  explosive  or  sIicky  liquids,  which 
would  eiIher  wear  ouI,  damage  or  block  a  mechanical 
shaII seal. 
1he  back-Io-back  double  seal  consisIs  oI  Iwo  shaII
seals mounIed back-Io-back in a separaIe seal chamber,
see Iigure 1.3.17. 1he back-Io-back double seal proIecIs 
Ihe surrounding environmenI and Ihe people working 
wiIh Ihe pump.
1he pressure in Ihe seal chamber musI be 1-2 bar higher 
Ihan Ihe pump pressure. 1he pressure can be generaIed 
by.
-  An exisIing, separaIe pressure source. Many    
  applicaIions incorporaIe pressurised sysIems.
-  A separaIe pump, e.g. a dosing pump.

lig. 1.3.17. 
8ack-Io-back seal arrangemenI 
5eaI chamber with 
barrier pressure Iiquid
Pumped Iiquid
8arrier pressure Iiquid
5ection 1.3
MechanicaI shaft seaIs
5iIicon carbideJsiIicon carbide
(5iCJ5iC)
Silicon carbide]silicon carbide (SiC]SiC) is an alIernaIive Io 
WC]WC  and  is  used  where  higher  corrosion  resisIance  is 
required .
1he SiC]SiC maIerial pairing has Ihe Iollowing IeaIures.
-  very briIIle maIerial requiring careIul handling
-  LxIremely wear resisIanI
-  LxIremely good corrosion resisIance. SiC (O 
1
s
, O 
1
P
 and  
  O 
1

) hardly corrodes, irrespecIive oI Ihe pumped liquid 
  Iype. Rowever, an excepIion is waIer wiIh very poor  
  conducIiviIy, such as demineralised waIer, which aIIacks 
  Ihe SiC varianIs O 
1
s
 and O 
1
P
, whereas O 
1
G
 is corrosion-   
  resisIanI also in Ihis liquid
-  ln general, Ihese maIerial pairings have poor dry-running 
  properIies however, Ihe O 
1
G
 ] O 
1
G
 maIerial wiIhsIands a 
  limiIed  period  oI  dry-running  on  accounI  oI  Ihe
   graphiIe conIenI oI Ihe maIerial
lor diIIerenI purposes, various SiC]SiC varianIs exisI. 

1
s
, dense-sintered, fine-grained 5iC
A direcI-sinIered, Iine-grained SiC wiIh a small amounI oI 
Iiny pores. 
lor  a  number  oI  years,  Ihis  SiC  varianI  was  used  as  a 
sIandard  mechanical  shaII  seal  maIerial.  Pressure  and 
IemperaIure limiIs are slighIly below Ihose oI WC]WC.
  D 
1
P
, porous, sintered, fine-grained 5iC
A  varianI  oI  Ihe  dense-sinIered  SiC.  1his  SiC  varianI  has 
large circular closed pores. 1he degree oI porosiIy is S-1S° 
and Ihe size oI Ihe pores 10-S0 µm ka.   
1he pressure and IemperaIure limiIs exceed Ihose oI WC]WC.
3S
ConsequenIly,  in  warm  waIer,  Ihe  O 
1
P
  ]  O 
1
P
  Iace  maIerial 
pairing  generaIes  less  noise  Ihan  Ihe  WC]WC  pairing. 
Rowever,  noise  Irom  porous  SiC  seals  musI  be  expecIed 
during Ihe running-in wear period oI 3-4 days.

1
C
 seIf-Iubricating, sintered 5iC
Several varianIs oI SiC maIerials conIaining dry lubricanIs 
are  available  on  Ihe  markeI.  1he  designaIion  O
1
G
  applies 
Io  a  SiC  maIerial,  which  is  suiIable  Ior  use  in  disIilled  or 
demineralised waIer, as opposed Io Ihe above maIerials.
Pressure and IemperaIure limiIs oI O 
1
G
 ] O 
1
G
 are similar Io 
Ihose oI O 
1
P
 ] O 
1
P
.
1he dry lubricanIs, i.e. graphiIe, reduce Ihe IricIion in case 
oI  dry-running,  which  is  oI  decisive  imporIance  Io  Ihe 
durabiliIy oI a seal during dry-running. 
CarbonJtungsten carbide or carbonJ
siIicon carbide features
Seals  wiIh  one  carbon  seal  Iace  have  Ihe  Iollowing 
IeaIures.
-  8riIIle maIerial requiring careIul handling
-  Worn by liquids conIaining solid parIicles
-  Good corrosion resisIance
-  Good dry-running properIies (Iemporary dry-running)
-  1he  selI-lubricaIing  properIies  oI  carbon  make  Ihe
  seal  suiIable  Ior  use  even  wiIh  poor  lubricaIing 
  condiIions  (high  IemperaIure)  wiIhouI  generaIing
  noise.  Rowever,  such  condiIions  will  cause  wear  oI
   Ihe  carbon  seal  Iace  leading  Io  reduced  seal  liIe.  1he 
  wear  depends  on  Ihe  pressure,  IemperaIure,  liquid
   diameIer and seal design. 
  Low  speeds  reduce  Ihe  lubricaIion  beIween  Ihe  seal
  Iaces,  as  a  resulI,  increased  wear  mighI  have  been
   expecIed. Rowever, Ihis is normally noI Ihe case because 
  Ihe disIance IhaI Ihe seal Iaces have Io move is reduced.
36
-  MeIal-impregnaIed  carbon  (A)  oIIers  limiIed  corro-
  sion  resisIance,  buI  improved  mechanical  sIrengIh, 
  heaI conducIiviIy and Ihus reduced wear
-  WiIh  reduced  mechanical  sIrengIh,  buI  higher
  corrosion  resisIance,  synIheIic  resin-impregnaIed
  carbon  (8)  covers  a  wide  applicaIion  Iield.  SynIheIic 
  resin-impregnaIed  carbon  is  approved  Ior  drinking
  waIer
             
-  1he  use  oI  carbon]SiC  Ior  hoI  waIer  applicaIions  may
  cause  heavy  wear  oI  Ihe  SiC,  depending  on  Ihe 
  qualiIy  oI  Ihe  carbon  and  waIer.  1his  Iype  oI  wear
  primarily  applies  Io  O
1
S
]carbon.  1he  use  oI  O
1
P

  O 
1
G
 or a carbon]WC pairing causes Iar less wear. 1hus, 
  carbon]WC, carbon]O
1
P
 or carbon]O
1
G
 are recommended
  Ior hoI waIer sysIems 
1.3.5 factors affecting the seaI 
performance
As  menIioned  previously,  no  seal  is  compleIely  IighI.  On 
Ihe  nexI  pages,  we  will  presenI  Ihe  Iollowing  IacIors, 
which  have  an  impacI  on  Ihe  seal  perIormance.  Lnergy 
consumpIion,  noise  and  leakage.  1hese  IacIors  will  be 
presenIed  individually.  Rowever,  iI  is  imporIanI  Io  sIress 
IhaI  Ihey  are  closely  inIerrelaIed,  and  Ihus  musI  be 
considered as a whole.  
 
£nergy consumption
lI comes as no surprise IhaI power is needed Io make Ihe 
seal roIaIe. 1he Iollowing IacIors conIribuIe Io Ihe power 
consumpIion, IhaI is Ihe power loss oI a mechanical shaII 
seal.
-  1he cenIriIugal pumping acIion oI Ihe roIaIing parIs.    
  1he power consumpIion increases dramaIically wiIh 
  Ihe speed oI roIaIion (Io Ihe Ihird power).
-  1he seal Iace IricIion.
   lricIion beIween Ihe Iwo seal Iaces consisIs oI 
  -  IricIion in Ihe Ihin liquid Iilm and 
  -  IricIion due Io poinIs oI conIacI beIween Ihe 
    seal Iaces.
1he  level  oI  power  consumpIion  depends  on  seal  design, 
lubricaIing condiIions and seal Iace maIerials.
ligure  1.3.18  is  a  Iypical  example  oI  Ihe  power  consumpIion 
oI a mechanical shaII seal. 1he Iigure shows IhaI up Io 3600 
rpm  IricIion  is  Ihe  ma|or  reason  Ior  Ihe  mechanical  shaII 
seal's energy consumpIion.
       
5peed (rpm)
0
0
0
00
0
200
20
2000 4000 6000 8000 10000 12000
Power Ioss (W)
3600
lig. 1.3.18. Power consumpIion oI a 12 mm 
mechanical shaII seal
Pumping
action
friction
5ection 1.3
MechanicaI shaft seaIs
37
8ar
25
20
15
10
5
0
10 20 30 40 50 60 0 80 90 100 110 °C
Ncise
Duty range
lig. 1.3.20. kelaIion beIween duIy range and speed
5peed at 3000 rpm
5peed at 1800 rpm
5peed at 1200 rpm
5peed at 600 rpm
Lnergy  consumpIion  is,  especially  in  connecIion  wiIh 
sIuIIing boxes, an imporIanI issue. As you can Iell Irom 
Ihe  example,  replacing  a  sIuIIing  box  by  a  mechanical 
shaII  seal  leads  Io  considerable  energy  savings,  see 
Iigure 1.3.19.
Noise
1he  choice  oI  seal  Iace  maIerials  is  decisive  Ior  Ihe 
IuncIion and Ihe liIe oI Ihe mechanical shaII seal. Noise 
is generaIed as a resulI oI Ihe poor lubricaIing condiIions 
in  seals  handling  low  viscosiIy  liquids.  1he  viscosiIy 
oI  waIer  decreases  wiIh  increasing  IemperaIure.  1his 
means  IhaI  Ihe  lubricaIing  condiIions  decrease  as  Ihe 
IemperaIure  rises.  lI  Ihe  pumped  liquid  reaches  or 
exceeds  boiling  IemperaIure,  Ihe  liquid  on  parI  oI  Ihe 
seal Iace evaporaIes, which resulIs in a IurIher decrease 
in  Ihe  lubricaIing  condiIions.  A  speed  reducIion  has  Ihe 
same eIIecI, see Iigure 1.3.20.
Leakage
1he  pumped  liquid  lubricaIes  Ihe  seal  Iace  oI  a 
mechanical  shaII  seal.  1hus,  beIIer  lubricaIion  means 
less  IricIion  and  increased  leakage.  Conversely,  less 
leakage  means  worse  lubricaIing  condiIions  and 
increased  IricIion.  ln  pracIice,  Ihe  amounI  oI  leakage 
and  power  loss  IhaI  occur  in  mechanical  shaII  seals  can 
vary. 1he reason is IhaI leakage depends on IacIors which 
are  impossible  Io  quanIiIy  IheoreIically  because  oI  Iype 
oI  seal  Iaces,  Iype  oI  liquid,  spring  load,  eIc.  1hereIore, 
Iigure 1.3.21 should be perceived as a guideline.
1o  read  Ihe  leakage  raIe  curve  correcIly  (Iigure  1.3.21), 
you have Io go Ihrough Iour sIeps.
Step 1. kead Ihe pressure  - in Ihis case S bar
Step 2. 30 mm unbalanced shaII seal
Step 3. Speed 3000 rpm
Step 4. Leakage raIe 0.06 ml]h
Dw (mm) 100 8
100 U
8 = baIanced
U = unbaIanced
n
 (
m
i
n
 
-
1 )
 3
6
0
0
3
0
0
0
1
8
0
0
1
5
0
0
80 U
60 U
40 U
0.001 0.01 0.06 0.1 1 Leakage D (mIJh)
DifferentiaI pressure to be seaIed      p (bar) 1 10 5 100
30 U
20 U
80 8
60 8
40 8
20 8
30 8
lig. 1.3.21. Leakage raIes
lig. 1.3.19. SIuIIing box versus mechanical shaII seal
5tandard pump 50 mLC, 50 mm shaft and 2900 rpm
Lnergy consumption
Stuffing box 2.0 kwh
Mechanical shaft seal 0.3 kwh
Leakage
Stuffing box 3.0 l/h (when mounted correctly)
Mechanical shaft seal 0.8 ml/h
Chapter 1. Design of pumps and motors
Secticn 1.4: Mctcrs
1.4.1   SIandards
1.4.2   MoIor sIarI-up
1.4.3   volIage supply
1.4.4   lrequency converIer
1.4.S   MoIor proIecIion
MoIors are used in many applicaIions all over Ihe world. 
1he purpose oI Ihe elecIric moIor is Io creaIe roIaIion, IhaI is 
Io converI elecIric energy inIo mechanical energy. Pumps are 
operaIed  by  means  oI  mechanical  energy,  which  is  provided 
by elecIric moIors.
1.4.1 5tandards
N£MA
1he  NaIional  LlecIrical  ManuIacIurers  AssociaIion  (NLMA) 
seIs sIandards Ior a wide range oI elecIric producIs, including 
moIors.  NLMA  is  primarily  associaIed  wiIh  moIors  used  in 
NorIh  America.  1he  sIandards  represenI  general  indusIry 
pracIices and are supporIed by Ihe manuIacIurers oI elecIric 
equipmenI.  1he  sIandards  can  be  Iound  in  NLMA  SIandard 
PublicaIion  No.  MG1.  Some  large  moIors  may  noI  Iall  under 
NLMA sIandards.
l£C
1he  lnIernaIional  LlecIroIechnical  Commission  (lLC)  seIs 
sIandards  Ior  moIors  used  in  many  counIries  around  Ihe 
world.  1he  lLC  60034  sIandard  conIains  recommended 
elecIrical  pracIices  IhaI  have  been  developed  by  Ihe 
parIicipaIing lLC counIries. 
lig. 1.4.1. LlecIric moIor
lig. 1.4.2. NLMA and lLC sIandards
5ection 1.4 
Motors
40
Directives and methods of protection - 
£x-motors
A1LX (A1mosphère LXplosible) reIers Io Iwo LU direcIives 
abouI danger oI explosion wiIhin diIIerenI areas. 1he A1LX 
direcIive  concerns  elecIrical,  mechanical,  hydraulic  and 
pneumaIic  equipmenI.  As  Io  Ihe  mechanical  equipmenI, 
Ihe saIeIy requiremenIs in Ihe A1LX direcIive ensure IhaI 
pump componenIs, such as shaII seals and bearings do noI 
heaI  up  and  igniIe  gas  and  dusI.  1he  hrsI  A1LX  direcIive 
(94]9]LC)  deals  wiIh  requiremenIs  puI  on  equipmenI  Ior 
use  in  areas  wiIh  danger  oI  explosion.  1he  manuIacIurer 
has Io Iulhl Ihe requiremenIs and mark his producIs wiIh 
caIegories.  1he  second  A1LX  direcIive  (99]92]LC)  deals 
wiIh  Ihe  minimum  saIeIy  and  healIh  requiremenIs  IhaI 
Ihe user has Io Iulhl, when working in areas wiIh danger oI 
explosion. DiIIerenI Iechniques are used Io prevenI elecIric 
equipmenI  Irom  becoming  a  source  oI  igniIion.  ln  Ihe 
case  oI  elecIric  moIors,  proIecIion  Iypes  d  (IlameprooI),  e 
(increased  saIeIy)  and  nA  (non-sparking)  are  applied 
in  connecIion  wiIh  gas,  and  DlP  (dusI  igniIion  prooI)  is 
applied in connecIion wiIh dusI.
fIameprccf mctcrs - prctecticn type ££xd {de}  
lirsI oI all, IlameprooI LLxd (Iype de) moIors are caIegory 
2G  equipmenI  Ior  use  in  zone  1.  1he  sIaIor  housing  and 
Ihe  Ilanges  enclose  Ihe  IlameprooI  moIor  parIs  IhaI 
can  igniIe  a  poIenIially  explosive  aImosphere.  8ecause 
oI  Ihe  enclosure,  Ihe  moIor  can  wiIhsIand  Ihe  pressure 
IhaI  goes  along  wiIh  Ihe  explosion  oI  an  explosive 
mixIure  inside  Ihe  moIor.  PropagaIion  oI  Ihe  explosion 
Io Ihe aImosphere IhaI surrounds Ihe enclosure is hereby 
avoided  because  Ihe  explosion  is  cooled  down  by  means 
oI  Ilame  paIhs.  1he  size  oI  Ihe  Ilame  paIhs  is  deIined  in 
Ihe  LN  S0018  sIandard.  1he  surIace  IemperaIure  oI  Ihe 
IlameprooI enclosure should always be in accordance wiIh 
Ihe IemperaIure classes.
lncreased safety mctcrs - prctecticn type ££x {e}
lncreased saIeIy moIors (Iype e) are caIegory 2G equipmenI 
Ior use in zone 1. 1hese moIors are noI IlameprooI and noI 
builI Io wiIhsIand an inIernal explosion. 1he consIrucIion 
oI such a moIor is based on increased securiIy againsI 
S
User Manufacturer
Zones:
Gas (G): 0, J and 2
Dust (D): 20, 2J and 22
Minor
danger
PotentieI
danger
Constant
danger
Category 3
equipment
(3CJ3D)
Category 2
equipment
(2CJ2D)
Category 1
equipment
(1CJ1D)
Zone:
0 or 20
Zone:
J or 2J
Zone:
J or 2J
Zone:
2 or 22
Zone:
2 or 22
lig 1.4.4. 1he explosion occurs 
inside Ihe moIor and is lead 
ouI oI Ihe moIor Ihrough Ihe 
Ilame paIhs. 1he IemperaIure 
classiIicaIion Ior IlameprooI 
LLxd moIors is valid Ior 
exIernal surIaces.
lig 1.4.3. 1he link 
beIween zones and 
equipmenI caIegories is 
a minimum requiremenI. 
lI Ihe naIional rules are 
more sIricI, Ihey are Ihe 
ones Io Iollow. 
lig 1.4.S. lor increased saIeIy 
moIors LLxe, no sparks may 
occur. 1he IemperaIure 
classiIicaIion covers boIh 
inIernal and exIernal surIaces. 
lig 1.4.6. WiIh non-sparking 
moIors LxnA, no igniIion is 
likely Io occur.
41
possible excessive IemperaIures and occurrence oI sparks 
and arcs during normal operaIion and when a predicIable 
error  occurs.  1he  IemperaIure  classiIicaIion  Ior  increased 
saIeIy  moIors  is  valid  Ior  boIh  inIernal  and  exIernal 
surIaces,  and  IhereIore,  iI  is  imporIanI  Io  observe  Ihe 
sIaIor winding IemperaIure.
Ncn-sparking mctcrs - prctecticn type £x {nA}
Non-sparking moIors (Iype nA) are caIegory 3G equipmenI 
Ior use in zone 2. 1hese moIors cannoI by any means igniIe 
a poIenIial explosive aImosphere under normal operaIion, 
see Iigure 1.4.6.
Dust lgniticn Prccf {DlP}
1wo Iypes oI DusI lgniIion ProoI moIors exisI. 2D]caIegory 
2 equipmenI and 3D]caIegory 3 equipmenI.
2DJcategcry 2 equipment
ln  order  Io  avoid  sIaIic  elecIriciIy  Io  cause  igniIion,  Ihe 
cooling  Ian  on  a  caIegory  2  DlP  moIor  Ior  use  in  zone  21 
(area wiIh poIenIial danger oI explosion) is made oI meIal. 
Likewise,  Io  minimise  Ihe  risk  oI  igniIion,  Ihe  exIernal 
ground  Ierminal  is  sub|ecI  Io  more  severe  demands  oI 
consIrucIion.  1he  exIernal  surIace  IemperaIure  oI  Ihe 
enclosure, which is indicaIed on Ihe moIor nameplaIe and 
corresponds Io Ihe running perIormance during Ihe worsI 
condiIions allowed Ior Ihe moIor. MoIors Ior use in zone 21 
(areas wiIh poIenIial danger oI explosion) have Io be lP6S 
proIecIed, IhaI is compleIely proIecIed againsI dusI.
3DJcategcry 3 equipment
1he  IemperaIure  indicaIed  on  a  caIegory  3  DlP  moIor  Ior 
use  in  zone  22  (areas  wiIh  minor  danger  oI  explosion) 
Type of
protection
Code
Standar ds Use in ATLX
category/
Zone
Principle Application
CLNLLLC
LN
|LC
60079
General
requirements
- 500l4 - 0 - 8asic electrical requirements All equipment
Oil immersion o 500l5 - 6
Category 2
Zone l
Llectrical components immersed in oil
excluding explosive atmosphere from
igniting
Transformers
Pressurised p 500l6 - 2
Category 2
Zone l
Lnclosure housing equipment is purged to
remove explosive atmosphere and pres-
surised to prevent ingress of
surrounding atmosphere
Switching and
control cabinets,
large motors
Powder filled q 500l7 - 5
Category 2
Zone l
Llectrical parts are surrounded with
power, e.g. quartz to prevent contact with
an explosive atmosphere
Llectronic devices,
e.g. capacitors, fuses
Plameproof d 500l8 - l
Category 2
Zone l
Lnclosure housing electrical equipment
which, if there is an internal explosion,
will not ignite surrounding atmosphere
control panels,

light fittings
|ncreased
safety
e 500l9 - 7
Category 2
Zone l
Additional methods are used to
eliminate arcs, sparks and hot surface
capable of igniting flammable
atmosphere
AC motors
AC motors,
, terminal
and connection boxes,
light fittings, squirrel
cage motors
|ntrinsic safety
i
a
i
b
50020
50020
- ll
- ll
Category l
Zone 0
Category 2
Zone l
Llectrical energy in equipment is limited
so that circuits cannot ignite an
atmosphere by sparking or heating
Measurement and
control equipment,
e.g. sensors,
instrumentation
Lncapsulation m 50028 - l8
Category 2
Zone l
Llectrical components embedded in
approved material to prevent contact
with explosive atmosphere
Measurement and
control devices,
solenoid valves
Type of
protection n
nA 5002l - l5
Category 3
Zone 2
Non-arcing and non-sparking
AC motors, terminal
boxes, light fittings
Note: Group || Dust atmospher es ar e covered by CLNLLLC LN 5028l-l-l and LN5028l-l-2
lig 1.4.7. SIandards and meIhods oI proIecIion
42
5ection 1.4 
Motors
corresponds  Io  Ihe  running  perIormance  under  Ihe  worsI 
condiIions  allowed  Ior  IhaI  speciIic  moIor.  A  moIor  Ior 
use  in  zone  22  has  Io  be  lPSS  proIecIed,  IhaI  is  proIecIed 
againsI  dusI.  1he  lP  proIecIion  is  Ihe  only  diIIerence 
beIween  2D]caIegory  2  equipmenI  and  3D]caIegory  3 
equipmenI.
Mounting (InternationaI Mounting - IM)
1hree  diIIerenI  ways  oI  mounIing  Ihe  moIor  exisI.  looI-
mounIed  moIor,  ßange-mounIed  moIor  wiIh  Iree-hole 
ßange  (ll)  and  ßange-mounIed  moIor  wiIh  Iapped-hole 
ßange  (l1).  ligure  1.4.8  shows  Ihe  diIIerenI  ways  oI 
mounIing  a  moIor  and  Ihe  sIandards  IhaI  apply  Ior  Ihe 
mounIings. 1he mounIing oI moIors is sIaIed according Io 
Ihe Iollowing sIandards.
-  lLC 60034-7, Code l, 
  i.e. designaIion lM Iollowed by Ihe previously 
  used DlN 42S90 code
-  lLC 60034-7,  Code ll
£ncIosure cIass 
(Ingress Protection - IP)
1he  enclosure  class  sIaIes  Ihe  degrees  oI  proIecIion  oI 
Ihe  moIor  againsI  ingress  oI  solid  ob|ecIs  and  waIer. 
1he  enclosure  class  is  sIaIed  by  means  oI  Iwo  leIIers  lP 
Iollowed  by  Iwo  digiIs,  Ior  example  lPSS.  1he  IirsI  digiI 
sIands  Ior  proIecIion  againsI  conIacI  and  ingress  oI  solid 
ob|ecIs and Ihe second digiI sIands Ior proIecIion againsI 
ingress oI waIer, see Iigure 1.4.9.
Drain holes enable Ihe escape oI waIer which has enIered 
Ihe  sIaIor  housing  Ior  insIance  Ihrough  condensaIion. 
When  Ihe  moIor  is  insIalled  in  a  damp  environmenI,  Ihe 
boIIom  drain  hole  should  be  opened.  Opening  Ihe  drain 
hole  changes  Ihe  moIor's  enclosure  class  Irom  lPSS  Io 
lP44.
IM 83
IM 1001
IM 85
IM 3001
IM V1
IM 3011
IM 814
IM 3601
IM V18
IM 3611
 
fIrst dIgIt Secend dIgIt
Protection against contact and 
ingress of soIid objects
Protection against 
ingress of water
0  No special proIecIion
1  1he moIor is proIecIed againsI
  solid ob|ecIs bigger Ihan 
  SS mm, e.g. a hand
2  1he moIor is proIecIed againsI
  ob|ecIs bigger Ihan 12 mm, e.g. 
  a Iinger
3  1he moIor is proIecIed againsI 
  solid ob|ecIs bigger Ihan 2S mm, 
  i.e. wires, Iools, eIc.
4  1he moIor is proIecIed againsI 
  solid ob|ecIs bigger Ihan 1 mm, 
  e.g. wires
5  1he moIor is proIecIed againsI 
  Ihe ingress oI dusI
 
6   1he moIor is compleIely 
  dusI-prooI
0  No special proIecIion
1  1he moIor is proIecIed againsI 
  verIically Ialling drops oI waIer, 
  such as condensed waIer
2  1he moIor is proIecIed againsI 
  verIically Ialling drops oI waIer, 
  even iI Ihe moIor is IilIed aI an 
  angle oI 1S°
3  1he moIor is proIecIed againsI 
  waIer spray Ialling aI an angle 
  oI  60°
  
Irom verIical
4  1he moIor is proIecIed againsI 
  waIer splashing Irom any 
  direcIion
5  1he moIor is proIecIed againsI 
  waIer being pro|ecIed Irom a 
  nozzle Irom any direcIion
6  1he moIor is proIecIed againsI 
  heavy seas or high-pressure 
  waIer |eIs Irom any direcIion
7  1he moIor is proIecIed when 
  submerged Irom 1S cm Io 1 m in
  waIer Ior a period speciIied by 
  Ihe manuIacIurer
8  1he moIor is proIecIed againsI 
  conIinuous submersion in waIer
  under condiIions speciIied by 
  Ihe manuIacIurer                


lig 1.4.8. DiIIerenI mounIing meIhods
foot-mounted 
motor
fIange-mounted 
motor with 
free-hoIe fIange
fIange-mounted 
motor with 
tapped-hoIe fIange
lig 1.4.9. 1he enclosure class is sIaIed by means oI Iwo digiIs lP 
Iollowed by Iwo leIIers, Ior example lPSS
IM 835
IM 2001
43
frame size
ligure  1.4.11  gives  an  overview  oI  Ihe  relaIion  beIween 
Irame  size,  shaII  end,  moIor  power  and  Ilange  Iype  and 
size. lor moIors in Irame sizes 63 up Io and including 31SM, 
Ihe  relaIionship  is  speciIied  in  LN  S0347.  lor  moIors  wiIh 
Irame size 31SL and larger, no sIandard covers Ihis relaIion. 
1he Iigure shows where on Ihe moIor Ihe diIIerenI values 
IhaI make up Ihe Irame size are measured. 
llanges  and  shaII  end  comply  wiIh  LN  S0347  and 
lLC 60072-1. Some pumps have a coupling, which requires 
a  smooIh  moIor  shaII  end  or  a  special  shaII  exIension 
which is noI deIined in Ihe sIandards. 
InsuIation cIass
1he  insulaIion  class  is  deIined  in  Ihe  lLC  6008S  sIandard 
and  Iells  someIhing  abouI  how  robusI  Ihe  insulaIion 
sysIem  is  Io  IemperaIures.  1he  liIe  oI  an  insulaIion 
maIerial is highly dependenI on Ihe IemperaIure Io which 
iI is exposed. 1he various insulaIion maIerials and sysIems 
are  classiIied  inIo  insulaIion  classes  depending  on  Iheir 
abiliIy Io resisI high IemperaIures.
I£C 100L (In this case L = 140mm)
1
0
0
m
m
Distance between 
hoIes
83
Maximum temperature increase
Hot-spot overtemperature
Maximum ambient temperature
10
80 105 125
40
8
[¨C] 180
155
130
120
40
f H
40 40
10
15
CIass
8
f
H
Maximum ambient
temperature
(¨C)
40
40
40
Maximum
temperature increase
(k)
80
105
125
Hot-spot
overtemperature
(k)
10
10
15
Maximum
winding temperature
(1max) (¨C)
130
155
180
lig 1.4.12. DiIIerenI insulaIion classes and Iheir IemperaIure increase aI 
nominal volIage and load
lig 1.4.10. lrame size
140mm
44
5ection 1.4 
Motors
1
frame size
4-poIe 6-poIe 8-poIe
free-hoIe 
fIange
1apped-hoIe 
fIange
[kW] [kW] [kW] (ff) (f1)
0.06,0.09 ll100 l16S
0.12 , 0.18 ll11S l17S
0.2S, 0.37 ll130 l18S
0.SS, 0.7S 0.37, 0.SS ll16S l1100
1.1 0.7S 0.37 ll16S l111S
1.S 1.1 0.SS ll16S l111S
2.2, 3 1.S 0.7S, 1.1 ll21S l1130
4 2.2 1.S ll21S l1130
S.S 3 2.2 ll26S l116S
7.S 4, S.S 3 ll26S l116S
11 7.S 4, S.S ll300 l121S
1S 11 7.S ll300 l121S
18.S - - ll300
22 1S 11 ll300
30 18.S, 22 1S ll3S0
37 30 18.S ll400
4S - 22 ll400
SS 37 30 llS00
7S 4S 37 llS00
90 SS 4S llS00
110 7S SS ll600
132 90 7S ll600
ll600
31S, 3SS, 400, 4S0, S00 ll740
S60, 630, 710 ll840
S6
63
71
80
90S
90L
100L
112M
132S
132M
160M
160L
180M
180L
200L
22SS
22SM
2S0M
280S
280M
31SS
31SM
31SL
3SS
400
4S0
2-poIe
[mm]
9
11
14
19
24
24
28
28
38
38
42
42
48
48
SS
SS
SS
60
6S
6S
6S
6S
6S
7S
80
90
4-, 6-, 8-poIe
[mm]
9
11
14
19
24
24
28
28
38
38
42
42
48
48
SS
60
60
6S
7S
7S
80
80
80
100
100
120
2-poIe
[kW]
0.09, 0.12
0.18, 0.2S
0.37, 0.SS
0.7S, 1.1
1.S
2.2
3
4
S.S, 7.S
-
11, 1S
18.S
22
-
30, 37
-
4S
SS
7S
90
110
132
160, 200, 2S0
31S, 3SS, 400, 4S0, S00
S60, 630, 710
800, 900, 1000 800, 900, 1000 ll940
4
fIange size 5haft end diameter kated power
3 2
lig 1.4.11. 1he relaIion beIween Irame size and power inpuI 
4S
5tarting method
DirecI-on-line sIarIing (DOL) Simple and cosI-eIIicienI.
SaIe sIarIing.
Righ locked-roIor currenI.
CurrenI pulses when swiIching over Irom sIar Io delIa.
NoI suiIable iI Ihe load has a low inerIia. 
keduced locked-roIor Iorque.
SIar]delIa sIarIing (SD)
(¥])
keducIion oI sIarIing currenI by IacIor 3.
AuIoIransIormer sIarIing keducIion oI locked-roIor currenI and Iorque. CurrenI pulses when swiIching Irom reduced Io Iull volIage.
keduced locked-roIor Iorque.
SoII sIarIer "SoII" sIarIing. No currenI pulses.
Less waIer hammer when sIarIing a pump.
keducIion oI locked-roIor currenI as required,
Iypically 2-3 Iimes.
keduced locked-roIor Iorque.
lrequency converIer sIarIing No currenI pulses.
Less waIer hammer when sIarIing a pump.
keducIion oI locked-roIor currenI as required, 
Iypically 2 Io 3 Iimes.
Can be used Ior conIinuous Ieeding oI Ihe moIor.
keduced locked-roIor Iorque.
Lxpensive
Pros Cons
Direct-on-Iine starting (DDL)
As  Ihe  name  suggesIs,  direcI-on-line  sIarIing  means  IhaI 
Ihe moIor is sIarIed by connecIing iI direcIly Io Ihe supply 
aI raIed volIage. DirecI-on-line sIarIing is suiIable Ior sIable 
supplies  and  mechanically  sIiII  and  well-dimensioned 
shaII  sysIems,  Ior  example  pumps.  Whenever  applying 
Ihe direcI-on-line sIarIing meIhod, iI is imporIanI Io consulI 
local auIhoriIies.
5tarJdeIta starting
1he  ob|ecIive  oI  Ihis  sIarIing  meIhod,  which  is  used  wiIh 
Ihree-phase  inducIion  moIors,  is  Io  reduce  Ihe  sIarIing 
currenI.  ln  one  posiIion,  currenI  supply  Io  Ihe  sIaIor 
windings  is  connecIed  in  sIar  (¥)  Ior  sIarIing.  ln  oIher 
posiIions, currenI supply is reconnecIed Io Ihe windings in 
delIa (L) once Ihe moIor has gained speed.
Autotransformer starting
As  Ihe  name  sIaIes,  auIoIransIormer  sIarIing  makes  use 
oI  an  auIoIransIormer.  1he  auIoIransIormer  is  placed  in 
series  wiIh  Ihe  moIor  during  sIarI  and  varies  Ihe  volIage 
up Io nominal volIage in Iwo Io Iour sIeps.
5oft starter
A  soII  sIarIer  is,  as  you  would  expecI,  a  device  which 
ensures a soII sIarI oI a moIor. 1his is done by raising Ihe 
volIage Io a preseI volIage raise Iime.
frequency converter starting
lrequency converIers are designed Ior conIinuous Ieeding 
oI moIors, buI Ihey can also be used Ior soII sIarIing.
1.4.2 Motor start-up
We  disIinguish  beIween  diIIerenI  ways  oI  sIarIing  up 
Ihe  moIor.  DirecI-on-line  sIarIing,  sIar]delIa  sIarIing, 
auIoIransIormer  sIarIing,  soII  sIarIer  and  Irequency 
converIer sIarIing.  Lach oI Ihese meIhods have Iheir pros 
and cons, see Iigure 1.4.13.
lig 1.4.13. SIarIing meIhod
46
5ection 1.4 
Motors
1.4.3 VoItage suppIy
1he  moIor's  raIed  volIage  lies  wiIhin  a  cerIain  volIage 
range. ligure 1.4.14 shows Iypical volIage examples Ior S0 
Rz and 60 Rz moIors. 
According  Io  Ihe  inIernaIional  sIandard  lLC  60038,  Ihe 
moIor  has  Io  be  able  Io  operaIe  wiIh  a  main  volIage 
Iolerance oI ± 10°.
lor moIors IhaI are designed according Io Ihe lLC 60034-
1  sIandard  wiIh  a  wide  volIage  range,  e.g.  380-41S  v,  Ihe 
main volIage may have a Iolerance oI ± S°.
1he  permissible  maximum  IemperaIure  Ior  Ihe  acIual 
insulaIion  class  is  noI  exceeded  when  Ihe  moIor  is 
operaIed  wiIhin  Ihe  raIed  volIage  range.  lor  condiIions 
aI Ihe exIreme boundaries Ihe IemperaIure Iypically rises 
approx. 10 Kelvin.
1.4.4 frequency converter
lrequency converIers are oIIen used Ior speed conIrolling 
pumps,  see  chapIer  4.  1he  Irequency  converIer  converIs 
Ihe  mains  volIage  inIo  a  new  volIage  and  Irequency, 
causing Ihe moIor Io run aI a diIIerenI speed. 1his way oI 
regulaIing Ihe Irequency mighI resulI in some problems.
-  AcousIic noise Irom Ihe moIor, which is someIimes     
  IransmiIIed Io Ihe sysIem as disIurbing noise
-  Righ volIage peaks on Ihe ouIpuI Irom Ihe Irequency    
  converIer Io Ihe moIor
50 Hz 60 Hz
-
-
-
460 v  
+_  
  10°
Mains voItage according to I£C 60038
230 v  
+_  
  10°
400 v  
+_  
  10°
690 v  
+_  
  10°
-
1ypicaI voItage exampIes
50 Hz
S0 Rz moIors come wiIh Ihe Iollowing volIages.
 ·  3 x 220 - 240 ] 380 - 41S ¥
 ·  3 x 200 - 220  ] 346 - 380 ¥
 ·  3 x 200 ] 346 ¥
 ·  3 x 380 - 41S  
 ·  1 x 220 - 230 ] 240
 60 Hz
 60 Rz moIors come wiIh Ihe Iollowing volIages.
 ·  3 x 200 - 230  ] 346 - 400 ¥
 ·  3 x 220 - 2SS  ] 380 - 440 ¥
 ·  3 x 220 - 277  ] 380 - 480 ¥
 ·  3 x 200 - 230  ] 346 - 400 ¥
 ·  3 x 380 - 480 
lig 1.4.14. 1ypical volIages
lig 1.4.1S. Mains volIage according Io lLC 60038
47
InsuIation for motors with frequency 
converter
ln  connecIion  wiIh  moIors  wiIh  Irequency  converIers  we 
disIinguish beIween diIIerenI kinds oI moIors, wiIh diIIerenI 
kinds oI insulaIion.
Mctcrs withcut phase insuIaticn
lor  moIors  consIrucIed  wiIhouI  Ihe  use  oI  phase 
insulaIion,  conIinuous  volIages  (kMS)  above  460  v 
can  increase  Ihe  risk  oI  disrupIive  discharges  in  Ihe 
windings  and  Ihus  desIrucIion  oI  Ihe  moIor.  1his  applies 
Io  all  moIors  consIrucIed  according  Io  Ihese  principles. 
ConIinuous operaIion wiIh volIage peaks above 6S0 v can 
cause damage Io Ihe moIor. 
Mctcrs with phase insuIaticn
ln  Ihree-phase  moIors,  phase  insulaIion  is  normally 
used  and  consequenIly,  speciIic  precauIions  are  noI 
necessary  iI  Ihe  volIage  supply  is  smaller  Ihan  S00  v. 
Mctcrs with reinfcrced insuIaticn
ln  connecIion  wiIh  supply  volIages  beIween  S00  and 
690  v,  Ihe  moIor  has  Io  have  reinIorced  insulaIion  or  be 
proIecIed wiIh delIa U ]delIa I IilIers. lor supply volIages 
oI 690 v and higher Ihe moIor has Io be IiIIed wiIh boIh 
reinIorced insulaIion and delIa U ]delIa I IilIers.
Mctcrs with insuIated bearings
ln  order  Io  avoid  harmIul  currenI  Ilows  Ihrough  Ihe 
bearings, Ihe moIor bearings have Io be elecIrically insulaIed. 
1his applies Ior moIors Irom Irame size 280 and up.
lig 1.4.16. SIaIor wiIh phase insulaIion
Phase insulaIion also reIerred 
Io as phase paper
48
5ection 1.4 
Motors
Motor efficiency
Generally  speaking,  elecIric  moIors  are  quiIe  eIIicienI. 
Some  moIors  have  elecIriciIy-Io-shaII  power  eIIiciencies 
oI  80-93°  depending  on  Ihe  moIor  size  and  someIimes 
even higher Ior bigger moIors. 1wo Iypes oI energy losses 
in  elecIric  moIors  exisI.  Load  dependenI  losses  and  load 
independenI losses. 
Load dependenI losses vary wiIh Ihe square oI Ihe currenI 
and cover.
-  SIaIor winding losses (copper losses) 
-  koIor losses (slip losses) 
-  SIray losses (in diIIerenI parIs oI Ihe moIor)
Load independenI losses in Ihe moIor reIer Io.
-  lron losses (core losses) 
-  Mechanical losses (IricIion)
DiIIerenI moIor classiIicaIions  caIegorise moIors according 
Io eIIiciency. 1he mosI imporIanI are CLMLP in Ihe LU (Lll1, 
Lll2 and Lll3) and LPAcI in Ihe US.   
MoIors can Iail because oI overload Ior a longer period oI 
Iime and IhereIore mosI moIors are inIenIionally oversized 
and only operaIe aI 7S° Io 80° oI Iheir Iull load capaciIy. 
AI Ihis level oI loading, moIor eIIiciency and power IacIor 
remain  relaIively  high.  8uI  when  Ihe  moIor  load  is  less 
Ihan 2S°, Ihe eIIiciency and Ihe power IacIor decrease. 
1he  moIor  eIIiciency  drops  quickly  below  a  cerIain 
percenIage oI Ihe raIed load. 1hereIore, iI is imporIanI Io 
size  Ihe  moIor  so  IhaI  Ihe  losses  associaIed  wiIh  running 
Ihe moIor Ioo Iar below iIs raIed capaciIy are minimised. 
lI  is  common  Io  choose  a  pump  moIor  IhaI  meeIs  Ihe 
power requiremenIs oI Ihe pump. 
1.4.5 Motor protection
MoIors are nearly always proIecIed againsI reaching IemperaIures, 
which  can  damage  Ihe  insulaIion  sysIem.  Depending  on 
Ihe  consIrucIion  oI  Ihe  moIor  and  Ihe  applicaIion,  Ihermal 
proIecIion can also have oIher IuncIions, e.g. prevenI damaging 
IemperaIures  in  Ihe  Irequency  converIer  iI  iI  is  mounIed  on 
Ihe moIor.
1he  Iype  oI  Ihermal  proIecIion  varies  wiIh  Ihe  moIor  Iype. 
1he  consIrucIion  oI  Ihe  moIor  IogeIher  wiIh  Ihe  power 
consumpIion musI be Iaken inIo consideraIion when choosing 
Ihermal  proIecIion.  Generally  speaking,  moIors  have  Io  be 
proIecIed againsI Ihe Iollowing condiIions.
£rrcrs causing sIcw temperature increases in 
the windings:
-  Slow overload
-  Long sIarI-up periods
-  keduced cooling ] lack oI cooling
-  lncreased ambienI IemperaIure
-  lrequenI sIarIs and sIops
-  lrequency IlucIuaIion
-  volIage IlucIuaIion
£rrcrs causing fast temperature increases in 
the windings:
-  8locked roIor
-  Phase Iailure
PercenI oí raIed load
P
e
r
c
e
n
I
0 25 50 75 150 125 100
100
20
40
60
80
1
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
Lííiciency
Power íacIor
C
o
s

PercenI oí raIed load
0 25 50 75 150 125 175 100
100
20
10
0
30
50
90
80
75 kW
7.5 kW
0.75 kW
70
60
40 L
í
í
i
c
i
e
n
c
y

%
lig 1.4.17. LIIiciency vs. load 
power IacIor vs. load
(schemaIic drawing)
lig 1.4.18. 1he relaIion 
beIween eIIiciency and 
raIed load oI diIIerenI 
sized moIors (schemaIic 
drawing)
49
1hermaI protection (1P)
According  Io  Ihe  lLC  60034-11  sIandard,  Ihe  Ihermal 
proIecIion  oI  Ihe  moIor  has  Io  be  indicaIed  on  Ihe 
nameplaIe  wiIh  a  1P  designaIion.  ligure  1.4.19  shows  an 
overview oI Ihe 1P designaIions. 
P1C thermistcrs
P1C  IhermisIors  (PosiIive  1emperaIure  CoeIIicienI
1hermisIors)  can  be  hIIed  inIo  Ihe  windings  oI  a  moIor
during  producIion  or  reIrohIIed  aIIerwards.  Usually  3
P1Cs  are  hIIed  in  series,  1  in  each  phase  oI  Ihe  winding.
1hey  can  be  purchased  wiIh  Irip  IemperaIures  ranging
Irom  90°C  Io  180°C  in  S  degrees  sIeps.  P1Cs  have  Io  be 
connecIed  Io  a  IhermisIor  relay,  which  deIecIs  Ihe  rapid 
increase in resisIance oI Ihe IhermisIor when iI reaches iIs 
Irip IemperaIure. 1hese devices are non-linear. AI ambienI 
IemperaIures Ihe resisIance oI a seI oI 3 will be abouI 200-
300 ohms and Ihis will increase rapidly when Ihe IhermisIor 
reaches iIs Irip IemperaIure.  lI Ihe IemperaIure increases 
any IurIher, Ihe P1C IhermisIor can reach several Ihousand 
ohms. 1he IhermisIor relays are usually seI Io Irip aI 3000 
ohms or are preseI Io Irip according Io whaI Ihe DlN 44082 
sIandard prescribes. 1he 1P designaIion Ior P1Cs Ior moIors 
smaller  Ihan  11kW  is  1P211  iI  Ihe  P1Cs  are  hIIed  inIo  Ihe 
windings.  lI  Ihe  P1Cs  are  reIrohIIed  Ihe  1P  designaIion  is 
1P111.  1he  1P  designaIion  Ior  P1Cs  Ior  moIors  larger  Ihan 
11kW is normally 1P111.
lndicaIion oI Ihe permissible IemperaIure level when Ihe moIor is exposed Io Ihermal 
overload. CaIegory 2 allows higher IemperaIures Ihan caIegory 1 does.   
1echnicaI overIoad with
variation (1 digit)
Only slow
(i.e. consIanI 
overload)
Only IasI
(i.e. blocked condiIion)
Slow and IasI
(i.e. consIanI overload 
and blocked condiIion )
2 levels aI emergency 
signal and cuIoII
1 level aI cuIoII
2 levels aI emergency 
signal and cuIoII
1 level aI cuIoII
1 level aI cuIoII
Number af IeveIs and 
function area (2 digits)
5ymboI
1P 111
1P 112
1P 121
1P 122
1P 211
1P 212
1P 221
1P 222
1P 311
1P 312
Category 1
(3 digits)
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
lig 1.4.19. 1P designaIions
1hermaI switch and thermcstats
1hermal  swiIches  are  small  bi-meIallic  swiIches  IhaI  swiIch 
due Io Ihe IemperaIure. 1hey are available wiIh a wide range 
oI  Irip  IemperaIures,  normally  open  and  closed  Iypes.  1he 
mosI  common  Iype  is  Ihe  closed  one.  One  or  Iwo,  in  series, 
are usually hIIed in Ihe windings like IhermisIors and can be 
connecIed  direcIly  Io  Ihe  circuiI  oI  Ihe  main  conIacIor  coil. 
ln  IhaI  way  no  relay  is  necessary.  1his  Iype  oI  proIecIion  is 
cheaper  Ihan  IhermisIors,  buI  on  Ihe  oIher  hand,  iI  is  less 
sensiIive and is noI able Io deIecI a locked roIor Iailure.
1hermal  swiIches  are  also  reIerred  Io  as  1hermik,  Klixon 
swiIches  and  P1O  (ProIecIion  1hermique  a  OuverIure). 
1hermal swiIches always carry a 1P111 designaIion.
SingIe-phase mctcrs
Single-phase  moIors  normally  come  wiIh  incorporaIed 
Ihermal  proIecIion.  1hermal  proIecIion  usually  has  an 
auIomaIic  reclosing.  1his  implies  IhaI  Ihe  moIor  has  Io 
be  connecIed  Io  Ihe  mains  in  a  way  IhaI  ensures  IhaI 
accidenIs caused by Ihe auIomaIic reclosing are avoided.
1hree-phase mctcrs
1hree-phase moIors have Io be proIecIed according Io local 
regulaIions.  1his  kind  oI  moIor  has  usually  incorporaIed 
conIacIs Ior reseIIing in Ihe exIernal conIrol circuiI.
S0
S1
5tandstiII heating
A  heaIing  elemenI  ensures  Ihe  sIandsIill  heaIing  oI 
Ihe  moIor.  1he  heaIing  elemenI  is  especially  used  in 
connecIion  wiIh  applicaIions  IhaI  sIruggle  wiIh  humidiIy 
and  condensaIion.  8y  using  Ihe  sIandsIill  heaIing,  Ihe 
moIor  is  warmer  Ihan  Ihe  surroundings  and  Ihereby  Ihe 
relaIive air humidiIy inside Ihe moIor is always lower Ihan 
100°.
Maintenance    
1he  moIor  should  be  checked  aI  regular  inIervals.  lI  is 
imporIanI  Io  keep  Ihe  moIor  clean  in  order  Io  ensure 
adequaIe  venIilaIion.  lI  Ihe  pump  is  insIalled  in  a  dusIy 
environmenI,  Ihe  pump  musI  be  cleaned  and  checked 
regularly.
8earings
Normally, moIors have a locked bearing in Ihe drive end and 
a bearing wiIh axial play in Ihe non-drive end. Axial play is 
required  due  Io  producIion  Iolerances,  Ihermal  expansion 
during operaIion, eIc. 1he moIor bearings are held in place 
by  wave  spring  washers  in  Ihe  non-drive  end,  see  Iigure 
1.4.21. 
1he  Iixed  bearing  in  Ihe  drive  end  can  be  eiIher  a  deep-
groove ball bearing or an angular conIacI bearing. 
8earing  clearances  and  Iolerances  are  sIaIed  according 
Io  lSO  1S  and  lSO  492.  8ecause  bearing  manuIacIurers 
have  Io  IulIil  Ihese  sIandards,  bearings  are  inIernaIionally 
inIerchangeable. 
ln order Io roIaIe Ireely, a ball bearing musI have a cerIain 
inIernal  clearance  beIween  Ihe  raceway  and  Ihe  balls. 
WiIhouI  Ihis  inIernal  clearance,  Ihe  bearings  can  eiIher 
be diIIiculI Io roIaIe or iI may even seize up and be unable 
Io  roIaIe.  On  Ihe  oIher  hand,  Ioo  much  inIernal  clearance
will  resulI  in  an  unsIable  bearing  IhaI  may  generaIe 
excessive noise or allow Ihe shaII Io wobble.  
Depending  on  which  pump  Iype  Ihe  moIor  is  IiIIed,  Ihe 
deep-groove  ball  bearing  in  Ihe  drive  end  musI  have  C3 
or  C4  clearance.  8earings  wiIh  C4  clearance  are  less  heaI 
sensiIive and have increased axial load-carrying capaciIy. 
1he bearing carrying Ihe axial Iorces oI Ihe pump can have 
C3 clearance iI.  
-  Ihe pump has compleIe or parIial hydraulic relieI
-  Ihe pump has many brieI periods oI operaIion
-  Ihe pump has long idle periods
C4 bearings are used Ior pumps wiIh IlucIuaIing high axial 
Iorces. Angular conIacI bearings are used iI Ihe pump exerIs 
sIrong one-way axial Iorces. 
Non-drive end Drive end
Non-drive end bearing 5pring washer Drive end bearing
lig 1.4.21. Cross-secIional drawing oI moIor
1.4.20. SIaIor wiIh heaIing elemenI
S2
Mctcrs with permanentIy Iubricated bearings
lor closed permanenIly lubricaIed bearings, use one oI Ihe 
Iollowing high IemperaIure resisIanI Iypes oI grease.
-  LiIhium-based grease
-  Polyurea-based grease
1he  Iechnical  speciIicaIions  musI  correspond  Io  Ihe 
sIandard  DlN  -  S182S  K2  or  beIIer.  1he  basic  oil  viscosiIy 
musI be higher Ihan.
-  S0 cSI (10
-6
m
2
]sec) aI 40°C and
-  8 cSI (mm
2
]sec) aI 100°C
lor example KlüberquieI 8OR 72-102 wiIh a grease
Iilling raIio oI. 30 - 40°.
Mctcrs with Iubricaticn system
Normally,  Irame  size  160  moIors  and  upwards  have 
lubricaIing  nipples  Ior  Ihe  bearings  boIh  in  Ihe  drive  end 
and Ihe non-drive end.
1he  lubricaIing  nipples  are  visible  and  easily  accessible. 
1he moIor is designed in such a way IhaI. 
-  Ihere is a Ilow oI grease around Ihe bearing
-  new grease enIers Ihe bearing
-  old grease is removed Irom Ihe bearing
MoIors  wiIh  lubricaIing  sysIems  are  supplied  wiIh  a 
lubricaIing  insIrucIion,  Ior  insIance  as  a  label  on  Ihe 
Ian  cover.  AparI  Irom  IhaI,  insIrucIions  are  given  in  Ihe 
insIallaIion and operaIing insIrucIions.
1he  lubricanI  is  oIIen  liIhium-based,  high  IemperaIure 
grease,  Ior  insIance  LXXON  UNlkLX  N3  or  Shell  Alvania 
Grease G3. 1he basic oil viscosiIy musI be 
·  higher Ihan S0 cSI (10
-6
m
2
]sec) aI 40°C and
·  8 cSI (mm
2
]sec) aI 100°C
ModeraIe Io sIrong Iorces.
Primarily ouIward pull on
Ihe shaII end
lixed deep-groove ball bearing (C4)
SIrong ouIward pull 
on Ihe shaII end
Small Iorces
(Ilexible coupling)
SIrong inward 
pressure
AxiaI forces 8earing types and recommended cIearance
Drive-end Non-drive-end
ModeraIe Iorces.
Primarily ouIward pull on
Ihe shaII end (parIly 
hydraulically relieved in 
Ihe pump)
Deep-groove ball bearing (C4)
lixed deep-groove ball bearing (C3)
lixed deep-groove ball bearing (C3)
lixed angular conIacI bearing
Deep-groove ball bearing (C3)
lixed angular conIacI bearing
Deep-groove ball bearing (C3)
Deep-groove ball bearing (C3)
Deep-groove ball bearing (C3)
lig.1.4.22. 1ypical Iypes oI bearings in pump moIors 
5ection 1.4 
Motors
Chapter 1. Design of pumps and motors
Secticn 1.5: liquids
1.S.1   viscous liquids
1.S.2   Non-NewIonian liquids
1.S.3   1he impacI oI viscous liquids on Ihe  
  perIormance oI a cenIriIugal pump
1.S.4   SelecIing Ihe righI pump Ior a liquid  
  wiIh anIiIreeze
1.S.S   CalculaIion example
1.S.6   CompuIer aided pump selecIion Ior  
  dense and viscous liquids
5ection 1.5
Liquids
1.5.1  Viscous Iiquids
1here  is  no  doubI  abouI  iI,  waIer  is  Ihe  mosI  common 
liquid  IhaI  pumps  handle.  Rowever,  in  a  number  oI 
applicaIions, pumps have Io handle oIher Iypes oI liquids, 
e.g.  oil,  propylene  glycol,  gasoline.  Compared  Io  waIer, 
Ihese Iypes oI liquids have diIIerenI densiIy and viscosiIy. 
viscosiIy is a measure oI Ihe Ihickness oI Ihe liquid. 
1he  higher  Ihe  viscosiIy,  Ihe  Ihicker  Ihe  liquid.  Propylene 
glycol and moIor oil are examples oI Ihick or high viscous 
liquids.  Gasoline  and  waIer  are  examples  oI  Ihin,  low 
viscous liquids.
1wo kinds oI viscosiIy exisI. 
- 1he dynamic viscosiIy (µ), which is normally measured    
  in Pas or Poise. (1 Poise = 0.1 Pas) 
- 1he kinemaIic viscosiIy (v), which is normally measured  
  in cenIiSIokes or m
2
]s (1 cSI = 10
-6
 m
2
]s) 
1he  relaIion  beIween  Ihe  dynamic  viscosiIy  (µ)  and  Ihe 
kinemaIic  viscosiIy  (v)  is  shown  in  Ihe  Iormula  on  your 
righI hand side.
On  Ihe  Iollowing  pages,  we  will  only  Iocus  on  kinemaIic 
viscosiIy (v).
1he  viscosiIy  oI  a  liquid  changes  considerably  wiIh  Ihe 
change in IemperaIure, hoI oil is Ihinner Ihan cold oil. As 
you can Iell Irom Iigure 1.S.1, a S0° propylene glycol liquid 
increases  iIs  viscosiIy  10  Iimes  when  Ihe  IemperaIure 
changes Irom +20 Io -20 
o
C.
lor  more  inIormaIion  concerning  liquid  viscosiIy,  go  Io 
appendix L. 
S4
v =
µ
µ
µ = densiIy oI liquid 
kinematic
viscosity
v [c5t]
Density
µ [kgJm
3
]
Liquid
temperature
t  [¨C]
Liquid
Water  20  998  1.004
CasoIine  20  733  0.75
DIive oiI  20  900  93
50Z PropyIene gIycoI  20  1043  6.4
50Z PropyIene gIycoI  -20  1061  68.7
lig. 1.S.1. Comparison oI viscosiIy values Ior waIer and a Iew oIher liquids. 
DensiIy values and IemperaIures are also shown
1.5.2 Non-Newtonian Iiquids 
1he  liquids  discussed  so  Iar  are  reIerred  Io  as  NewIonian 
Iluids. 1he viscosiIy oI NewIonian liquids is noI aIIecIed by 
Ihe  magniIude  and  Ihe  moIion  IhaI  Ihey  are  exposed  Io. 
Mineral oil and waIer are Iypical examples oI Ihis Iype oI 
liquid. On Ihe oIher hand, Ihe viscosiIy oI non-NewIonian 
liquids does change when agiIaIed. 
1his calls Ior a Iew examples.
- DilaIanI liquids like cream - Ihe viscosiIy increases    
  when agiIaIed
- PlasIic Iluids like caIsup - have a yield value, which has  
  Io be exceeded beIore Ilow sIarIs. lrom IhaI poinI on,    
  Ihe viscosiIy decreases wiIh an increase in agiIaIion
- 1hixoIrophic liquids like non-drip painI - exhibiI a    
  decreasing viscosiIy wiIh an increase in agiIaIion
1he non-NewIonian liquids are noI covered by Ihe viscosiIy 
Iormula described earlier in Ihis secIion.
1.5.3 1he  impact  of  viscous  Iiquids  on  the 
performance of a centrifugaI pump
viscous  liquids,  IhaI  is  liquids  wiIh  higher  viscosiIy  and]
or  higher  densiIy  Ihan  waIer,  aIIecI  Ihe  perIormance  oI 
cenIriIugal pumps in diIIerenI ways.
- Power consumpIion increases, i.e. a larger moIor may    
    be required Io perIorm Ihe same Iask
- Read, Ilow raIe and pump eIIiciency are reduced 
LeI  us  have  a  look  aI  an  example.  A  pump  is  used  Ior 
pumping  a  liquid  in  a  cooling  sysIem  wiIh  a  liquid 
IemperaIure  below  0
o
C.  1o  avoid  IhaI  Ihe  liquid  Ireezes, 
an  anIiIreeze  agenI  like  propylene  glycol  is  added  Io 
Ihe  waIer.  When  glycol  or  a  similar  anIiIreeze  agenI  is 
added Io Ihe pumped liquid, Ihe liquid obIains properIies, 
diIIerenI Irom Ihose oI waIer. 1he liquid will have.
- Lower Ireezing poinI, I
I
 |°Cj
- Lower speciIic heaI, c
p
 |k!]kg
.
Kj
- Lower Ihermal conducIiviIy, ì |W]m
.
Kj
- Righer boiling poinI, I
b
 |°Cj
- Righer coeIIicienI oI expansion, | |m]°Cj
- Righer densiIy, µ |kg]m
3
j
- Righer kinemaIic viscosiIy, v |cSIj
1hese properIies have Io be kepI in mind when designing 
a  sysIem  and  selecIing  pumps.  As  menIioned  earlier, 
Ihe  higher  densiIy  requires  increased  moIor  power  and 
Ihe  higher  viscosiIy  reduces  pump  head,  Ilow  raIe  and 
eIIiciency  resulIing  in  a  need  Ior  increased  moIor  power, 
see Iigure 1.S.2. 
O
R, P, 
R
P

lig. 1.S.2. Changed head, eIIiciency and power inpuI Ior 
liquid wiIh higher viscosiIy
SS
1.5.4 5eIecting the right pump for a 
Iiquid with antifreeze
Pump characIerisIics are usually based on waIer aI around 
20°C,  i.e.  a  kinemaIic  viscosiIy  oI  approximaIely  1  cSI  and 
a densiIy oI approximaIely 1,000 kg]m¹.
When  pumps  are  used  Ior  liquids  conIaining  anIiIreeze 
below  0°C,  iI  is  necessary  Io  examine  wheIher  Ihe  pump 
can  supply  Ihe  required  perIormance  or  wheIher    a 
larger  moIor  is  required.  1he  Iollowing  secIion  presenIs 
a  simpliIied  meIhod  used  Io  deIermine  pump  curve 
correcIions  Ior  pumps  in  sysIems  IhaI  have  Io  handle  a 
viscosiIy  beIween  S  -  100  cSI  and  a  densiIy  oI  maximum 
1,300  kg]m¹.  Please  noIice  IhaI  Ihis  meIhod  is  noI  as 
precise  as  Ihe  compuIer  aided  meIhod  described  laIer  in 
Ihis secIion.
Pump curve ccrrecticns fcr pumps handIing high 
visccus Iiquid
8ased on knowledge abouI required duIy poinI, O
S
, R
S
, and 
kinemaIic  viscosiIy  oI  Ihe  pumped  liquid,  Ihe  correcIion 
IacIors oI R and P

can be Iound, see Iigure 1.S.3. 
lig.  1.S.3.  lI  is  possible  Io  deIermine  Ihe  correcIion  IacIor  Ior  head  and 
power consumpIion aI diIIerenI Ilow, head and viscosiIy values
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
110
120
130
140
0.9
1.0
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.8
1.9
1.00
1.05
1.20
1.15
1.10
1.25
1.30
1.35
0
H
=
6
m
H

=

1
0

m
H
=
2
0
m
H
=
4
0
m
H
=
6
0
m
10
c5t
20
c5t
4
0
c5
t
6
0
c
5
t
1
0
0
c
5
t
5 c5t
1
0
c
5
t
2
0
c
5
t
4
0
c
5
t
6
0

c
5
t
1
0
0

c
5
t
5 c5
t
k
H
k
P2
D [m
3
Jh]
S6
5ection 1.5
Liquids
ligure 1.S.3 is read in Ihe Iollowing way.
 
When  k
R
  and  k
P2
  are  Iound  in  Ihe  Iigure,  Ihe  equivalenI 
head  Ior  clean  waIer  R
W
  and  Ihe  correcIed  acIual  shaII 
power P
2S
 can be calculaIed by Ihe Iollowing Iormula
where
R

.  is Ihe equivalenI head oI Ihe pump iI Ihe pumped    
  liquid is "clean" waIer
P
2W 
.  is Ihe shaII power aI Ihe duIy poinI (O
S
,R
W
) when 
  Ihe pumped liquid is waIer
R
S
 .   is Ihe desired head oI Ihe pumped liquid 
  (wiIh agenIs)
P
2S
 .   is Ihe shaII power aI Ihe duIy poinI (O
s
,R
s
) when    
  Ihe pumped liquid is waIer (wiIh agenIs)
µ
s
 .   is Ihe densiIy oI Ihe pumped liquid
µ
w
 .   is Ihe densiIy oI waIer = 998 kg]m
3
1he  pump  selecIion  is  based  on  Ihe  normal  daIa  sheeIs]
curves applying Io waIer. 1he pump should cover Ihe duIy 
poinI  O,R  =  O
S
,R
W
,  and  Ihe  moIor  should  be  powerIul 
enough Io handle P
2S
 on Ihe shaII.
ligure 1.S.4 shows how Io proceed when selecIing a pump 
and IesIing wheIher Ihe moIor is wiIhin Ihe power range 
allowed.

P
2S
= K
P2
.
P
2w
.

s
w
WaIer
WaIer
MixIure
MixIure
R
w
R
w
= k
R
.
R
S
2
1
R
R
s
P
2s
P
P
2w
O
s
O
O
5
3
4

lig. 1.S.4. Pump curve correcIion when choosing Ihe righI pump Ior 
Ihe sysIem
1he  pump  and  moIor  selecIing  procedure  conIains  Ihe 
Iollowing sIeps.
·  CalculaIe Ihe correcIed head R
w
 
  (based on R
S
 and k
R
), see Iigure 1.S.4  1-2
·  Choose a pump capable oI providing perIormance    
  according Io Ihe correcIed duIy poinI (O
S
, R
W
)
·  kead Ihe power inpuI P
2W
 in Ihe duIy poinI (O
S
,R
w
), 
  see Iigure 1.S.4  3-4
·  8ased on P
2W
 , k
P2
 , µ
W
 , and µ
S
 calculaIe Ihe      
  correcIed required shaII power P
2S
 , see Iigure 1.S.4  4-5
·  Check iI P
2S
 < P
2 MAX
 oI Ihe moIor. lI IhaI is Ihe case  
  Ihe moIor can be used. OIherwise selecI a more 
  powerIul moIor
H
W
  =  k

.
  
H
5
µ
s
µ
w
P
25
  =  k
P2 
.
  
P
2w  
.
     
S7
1.5.5 CaIcuIation exampIe
A  circulaIor  pump  in  a  reIrigeraIion  sysIem  is  Io  pump  a 
40° (weighI) propylene glycol liquid aI -10°C. 1he desired 
Ilow  is  O
S
  =  60  m
3
]h,  and  Ihe  desired  head  is  R
S
  =  12  m. 
Knowing Ihe required duIy poinI, iI is possible Io Iind Ihe OR-
characIerisIic Ior waIer and choose a pump, which is able Io 
cover Ihe duIy poinI. Once we have deIermined Ihe needed 
pump Iype and size we can check iI Ihe pump is IiIIed wiIh a 
moIor, which can handle Ihe speciIic pump load.
1he  liquid  has  kinemaIic  viscosiIy  oI  20  cSI  and  a  densiIy 
oI 1049 kg]m
3
. WiIh O
S
 = 60 m
3
]h, R
S
 = 12 m and v = 20 cSI, 
Ihe correcIion IacIors can be Iound in Iigure 1.S.3.
  k
H
 = 1.03 
  k
P2
 = 1.15
  H
W
 = k
H
 · H
5
 = 1.03 · 12 = 12.4 m 
  D
5
 = 60 m
3
Jh
1he pump has Io be able Io cover a duIy poinI equivalenI 
Io O,R = 60 m3]h, 12.4m. Once Ihe necessary pump size is 
deIermined, Ihe P
2
 value Ior Ihe duIy poinI is Iound, which 
in Ihis case is P
2W
 = 2.9 kW. Now iI is possible Io calculaIe 
Ihe required moIor power Ior propylene glycol mixIure.
1he calculaIion shows, IhaI Ihe pump has Io be IiIIed wiIh 
a  4  kW  moIor,  which  is  Ihe  smallesI  moIor  size  able  Io 
cover Ihe calculaIed P
2S
 = 3.S kW. 
1.5.6 Computer aided pump seIection for 
dense and viscous Iiquids 
Some  compuIer  aided  pump  selecIion  Iools  include  a 
IeaIure  IhaI  compensaIes  Ior  Ihe  pump  perIormance 
curves based on inpuI oI Ihe liquid densiIy and viscosiIy. 
ligure 1.S.S shows Ihe pump perIormance curves Irom Ihe 
example we |usI wenI Ihrough.  
1he  Iigure  shows  boIh  Ihe  perIormance  curves  Ior  Ihe 
pump  when  iI  handles  viscous  liquid  (Ihe  Iull  lines)  and 
Ihe perIormance curves when iI handles waIer (Ihe broken 
lines).  As  indicaIed  head,  Ilow  and  eIIiciency  are  reduced, 
resulIing in an increase in power consumpIion. 
1he  value  oI  P
2
  is  3.4  kW,  which  corresponds  Io  Ihe  resulI 
we goI in Ihe calculaIion example in secIion 1.S.4.
H
[m]

[Z]
0
1
2
3
4
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
0 10 20
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
30 40 50 60 70 80 D [m
3
Jh]
D [m
3
Jh]
P
2
[kW]
lig. 1.5.5: Pump períormance curves
µ
5
µ
w
P
25
  =  k
P2 
.
  
P
2w 
.
 
P
25 
=  1.15 
.
 
 2.9  
.
 
 
1049
 998
   =  3.5 kW
S8
5ection 1.5
Liquids
Chapter 1. Design of pumps and motors
Secticn 1.6: MateriaIs
1.6.1   WhaI is corrosion!
1.6.2   1ypes oI corrosion
1.6.3   MeIal and meIal alloys
1.6.4  Ceramics
1.6.S   PlasIics
1.6.6  kubber
1.6.7   CoaIings
60
5ection 1.6
MateriaIs
ln Ihis secIion you can read abouI diIIerenI maIerials IhaI 
are  used  Ior  pump  consIrucIion.  Our  main  Iocus  will  be 
on  Ihe  IeaIures  IhaI  every  single  meIal  and  meIal  alloy 
have  Io  oIIer.  8uI  beIore  we  dig  any  IurIher  inIo  Ihe 
world oI maIerials, we will have a closer look aI corrosion. 
8esides explaining whaI corrosion is, we will examine Ihe 
diIIerenI  Iypes  oI  corrosion  and  whaI  can  be  done  Io 
prevenI corrosion Irom occurring. 
1.6.1 What is corrosion?
Corrosion  is  usually  reIerred  Io  as  Ihe  degradaIion  oI  Ihe 
meIal  by  chemical  or  elecIrochemical  reacIion  wiIh  iIs 
environmenI,  see  Iigure  1.6.1.  When  considered  broadly, 
corrosion  may  be  looked  upon  as  Ihe  Iendency  oI  Ihe 
meIal  Io  reverI  Io  iIs  naIural  sIaIe  similar  Io  Ihe  oxide 
Irom which iI was originally melIed. Only precious meIals, 
such  as  gold  and  plaIinum  are  Iound  in  naIure  in  Iheir 
meIallic sIaIe.
Some meIals produce a IighI proIecIive oxide layer on Ihe 
surIace,  which  hinders  IurIher  corrosion.  lI  Ihe  surIace 
layer is broken iI is selI-healing. 1hese meIals are passivaIed. 
Under  aImospheric  condiIions  Ihe  corrosion  producIs
oI  zinc  and  aluminium  Iorm  a  Iairly  IighI  layer  and 
IurIher corrosion is prevenIed. 
Likewise,  on  Ihe  surIace  oI  sIainless  sIeel  a  IighI  layer  oI 
iron and chromium oxide is Iormed and on Ihe surIace oI 
IiIanium a layer oI IiIanium oxide is Iormed. 1he proIecIive 
layer  oI  Ihese  meIals  explains  Iheir  good  corrosion 
resisIance.  kusI,  on  Ihe  oIher  hand,  is  a  non-proIecIive 
corrosion producI on sIeel. 
kusI  is  porous,  noI  Iirmly  adherenI  and  does  noI  prevenI 
conIinued corrosion, see Iigure 1.6.2.
pH (acidity)
Oxidizing agents (such as oxygen)
Temperature
Concentration of solution constituents
(such as chlorides)
8iological activity
Operating conditions
(such as velocity, cleaning procedures and shutdowns)
£nvironmentaI variabIes that affect the
corrosion resistance of metaIs and aIIoys
lig. 1.6.1.  LnvironmenIal variables IhaI aIIecI Ihe corrosion 
resisIance oI meIals and alloys
Ncn-prctective ccrrcsicn prcduct
Prctective ccrrcsicn prcduct
lig. 1.6.2. Lxamples oI corrosion producIs
kust on steeI
Dxide Iayer on stainIess steeI
1.6.2 1ypes of corrosion
Generally,  meIallic  corrosion  involves  Ihe  loss  oI  meIal  aI 
a  spoI  on  an  exposed  surIace.  Corrosion  occurs  in  various 
Iorms  ranging  Irom  uniIorm  aIIacks  over  Ihe  enIire  surIace 
Io severe local aIIacks. 
1he  environmenI's  chemical  and  physical  condiIions 
deIermine boIh Ihe Iype and Ihe raIe oI corrosion aIIacks. 1he 
condiIions also deIermine Ihe Iype oI corrosion producIs IhaI 
are Iormed and Ihe conIrol measures IhaI need Io be Iaken. ln 
many cases, iI is impossible or raIher expensive Io compleIely 
sIop  Ihe  corrosion  process,  however,  iI  is  usually  possible  Io 
conIrol Ihe process Io accepIable levels. 
On  Ihe  Iollowing  pages  we  will  go  Ihrough  Ihe  diIIerenI 
Iorms  oI  corrosion  in  order  Io  give  you  an  idea  oI  Iheir 
characIerisIics.
Unifcrm ccrrcsicn 
UniIorm  or  general  corrosion  is  characIerised  by  corrosive 
aIIacks  proceeding  evenly  over  Ihe  enIire  surIace,  or  on  a 
large parI oI Ihe IoIal area. General Ihinning conIinues unIil 
Ihe  meIal  is  broken  down.  UniIorm  corrosion  is  Ihe  Iype  oI 
corrosion where Ihe largesI amounI oI meIal is wasIed.
Lxamples oI meIals, which are sub|ecI Io uniIorm 
corrosion. 
·  SIeel in aeraIed waIer
·  SIainless sIeel in reducing acids (such as LN 1.4301 
  (AlSl 304) in sulIuric acid)
Pitting ccrrcsicn
PiIIing  corrosion  is  a  localised  Iorm  oI  corrosive  aIIacks. 
PiIIing corrosion Iorms holes or piIs on Ihe meIal surIace. 
lI perIoraIes Ihe meIal while Ihe IoIal corrosion, measured 
by  weighI  loss,  mighI  be  raIher  minimal.   1he  raIe  oI 
peneIraIion  may  be  10  Io  100  Iimes  IhaI  oI  general 
corrosion  depending  on  Ihe  aggressiveness  oI  Ihe  liquid. 
PiIIing occurs more easily in a sIagnanI environmenI.
Lxample oI meIal IhaI is sub|ecI Io piIIing corrosion. 
·  SIainless sIeel in seawaIer
lig. 1.6.3. UniIorm corrosion
lig. 1.6.4. PiIIing corrosion
61
1. Design of pumps and motors
1.1 Pump construction, (10)
Crevice ccrrcsicn
Crevice  corrosion  -  like  piIIing  corrosion  -  is  a  localised 
Iorm oI corrosion aIIack. Rowever, crevice corrosion sIarIs 
more easily Ihan piIIing. Crevice corrosion occurs aI narrow 
openings or spaces beIween Iwo meIal surIaces or beIween 
meIals  and  non-meIal  surIaces  and  is  usually  associaIed 
wiIh a sIagnaIe condiIion in Ihe crevice. Crevices, such as 
Ihose  Iound  aI  Ilange  |oinIs  or  aI  Ihreaded  connecIions, 
are Ihus oIIen Ihe mosI criIical spoIs Ior corrosion.
Lxample oI meIal IhaI is sub|ecI Io crevice corrosion. 
·  SIainless sIeel in seawaIer
lntergranuIar ccrrcsicn
As  Ihe  name  implies,  inIergranular  corrosion  occurs  aI 
grain  boundaries.  lnIergranular  corrosion  is  also  called 
inIercrysIalline  corrosion.  1ypically,  Ihis  Iype  oI  corrosion 
occurs  when  chromium  carbide  precipiIaIes  aI  Ihe  grain 
boundaries  during  Ihe  welding  process  or  in  connecIion 
wiIh  insuIIicienI  heaI  IreaImenI.  A  narrow  region  around 
Ihe  grain  boundary  may  IhereIore  depleIe  in  chromium 
and  become  less  corrosion  resisIanI  Ihan  Ihe  resI  oI  Ihe 
maIerial.  1his  is  unIorIunaIe  because  chromium  plays  an 
imporIanI role in corrosion resisIance.
Lxamples oI meIals IhaI are sub|ecI Io inIergranular corrosion.
·  SIainless sIeel - which is insuIIicienIly welded or 
  heaI-IreaIed
·  SIainless sIeel LN 1.4401 (AlSl 316) in concenIraIed 
  niIric acid
SeIective ccrrcsicn
SelecIive  corrosion  is  a  Iype  oI  corrosion  which  aIIacks 
one  single  elemenI  oI  an  alloy  and  dissolves  Ihe  elemenI 
in  Ihe  alloy  sIrucIure.  ConsequenIly,  Ihe  alloy's  sIrucIure 
is weakened. 
Lxamples oI selecIive corrosion.
·  1he dezinciIicaIion oI unsIabilised brass, whereby a    
  weakened, porous copper sIrucIure is produced  
·  GraphiIisaIion oI gray casI iron, whereby a briIIle 
  graphiIe skeleIon is leII because oI Ihe dissoluIion 
  oI iron
lig. 1.6.S. Crevice corrosion
lig. 1.6.6. lnIergranular corrosion
lig. 1.6.7. SelecIive corrosion
Copper
Zinc corrosion products
8rass
62
5ection 1.6
MateriaIs
£rcsicn ccrrcsicn
Lrosion  corrosion  is  a  process  IhaI  involves  corrosion 
and  erosion.  1he  raIe  oI  corrosion  aIIack  is  acceleraIed 
by  Ihe  relaIive  moIion  oI  a  corrosive  liquid  and  a 
meIal  surIace.  1he  aIIack  is  localised  in  areas  wiIh 
high  velociIy  or  IurbulenI  Ilow.  Lrosion  corrosion 
aIIacks  are  characIerised  by  grooves  wiIh  direcIional 
paIIern. 
Lxamples oI meIals which are sub|ecI Io erosion corrosion.
·  8ronze in seawaIer
·  Copper in waIer
Cavitaticn ccrrcsicn
A  pumped  liquid  wiIh  high  velociIy  reduces  Ihe  pressure. 
When  Ihe  pressure  drops  below  Ihe  liquid  vapour 
pressure,  vapour  bubbles  Iorm  (Ihe  liquid  boils). 
ln  Ihe  areas  where  Ihe  vapour  bubbles  Iorm,  Ihe
liquid  is  boiling.  When  Ihe  pressure  raises  again,  Ihe 
vapour  bubbles  collapse  and  produce  inIensive 
shockwaves.  ConsequenIly,  Ihe  collapse  oI  Ihe  vapour 
bubbles  remove  meIal  or  oxide  Irom  Ihe  surIace. 
Lxamples oI meIals IhaI are sub|ecI Io caviIaIion.  
·  CasI iron in waIer aI high IemperaIure
·  8ronze in seawaIer
Stress ccrrcsicn cracking {SCC}
SIress  corrosion  cracking  (SCC)  reIers  Io  Ihe  combined 
inIluence  oI  Iensile  sIress  (applied  or  inIernal)  and 
corrosive  environmenI. 1he  maIerial  can  crack  wiIhouI 
any  signiIicanI  deIormaIion  or  obvious  deIerioraIion  oI 
Ihe  maIerial. OIIen,  piIIing  corrosion  is  associaIed  wiIh 
Ihe sIress corrosion cracking phenomena.
Lxamples  oI  meIals  IhaI  are  sub|ecI  Io  sIress  corrosion 
cracking.
·  SIainless sIeel LN 1.4401 (AlSl 316) in chlorides
·  8rass in ammonia
lig. 1.6.8. Lrosion corrosion
lig. 1.6.9. CaviIaIion corrosion
lig. 1.6.10. SIress corrosion cracking
fIow
63
1. Design of pumps and motors
1.1 Pump construction, (10)
<
Ccrrcsicn fatigue
Pure  mechanical  IaIigue  is  when  a  maIerial  sub|ecIed 
Io  a  cyclic  load  Iar  below  Ihe  ulIimaIe  Iensile  sIrengIh 
can  Iail. lI  Ihe  meIal  is  simulIaneously exposed  Io  a 
corrosive  environmenI,  Ihe  Iailure  can  Iake  place  aI  an 
even  lower  sIress  and  aIIer  a  shorIer  Iime.  ConIrary  Io 
a  pure  mechanical  IaIigue,  Ihere  is  no  IaIigue  limiI  in 
corrosion-assisIed IaIigue.
Lxample oI meIals IhaI are sub|ecI Io corrosion IaIigue.
·  Aluminium sIrucIures in corrosive aImosphere
CaIvanic ccrrcsicn
When  a  corrosive  elecIrolyIe  and  Iwo  meIallic  maIerials 
are  in  conIacI  (galvanic  cell),  corrosion  increases  on  Ihe 
leasI  noble  maIerial  (Ihe  anode)  and  decreases  on  Ihe 
noblesI  (Ihe  caIhode).  1he  increase  in  corrosion  is  called 
galvanic  corrosion.  1he  Iendency  oI  a  meIal  or  an  alloy 
Io  corrode  in  a  galvanic  cell  is  deIermined  by  iIs  posiIion 
in  Ihe  galvanic  series.  1he  galvanic  series  indicaIes  Ihe 
relaIive  nobiliIy  oI  diIIerenI  meIals  and  alloys  in  a  given 
environmenI (e.g. seawaIer, see Iigure 1.6.12).
1he  IarIher  aparI  Ihe  meIals  are  in  Ihe  galvanic  series, 
Ihe greaIer Ihe galvanic corrosion eIIecI will be. MeIals or 
alloys aI Ihe upper end are noble, while Ihose aI Ihe lower 
end are leasI noble.
 
Lxamples oI meIal IhaI are sub|ecI Io galvanic corrosion.
·  SIeel in conIacI wiIh 1.4401
·  Aluminium in conIacI wiIh copper
1he  principles  oI  galvanic  corrosion  are  used  in  caIhodic 
proIecIion.  CaIhodic  proIecIion  is  a  means  oI  reducing 
or  prevenIing  Ihe  corrosion  oI  a  meIal  surIace  by  Ihe 
use  oI  sacriIicial  anodes  (zinc  or  aluminum)  or  impressed 
currenIs. 
lig. 1.6.11. Corrosion IaIigue
lig. 1.6.12. Galvanic corrosion
lig. 1.6.13. Galvanic series Ior meIals and alloys in seawaIer
AIuminium - Iess nobIe Copper - most nobIe
64
5ection 1.6
MateriaIs
1.6.3 MetaI and metaI aIIoys
On  Ihe  Iollowing  pages,  you  can  read  abouI  Ihe  IeaIures 
oI diIIerenI meIals and meIal alloys, used Ior consIrucIion 
oI pumps.
ferrous aIIoys 
lerrous alloys are alloys where iron is Ihe prime consIiIuenI.
lerrous  alloys  are  Ihe  mosI  common  oI  all  maIerials 
because oI Iheir availabiliIy, low cosI, and versaIiliIy.
SteeI
SIeel  is  a  widely  used  maIerial  primarily  composed  oI  iron 
alloyed  wiIh  carbon.  1he  amounI  oI  carbon  in  sIeel  varies 
in Ihe range Irom 0.003° Io 1.S° by weighI. 1he conIenI oI 
carbon has an imporIanI impacI on Ihe maIerial's sIrengIh, 
weldabiliIy,  machinabiliIy,  ducIiliIy,  and  hardness.  As  a 
rule-oI-Ihumb,  an  increase  in  carbon  conIenI  will  lead  Io 
an  increase  in  sIrengIh  and  hardness  buI  Io  a  decrease  in 
ducIiliIy and weldabiliIy. 1he mosI common Iype oI sIeel is 
carbon  sIeel.  Carbon  sIeel  is  grouped  inIo  Iour  caIegories, 
see Iigure 1.6.14.
SIeel  is  available  in  wroughI  as  well  as  in  casI  condiIion. 
1he  general  characIerisIics  oI  sIeel  casIings  are  closely 
comparable  Io  Ihose  oI  wroughI  sIeels.  1he  mosI  obvious
advanIage oI sIeel is IhaI iI is relaIively inexpensive Io make, 
Iorm  and  process.  On  Ihe  oIher  hand,  Ihe  disadvanIage 
oI  sIeel  is  IhaI  iIs  corrosion  resisIance  is  low  compared  Io 
alIernaIive maIerials, such as sIainless sIeel.
CaviIaIion corrosion oI bronze impeller
Lrosion corrosion oI casI iron impeller
PiIIing corrosion oI LN 1.4401 (AlSl 316)
lnIergranular corrosion oI
sIainless sIeel
Crevice corrosion oI 
LN 1.4462 (SAl 220S)
1 mm
1ype of steeI Content of carbon
Low carbon or mild steel 0.003% to 0.30% of carbon
Medium carbon steel 0.30% to 0.45% of carbon
High carbon steel 0.45% to 0.75% of carbon
very high carbon steel 0.75% to l.50% of carbon
lig 1.6.14. lour Iypes oI carbon sIeel
6S
NcduIar {ductiIe} ircn 
Nodular  iron  conIains  around  0.03-0.0S°  by  weighI  oI 
magnesium.  Magnesium  causes  Ihe  Ilakes  Io  become 
globular  so  Ihe  graphiIe  is  dispersed  IhroughouI  a  IerriIe 
or  pearliIe  maIrix  in  Ihe  Iorm  oI  spheres  or  nodules.  1he 
graphiIe  nodules  have  no  sharp  IeaIures.  1he  round  shape 
oI  nodular  graphiIe  reduces  Ihe  sIress  concenIraIion  and 
consequenIly,  Ihe  maIerial  is  much  more  ducIile  Ihan  grey 
iron.  ligure  1.6.16  clearly  shows  IhaI  Ihe  Iensile  sIrengIh  is 
higher Ior nodular iron Ihan is Ihe case Ior grey iron. Nodular 
iron  is  normally  used  Ior  pump  parIs  wiIh  high  sIrengIh 
requiremenIs  (high  pressure  or  high  IemperaIure 
applicaIions). 
StainIess steeI
SIainless  sIeel  is  chromium  conIaining  sIeel  alloys.  1he 
minimum  chromium  conIenI  in  sIandardised  sIainless 
sIeel is 10.S°. Chromium improves Ihe corrosion resisIance 
oI  sIainless  sIeel.  1he  higher  corrosion  resisIance  is  due 
Io  a  chromium  oxide  Iilm  IhaI  is  Iormed  on  Ihe  meIal 
surIace.  1his  exIremely  Ihin  layer  is  selI-repairing  under 
Ihe righI condiIions.
Molybdenum,  nickel  and  niIrogen  are  oIher  examples  oI 
Iypical  alloying  elemenIs.    Alloying  wiIh  Ihese  elemenIs 
brings  ouI  diIIerenI  crysIal  sIrucIures, which  enable 
diIIerenI properIies in connecIion wiIh machining, Iorming, 
welding,  corrosion  resisIance,  eIc.  ln  general,  sIainless 
sIeel  has  a  higher  resisIance  Io  chemicals  (i.e.  acids)  Ihan 
sIeel and casI iron have. 
Cast ircn
CasI  iron  can  be  considered  an  alloy  oI  iron,  silicon 
and  carbon.  1ypically,  Ihe  concenIraIion  oI  carbon  is 
beIween  3-4°  by  weighI,  mosI  oI  which  is  presenI 
in  insoluble  Iorm  (e.g.  graphiIe  Ilakes  or  nodules). 
1he  Iwo  main  Iypes  are  grey  casI  iron  and  nodular 
(ducIile)  casI  iron.  1he  corrosion  resisIance  oI  casI  iron  is 
comparable Io Ihe one Ior sIeel, and someIimes even beIIer. 
CasI  iron  can  be  alloyed  wiIh  13-16°  by  weighI  silicon  or 
1S-3S°  by  weighI  nickel  (Ni-resisI)  respecIively  in  order  Io 
improve  corrosion  resisIance.  various  Iypes  oI  casI  irons  are 
widely  used  in  indusIry,  especially  Ior  valves,  pumps,  pipes 
and auIomoIive parIs. CasI iron has good corrosion resisIance 
Io neuIral and alkaline liquids (high pR) . 8uI iIs resisIance Io 
acids (low pR) is poor.
Crey ircn
ln grey iron, Ihe graphiIe is dispersed IhroughouI a IerriIe 
or  pearliIe  maIrix  in  Ihe  Iorm  oI  Ilakes.  lracIure  surIaces 
Iake on a grey appearance (hence Ihe name!). 1he graphiIe 
Ilakes  acI  as  sIress  concenIraIors  under  Iensile  loads, 
making  iI  weak  and  briIIle  in  Iension,  buI  sIrong 
and  ducIile  in  compression.  Grey  iron  is  used  Ior  Ihe 
consIrucIion oI moIor blocks because oI iIs high vibraIion 
damping  abiliIy.  Grey  iron  is  an  inexpensive  maIerial  and 
is  relaIively  easy  Io  casI  wiIh  a  minimal  risk  oI  shrinkage. 
1haI  is  why  grey  iron  is  oIIen  used  Ior  pump  parIs  wiIh 
moderaIe sIrengIh requiremenIs.
1. Design of pumps and motors
1.1 Pump construction, (10)


lig 1.6.1S. Comparison and designaIions oI grey iron
lig 1.6.16. Comparison and designaIions oI nodular iron
66
5ection 1.6
MateriaIs
ln  environmenIs  conIaining  chlorides,  sIainless  sIeel  can 
be  aIIacked  by  localised  corrosion,  e.g.  piIIing    corrosion 
and  crevice  corrosion.  1he  resisIance  oI  sIainless  sIeel  Io 
Ihese  Iypes  oI  corrosion  is  highly  dependenI  on  iIs 
chemical  composiIion.  lI  has  become  raIher  common  Io 
use  Ihe  so-called  PkL  (PiIIing  kesisIance  LquivalenI) 
values  as  a  measure  oI  piIIing  resisIance  Ior  sIainless 
sIeel.  PkL  values  are  calculaIed  by  Iormulas  in  which  Ihe 
relaIive  inIluence  oI  a  Iew  alloying  elemenIs  (chromium, 
ChemicaI composition of stainIess steeI [wZ]
Microstructure Designation % % % % % PPL
5)
LN/A|S|/UNS Carbon max. Chromium Nickel Molybdenum Other
Perritic l.40l6/430/ S43000 0.08 l6-l8 l7
Martensitic l.4057/43l/ S43l00 0.l2-0.22 l5-l7 l.5-2.5 l6
Austenitic l.4305/303/ S30300 0.l l7-l9 8-l0 S 0.l5-0.35 l8
Austenitic l.430l/304/ S30400 0.07 l7-l9.5 8-l0.5 l8
Austenitic l.4306/304L/ S30403 0.03 l8-20 l0-l2 l8
Austenitic l.440l/3l6/ S3l600 0.07 l6.5-l8.5 l0-l3 2-2.5 24
Austenitic l.4404/3l6L/ S3l603 0.03 l6.5-l8.5 l0-l3 2-2.5 24
Austenitic l.457l/3l6Ti/ 0.08 l6.5-l8.5 l0.5-l3.5 2-2.5 Ti > 5 x carbon 24
S3l635 Ti < 0.70
Austenitic l.4539/904L/ N08904 0.02 l9-2l 24-26 4-5 Cu l.2-2 34
Austenitic l.4547/none / 0.02 20 l8 6.l N 0.l8-0.22 43
S 3l254
3)
Cu 0.5-l
Perritic/ l.4462/ none/ 0.03 2l-23 4.5-6.5 2.5-3.5 N 0.l0-0.22 34
austenitic S32205
2)

Perritic/ l.44l0/none/ 0.03 25 7 4 N 0.24-0.32 43
austenitic S 32750
4)
Microstructure Designation % % % % % PPL
LN/ASTM/UNS Carbon max. Chromium Nickel Molybdenum Other
Austenitic
l)
l.4308/CP8/ 192600 0.07 l8-20 8-ll l9
Austenitic
l)
l.4408/CP8M/ 192900 0.07 l8-20 9-l2 2-2.5 26
Austenitic
l)
l.4409/CP3M/ 192800 0.03 l8-20 9-l2 2-2.5 N max. 0.2 26
Austenitic l.4584/none/ none 0.025 l9-2l 24-26 4-5
N max. 0.2
35

Cu l-3
Perritic/
Austenitic l.4470/CD3MN/ 192205 0.03 2l-23 4.5-6.5 2.5-3.5 N 0.l2-0.2 35
Perritic/ l.45l7/CD4MCuN/ N 0.l2-0.22
Austenitic 193372 0.03 24.5-26.5 2.5-3.5 2.5-3.5 Cu 2.75-3.5 38

molybdenum  and  niIrogen)  on  Ihe  piIIing  resisIance  is 
Iaken  inIo  consideraIion.  1he  higher  Ihe  PkL,  Ihe  higher 
Ihe resisIance Io localised corrosion. 8e aware IhaI Ihe PkL 
value is a very rough esIimaIe oI Ihe piIIing resisIance oI 
a sIainless sIeel and should only be used Ior comparison]
classiIicaIion oI diIIerenI Iypes oI sIainless sIeel. 
ln  Ihe  Iollowing,  we  will  presenI  Ihe  Iour  ma|or  Iypes  oI 
sIainless sIeel. IerriIic, marIensiIic, ausIeniIic and duplex. 
1) 
ConIains some IerriIe   
2)
 Also known as SAl 220S,   
3)
 Also known as 2S4 SMO,   
4)
 Also known as SAl 2S07  
S)
 PiIIing kesisIance LquivalenI (PkL). Cr° + 3.3xMo° + 16xN°.   
lig 1.6.17. Chemical composiIion oI sIainless sIeel 
67
ferritic {magnetic} 
lerriIic  sIainless  sIeel  is  characIerised  by  quiIe  good 
corrosion  properIies,  very  good  resisIance  Io  sIress 
corrosion  cracking  and  moderaIe  Ioughness.  Low  alloyed 
IerriIic  sIainless  sIeel  is  used  in  mild  environmenIs 
(Ieaspoons,  kiIchen  sinks,  washing  machine  drums, 
eIc.)  where  iI  is  a  requiremenI  IhaI  Ihe  componenI  is 
mainIenance-Iree and non-rusIing. 
Martensitic {magnetic}
MarIensiIic sIainless sIeel is characIerised by high sIrengIh 
and  limiIed  corrosion  resisIance.  MarIensiIic  sIeels  are 
used  Ior  springs,  shaIIs,  surgical  insIrumenIs  and  Ior 
sharp-edged Iools, such as knives and scissors. 
Austenitic {ncn-magnetic}
AusIeniIic  sIainless  sIeel  is  Ihe  mosI  common  Iype 
oI  sIainless  sIeel  and  is  characIerised  by  a  high 
corrosion  resisIance,  very  good  IormabiliIy,  Ioughness 
and  weldabiliIy.  AusIeniIic  sIainless  sIeel,  especially 
Ihe  LN  1.4301  and  LN  1.4401  are  used  Ior  almosI  any 
Iype  oI  pump  componenIs  in  Ihe  indusIry.  1his  kind  oI 
sIainless sIeel can be eiIher wroughI or casI.
 
LN 1.430S is one oI Ihe mosI popular sIainless sIeel Iypes 
oI  all  Ihe  Iree  machining  sIainless  sIeel  Iypes.  Due  Io  iIs 
high sulphur conIenI (0.1S-0.3S w°), Ihe machinabiliIy has 
improved  considerably  buI  unIorIunaIely  aI  Ihe  expense 
oI  iIs  corrosion  resisIance  and  iIs  weldabiliIy.  Rowever, 
over  Ihe  years  Iree  machining  grades  wiIh  a  low  sulphur 
conIenI and Ihus a higher corrosion resisIance have been 
developed.
lI  sIainless  sIeel  is  heaIed  up  Io  S00°C  -  800°C  Ior  a 
longer  period  oI  Iime  during  welding,  Ihe  chromium 
mighI Iorm chromium carbides wiIh Ihe carbon presenI in 
Ihe  sIeel. 1his  reduces  chromium's  capabiliIy  Io  mainIain 
Ihe passive Iilm and mighI lead Io inIergranular corrosion 
also reIerred Io as sensiIisaIion (see secIion 1.6.2).
lI low carbon grades oI sIainless sIeel are used Ihe risk oI 
sensiIisaIion is reduced. SIainless sIeel wiIh a low conIenI 
1. Design of pumps and motors
1.1 Pump construction, (10)
oI  carbon  is  reIerred  Io  as  LN  1.4306  (AlSl  304L)  or  LN 
1.4404  (AlSl  316L).  8oIh  grades  conIain  0.03°  oI  carbon 
compared  Io  0.07°  in  Ihe  regular  Iype  oI  sIainless  sIeel 
LN  1.4301  (AlSl  304)  and  LN  1.4401  (AlSl  316),  see 
illusIraIion 1.6.17.
1he sIabilised grades LN 1.4S71 (AlSl 3161i) conIain a small 
amounI oI IiIanium. 8ecause IiIanium has a higher aIIiniIy 
Ior  carbon  Ihan  chromium,  Ihe  IormaIion  oI  chromium 
carbides  is  minimised.  1he  conIenI  oI  carbon  is  generally 
low in modern sIainless sIeel, and wiIh Ihe easy availabiliIy 
oI  'L'  grades  Ihe  use  oI  sIabilised  grades  has  declined 
markedly.
ferritic-austenitic cr dupIex {magnetic}
lerriIic-ausIeniIic  (duplex)  sIainless  sIeel  is  characIerised 
by high sIrengIh, good Ioughness, high corrosion resisIance 
and  excellenI  resisIance  Io  sIress  corrosion  cracking  and 
corrosion IaIigue in parIicular.
lerriIic-ausIeniIic  sIainless  sIeel  is  Iypically  used  in 
applicaIions  IhaI  require  high  sIrengIh,  high  corrosion 
resisIance  and  low  suscepIibiliIy  Io  sIress  corrosion  cracking 
or  a  combinaIion  oI  Ihese  properIies.  SIainless  sIeel 
LN 1.4462 is widely used Ior making pump shaIIs and pump 
housings.
68
5ection 1.6
MateriaIs
NickeI aIIoys  
Nickel  base  alloys  are  deIined  as  alloys  in  which  nickel 
is  presenI  in  greaIer  proporIion  Ihan  any  oIher  alloying 
elemenI.  1he  mosI  imporIanI  alloying  consIiIuenIs  are 
iron,  chromium,  copper,  and  molybdenum.  1he  alloying 
consIiIuenIs  make  iI  possible  Io  Iorm  a  wide  range  oI 
alloy  classes.  Nickel  and  nickel  alloys  have  Ihe  abiliIy  Io 
wiIhsIand  a  wide  varieIy  oI  severe  operaIing  condiIions, 
Ior  insIance  corrosive  environmenIs,  high  IemperaIures, 
high sIresses or a combinaIion oI Ihese IacIors. 
RasIelloys
1M
  alloys are a line oI commercial alloys conIaining 
Ni,  Mo,  Cr,  and  le.  Nickel  base  alloys,  such  as  lnconel
1M
 
Alloy 62S, RasIelloys
1M
 C-276 and C-22 are highly corrosion 
resisIanI and noI sub|ecI Io piIIing or crevice corrosion in 
low  velociIy  seawaIer,  and  do  noI  suIIer  Irom  erosion  aI 
high velociIy. 
 
1he  price  oI  nickel  base  alloy  limiIs  iIs  use  in  cerIain 
applicaIions.  Nickel  alloys  are  available  in  boIh  wroughI 
and  casI  grades.  Rowever,  nickel  alloys  are  more  diIIiculI 
Io casI Ihan Ihe common carbon sIeels and sIainless sIeel 
alloys.  Nickel  alloys  are  especially  used  Ior  pump  parIs  in 
Ihe chemical process indusIry.
Copper aIIoys
Pure copper has excellenI Ihermal and elecIrical properIies, 
buI is a very soII and ducIile maIerial. 
Alloying  addiIions  resulI  in  diIIerenI  casI  and  wroughI 
maIerials,  which  are  suiIable  Ior  use  in  Ihe  producIion  oI 
pumps,  pipelines,  IiIIings,  pressure  vessels  and  Ior  many 
marine, elecIrical and general engineering applicaIions.
8rasses  are  Ihe  mosI  widely  used  oI  Ihe  copper  alloys 
because  oI  Iheir  low  cosI,  Iheir  easy  or  inexpensive 
IabricaIion  and  machining.  Rowever,  Ihey  are  inIerior  in 
sIrengIh Io bronzes and musI noI be used in environmenIs 
IhaI cause dezinciIicaIion (see selecIive corrosion).
ked  brass,  bronze  and  copper  nickels  in  parIicular  have, 
compared  Io  casI  iron  a  high  resisIance  Io  chlorides  in 
aggressive liquids, such as seawaIer. ln such environmenIs, 
brass is unsuiIable because oI iIs Iendency Io dezinciIicaIe. 
All  copper  alloys  have  poor  resisIance  Io  alkaline  liquids 
(high  pR),  ammonia  and  sulIides  and  are  sensiIive  Io 
erosion.  8rass,  red  brass  and  bronze  are  widely  used  Ior 
making  bearings, impellers and pump housings. 

1} leoJ ron be oJJeJ os on ollcyinq element tc imprcve
the morhinobility.
2} 8rcnze ron be ollcyeJ with oluminium tc inrreose strenqth.
lig 1.6.18. Common Iypes oI copper alloys
69
1itanium
Pure IiIanium has a low densiIy, is quiIe ducIile and has a 
relaIively low sIrengIh.  Rowever, when a limiIed amounI 
oI oxygen is added iI will sIrengIhen IiIanium and produce 
Ihe so-called commercial-pure grades. AddiIions oI various 
alloying  elemenIs,  such  as  aluminium  and  vanadium 
increase  iIs  sIrengIh  signiIicanIly,  aI  Ihe  expense  oI 
ducIiliIy.  1he  aluminium  and  vanadium  alloyed  IiIanium 
(1i-6Al-4v)  is  Ihe  "workhorse"  alloy  oI  Ihe  IiIanium 
indusIry. lI is used in many aerospace engine and airIrame 
componenIs.  8ecause  IiIanium  is  a  high-price  maIerial,  iI 
is noI yeI a maIerial which is oIIen used Ior making pump 
componenIs. 
1iIanium  is  a  very  reacIive  maIerial.  As  iI  is  Ihe  case  Ior 
sIainless sIeel, IiIanium's corrosion resisIance depends on 
Ihe  IormaIion  oI  an  oxide  Iilm.  Rowever,  Ihe  oxide  Iilm 
is  more  proIecIive  Ihan  IhaI  on  sIainless  sIeel.  1hereIore, 
IiIanium  perIorms  much  beIIer  Ihan  sIainless  sIeel  in 
aggressive  liquids,  such  as  seawaIer,  weI  chlorine  or 
organic chlorides, IhaI cause piIIing and crevice corrosion.
1. Design of pumps and motors
1.1 Pump construction, (10)
AIuminium
 
Pure  aluminium  is  a  lighI  and  soII  meIal  wiIh  a  densiIy 
oI  abouI  a  Ihird  oI  IhaI  oI  sIeel.  Pure  aluminium  has  a 
high  elecIrical  and  Ihermal  conducIiviIy.  1he  mosI  common 
alloying  elemenIs  are  silicon  (silumin),  magnesium,  iron  and 
copper.    Silicon  increases  Ihe  maIerial's  casIabiliIy,  copper 
increases  iIs  machinabiliIy  and  magnesium  increases  iIs 
corrosion resisIance and sIrengIh. 
1he obvious advanIages oI aluminium are IhaI Ihe maIerial 
naIurally  generaIes  a  proIecIive  oxide  Iilm  and  is  highly 
corrosion  resisIanI  iI  iI  is  exposed  Io  Ihe  aImosphere. 
1reaImenI,  such  as  anodising,  can  IurIher  improve  Ihis 
properIy.  Aluminium  alloys  are  widely  used  in  sIrucIures 
where  a  high  sIrengIh  Io  weighI  raIio  is  imporIanI,  such 
as  in  Ihe  IransporIaIion  indusIry.  lor  example,  Ihe  use  oI 
aluminium  in  vehicles  and  aircraIIs  reduces  weighI  and 
energy consumpIion.
On  Ihe  oIher  hand,  Ihe  disadvanIage  oI  aluminium  is  IhaI 
iI  is  noI  sIable  aI  low  or  high  pR  and  in  chloride-conIaining 
environmenIs. 1his properIy makes aluminium unsuiIable Ior 
exposure  Io  aqueous  soluIions  especially  under  condiIions 
wiIh  high  Ilow.  1his  is  IurIher  emphasised  by  Ihe  IacI  IhaI 
aluminium  is  a  reacIive  meIal,  i.e.  has  a  low  posiIion  in  Ihe 
galvanic  series  (see  galvanic  corrosion)  and  may  easily  suIIer 
Irom  galvanic  corrosion  iI  coupled  Io  nobler  meIals  and 
alloys. 
Deigati a ayig eeet
1000-series Unalloyed (pure) >99° Al
2000-series
Copper is Ihe principal alloying elemenI, Ihough oIher
elemenIs (magnesium) may be speciIied
3000-series Manganese is Ihe principal alloying elemenI
4000-series Silicon is Ihe principal alloying elemenI
S000-series Magnesium is Ihe principal alloying elemenI
6000-series
Magnesium and silicon are principal alloying elemenIs
7000-series
Zinc is Ihe principal alloying elemenI, buI oIher elemenIs,
such as copper, magnesium, chromium, and zirconium
may be speciIied
8000-series
OIher elemenIs (including Iin and some liIhium
composiIions)

CP: commercial pure (titanium content above 99.5%)
lig 1.6.19. Ma|or alloying elemenIs oI aluminium
lig 1.6.20. 1iIanium grades and alloy characIerisIics
70
5ection 1.6
MateriaIs
1.6.4 Ceramics
Ceramic  maIerials  are  deIined  as  inorganic,  non-meIallic 
maIerials,  which  are  Iypically  crysIalline  in  naIure.  1hey 
are  composed  oI  meIallic  and  non-meIallic  elemenIs. 
Common Iechnical ceramics are aluminium oxide (alumina 
-  Al
2
O
3
),  silicon  carbide  (SiC),  IungsIen  carbide  (WC),  and 
silicon niIride (Si
3
N
4
). 
Ceramics  are  suiIable  Ior  applicaIions  which  require  high 
Ihermal sIabiliIy, high sIrengIh, high wear resisIance, and 
high corrosion resisIance. 1he disadvanIage oI ceramics is 
Ihe  low  ducIiliIy  and  high  Iendency  Ior  briIIle  IracIures. 
Ceramics  are  mainly  used  Ior  making  bearings  and  seal 
Iaces Ior shaII seals.
1.6.5 PIastics
Some plasIics are derived Irom naIural subsIances, such as 
planIs, buI mosI Iypes are man-made. 1hese are known as 
synIheIic plasIics. MosI synIheIic plasIics come Irom crude 
oil, buI coal and naIural gas are also used. 
1here  are  Iwo  main  Iypes  oI  plasIics.  1hermoplasIics  and 
IhermoseIs  (IhermoseIIing  plasIics).  1he  IhermoplasIics 
are Ihe mosI common kind oI plasIic used worldwide. 
PlasIics  oIIen  conIain  addiIives,  which  IransIer  cerIain 
addiIional  properIies  Io  Ihe  maIerial.  lurIhermore, 
plasIics  can  be  reinIorced  wiIh  Iiberglass  or  oIher  Iibres. 
1hese  plasIics  IogeIher  wiIh  addiIives  and  hbres  are  also 
reIerred Io as composiIes.
  Lxamples oI addiIives Iound in plasIics
·  lnorganic Iillers Ior mechanical reinIorcemenI 
·  Chemical sIabilisers, e.g. anIioxidanIs 
·  PlasIicisers 
·  llame reIardanIs  
1hermopIastics
1hermoplasIic polymers consisI oI long polymer molecules 
IhaI  are  noI  linked  Io  each  oIher,  i.e.  have  no  cross-links. 
1hey are oIIen supplied as granules and heaIed Io permiI 
IabricaIion by meIhods, such as moulding or exIrusion. 
A wide range is available, Irom low-cosI commodiIy plasIics 
(e.g.  PL,  PP,  PvC)  Io  high  cosI  engineering  IhermoplasIics 
(e.g.  PLLK)  and  chemical  resisIanI  Iluoropolymers  (e.g. 
P1lL, PvDl). P1lL is one oI Ihe Iew IhermoplasIics, which 
is  noI  melI-processable.  1hermoplasIics  are  widely  used 
Ior  making  pump  housings  or  Ior  lining  oI  pipes  and  pump 
housings. 
1hermosets
1hermoseIs  harden  permanenIly  when  heaIed,  as  cross-
linking  hinders  bending  and  roIaIions.  Cross-linking  is 
achieved  during  IabricaIion  using  chemicals,  heaI,  or 
radiaIion,  Ihis  process  is  called  curing  or  vulcanizaIion. 
1hermoseIs  are  harder,  more  dimensionally  sIable,  and 
more briIIle Ihan IhermoplasIics and cannoI be remelIed. 
lmporIanI  IhermoseIs  include  epoxies,  polyesIers, 
and  polyureIhanes.  1hermoseIs  are  among  oIher  Ihings 
used Ior surIace coaIings.
PP
PL
PvC
PLLK
PvDP
PTPL`
Abbreviaticn PcIymer name
Polypropylene
Polyethylene
Polyvinylchloride
Polyetheretherketone
Polyvinylidene fluoride
Polytetrafluoroethylene
`1rade name. 1eIlon°
Linear polymer chains
1hermcpIastics
£Iastcmers
1hermcsets
8ranched polymer chains
weakly cross-linked polymer chains
Strongly cross-linked polymer chains
lig 1.6.22. DiIIerenI Iypes oI polymers
lig 1.6.21. Overview oI polymer names
71
1. Design of pumps and motors
1.1 Pump construction, (10)
1.6.6 kubber 
1he  Ierm  rubber  includes  boIh  naIural  rubber  and 
synIheIic  rubber.  kubbers  (or  elasIomers)  are  Ilexible  long-
chain polymers IhaI can be sIreIched easily Io several Iimes 
Iheir  unsIreIched  lengIh  and  which  rapidly  reIurn  Io  Iheir 
original  dimensions  when  Ihe  applied  sIress  is  released. 
kubbers  are  cross-linked  (vulcanized),  buI  have  a  low  cross-
link  densiIy,  see  Iigure  1.6.22.  1he  cross-link  is  Ihe  key  Io 
Ihe  elasIic,  or  rubbery,  properIies  oI  Ihese  maIerials.  1he 
elasIiciIy provides resiliency in sealing applicaIions. DiIIerenI 
componenIs  in  a  pump  are  made  oI  rubber,  e.g.  gaskeIs
and O-rings (see secIion 1.3 on shaII seals). ln Ihis secIion we 
will  presenI  Ihe  diIIerenI  kinds  oI  rubber  qualiIies  and  Iheir 
main  properIies  as  regards  IemperaIure  and  resisIance  Io 
diIIerenI kinds oI liquid groups.
AI  IemperaIures  up  Io  abouI  100°C  niIrile  rubber  is  an 
inexpensive maIerial IhaI has a high resisIance Io oil and 
Iuel.  DiIIerenI  grades  exisI  -  Ihe  higher  Ihe  acryloniIrile 
(ACN) conIenI, Ihe higher Ihe oil resisIance, buI Ihe poorer 
is Ihe low IemperaIure IlexibiliIy. NiIrile rubbers have high 
resilience  and  high  wear  resisIance  buI  only  moderaIe 
sIrengIh.  lurIher,  Ihe  rubber  has  limiIed  weaIhering 
resisIance and poor solvenI resisIance. lI can generally be 
used down Io abouI -30°C, buI cerIain grades can operaIe 
aI lower IemperaIures.
LIhylene  propylene  has  excellenI  waIer  resisIance  which 
is  mainIained  Io  high  IemperaIures  approximaIely  120-
140°C. 1he rubber Iype has good resisIance Io acids, sIrong 
alkalis  and  highly  polar  Iluids,  such  as  meIhanol  and 
aceIone.  Rowever,  iI  has  very  poor  resisIance  Io  mineral 
oil and Iuel.
fIucrceIastcmers {fkM} 
lluoroelasIomers cover a whole Iamily oI rubbers designed 
Io  wiIhsIand  oil,  Iuel  and  a  wide  range  oI  chemicals 
including  non-polar  solvenIs.    oIIers  excellenI 
resisIance  Io  high  IemperaIure  operaIion  (up  Io  200°C 
depending  on  Ihe  grade)  in  air  and  diIIerenI  Iypes  oI  oil. 
  rubbers  have  limiIed  resisIance  Io  sIeam,  hoI  waIer, 
meIhanol, and oIher highly polar Iluids. lurIher, Ihis Iype 
oI  rubber  has  poor  resisIance  Io  amines,  sIrong  alkalis 
and  many  Ireons.  1here  are  sIandard  and  special  grades 
- Ihe laIIer have special properIies, such as improved low-
IemperaIure or chemical resisIance. 
 
Silicone  rubbers  have  ouIsIanding  properIies,  such  as  low 
compression  seI  in  a  wide  range  oI  IemperaIures  (Irom 
-60°C  Io  200°C  in  air),  excellenI  elecIrical  insulaIion  and 
are  non-Ioxic.  Silicone  rubbers  are  resisIanI  Io  waIer, 
some  acids  and  oxidizing  chemicals.  ConcenIraIed  acids, 
alkalines,  and  solvenIs  should  noI  be  used  wiIh  silicone 
rubbers.  ln  general,  Ihese  Iypes  oI  rubber  have  poor 
resisIance  Io  oil  and  Iuel.  Rowever,  Ihe  resisIance  oI  lMO 
silicone  rubber  Io  oil  and  Iuel  is  beIIer  Ihan  IhaI  oI  Ihe 
silicone rubber Iypes MO, vMO, and PMO.
PerIluoroelasIomers  have  very  high  chemical  resisIance, 
almosI comparable Io IhaI oI P1lL (polyIeIraIluoreIhylene, 
e.g.  1eIlon
k
).  1hey  can  be  used  up  Io  high  IemperaIures, 
buI Iheir disadvanIages are diIIiculI processing, very high 
cosI and limiIed use aI low IemperaIures.  
Common types of copper aIIoys
N8k
Abbreviaticn
Nitrile rubber
£PDM, £PM Lthylene propylene rubber
fkM Pluoroelastomers viton
P
Siloprene
P
8una-N
P
ffkM Perfluoroelastomers
Chemraz
P
Kalrez
P
M0, VM0, PM0, fM0 Silicone rubber
Ccmmcn name
£xampIes cf
trade name
Nordel
P
lig 1.6.23. kubber Iypes
72
5ection 1.6
MateriaIs
1.6.7 Coatings
ProIecIive  coaIing  -  meIallic,  non-meIallic  (inorganic) 
or organic - is a common meIhod oI corrosion conIrol. 1he 
main IuncIion oI coaIings is (aside Irom galvanic coaIings, 
such  as  zinc)  Io  provide  an  eIIecIive  barrier  beIween  Ihe 
meIal (subsIraIe) and iIs environmenI. 1hey allow Ihe use 
oI  normal  sIeel  or  aluminium  insIead  oI  more  expensive 
maIerials.  ln  Ihe  Iollowing  secIion  we  will  examine 
Ihe  possibiliIies  oI  prevenIing  corrosion  by  means  oI 
diIIerenI coaIings. 
MeIallic and  non-meIallic (inorganic) coaIings and organic 
coaIings.
MetaIIic coatings
MetaIIic ccatings Iess ncbIe than the substrate
Zinc  coaIings  are  commonly  used  Ior  Ihe  proIecIion  oI 
sIeel  sIrucIures  againsI  aImospheric  corrosion.  Zinc  has 
Iwo  IuncIions.  iI  acIs  as  a  barrier  coaIing  and  iI  provides 
galvanic  proIecIion.  Should  an  exposed  area  oI  sIeel 
occur,  Ihe  zinc  surIace  preIerenIially  corrodes  aI  a  slow 
raIe  and  proIecIs  Ihe  sIeel.  1he  preIerenIial  proIecIion 
is  reIerred  Io  as  caIhodic  proIecIion.  When  damage  is 
small, Ihe proIecIive corrosion producIs oI zinc will Iill Ihe 
exposed area and sIop Ihe aIIack.  
MetaIIic ccatings ncbIer than the substrate
LlecIroplaIing  oI  nickel  and  chromium  coaIings  on  sIeel 
are  examples  oI  meIallic  coaIings  IhaI  are  nobler  Ihan 
Ihe subsIraIe. Unlike galvanic coaIings where Ihe coaIing 
corrodes  near  areas  where  Ihe  base  meIal  is  exposed, 
any  void  or  damage  in  a  barrier  coaIing  can  lead  Io  an 
immediaIe base meIal aIIack.
To protect the base steel,
zinc coating sacrifices itself
slowly by galvanic action.
Steel coated with a more noble
metal, such as nickel, corrodes
more rapidly if the coating
is damaged.
lig 1.6.24. Galvanic vs. barrier corrosion proIecIion
73
Paints
As  menIioned  above,  painIs  are  an  imporIanI  class  oI 
organic  coaIing.  ligure  1.6.2S  shows  several  Iypes  oI 
organic  coaIings.  A  Iypical  painI  IormulaIion  conIains 
polymeric  binders,  solvenIs,  pigmenIs  and  addiIives.  lor 
environmenIal  reasons,  organic  solvenIs  are  increasingly 
being replaced by waIer or simply eliminaIed, e.g powder 
coaIing.  PainIed  meIal  sIrucIures  usually  involve  Iwo  or 
more layers oI coaIing applied on a primary coaIing, which 
is in direcI conIacI wiIh Ihe meIal.    
1. Design of pumps and motors
1.1 Pump construction, (10)
<
Non-metaIIic coatings 
(inorganic coatings)
Conversion  coaIings  are  an  imporIanI  caIegory  oI  non-
meIallic coaIings (inorganic). 
Ccnversicn ccatings
Conversion  coaIings  are  Iormed  by  a  conIrolled  corrosion 
reacIion  oI  Ihe  subsIraIe  in  an  oxidised  soluIion. 
Well-known examples oI conversion coaIings are anodising 
or chromaIing oI aluminium, and phosphaIe IreaImenI oI 
sIeel.    Anodising  is  mainly  used  Ior  surIace  proIecIion  oI 
aluminium, while chromaIing and phosphaIing are usually 
used  Ior  pre-IreaImenI  in  connecIion  wiIh  painIing. 
8esides  improving  painI  adhesion,  iI  helps  Io  prevenI  Ihe 
spreading oI rusI under layers oI painI.
Drganic coatings 
Organic  coaIings  conIain  organic  compounds  and  are 
available in a wide range oI diIIerenI Iypes. Organic coaIings 
are applied Io Ihe meIal by meIhods oI spraying, dipping, 
brushing, lining or elecIro-coaIing (painI applied by means 
oI  elecIric  currenI)  and  Ihey  may  or  may  noI  require 
heaI-curing.  8oIh  IhermoplasIic  coaIings,  such  as 
polyamide,  polypropylene,  polyeIhylene,  PvDl  and  P1lL  and 
elasIomer  coaIings  are  applied  Io  meIal  subsIraIes  Io 
combine  Ihe  mechanical  properIies  oI  meIal  wiIh  Ihe 
chemical  resisIance  oI  plasIics  buI  painIs  are  by  Iar  Ihe 
mosI widely used organic coaIing. 
PhysicaI states of common organic coatings
Pesin Solvent- water- Powder Two comp.
type based based coating liquid
Acrylic X X X
Alkyd X X
Lpoxy X X X X
Polyester X X X
Polyurethane X X X X
vinyl X X X
lig 1.6.2S. Physical sIaIes oI common organic coaIings
74
5ection 1.6
MateriaIs
Chapter 2. InstaIIation and performance reading
Secticn 2.1: Pump instaIIaticn
2.1.1   New insIallaIion
2.1.2   LxisIing insIallaIion
2.1.3   Pipe ßow Ior single-pump insIallaIion
2.1.4   LimiIaIion oI noise and vibraIions
2.1.S   Sound level (L)
Secticn 2.2: Pump perfcrmance
2.2.1   Rydraulic Ierms
2.2.2   LlecIrical Ierms
2.2.3   Liquid properIies
CorrecI advice and selecIion oI pump Iype Ior an insIallaIion 
has  larger  implicaIion  Ihan  whaI  meeIs  Ihe  eye.  1he 
larger  Ihe  pumps,  Ihe  greaIer  Ihe  cosIs  wiIh  respecI 
Io  invesImenI,  insIallaIion,  commissioning,  running 
and  mainIenance  -  basically  Ihe  liIe  cycle  cosI  (LCC).  An 
exIensive  producI  porIIolio  combined  wiIh  compeIenI 
advice and aIIer-sales service is Ihe IoundaIion oI a correcI 
selecIion.  1he  Iollowing  analysis,  recommendaIions  and 
hinIs  are  general  Ior  any  insIallaIion,  buI  Io  a  greaIer 
exIenI  relevanI  Ior  medium-sized  and  large  insIallaIions. 
We  will  presenI  our  recommendaIions  Ior  Iwo  Iypes  oI 
insIallaIion. New and exisIing insIallaIions.
2.1.1 New instaIIation
-  lI Ihe pipework has noI been planned yeI, you can base  
  Ihe  selecIion  oI  pump  Iype  on  oIher  primary  selecIion 
  criIeria,  e.g.  eIIiciency,  invesImenI  cosIs  or  liIe  cycle 
  cosIs  (LCC).  1his  will  noI  be  covered  in  Ihis 
  secIion.  Rowever,  Ihe  general  guidelines,  which  are 
  presenIed,  also  apply  Ior  pipework  IhaI  has  noI  yeI 
  been planned.
-  lI Ihe pipework has already been planned, Ihe selecIion  
  oI pump is equivalenI Io replacing a pump in an exisIing
  insIallaIion.
76
2.1.2 £xisting instaIIation - repIacement
1he  Iollowing  Iive  sIeps  will  help  you  make  an  opIimum 
pump selecIion Ior an exisIing insIallaIion.
Pre-investigaticn cf the instaIIaticn shcuId incIude 
the fcIIcwing ccnsideraticns:
-  8asic pipe Ilow - pipes in and ouI oI Ihe building, e.g.    
  Irom ground, along Iloor or Irom ceiling
-  SpeciIic pipework aI Ihe poinI oI insIallaIion, e.g. 
  in-line or end-sucIion, dimensions, maniIolds
-  Space available - widIh, depIh and heighI
-  AccessibiliIy in connecIion wiIh insIallaIion and 
  mainIenance, Ior insIance doorways
-  AvailabiliIy oI liIIing equipmenI or alIernaIively 
  accessibiliIy oI such equipmenI
-  lloor Iype, e.g. solid or suspended Iloor wiIh basemenI
-  LxisIing IoundaIion
-  LxisIing elecIric insIallaIion
Previcus pump instaIIaticn
-  Pump make, Iype, speciIicaIions including old duIy    
  poinI, shaII seal, maIerials, gaskeIs, conIrolling
-  RisIory, e.g. liIeIime, mainIenance
future requirements
-  Desired improvemenIs and beneIiIs
-  New selecIion criIeria including duIy poinIs and 
  operaIing Iimes, IemperaIure, pressure, liquid 
  speciIicaIions
-  Supplier criIeria, e.g. availabiliIy oI spare parIs
Adviscry
-  Ma|or changes mighI be beneIicial in a long or shorI 
  Ierm or boIh and musI be documenIed, e.g. insIallaIion
   savings, liIe cycle cosIs (LCC), reducIion on environmenIal 
  impacI like noise and vibraIions and accessibiliIy in 
  connecIion wiIh mainIenance
SeIecticn
-  MusI be based on a cusIomer-agreed lisI oI prioriIies
lor Ihe selecIion oI Ihe correcI pump Iype and advice on 
insIallaIion, Iwo main areas are imporIanI. Pipe Ilow and 
limiIaIion oI noise and vibraIions. 1hese Iwo areas will
be dealI wiIh on Ihe Iollowing pages.
5ection 2.1
Pump instaIIation
2.1.3 Pipe fIow for singIe-pump instaIIation
ligure 2.1.1 is based on single-pump insIallaIion. ln parallel insIallaIions accessibiliIy plays a 
ma|or role Ior how good a pump choice is. 
1he evaluaIion criIerion is as simple pipework as possible, hence as Iew bends as possible.
Pipewcrk
1o the pump:
Ion fIoor
8est choice
8est choice
8est choice
8est choice
8est choice
8est choice
8est choice
Cood choice
Cood choice
Cood choice
Cood choice
Cood choice
Cood choice
Cood choice
Cood choice Cood choice
Cood choice Cood choice
Least good choice Least good choice
Least good choice
Least good choice
Cood choice
8est choice
8est choice
8est choice 8est choice
8est choice
8est choice
Not appIicabIe
from ground
A. In-Iine cIose-coupIed
(horizontaI or verticaI
mounting)
from ceiIing
WaII-
mounted
from the pump:
AIong fIoor
AIong fIoor
1o ground
1o ceiIing
1o ground
1o ceiIing
WaII-
mounted
AIong fIoor
1o ceiIing
Pump type
1o ground
C. £nd-suction Iong-coupIed
(onIy horizontaI mounting)

8. £nd-suction cIose- coupIed
(horizontaI or verticaI
mounting)
5cores:
8est choice
Cood choice
Least good choice
Not appIicabIe
lig. 2.1.1 Pipework and pump Iype
77
AccessibiliIy plays a ma|or role in how well a speciIic pump 
choice is in connecIion wiIh insIallaIion oI several pumps 
in  parallel.  1he  accessibiliIy  is  noI  always  easy  Ior  in-line 
pumps  insIalled  in  parallel  because  oI  Ihe  pipework,  see 
Iigure  2.1.2.    As  iI  appears  Irom  Iigure  2.1.3,  end-sucIion 
pumps insIalled in parallel provide easier accessibiliIy.
2.1.4 Limitation of noise and vibrations
1o  achieve  opIimum  operaIion  and  minimise  noise  and 
vibraIion,  iI  may  be  necessary  Io  consider  vibraIion 
dampening  oI  Ihe  pump  in  cerIain  cases.  Generally,  Ihis 
should  always  be  considered  in  Ihe  case  oI  pumps  wiIh 
moIors  above  7.S  kW.  Smaller  moIor  sizes,  however,  may 
also  cause  undesirable  noise  and  vibraIion.  Noise  and 
vibraIion  are  generaIed  by  Ihe  roIaIion  in  moIor  and 
pump  and  by  Ihe  Ilow  in  pipes  and  IiIIings.  1he  eIIecI 
on  Ihe  environmenI  depends  on  correcI  insIallaIion  and 
Ihe  sIaIe  oI  Ihe  enIire  sysIem.  8elow  we  will  presenI  3 
diIIerenI  ways  oI  limiIing  noise  and  vibraIion  in  a  pump 
insIallaIion. loundaIion, dampeners and expansion |oinI.
foundation
lloor  consIrucIions  can  be  divided  inIo  Iwo  Iypes.  Solid 
Iloor and suspended Iloor.
  5oIid - minimum risk oI noise due Io bad 
  Iransmission oI vibraIions, see Iigure 2.1.4.
  5uspended - risk oI Iloor ampliIying Ihe noise.    
  8asemenI can acI as a resonance box, 
  see Iigure 2.1.S.
1he pump should be insIalled on a plane and rigid surIace. 
lour  basic  ways  oI  insIallaIion  exisI  Ior  Ihe  Iwo  Iypes 
oI  Iloor  consIrucIion.  lloor,  plinIh,  IloaIing  plinIh  and 
IoundaIion suspended on vibraIion dampeners.
lig. 2.1.3. 
3 end-sucIion pumps in parallel, easier mainIenace access 
because oI pipework
lig. 2.1.4. Solid Iloor consIrucIion
lig. 2.1.S. Suspended Iloor consIrucIion
lig. 2.1.2. 
3 in-line pumps in parallel, limiIed mainIenance 
access because oI pipework
fIccr
ScIid grcund
fIccr
WaII
Crcund ñccr
8asement
fIccr
ScIid grcund
78
5ection 2.1
Pump instaIIation
fIccr 
DirecI mounIing on Iloor, hence direcI vibraIion    
Iransmission, see Iigure 2.1.6.
PIinth 
Poured direcIly on concreIe Iloor, hence as Iloor, see   
Iigure 2.1.7.
fIcating pIinth 
kesIing on a dead maIerial, e.g. sand, hence 
reduced risk oI vibraIion Iransmission, see Iigure 2.1.8.
 
fcundaticn suspended cn vibraticn dampeners 
OpIimum soluIion wiIh conIrolled vibraIion 
Iransmission, see Iigure 2.1.9.
As  a  rule  oI  Ihumb,  Ihe  weighI  oI  a  concreIe  IoundaIion 
should be 1.S x Ihe pump weighI. 1his weighI is needed Io 
geI Ihe dampeners Io work eIIicienIly aI low pump speed. 
lig. 2.1.6. lloor
lloor     8ase plaIe    Pump uniI
lig. 2.1.10.  1he same 
IoundaIion rules go 
Ior verIical in-line 
pumps
lig. 2.1.7. PlinIh
lloor     PlinIh    8ase plaIe    Pump uniI
lig. 2.1.8. 
lloaIing plinIh
lloor    Sand    PlinIh    8ase plaIe    Pump uniI
lig. 2.1.9. loundaIion 
suspended on 
vibraIion dampeners 
lloor    
vibraIion dampeners    loundaIion    8ase plaIe    Pump uniI
Pump uniI
  
loundaIion
vibraIion 
dampeners
lloor
79
Dampeners
1he  selecIion  oI  Ihe  righI  vibraIion  dampener  requires 
Ihe Iollowing daIa.
-  lorces acIing on Ihe dampener
-  MoIor speed considering speed conIrol, iI any
-  kequired dampening in ° (suggesIed value is 70°)
1he  deIerminaIion  oI  Ihe  righI  dampener  varies  Irom 
insIallaIion  Io  insIallaIion  buI  a  wrong  selecIion  oI 
dampener may increase Ihe vibraIion level in cerIain cases. 
1he supplier should IhereIore size vibraIion dampeners.
Pumps  insIalled  wiIh  vibraIion  dampeners  musI  always 
have  expansion  |oinIs  IiIIed  aI  boIh  Ihe  sucIion  and  Ihe 
discharge side. 1his is imporIanI in order Io avoid IhaI Ihe 
pump hangs in Ihe Ilanges. 
£xpansion joints
Lxpansion |oinIs are insIalled Io.
-  absorb expansions]conIracIions in Ihe pipework    
  caused by changing liquid IemperaIure
-  reduce mechanical sIrains in connecIion wiIh pressure    
  waves in Ihe pipework
-  isolaIe mechanical noise in Ihe pipework (noI Ior meIal   
  bellows expansion |oinIs)
Lxpansion  |oinIs  musI  noI  be  insIalled  Io  compensaIe  Ior 
inaccuracies in Ihe pipework, such as cenIre displacemenI 
or misalignmenI oI Ilanges.
  
Lxpansion  |oinIs  are  IiIIed  aI  a  disIance  oI  minimum  1  Io 
1.S 
.
 DN diameIer Irom Ihe pump on Ihe sucIion side as well 
as  on  Ihe  discharge  side.  1his  prevenIs  Ihe  developmenI  oI 
Iurbulence in Ihe expansion |oinIs, resulIing in beIIer sucIion 
condiIions  and  a  minimum  pressure  loss  on  Ihe  pressure 
side.  AI  high  waIer  velociIies  (>S  m]s)  iI  is  besI    Io  insIall 
larger expansion |oinIs corresponding Io Ihe pipework.
lig. 2.1.11. lnsIallaIion wiIh expansion |oinIs, vibraIion dampeners and 
Iixed pipework
8ase plaIe
Pump uniI    
vibraIion 
dampeners 
lloor
Lxpansion
|oinI
loundaIion
80
5ection 2.1
Pump instaIIation
ligures  2.1.12-2.1.14  show  examples  oI  rubber  bellows 
expansion |oinIs wiIh or wiIhouI Iie bars.
Lxpansion |oinIs wiIh Iie bars can be used Io minimise Ihe 
Iorces  caused  by  Ihe  expansion  |oinIs.  Lxpansion  |oinIs 
wiIh Iie bars are recommended Ior sizes larger Ihan DN 100. 
An  expansion  |oinI  wiIhouI  Iie  bars  will  exerI  Iorce  on 
Ihe  pump  Ilanges.  1hese  Iorces  aIIecI  Ihe  pump  and  Ihe 
pipework.
1he  pipes  musI  be  Iixed  so  IhaI  Ihey  do  noI  sIress  Ihe 
expansion  |oinIs  and  Ihe  pump,  see  Iigure  2.1.11.  1he  Iix 
poinIs  should  always  be  placed  as  close  Io  Ihe  expansion 
|oinIs  as  possible.  lollow  Ihe  expansion  |oinI  supplier's 
insIrucIions.
AI IemperaIures above 100°C combined wiIh a high pressure, 
meIal bellows expansion |oinIs are oIIen preIerred due Io 
Ihe risk oI rupIure. 
2.1.5 5ound IeveI (L)
1he  sound  level  in  a  sysIem  is  measured  in  decibel  (d8). 
Noise  is  unwanIed  sound.  1he  level  oI  noise  can  be 
measured in Ihe Iollowing Ihree ways. 
  1. Pressure - L
p
 . 1he pressure oI Ihe air waves
  2. Power - L
W
 . 1he power oI Ihe sound
  3. lnIensiIy - L
l
. 1he power per m
2
 (will noI be 
      covered in Ihis book)
lI is noI possible Io compare Ihe Ihree values direcIly, buI iI 
is possible Io calculaIe beIween Ihem based on sIandards. 
1he rule oI Ihumb is. 
lig. 2.1.14. MeIal 
bellows expansion 
|oinIs wiIh Iie bars
lig. 2.1.12. kubber bellows 
expansion |oinIs wiIh Iie bars
lig. 2.1.13. kubber 
bellows expansion 
|oinIs wiIhouI Iie 
bars
SmaIIer pumps, e.g. 1.5 kW: l
w
  = l

 + 11 d8
larger pumps, e.g. 110 kW: l
w
  = l

 + 16 d8  
120
100
80
60
40
20
20 S0 100 200 1 2 S 10 20kRz S00Rz
0
lrequency
kRz
Pain threshoId
Lp (d8)
1hreshoId of hearing
5peech
Music
lig. 2.1.1S. 1hreshold oI hearing vs. Irequency
81
1he  LU  Machine  DirecIive  prescribes  IhaI  sound  levels 
have  Io  be  indicaIed  as  pressure  when  Ihey  are  below  8S 
d8(A) and as power when Ihey exceed 8S d8(A).
Noise  is  sub|ecIive  and  depends  on  a  person´s  abiliIy 
Io  hear,  e.g.  young  vs.  old  person.  1hereIore,  Ihe  above-
menIioned  measuremenIs  geI  weighI  according  Io 
Ihe  sensibiliIy  oI  a  sIandard  ear,  see  Iigure  2.1.1S.  1he 
weighIing  is  known  as  A-weighIing  (d8(A)),  expressed  as 
e.g. L
pA
, and Ihe measuremenIs are ad|usIed depending on 
Irequency. ln some cases iI increases and in oIher cases iI 
decreases,  see  Iigure  2.1.16.  OIher  weighIings  are  known 
as 8 and C buI Ihey are used Ior oIher purposes, which we 
do noI cover in Ihis book.
ln case oI Iwo or more pumps in operaIion, Ihe sound level 
can be calculaIed. lI iI is pumps wiIh Ihe same sound level 
Ihe  IoIal  sound  level  can  be  calculaIed  adding  Ihe  value 
Irom  Iigure  2.1.17,  e.g.  2 
.
  pumps  is  Lp  +  3  d8,  3 
.
  pumps  is 
Lp  +  S  d8.  lI  Ihe  pumps  have  diIIerenI  sound  level,  values 
Irom Iigure 2.1.18 can be added.
lndicaIions  oI  sound  level  should  normally  be  sIaIed  as 
Iree  Iield  condiIions  over  reIlecIing  surIace,  meaning  Ihe 
sound  level  on  a  hard  Iloor  wiIh  no  walls.  GuaranIeeing 
values  in  a  speciIic  room  in  a  speciIic  pipe  sysIem  is 
diIIiculI because Ihese values are beyond Ihe reach oI Ihe 
manuIacIurer.  CerIain  condiIions  could  have  a  negaIive 
impacI  (increasing  sound  level)  or  a  posiIive  impacI 
on  Ihe  sound  level.  kecommendaIions  Io  insIallaIion 
and  IoundaIion  can  be  given  Io  eliminaIe  or  reduce  Ihe 
negaIive impacI.
 
d8 (A)
10
0
10 100 1000
-10
-20
-30
-40
-S0
-60
-70
-80
10000 Rz
4 8 12 16 20 24
S
10
1S
2 4 6 8 10
1
2
2.S
1.S
0.S
3
lig. 2.1.16 A-weighIing curve
lig. 2.1.17 lncrease oI Ihe IoIal sound pressure level wiIh 
equal sources
lig.  2.1.18  lncrease  oI  Ihe  IoIal  sound  pressure  level  wiIh 
diIIerenI sources
£xperience vaIues:
  kise of         Perceived as:
  + 3d8      !usI noIiceable
  + Sd8      Clearly noIiceable
  +10d8    1wice as loud
82
5ection 2.1
Pump instaIIation
5ection 2.2
Pump performance
When  you  examine  a  pump,  Ihere  are  several  Ihings 
you  have  Io  check.  8esides  checking  Ihe  pump's  physical 
condiIion,  Ior  insIance  iI  iI  is  rusIy  or  makes  abnormal 
noise,  you  have  Io  know  a  number  oI  values  in  order  Io 
be  able  Io  Iell  iI  Ihe  pump  perIorms  as  iI  is  supposed 
Io.  On  Ihe  nexI  pages,  we  will  presenI  Ihree  groups  oI 
values  you  may  need  Io  Iocus  on  when  you  examine  a 
pump's  perIormance.  Rydraulic  Ierms,  elecIrical  Ierms, 
mechanical Ierms and liquid properIies.
2.2.1 HydrauIic terms
When you wanI Io examine pump perIormance, Ihere are 
a  number  oI  values  you  need  Io  know.  ln  Ihis  secIion,  we 
will  presenI  Ihe  mosI  imporIanI  hydraulic  Ierms.  llow, 
pressure and head.
fIow
llow  is  Ihe  amounI  oI  liquid  IhaI  passes  Ihrough  a  pump 
wiIhin  a  cerIain  period  oI  Iime.  When  we  deal  wiIh 
perIormance  reading,  we  disIinguish  beIween  Iwo  Ilow 
parameIers. volume Ilow and mass Ilow.
VcIume fIcw {0}
volume  Ilow  is  whaI  we  can  read  Irom  a  pump  curve  or 
puI  in  anoIher  way,  a  pump  can  move  a  volume  per  uniI 
oI  Iime  (measured  in  m
3
]h)  no  maIIer  Ihe  densiIy  oI  Ihe 
liquid. When we deal wiIh e.g. waIer supply, volume Ilow 
is  Ihe  mosI  imporIanI  parameIer,  because  we  need  Ihe 
pump  Io  deliver  a  cerIain  volume,  e.g.  oI  drinking  waIer 
or waIer Ior irrigaIion.1hroughouI Ihis book Ihe Ierm Ilow 
reIers Io volume Ilow.
Mass fIcw {0
m
}
Mass  Ilow  is  Ihe  mass,  which  a  pump  moves  per  uniI  oI 
Iime and is measured in kg]s. 1he liquid IemperaIure has an 
inIluence on how big a mass Ilow Ihe pump can move per uniI 
oI Iime since Ihe liquid densiIy changes wiIh Ihe IemperaIure. 
ln connecIion wiIh heaIing, cooling and air-condiIion sysIems, 
Ihe mass Ilow is an essenIial value Io know, because Ihe mass 
is Ihe carrier oI energy (see ReaI capaciIy).
lig. 2.2.1.  CalculaIion examples
£xampIes Unit
Water
VoIume fIow D 10 m
3
Jh
Density 998 943 kgJm
3
Mass fIow D
m
9980 9403 kgJh
2.77 2.62 kgJs
at 20
¨
C at 120
¨
C
D
m
D
m

.

D


D
= =
,
83
Pressure (p)
Pressure  is  a  measure  oI  Iorce  per  uniI  area.  We 
disIinguish  beIween  sIaIic  pressure,  dynamic  pressure 
and  IoIal  pressure.  1he  IoIal  pressure  is  Ihe  sum  oI  Ihe 
sIaIic pressure and Ihe dynamic pressure.
Static pressure
1he sIaIic pressure p
sIa  
is Ihe pressure, which is measured 
wiIh a pressure gauge placed perpendicular Io Ihe Ilow or 
in a non-moving liquid, see Iigure 2.2.2.  
Dynamic pressure
1he  dynamic  pressure  p
dyn
  is  caused  by  liquid  velociIy. 
Dynamic pressure cannoI be measured by a normal pressure 
gauge, buI is calculaIed by Ihe Iollowing Iormula.
1
2
where.
µ is Ihe densiIy oI Ihe liquid in |kg]m
3
j
v is Ihe velociIy oI Ihe liquid in |m]sj
Dynamic  pressure  can  be  converIed  inIo  sIaIic  pressure 
by  reducing  Ihe  liquid  velociIy  and  vice  versa.  ligure  2.2.3 
shows a parI oI a sysIem where Ihe pipe diameIer increases 
Irom D
1
 Io D
2
, resulIing in a decrease in liquid speed Irom v
1
 
Io v
2
.  Assuming IhaI Ihere is no IricIion loss in Ihe sysIem, 
Ihe sum oI Ihe sIaIic pressure and Ihe dynamic pressure is 
consIanI IhroughouI Ihe horizonIal pipe. 
1
2
So,  an  increase  in  pipe  diameIer,  as  Ihe  one  shown  in 
Iigure 2.2.3 resulIs in an increase in Ihe sIaIic head which 
is measured wiIh Ihe pressure gauge p
2
.
ln mosI pumping sysIems, Ihe dynamic pressure p
dyn
 has 
a minor impacI on Ihe IoIal pressure. lor example, iI Ihe 
velociIy oI a waIer Ilow is 4.S m]s, Ihe dynamic pressure is 
around 0.1 bar, which is considered insigniIicanI in many 
pumping sysIems. LaIer on in Ihis chapIer, we will discuss 
dynamic  pressure  in  connecIion  wiIh  deIermining  Ihe 
head oI a pump.  
lig.  2.2.2.  Row  Io  deIermine  Ihe  sIaIic  pressure  p
sIa
,  Ihe  dynamic 
pressure p
dyn
  and Ihe IoIal pressure p
IoI
 
lig. 2.2.3. 1he sIaIic pressure increases iI Ihe liquid velociIy is reduced.
1he hgure applies Ior a sysIem wiIh insignihcanI IricIion loss
D
2
D
1
p
sIa
p
IoI
p
dyn
A
P
8
p
1
p
2
v
1
v
2
p
sIa
p
IoI
p
dyn
p
IoI
p
sIa
p
sIa
p
IoI
D
84
5ection 2.2
Pump performance
2
4
6
8
10
12
H(m)
D
DuIy poinI Ior brine aI 20´C
DuIy poinI Ior waIer aI 20´C
DuIy poinI Ior waIer aI 9S´C
DuIy poinI Ior diesel aI 20´C
7
.
3

m
1
0
.
2

m
1
0
.
6

m
1
2
.
7
5

m
1 bar 1 bar 1 bar 1 bar
8rine  aI 20°C
1300 kg]m
3
1 bar = 7.3 m
WaIer aI 20°C
997 kg]m
3
1 bar = 10.2 m
WaIer aI 9S°C
960 kg]m
3
1 bar = 10.6 m
Diesel oil aI 20°C
800 kg]m
3
1 bar = 12.7S m
lig.  2.2.S.  Pumping  Iour  diIIerenI  liquids  aI  1  bar  aI  Ihe  discharge  side 
oI  Ihe  pump  resulIs  in  Iour  diIIerenI  heads  (m),  hence  Iour  diIIerenI 
duIy poinIs
Measuring pressure
Pressure  is  measured  in  e.g.  Pa  (N]m¹),  bar  (10
S
  Pa)  or  PSl 
(lb]in¹). When we deal wiIh pressure iI is imporIanI Io know 
Ihe poinI oI reIerence Ior Ihe pressure measuremenI. 1wo 
Iypes oI pressure are essenIial in connecIion wiIh pressure 
measuremenI. AbsoluIe pressure and gauge pressure.
AbscIute pressure {p
abs
}
AbsoluIe  pressure  is  deIined  as  Ihe  pressure  above 
absoluIe  vacuum,  0  aIm,  IhaI  is  Ihe  absoluIe  zero  Ior 
pressure. Usually, Ihe value "absoluIe pressure" is used in 
caviIaIion calculaIions. 
Cauge pressure
Gauge  pressure,  oIIen  reIerred  Io  as  overpressure,  is  Ihe 
pressure,  which  is  higher  Ihan  Ihe  normal  aImospheric 
pressure  (1  aIm).  Normally,  pressure  p  is  sIaIed  as  gauge 
pressure,  because  mosI  sensor  and  pressure  gauge 
measuremenIs  measure  Ihe  pressure  diIIerence  beIween 
Ihe sysIem and Ihe aImosphere. 1hroughouI Ihis book Ihe 
Ierm pressure reIers Io gauge pressure.
Head (H)
1he head oI a pump is an expression oI how high Ihe pump 
can  liII  a  liquid.  Read  is  measured  in  meIer  (m)  and  is 
independenI  on  Ihe  liquid  densiIy.  1he  Iollowing  Iormula 
shows Ihe relaIion beIween pressure (p) and head (R).
where .
R is Ihe head in |mj
p is Ihe pressure in |Pa = N]m
2
j
µ is Ihe liquid densiIy in |kg]m
3
j
g is Ihe acceleraIion oI graviIy in |m]s
2
j
 
Normally,  pressure  p  is  measured  in  |barj,  which  equals 
10
S  
Pa. Rowever, oIher pressure uniIs are used as well, see 
Iigure 2.2.4.
1he relaIion beIween pressure and head is shown in Iigure 
2.2.S  where  a  pump    handles  Iour  diIIerenI  liquids.  1he 
head  oI  Ihe  pump  depends  on  Ihe  Iype  oI  liquid.  As  iI 
appears  Irom  Ihe  Iigure,  Ihe  pumping  oI  diIIerenI  liquids 
resulIs in diIIerenI heads and hence diIIerenI duIy poinIs.
 
1 Pa = 1 NIm
2
10
-S
1 9.87
.
10
-4
7S0
.
10
-S
1.02
.
10
-4
7S0
1.02
.
10
-S
1 10
S
0.987 10.2 1.02
760 1.013 1.013
.
10
S
1 10.33 1.033
736 0.981 0.981
.
10
S
0.968 10 1
73.6 0.0981 0.981
.
10
4
' Physical aImosphere '' 1heoreIical aImosphere
0.0968 1 0.1
Pa bar
Cenversien tabIe fer pressure units
atm* at** mH
2
D mmHg
1 bar
1 atm
1 at = 1 kpIcm
3
1 m H
2
D
lig. 2.2.4.  Conversion Iable Ior pressure uniIs
8S
lig. 2.2.6. SIandard end-sucIion pump wiIh dimension diIIerence on 
sucIion and discharge porIs 
Hcw tc determine the head  
1he  pump  head  is  deIermined  by  reading  Ihe  pressure  on 
Ihe Ilanges oI Ihe pump p
2
, p

and Ihen converI Ihe values 
inIo head - see Iigure 2.2.6. Rowever, iI a geodeIic diIIerence 
in head is presenI beIween Ihe Iwo measuring poinIs, as iI 
is Ihe case in Iigure 2.2.6, iI is necessary Io compensaIe Ior 
Ihe  diIIerence.  lurIhermore,  iI  Ihe  porI  dimensions  oI  Ihe 
Iwo  measuring  poinIs  diIIer  Irom  one  anoIher  Ihe  acIual 
head has Io be correcIed Ior Ihis as well.
1he  acIual  pump  head  R  is  calculaIed  by  Ihe  Iollowing 
Iormula.
where .
R is Ihe acIual pump head in |mj
p  is Ihe pressure aI Ihe Ilanges in |Pa = N]m
2
j
  is Ihe liquid densiIy in |kg]m
3
j
g  is Ihe acceleraIion oI graviIy in |m]s
2
j
h  is Ihe geodeIic heighI in |mj
v  is Ihe liquid velociIy in |m]sj
1he  liquid  velociIy  v  is  calculaIed  by  Ihe  Iollowing 
Iormula. 
where.
v is Ihe velociIy in |m]sj
O is Ihe volume Ilow in |m
3
]sj
D is Ihe porI diameIer in |mj
When  combining  Ihese  Iwo  Iormulas,  head  R  depends 
on  Ihe  Iollowing  IacIors.  1he  pressure  measuremenIs 
p
1
  and  p
2
,  Ihe  diIIerence  in  geodeIic  heighI  beIween  Ihe 
measuring  poinIs  (h
2
-h
1
),  Ihe  Ilow  Ihrough  Ihe  pump  O 
and Ihe diameIer oI Ihe Iwo porIs D
1
 and D
2
 .
1he  correcIion  due  Io  Ihe  diIIerence  in  porI  diameIer  is 
caused by Ihe diIIerence in Ihe dynamic pressure. lnsIead oI 
calculaIing Ihe correcIion Irom Ihe Iormula, Ihe conIribuIion 
can be read in a nomogram, see appendix l.
h
2
h
1
v
1
p
1
D
1
D
2
v
2
p
2
86
5ection 2.2
Pump performance
CaIcuIaticn exampIe
A pump oI Ihe same Iype as Ihe one shown in Iigure 2.2.7 
is insIalled in a sysIem wiIh Ihe Iollowing daIa. 
O = 240 m
3
]h
p
1
 = 0.S bar
p
2
 = 1.1 bar
Liquid. WaIer aI 20
0
C
SucIion porI diameIer D
1
 = 1S0 mm 
Discharge porI diameIer D
2
 = 12S mm. 
1he diIIerence in heighI beIween Ihe Iwo porIs where Ihe 
pressure gauges are insIalled is h
2
-h
1
 = 3SS mm. 
We are now able Io calculaIe Ihe head oI Ihe pump.        
As iI appears Irom Ihe calculaIion, Ihe pressure diIIerence 
measured  by  pressure  gauges  is  abouI  1.1  m  lower  Ihan 
whaI  Ihe  pump  is  acIually  perIorming.  1his  calls  Ior  an 
explanaIion. lirsI, Ihe deviaIion is caused by Ihe diIIerence 
in  heighI  beIween  Ihe  pressure  gauges  (0.36  m)  and 
second,  iI  is  caused  by  Ihe  diIIerence  in  porI  dimensions, 
which in Ihis case is 0.77 m.
lig.  2.2.7.  SIandard  end-sucIion  pump  wiIh  diIIerenI 
dimensions oI sucIion and discharge porIs (Lxample)
h
2
- h
1
= 3 mm

1
= 3.77 m]
2
p
1
= .5 bar
D
1
= 15 mm
D
2
= 125 mm
v
2
= .43 m]
2
p
2
= 1.1 bar

87
lig.2.2.8. 1he sysIem pressure R
sIa
 in a closed sysIem
has Io be higher Ihan Ihe physical heighI oI Ihe insIallaIion
lI  Ihe  pressure  gauges  are  placed  aI  Ihe  same  geodeIic 
heighI,  or  iI  a  diIIerenIial  pressure  gauge  is  used  Ior  Ihe 
measuremenI,  iI  is  noI  necessary  Io  compensaIe  Ior  Ihe 
diIIerence  in  heighI  (h
2
-h
1
).  ln  connecIion  wiIh  in-line 
pumps,  where  inleI  and  ouIleI  are  placed  aI  Ihe  same 
level,  Ihe  Iwo  porIs  oIIen  have  Ihe  same  diameIer.  lor 
Ihese  Iypes  oI  pumps  a  simpliIied  Iormula  is  used  Io 
deIermine Ihe head. 
DifferentiaI pressure {Ap} 
1he  diIIerenIial  pressure  is  Ihe  pressure  diIIerence 
beIween  Ihe  pressures  measured  aI  Iwo  poinIs,  e.g.  Ihe 
pressure  drops  across  valves  in  a  sysIem.  DiIIerenIial 
pressure is measured in Ihe same uniIs as pressure. 
System pressure
1he sysIem pressure is Ihe sIaIic pressure, which is presenI 
aI a poinI in Ihe sysIem, when Ihe pumps are noI running. 
SysIem  pressure  is  imporIanI  Io  consider  when  you  deal 
wiIh  a  closed  sysIem.  1he  sysIem  pressure  in  (m)  R
sIa
  in 
Ihe lowesI poinI musI always be higher Ihan Ihe heighI oI 
Ihe sysIem in order Io ensure IhaI Ihe sysIem is Iilled wiIh 
liquid and can be venIed properly.
h

Dry cooler
Chiller
R
sysI
> h
R
sysI
88
5ection 2.2
Pump performance
NPSR
O
R
lig.. 2.2.12. NPSR-curve
Cavitaticn and NPSH
CaviIaIion occurs somewhere in a pump when Ihe pressure 
is lower Ihan Ihe vapour pressure oI Ihe liquid, see Iigures 
2.2.9 and 2.2.10.
When  Ihe  pressure  on  Ihe  sucIion  side  drops  below 
Ihe  vapour  pressure  oI  Ihe  liquid,  (Iigure  2.2.10  yellow 
doI).  small  vapour  bubbles  Iorm.  1hese  bubbles  collapse 
(implode)  when  Ihe  pressure  rises  (Iigure  2.2.10  red  doI) 
and  releases  shock  waves.  ConsequenIly,  impellers  can 
be  damaged  by  Ihe  energy  released.  1he  raIe  oI  damage 
Io Ihe impeller depends on Ihe properIies oI Ihe maIerial. 
SIainless sIeel is more resisIanI Io caviIaIion Ihan bronze, 
and  bronze  is  more  resisIanI  Io  caviIaIion  Ihan  casI  iron, 
see secIion 1.6.3.
CaviIaIion  decreases  Ilow  (O)  and  head  (R),  which  leads 
Io  reduced  pump  perIormance,  see  Iigure  2.2.11.  Damage 
due  Io  caviIaIion  is  oIIen  only  deIecIed  when  Ihe  pump 
is dismanIled. lurIhermore, caviIaIion resulIs in increased 
noise  and  vibraIions,  which  can  consequenIly  damage 
bearings, shaII seals and weldings.
CaIcuIaticn cf the risk cf cavitaticn   
1o  avoid  caviIaIion,  Ihe  Iollowing  Iormula  is  used  Io 
calculaIe Ihe maximum sucIion head.
h
max
 - Maximum sucIion head
R
b
  -  AImospheric  pressure  aI  Ihe  pump  siIe,  Ihis  is  Ihe 
IheoreIical maximum sucIion liII, see Iigure 2.2.13 
R
I
 - lricIion loss in Ihe sucIion pipe
NPSR  =  NeI  PosiIive  SucIion  Read  (is  Io  be  read  aI  Ihe 
NPSR  curve  aI  Ihe  highesI  operaIional  Ilow),  see  Iigure 
2.2.12.
b
P
r
e
s
s
u
r
e
 
|
P
a
]
lmpeller inleI  lmpeller ouIleI 
a
p
p
1
vapour pressure
p
lig.. 2.2.9. lmplosion oI caviIaIion bubbles on Ihe back oI impeller vanes
O
R
Curve when
pump caviIaIes
lig.. 2.2.10. DevelopmenI oI pressure Ihrough a cenIriIugal pump
lig.. 2.2.11. Pump curve when pump caviIaIes
a = front of impeIIer vanes
b = 8ack of impeIIer vanes
a
b
a = front of impeIIer vanes
b = 8ack of impeIIer vanes
89
ImpIoding vapour bubbIes
1he NPSR value indicaIes Io whaI exIenI Ihe pump is noI 
able Io creaIe absoluIe vacuum, IhaI is Io liII a Iull waIer 
column 10.33 m above sea level, see Iigure 2.2.13.
NPSR  can  eiIher  be  named  NPSR
r
  (required)  or  NPSR
a
 
(available).
NPSR
required 
    1he required sucIion head Ior Ihe pump
NPSR
available
    1he available sucIion head in Ihe sysIem
1he  NPSR  value  oI  a  pump  is  deIermined  by  IesIing 
according  Io  lSO  9906  and  is  made  in  Ihe  Iollowing 
way.  1he  sucIion  head  is  reduced  while  Ihe  Ilow  is  kepI 
aI  a  consIanI  level.  When  Ihe  diIIerenIial  pressure  has 
decreased  by  3°,  Ihe  pressure  aI  Ihe  pump's  sucIion  side 
is  read,  and  Ihe  NPSR  value  oI  Ihe  pump  is  deIined.  1he 
IesIing is repeaIed aI diIIerenI Ilows, which Iorm Ihe basis 
oI Ihe NPSR curve in Ihe end.    
PuI in anoIher way. When Ihe NPSR curve is reached, Ihe 
level oI caviIaIion is so high IhaI Ihe head oI Ihe pump has 
decreased by 3°.   
R
v
  -  vapour  pressure  oI  Ihe  liquid,  Ior  more  inIormaIion 
concerning vapour pressure oI waIer, go Io appendix D.
R
s
 - SaIeIy IacIor. R
s
 depends on Ihe siIuaIion and normally 
varies  beIween  0.S  m  and  1  m  and  Ior  liquids  conIaining 
gas up Io 2 m, see Iigure 2.2.1S.
2.2.2 £IectricaI terms
When you wanI Io examine a pump perIormance, you need 
Io know a range oI  values. ln Ihis secIion we will presenI 
Ihe mosI imporIanI elecIrical values. Power consumpIion, 
volIage, currenI and power IacIor. 
Liquid with air
Q |m
3
ís]
 
R
 
|
m
]
NPSR
Vented Iiquid
lig.. 2.2.1S. 1ypical NPSR-curve Ior liquid conIaining gas
NP5H
H
b
H
f
h
H
v
20
15
12
10
8,0
6,0
5,0
4,0
3,0
2,0
1,0
0,8
0,6
0,4
0,3
0,2
0,1
1,5
120
110
90
100
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10

Hv
(m)
tm
(¨C )
150
130
140
25
35
45
40
30
lig..  2.2.14.  SysIem  wiIh  indicaIion  oI  Ihe 
diIIerenI  values  IhaI  are  imporIanI  in 
connecIion wiIh sucIion calculaIions
Height above
sea IeveI
(m)
0
500
1000
2000
1.013 10.33
0.935
100
9.73
0.899
0.795
9.16
8.10
99
96
93
8arometric
pressure
p
b
(bar)
Water
coIumn
H
b
(m)
8oiIing point
of water
(¨C)
lig.. 2.2.13. 8aromeIric pressure above sea level
90
5ection 2.2
Pump performance
Power consumption (P)
  
Pumps are made oI several componenIs, see hgure 2.2.16. 
1he power consumpIion oI Ihe diIIerenI componenIs is 
designaIed in Ihe Iollowing way.
P
1
  1he power inpuI Irom Ihe mains or, puI in anoIher
  way, Ihe amounI oI power Ihe consumer has Io 
  pay Ior
P
2
  1he power inpuI Io Ihe pump or Ihe power ouIpuI 
  Irom Ihe moIor. OIIen reIerred Io as shaII power
P
H
  Rydraulic power - Ihe power IhaI Ihe pump 
  IransIers Io Ihe liquid in Ihe shape oI Ilow 
  and head 
lor  Ihe  mosI  common  pump  Iypes,  Ihe  Ierm  power
consumpIion  normally  reIers  Io  P
2
.  Power  is  measured 
in W, kW.
LIhciency in connecIion wiIh pumps normally only covers 
Ihe  eIhciency  oI  Ihe  pump  parI  q
P
.  A  pump's  eIhciency  is 
deIermined  by  several  IacIors,  Ior  insIance  Ihe  shape  oI 
Ihe  pump  housing,  Ihe  impeller  and  diIIuser  design  and 
Ihe surIace roughness. lor Iypical pump uniIs consisIing oI 
boIh  pump  and  elecIric  moIor,  Ihe  IoIal  eIhciency  q
1
  also 
includes Ihe eIhciency oI Ihe moIor.
lI  a  Irequency  converIer  is  included  as  well,  Ihe  eIhciency 
oI Ihe enIire uniI also has Io incorporaIe Ihe eIhciency oI 
Ihe Irequency converIer.
P
1
P
2
P
H
lig.  2.2.16.  Pump  uniI  wiIh  indicaIion  oI  diIIerenI  power 
consumpIion levels
91
VoItage (U)
Like  pressure  drives  Ilow  Ihrough  a  hydraulic  sysIem, 
volIage  drives  a  currenI  (l)  Ihrough  an  elecIrical  circuiI. 
volIage  is  measured  in  volIs  (v)  and  can  be  eiIher  direcI 
currenI (DC), e.g. 1.S v baIIery - or alIernaIing currenI (AC), 
e.g. elecIriciIy supply Ior houses, eIc. Normally, pumps are 
supplied wiIh AC volIage supply.
1he layouI oI AC mains supply diIIers Irom one counIry Io 
anoIher.  Rowever,  Ihe  mosI  common  layouI  is  Iour  wires 
wiIh  Ihree  phases  (L1,  L2,  L3)  and  a  neuIral  (N).  8esides 
Ihese  Iour  wires,  a  proIecIive  earIh  connecIion  (PL)  is 
added Io Ihe sysIem as well, see Iigure 2.2.17.
lor  a  3x400  v]230  v  mains  supply,  Ihe  volIage  beIween 
any  Iwo  oI  Ihe  phases  (L1,  L2,  L3)  is  400  v.  1he  volIage 
beIween one oI Ihe phases and neuIral (N) is 230 v.
1he raIio beIween Ihe phase-phase volIage and Ihe phase-
neuIral  volIage  is  deIermined  by  Ihe  Iormula  on  your 
righI.
CurrenI is Ihe Ilow oI elecIriciIy and is measured in ampere 
(A). 1he amounI oI currenI in an elecIrical circuiI depends 
on Ihe supplied volIage and Ihe resisIance] impedance in 
Ihe elecIrical circuiI.
Power (P) and power factor (cos or Pf)
Power  consumpIion  is  indeed  oI  high  imporIance  when 
iI  comes  Io  pumps.  lor  pumps  wiIh  sIandard  AC  moIors, 
Ihe  power  inpuI  is  Iound  by  measuring  Ihe  inpuI  volIage 
and  inpuI  currenI  and  by  reading  Ihe  value  cos  on  Ihe 
moIor]pump nameplaIe. cos is Ihe phase angle beIween 
volIage and currenI. cos is also reIerred Io as power IacIor 
(Pl).  1he  power  consumpIion  P
1
  can  be  calculaIed  by  Ihe 
Iormulas  shown  on  your  righI  depending  on  wheIher  Ihe 
moIor is a single-phase or a Ihree-phase moIor.  
L
1
L
2
L
3
N
PL
400V 1hree-phase suppIy
230V 5ingIe-phase suppIy
lig. 2.2.17. Mains supply, e.g. 3 x 400  v
]
]
AC single-phase moIor, e.g. 1 x 230 v
        
AC Ihree-phase moIor, e.g. 3 x 400 v
 
             
92
5ection 2.2
Pump performance
1he volIage beIween any Iwo phases (L1, L2, L3) 
is Ior a 3x400 v]230 v mains supply, 400 v.
1he  volIage  beIween  one  oI  Ihe  phases  and 
neuIral  (N)  is  230v.  1he  raIio  beIween  Ihe 
phase-phase  volIage  and  Ihe  phase-neuIral 
volIage is. 
                       
              
2.2.3 Liquid properties
When you are making your sysIem calculaIions, Ihere are 
Ihree properIies you mighI need Io know abouI Ihe liquid 
in  order  Io  make  Ihe  righI  calculaIions.  Liquid  IemperaIure, 
densiIy, and heaI capaciIy.
1he  liquid  IemperaIure  is  measured  in  °C  (Celcius),  K 
(Kelvin),  or  °l  (lahrenheiI).  °C  and  K  are  acIually  Ihe 
same  uniI  buI  0°C  is  Ihe  Ireezing  poinI  oI  waIer  and  0K 
is Ihe absoluIe zero, IhaI is -273.1S°C - Ihe lowesI possible 
IemperaIure.  1he  calculaIion  beIween  lahrenheiI  and 
Celcius  is.  °l  =  °C 
.
  1.8  +  32,  hence  Ihe  Ireezing  poinI  oI 
waIer  is  0°C  and  32°l  and  Ihe  boiling  poinI  is  100°C  and 
212°l.
   
1he densiIy is measured in kg]m

or
 
kg]dm
3

1he  heaI  capaciIy  Iells  us  how  much  addiIional  energy  a 
liquid can conIain per mass when iI is heaIed. Liquid heaI 
capaciIy depends on IemperaIure, see Iigure 2.2.18. 1his is 
used  in  sysIems  Ior  IransporIing  energy,  e.g.  heaIing,  air-
con  and  cooling.  Mixed  liquids,  e.g.  glycol  and    waIer  Ior 
air-con have a lower heaI capaciIy Ihan pure waIer hence 
higher  Ilow  is  required  Io  IransporI  Ihe  same  amounI  oI 
energy.
93
-40 -20 0 20 60 80 40 100 120´C
2.0
2.4
2.8
3.2
3.6
4.0
4.4
0.S
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1.0
k!/kgK kcal/kgK
0° pure waLer
20°
34°
44°
S2°
lig. 2.2.18.  ReaI capaciIy vs. IemperaIure Ior eIhylene glycol
Chapter 3. 5ystem hydrauIic 
Secticn 3.1: System characteristics
3.1.1   Single resisIances
3.1.2   Closed and open sysIems
Secticn 3.2: Pumps ccnnected in series and paraIIeI 
3.2.1   Pumps in parallel
3.2.2   Pumps connecIed in series
5ection 3.1
5ystem characteristics
Previously,  in  secIion  1.1.2  we  discussed  Ihe  basic 
characIerisIics  oI  pump  perIormance  curves.  ln  Ihis 
chapIer  we  will  examine  Ihe  pump  perIormance  curve  aI 
diIIerenI  operaIing  condiIions  as  well  as  a  Iypical  sysIem 
characIerisIic.  linally,  we  will  Iocus  on  Ihe  inIeracIion 
beIween a pump and a sysIem.
A sysIem's characIerisIic describes Ihe relaIion beIween Ihe 
Ilow O and head R in Ihe sysIem. 1he sysIem characIerisIic 
depends on Ihe Iype oI sysIem in quesIion. We disIinguish 
beIween Iwo Iypes.  Closed and open sysIems.
-  CIcsed systems 
are  circulaIing  sysIems  like  heaIing  or  air-condiIioning 
sysIems,  where  Ihe  pump  has  Io  overcome  Ihe  IricIion 
losses in Ihe pipes, IiIIings, valves, eIc. in Ihe sysIem. 
-  0pen systems 
are  liquid  IransporI  sysIems  like  waIer  supply  sysIems.  ln 
such  sysIems  Ihe  pump  has  Io  deal  wiIh  boIh  Ihe  sIaIic 
head  and  overcome  Ihe  IricIion  losses  in  Ihe  pipes  and 
componenIs.
When  Ihe  sysIem  characIerisIic  is  drawn  in  Ihe  same 
sysIem oI co-ordinaIes as Ihe pump curve, Ihe duIy poinI 
oI Ihe pump can be deIermined as Ihe poinI oI inIersecIion 
oI Ihe Iwo curves, see Iigure.3.1.1.
Open  and  closed  sysIems  consisI  oI  resisIances  (valves, 
pipes,  heaI  exchanger,  eIc.)  connecIed  in  series  or 
parallel, which alIogeIher aIIecI Ihe sysIem characIerisIic. 
1hereIore,  beIore  we  conIinue  our  discussion  on  open 
and  closed  sysIems,  we  will  brieIly  describe  how  Ihese 
resisIances aIIecI Ihe sysIem characIerisIic.  
lig. 3.1.1. 1he poinI oI inIersecIion beIween Ihe pump curve and Ihe sysIem 
characIerisIic is Ihe duIy poinI oI Ihe pump
96
3.1.1 5ingIe resistances
Lvery  componenI  in  a  sysIem  consIiIuIes  a  resisIance 
againsI  Ihe  liquid  Ilow  which  leads  Io  a  head  loss  across 
every  single  componenI  in  Ihe  sysIem.  1he  Iollowing 
Iormula is used Io calculaIe Ihe head loss LR.
AH = k 
.
 D
2
k  is  a  consIanI,  which  depends  on  Ihe  componenI  in 
quesIion  and  O  is  Ihe  Ilow  Ihrough  Ihe  componenI.  As  iI 
appears Irom Ihe Iormula, Ihe head loss is proporIional Io 
Ihe Ilow in second power. So, iI iI is possible Io lower Ihe 
Ilow  in  a  sysIem,  a  subsIanIial  reducIion  in  Ihe  pressure 
loss occurs.
kesistances ccnnected in series 
1he  IoIal  head  loss  in  a  sysIem  consisIing  oI  several 
componenIs connecIed in series is Ihe sum oI head losses 
IhaI  each  componenI  represenIs.    ligure  3.1.2  shows  a 
sysIem  consisIing  oI  a  valve  and  a  heaI  exchanger.  lI  we 
do  noI  consider  Ihe  head  loss  in  Ihe  piping  beIween  Ihe 
Iwo componenIs, Ihe IoIal head loss LR
IoI
  is calculaIed by 
adding Ihe Iwo head losses.
AH
tot
 = AH
1
 + AH
2
lurIhermore,  Iigure  3.1.2  shows  how  Ihe  resulIing  curve 
will  look  and  whaI  Ihe  duIy  poinI  will  be  iI  Ihe  sysIem 
is  a  closed  sysIem  wiIh  only  Ihese  Iwo  componenIs.  As 
iI  appears  Irom  Ihe  Iigure,  Ihe  resulIing  characIerisIic 
is  Iound  by  adding  Ihe  individual  head  losses  LR  aI  a 
given  Ilow  O.    Likewise,  Ihe  Iigure  shows  IhaI  Ihe  more 
resisIance in Ihe sysIem, Ihe sIeeper Ihe resulIing sysIem 
curve will be. 
lig. 3.1.2: 1he head loss íor Iwo componenIs connecIed in series
is Ihe sum oí Ihe Iwo individual head losses
97
kesistances ccnnected in paraIIeI 
ConIrary  Io  connecIing  componenIs  in  series,  connecIing 
componenIs  in  parallel  resulI  in  a  more  IlaI  sysIem 
characIerisIic.  1he  reason  is  IhaI  componenIs  insIalled 
in  parallel  reduce  Ihe  IoIal  resisIance  in  Ihe  sysIem  and 
Ihereby Ihe head loss. 
1he diIIerenIial pressure across Ihe componenIs connecIed 
in  parallel  is  always  Ihe  same.  1he  resulIing  sysIem 
characIerisIic  is  deIined  by  adding  all  Ihe  componenIs' 
individual  Ilow  raIe  Ior  a  speciIic  LR.  ligure  3.1.3  shows 
a sysIem wiIh a valve and a heaI exchanger connecIed in 
parallel. 
1he  resulIing  Ilow  can  be  calculaIed  by  Ihe  Iollowing 
Iormula Ior a head loss equivalenI Io LR 

tot
 = D 
1
 + D
2
3.1.2 CIosed and open systems
As menIioned previously, pump sysIems are spliI inIo Iwo 
Iypes  oI  basic  sysIems.  Closed  and  open  sysIems.  ln  Ihis 
secIion, we will examine Ihe basic characIerisIics oI Ihese 
sysIems. 
CIcsed systems
1ypically,  closed  sysIems  are  sysIems,  which  IransporI 
heaI energy in heaIing sysIems, air-condiIioning sysIems, 
process  cooling  sysIems,  eIc.  A  common  IeaIure  oI  Ihese 
Iypes oI closed sysIems is IhaI Ihe liquid is circulaIed and 
is Ihe carrier oI heaI energy. ReaI energy is in IacI whaI Ihe 
sysIem has Io IransporI.
Closed  sysIems  are  characIerised  as  sysIems  wiIh  pumps 
IhaI  only  have  Io  overcome  Ihe  sum  oI  IricIion  losses, 
which  are  generaIed  by  all  Ihe  componenIs.  ligure  3.1.4 
shows  a  schemaIic  drawing  oI  a  closed  sysIem  where 
a  pump  has  Io  circulaIe  waIer  Irom  a  heaIer  Ihrough  a 
conIrol valve Io a heaI exchanger. 
lig. 3.1.3. ComponenIs connecIed in parallel reduce Ihe resisIance in 
Ihe sysIem and resulI in a more IlaI sysIem characIerisIic
lig. 3.1.4. SchemaIic drawing oI a closed sysIem
98
5ection 3.1
5ystem characteristics
All Ihese componenIs IogeIher wiIh Ihe pipes and IiIIings 
resulI in a sysIem characIerisIic as Ihe one shown in Iigure 
3.1.S.  1he required pressure in a closed sysIem (which Ihe 
sysIem curve illusIraIes) is a parabola sIarIing in Ihe poinI 
(O,R) = (0,0) and is calculaIed by Ihe Iollowing Iormula.
H = k 
.
 D
2
As  Ihe  Iormula  and  curve  indicaIe,  Ihe  pressure  loss  is 
approaching zero when Ihe Ilow drops.
0pen systems
Open  sysIems  are  sysIems,  where  Ihe  pump  is  used  Io 
IransporI  liquid  Irom  one  poinI  Io  anoIher,  e.g.  waIer 
supply  sysIems,  irrigaIion  sysIems,  indusIrial  process 
sysIems.  ln  such  sysIems  Ihe  pump  has  Io  deal  wiIh 
boIh Ihe geodeIic head oI Ihe liquid and Io overcome Ihe 
IricIion losses in Ihe pipes and Ihe sysIem componenIs.
We disIinguish beIween Iwo Iypes oI open sysIem.
·  Open sysIems where Ihe IoIal required geodeIic liII    
  is posiIive.
·  Open sysIems where Ihe IoIal required geodeIic liII    
  is negaIive.
0pen system with pcsitive gecdetic head  ligure 
3.1.6 shows a Iypical open sysIem wiIh posiIive geodeIic 
liII. A pump has Io IransporI waIer Irom a break Iank aI 
ground level up Io a rooI Iank on Ihe Iop oI a building. 
lirsI oI all, Ihe pump has Io provide a head higher Ihan 
Ihe geodeIic head oI Ihe waIer (h). Secondly, Ihe pump 
has Io provide Ihe necessary head Io overcome Ihe IoIal 
IricIion loss beIween Ihe Iwo Ianks in piping, IiIIings, 
valves, eIc. (R
I
). 1he pressure loss depends on Ihe amounI 
oI Ilow, see Iigure 3.1.7. 
lig. 3.1.S. 1he sysIem characIerisIic Ior a closed sysIem is a 
parabola sIarIing in poinI (0,0)
lig. 3.1.6. Open sysIem wiIh posiIive geodeIic liII 
lig.  3.1.7.  SysIem  characIerisIic  IogeIher  wiIh  Ihe  pump  perIormance 
curve Ior Ihe open sysIem in Iigure 3.1.6
D
O
1
99
1he  Iigure  shows  IhaI  in  an  open  sysIem  no  waIer  Ilows 
iI  Ihe  maximum  head  (R
max
)  oI  Ihe  pump  is  lower  Ihan 
Ihe  geodeIic  head  (h).  Only  when  R  >  h,  waIer  will  sIarI 
Io  Ilow  Irom  Ihe  break  Iank  Io  Ihe  rooI  Iank.  1he  sysIem 
curve  also  shows  IhaI  Ihe  lower  Ihe  Ilow  raIe,  Ihe  lower 
Ihe IricIion loss (R
I
) and consequenIly Ihe lower Ihe power 
consumpIion oI Ihe pump.
So,  Ihe  Ilow  (O
1
)  and  Ihe  pump  size  have  Io  maIch  Ihe 
need  Ior  Ihe  speciIic  sysIem.  1his  is  in  IacI  a  rule-oI-
Ihumb  Ior  liquid  IransporI  sysIems.  A  larger  Ilow  leads 
Io  a  higher  pressure  loss,  whereas  a  smaller  Ilow  leads  Io 
a  smaller  pressure  loss  and  consequenIly  a  lower  energy 
consumpIion.
0pen system with negative gecdetic Iift 
A  Iypical  example  oI  an  open  sysIem  wiIh  negaIive 
required head is a pressure boosIer sysIem, e.g. in a waIer 
supply sysIem. 1he geodeIic head (h) Irom Ihe waIer Iank 
brings waIer Io Ihe consumer - Ihe waIer Ilows, alIhough 
Ihe pump is noI running. 1he diIIerence in heighI beIween 
Ihe  liquid  level  in  Ihe  Iank  and  Ihe  alIiIude  oI  Ihe  waIer 
ouIleI (h) resulIs in a Ilow equivalenI Io O
o
. Rowever, Ihe 
head is insuIIicienI Io ensure Ihe required Ilow (O
1
) Io Ihe 
consumer.  1hereIore,  Ihe  pump  has  Io  boosI  Ihe  head  Io 
Ihe  level  (R
1
)  in  order  Io  compensaIe  Ior  Ihe  IricIion  loss 
(R
I
)  in  Ihe  sysIem.  1he  sysIem  is  shown  in  Iigure  3.1.8 
and  Ihe  sysIem  characIerisIic  IogeIher  wiIh  Ihe  pump 
perIormance curve are shown in Iigure 3.1.9.
1he  resulIing  sysIem  characIerisIic  is  a  parabolic  curve 
sIarIing aI Ihe R-axes in Ihe poinI (0,-h). 
1he  Ilow  in  Ihe  sysIem  depends  on  Ihe  liquid  level  in  Ihe 
Iank. lI we reduce Ihe waIer level in Ihe Iank Ihe heighI (h) 
is reduced. 1his resulIs in a modiIied sysIem characIerisIic 
and a reduced Ilow in Ihe sysIem, see Iigure 3.1.9.
lig. 3.1.8. Open sysIem wiIh negaIive geodeIic liII
lig. 3.1.9. SysIem characIerisIic IogeIher wiIh Ihe pump 
perIormance curve Ior Ihe open sysIem in hgure 3.1.8
100
5ection 3.1
5ystem characteristics
1o exIend Ihe IoIal pump perIormance in a sysIem, pumps 
are oIIen connecIed in series or parallel. ln Ihis secIion we 
will concenIraIe on Ihese Iwo ways oI connecIing pumps.
 
3.2.1 Pumps in paraIIeI
Pumps connecIed in parallel are oIIen used when 
- Ihe required Ilow is higher Ihan whaI one single pump  
  can supply
- Ihe sysIem has variable Ilow requiremenIs and when    
  Ihese requiremenIs are meI by swiIching Ihe parallel-   
  connecIed pumps on and oII. 
Normally, pumps connecIed in parallel are oI similar Iype 
and  size.  Rowever,  Ihe  pumps  can  be  oI  diIIerenI  size,  or 
one or several pumps can be speed-conIrolled and Ihereby 
have diIIerenI perIormance curves.
 
1o  avoid  bypass  circulaIion  in  pumps,  which  are  noI 
running,  a  non-reIurn  valve  is  connecIed  in  series  wiIh 
each  oI  Ihe  pumps.  1he  resulIing  perIormance  curve 
Ior  a  sysIem  consisIing  oI  several  pumps  in  parallel  is 
deIermined  by  adding  Ihe  Ilow,  which  Ihe  pumps  deliver 
aI a speciIic head. 
ligure  3.2.1  shows  a  sysIem  wiIh  Iwo  idenIical  pumps 
connecIed  in  parallel.  1he  sysIem's  IoIal  perIormance 
curve is deIermined by adding O
1
 and O
2
 Ior every value oI 
head which is Ihe same Ior boIh pumps, R
1
=R


8ecause Ihe pumps are idenIical Ihe resulIing pump curve 
has Ihe same maximum head R
max
 buI Ihe maximum Ilow 
O
max 
is Iwice as big. lor each value oI head Ihe Ilow is Ihe 
double as Ior a single pump in operaIion. 
D = D
1
 + D
2
 = 2 D
1
 = 2 D
2
lig.  3.2.1.  1wo  pumps  connecIed  in  parallel  wiIh  similar 
perIormance curves
101
5ection 3.2
Pumps connected in series and paraIIeI 
ligure 3.2.2 shows Iwo diIIerenI sized pumps connecIed in 
parallel. When adding O
1
 and O
2
 Ior a given head R
1
=R
2, 
Ihe 
resulIing  perIormance  curve  is  deIined.  1he  haIched  area 
in Iigure 3.2.2 shows IhaI P1 is Ihe only pump Io supply in 
IhaI speciIic area, because iI has a higher maximum head 
Ihan P2. 
Speed-ccntrcIIed pumps ccnnected in paraIIeI
1he  combinaIion  oI  pumps  connecIed  in  parallel  and 
speed-conIrolled  pumps  is  a  very  useIul  way  Io  achieve 
eIIicienI pump perIormance when Ihe Ilow demand varies. 
1he meIhod is common in connecIion wiIh waIer supply ] 
pressure  boosIing  sysIems.  LaIer  in  chapIer  4,  we  will 
discuss speed-conIrolled pumps in deIail. 
A  pumping  sysIem  consisIing  oI  Iwo  speed-conIrolled 
pumps  wiIh  Ihe  same  perIormance  curve  covers  a  wide 
perIormance range, see Iigure 3.2.3. 
One  single  pump  is  able  Io  cover  Ihe  required  pump 
perIormance  up  unIil  O
1
.  Above  O
1
  boIh  pumps  have  Io 
operaIe  Io  meeI  Ihe  perIormance  needed.  lI  boIh  pumps 
are running aI Ihe same speed Ihe resulIing pump curves 
look like Ihe orange curves shown in Iigure 3.2.3. 
Please noIe IhaI Ihe duIy poinI indicaIed aI O
1
 is obIained 
wiIh  one  pump  running  aI  Iull  speed.  Rowever,  Ihe 
duIy  poinI  can  also  be  achieved  when  Iwo  pumps  are 
running aI reduced speed. 1his siIuaIion is shown in Iigure 
3.2.4  (orange  curves).  1he  Iigure  also  compares  Ihe  Iwo 
siIuaIions  wiIh  regard  Io  eIIiciency.  1he  duIy  poinI  Ior 
one  single  pump  running  aI  Iull  speed  resulIs  in  a  bad 
pump  eIIiciency  mainly  because  Ihe  duIy  poinI  is  locaIed 
Iar  ouI  on  Ihe  pump  curve.  1he  IoIal  eIIiciency  is  much 
higher  when  Iwo  pumps  run  aI  reduced  speed,  alIhough 
Ihe  maximum  eIIiciency  oI  Ihe  pumps  decreases  slighIly 
aI reduced speed. 
Lven  Ihough  one  single  pump  is  able  Io  mainIain  Ihe 
required  Ilow  and  head,  iI  is  someIimes  necessary  due 
Io  eIIiciency  and  Ihus  energy  consumpIion  Io  use  boIh 
pumps  aI  Ihe  same  Iime.  WheIher  Io  run  one  or  Iwo 
pumps depend on Ihe acIual sysIem characIerisIic and Ihe 
pump Iype in quesIion.
lig 3.2.2. 1wo pumps connecIed in parallel wiIh unequal 
perIormance curves
lig. 3.2.3. 1wo speed-conIrolled pumps connecIed in parallel (same size). 
1he orange curve shows Ihe perIormance aI reduced speed
lig.  3.2.4.  One  pump  aI  Iull  speed  compared  Io  Iwo  pumps  aI  reduced 
speed. ln Ihis case Ihe Iwo pumps have Ihe highesI IoIal eIIiciency
102
5ection 3.2
Pumps connected in series and paraIIeI 
3.2.2. Pumps connected in series 
Normally,  pumps  connecIed  in  series  are  used  in 
sysIems where a high pressure is required. 1his is also 
Ihe case Ior mulIisIage pumps which are based on Ihe 
series principle, i.e. one sIage equals one pump. ligure 
3.2.S  shows  Ihe  perIormance  curve  oI  Iwo  idenIical 
pumps connecIed in series. 1he resulIing perIormance 
curve  is  made  by  marking  Ihe  double  head  Ior  each 
Ilow  value  in  Ihe  sysIem  oI  co-ordinaIes.  1his  resulIs 
in a curve wiIh Ihe double maximum head (2R
max
) and 
Ihe  same  maximum  Ilow  (O
max
)  as  each  oI  Ihe  single 
pumps.
ligure 3.2.6 shows Iwo diííerenI sized pumps connecIed 
in  series. 1he  resulIing  períormance  curve  is  íound  by 
adding R
1
 and R
2
 aI a given common ílow Q
1
=Q
2

1he  haIched  area  in  íigure  3.2.6  shows  IhaI  P2  is  Ihe 
only pump Io supply in IhaI speciíic area because iI has 
a higher maximum ílow Ihan P1.
  As  discussed  in  secIion  3.2.1,  unequal  pumps  can  be 
a  combinaIion  oI  diIIerenI  sized  pumps  or  oI  one  or 
several  speed-conIrolled  pumps.  1he  combinaIion  oI 
a  Iixed  speed  pump  and  a  speed-conIrolled  pump 
connecIed  in  series  is  oIIen  used  in  sysIems  where  a 
high and consIanI pressure is required. 1he Iixed speed 
pump supplies Ihe liquid Io Ihe speed-conIrolled pump, 
whose  ouIpuI  is  conIrolled  by  a  pressure  IransmiIIer 
P1, see Iigure 3.2.7.
lig. 3.2.S. 1wo equal sized pumps connecIed in series
lig. 3.2.6. 1wo diIIerenI sized pumps connecIed in series
lig.  3.2.7.    Lqual  sized  Iixed  speed  pump  and  speed-conIrolled  pump 
connecIed  in  series.  A  pressure  IransmiIIer  P1  IogeIher  wiIh  a  speed 
conIroller is making sure IhaI Ihe pressure is consIanI aI Ihe ouIleI oI P2.
D
103
Chapter 4. Performance adjustment of pumps
Secticn 4.1: Adjusting pump perfcrmance
4.1.1  1hroIIle conIrol
4.1.2  8ypass conIrol
4.1.3  ModiIying impeller diameIer
4.1.4  Speed conIrol
4.1.S  Comparison oI ad|usImenI meIhods
4.1.6  Overall eIhciency oI Ihe pump sysIem
4.1.7  Lxample. kelaIive power consumpIion when Ihe ßow 
  is reduced by 20°
Secticn 4.2: Speed-ccntrcIIed pump scIuticns
4.2.1  ConsIanI pressure conIrol
4.2.2  ConsIanI IemperaIure conIrol
4.2.3  ConsIanI diIIerenIial pressure in a circulaIing sysIem
4.2.4  llow-compensaIed diIIerenIial pressure conIrol
Secticn 4.3: Advantages cf speed ccntrcI
Secticn 4.4: Advantages cf pumps with integrated 
frequency ccnverter
4.4.1 PerIormance curves oI speed-conIrolled pumps
4.4.2 Speed-conIrolled pumps in diIIerenI sysIems
Secticn 4.5: frequency ccnverter
4.S.1  8asic IuncIion and characIerisIics
4.S.2  ComponenIs oI Ihe Irequency converIer
4.S.3  Special condiIions regarding Irequency converIers
5ection 4.1
Adjusting pump performance
When  selecIing  a  pump  Ior  a  given  applicaIion  iI  is 
imporIanI  Io  choose  one  where  Ihe  duIy  poinI  is  in  Ihe 
high-eIIiciency  area  oI  Ihe  pump.  OIherwise,  Ihe  power 
consumpIion oI Ihe pump is unnecessarily high - see Iigure 
4.1.1. 
Rowever, someIimes iI is noI possible Io selecI a pump IhaI 
IiIs  Ihe  opIimum  duIy  poinI  because  Ihe  requiremenIs  oI 
Ihe sysIem change or Ihe sysIem curve changes over Iime.
1hereIore,  iI  can  be  necessary  Io  ad|usI  Ihe  pump 
perIormance so IhaI iI meeIs Ihe changed requiremenIs.
1he  mosI  common  meIhods  oI  changing  pump 
perIormance are.
- 1hroIIle conIrol
- 8ypass conIrol
- ModiIying impeller diameIer
- Speed conIrol
Choosing a meIhod oI ad|usIing Ihe pump perIormance is 
based on an evaluaIion oI Ihe iniIial invesImenI IogeIher 
wiIh Ihe operaIing cosIs oI Ihe pump. All meIhods can be 
carried  ouI  conIinuously  during  operaIion  aparI  Irom  Ihe 
modiIying  impeller  diameIer-meIhod.  OIIen,  oversized 
pumps  are  selecIed  Ior  Ihe  sysIem  and  IhereIore  iI  is 
necessary  Io  limiI  Ihe  perIormance  -  IirsI  oI  all,  Ihe  Ilow 
raIe and in some applicaIions Ihe maximum head. 
On  Ihe  Iollowing  pages  you  can  read  abouI  Ihe  Iour 
ad|usIing meIhods. 
lig.. 4.1.1. When selecIing a pump iI is imporIanI Io choose a pump 
where Ihe duIy poinI is wiIhin Ihe high eIhciency area.

[m]
50
40
30
20
10
40
20
30
10
0
60
70
50
0
0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 D [m
3
Jh]
106
S
xx
4.1.1 1hrottIe controI
A IhroIIle valve is placed in series wiIh Ihe pump making iI 
possible Io ad|usI Ihe duIy poinI. 1he IhroIIling resulIs in a 
reducIion oI Ilow, see Iigure 4.1.2. 1he IhroIIle valve adds 
resisIance  Io  Ihe  sysIem  and  raises  Ihe  sysIem  curve  Io  a 
higher posiIion. WiIhouI Ihe IhroIIle valve, Ihe Ilow is O
2
.
 
WiIh Ihe IhroIIle valve connecIed in series wiIh Ihe pump, 
Ihe Ilow is reduced Io O
1
.
1hroIIle  valves  can  be  used  Io  limiI  Ihe  maximum  Ilow.  8y 
adding  Ihe  valve,  Ihe  maximum  possible  Ilow  in  Ihe  sysIem 
is limiIed. ln Ihe example, Ihe Ilow will never be higher Ihan 
O
3
, even iI Ihe sysIem curve is compleIely IlaI - meaning no 
resisIance aI all in Ihe sysIem.  When Ihe pump perIormance 
is ad|usIed by Ihe IhroIIling meIhod, Ihe pump will deliver a 
higher head Ihan necessary Ior IhaI parIicular sysIem. 
lI Ihe pump and Ihe IhroIIle valve are replaced by a smaller 
pump,  Ihe  pump  will  be  able  Io  meeI  Ihe  wanIed  Ilow  O
1

buI aI a lower pump head and consequenIly a lower power 
consumpIion, see hgure 4.1.2.
4.1.2 8ypass controI
lnsIead  oI  connecIing  a  valve  in  series  wiIh  Ihe  pump,  a 
bypass  valve  across  Ihe  pump  can  be  used  Io  ad|usI  Ihe 
pump perIormance, see Iigure 4.1.3. 
Compared  Io  Ihe  IhroIIle  valve,  insIalling  a  bypass  valve 
will  resulI  in  a  cerIain  minimum  Ilow  O
8P
  in  Ihe  pump, 
independenI  on  Ihe  sysIem  characIerisIics.  1he  Ilow    O
P
    is 
Ihe  sum  oI  Ihe  Ilow  in  Ihe  sysIem  O
S
  and  Ihe  Ilow  in  Ihe 
bypass valve O
8P.
  
 
1he  bypass  valve  will  inIroduce  a  maximum  limiI  oI  head 
supplied  Io  Ihe  sysIem  R
max
  ,  see  Iigure  4.1.3.  Lven  when 
Ihe required Ilow in Ihe sysIem is zero, Ihe pump will never 
run  againsI  a  closed  valve.  Like  iI  was  in  Ihe  case  wiIh 
Ihe  IhroIIling  valve,  Ihe  required  Ilow  O
S
  can  be  meI  by  a 
smaller pump and no bypass valve, Ihe resulI being a lower 
Ilow and consequenIly a lower energy consumpIion.
lig.. 4.1.2. 1he IhroIIle valve increases Ihe resisIance in Ihe sysIem  
and consequenIly reduces Ihe ßow.
R
Q
1
Q
2
Q
3
Q

Pump
Smaller pump
kesulIing characIerisIic
SysIem
1hroIIle valve
R
v
R
s
R
Q
8P
Q
S
Q
P
R
max
R
P
Q

Pump
Smaller
pump
kesulIing characIerisIic
SysIem
8ypass valve
Q
s
Q
8P
SysIem
1hroIIle valve
R
p
R
v
R
s
SysIem
8ypass valve
Q
8P
Q
S
Q
P
R
P
lig.. 4.1.3. 1he bypass valve bypasses parI oI Ihe ßow Irom Ihe pump 
and Ihereby reduces Ihe ßow in Ihe sysIem
107
4.1.3 Modifying impeIIer diameter
AnoIher way oI ad|usIing Ihe perIormance oI a cenIriIugal 
pump  is  by  modiIying  Ihe  impeller  diameIer  in  Ihe  pump 
meaning,  reducing  Ihe  diameIer  and  consequenIly 
reducing Ihe pump perIormance. 
Obviously,  reducing  Ihe  impeller  diameIer  cannoI  be 
done  while  Ihe  pump  is  operaIing.  Compared  Io  Ihe 
IhroIIling  and  bypass  meIhods,  which  can  be  carried  ouI 
during  operaIion,  modiIying  Ihe  impeller  diameIer  has 
Io  be  done  in  advance  beIore  Ihe  pump  is  insIalled  or  in 
connecIion wiIh service. 1he Iollowing Iormulas show Ihe 
relaIion  beIween  Ihe  impeller  diameIer  and  Ihe  pump 
perIormance.
 
Please  noIe  IhaI  Ihe  Iormulas  are  an  expression  oI  an 
ideal  pump.  ln  pracIice,  Ihe  pump  eIIiciency  decreases 
when Ihe impeller diameIer is reduced. lor minor changes 
oI  Ihe  impeller  diameIer  D
x
  >  0.8 
.
  D
n
,  Ihe  eIIiciency  is 
only  reduced  by  a  Iew  °-poinIs.  1he  degree  oI  eIIiciency 
reducIion  depends  on  pump  Iype  and  duIy  poinI  (check 
speciIic pump curves Ior deIails).
As  iI  appears  Irom  Ihe  Iormulas,  Ihe  Ilow  and  Ihe  head 
change  wiIh  Ihe  same  raIio  -  IhaI  is  Ihe  raIio  change 
oI  Ihe  impeller  diameIer  in  second  power.  1he  duIy 
poinIs  Iollowing  Ihe  Iormulas  are  placed  on  a  sIraighI 
line  sIarIing  in  (0,0).  1he  change  in  power  consumpIion 
is  Iollowing  Ihe  diameIer  change  in  IourIh  power.
4.1.4 5peed controI
1he  lasI  meIhod  oI  conIrolling  Ihe  pump  perIormance 
IhaI  we  will  cover  in  Ihis  secIion  is  Ihe  variable  speed 
conIrol  meIhod.  Speed  conIrol  by  means  oI  a  Irequency 
converIer  is  wiIhouI  no  doubI  Ihe  mosI  eIIicienI  way  oI 
ad|usIing  pump  perIormance  exposed  Io  variable  Ilow 
requiremenIs.
xx xx
R
R

D
lig.  4.1.4. Change in pump perIormance when Ihe impeller 
diameIer is reduced
108
5ection 4.1
Adjusting pump performance

1he Iollowing equaIions apply wiIh close approximaIion Io 
how Ihe change oI speed oI cenIriIugal pumps inIluences 
Ihe perIormance oI Ihe pump.
1he  aIIiniIy  laws  apply  on  condiIion  IhaI  Ihe  sysIem 
characIerisIic  remains  unchanged  Ior  n
n
  and  n
x
  and    Iorms 
a  parabola  Ihrough  (0,0)  -  see  secIion  3.1.1.    1he  power 
equaIion  IurIhermore  implies  IhaI  Ihe  pump  eIIiciency  is 
unchanged aI Ihe Iwo speeds. 
1he  Iormulas  in  Iigure  4.1.S  show  IhaI  Ihe  pump  Ilow  (O) 
is  proporIional  Io  Ihe  pump  speed  (n).  1he  head  (R)  is 
proporIional Io Ihe second power oI Ihe speed (n) whereas 
Ihe  power  (P)  is  proporIional  Io  Ihe  Ihird  power  oI  Ihe 
speed. ln pracIice, a reducIion oI Ihe speed will resulI in a 
slighI Iall in eIIiciency. 1he eIIiciency aI reduced speed (n
x

can be esIimaIed by Ihe Iollowing Iormula, which is valid 
Ior speed reducIion down Io S0° oI Ihe maximum speed.
 
linally, iI you need Io know precisely how much power you 
can save by reducing Ihe pump speed, you have Io Iake Ihe 
eIIiciency  oI  Ihe  Irequency  converIer  and  Ihe  moIor  inIo 
accounI.
lig.  4.1.S. SysIem characIerisIics Ior diIIerenI aIIiniIy equaIions
109
4.1.5 Comparison of adjustment methods
Now  IhaI  we  have  described  Ihe  Iour  diIIerenI  ways  oI 
changing  Ihe  perIormance  oI  a  cenIriIugal  pump,  we  will 
have a look aI how Ihey diIIer Irom one anoIher. 
When we consider Ihe pump and iIs perIormance-changing 
device  as  one  uniI,  we  can  observe  Ihe  resulIing  OR-
characIerisIic oI Ihis device and compare Ihe resulI oI Ihe 
diIIerenI sysIems.
1hrcttIe ccntrcI
1he IhroIIling meIhod implies a valve connecIed in series 
wiIh  a  pump,  see  Iigure  4.1.6a.  1his  connecIion  acIs  as 
a  new  pump  aI  unchanged  maximum  head  buI  reduced 
Ilow perIormance. 1he pump curve R
n
, Ihe valve curve and 
Ihe  curve  covering  Ihe  compleIe  sysIem  -  R
x
,  see  Iigure 
4.1.6b.
8ypass ccntrcI
When a valve is connecIed across Ihe pump, see Iigure 4.1.7a, 
Ihis connecIion acIs as a new pump aI reduced maximum 
head  and  a  OR-curve  wiIh  a  changed  characIerisIic.  1he 
curve will Iend Io be more linear Ihan quadraIic, see Iigure 
4.1.7b
Mcdifying impeIIer diameter
1he  impeller  reducing  meIhod  does  noI  imply  any  exIra 
componenIs. ligure 4.1.8 shows Ihe reduced OR-curve (R
x

and Ihe original curve characIerisIics (R
n
).
Speed ccntrcI
1he  speed  conIrol  meIhod  (Iigure  1.4.9)  resulIs  in  a 
new OR-curve aI reduced head and Ilow. 1he characIerisIics 
oI  Ihe  curves  remain  Ihe  same.  Rowever,  when  speed 
is  reduced  Ihe  curves  become  more  IlaI,  as  Ihe  head  is 
reduced Io a higher degree Ihan Ihe Ilow.
Compared  Io  Ihe  oIher  meIhods  Ihe  speed  conIrol 
meIhod also makes iI possible Io exIend Ihe perIormance 
range  oI  Ihe  pump  above  Ihe  nominal  OR-curve,  simply 
by  increasing  Ihe  speed  above  nominal  speed  level  oI 
Ihe  pump,  see  Ihe  R
y
-curve  in  Iigure  4.1.9.  lI  Ihis  over-
synchronous  operaIion  is  used,  Ihe  size  oI  Ihe  moIor  has 
Io be Iake inIo accounI.
R
n
R
x
R
y
Speed conIroller
R
n
R
x
D
lig.  4.1.8. lmpeller diameIer ad|usImenI
lig.  4.1.9. Speed conIroller connecIed Io a pump
R
n
R
x
valve
1hroIIle valve
lig.  4.1.6. 1hroIIle valve connecIed in series wiIh a pump
a
b
R
n
R
x
valve
8ypass valve
lig.  4.1.7. 8ypass valve connecIed across Ihe pump
a
b
110
5ection 4.1
Adjusting pump performance
4.1.6 DveraII efficiency of the pump system
8oIh Ihe IhroIIling and Ihe bypass meIhod inIroduce some 
hydraulic power losses in Ihe valves (P
loss
 = k O R).  1hereIore, 
Ihe resulIing eIIiciency oI Ihe pumping sysIem is reduced.
keducing  Ihe  impeller  size  in  Ihe  range  oI  D
x
]D
n
>0.8 
does  noI  have  a  signiIicanI  impacI  on  Ihe  pump 
eIIiciency.  1hereIore,  Ihis  meIhod  does  noI  have  a 
negaIive inIluence on Ihe overall eIIiciency oI Ihe sysIem. 
1he  eIIiciency  oI  speed-conIrolled  pumps  is  only  aIIecIed 
Io  a  limiIed  exIenI,  as  long  as  Ihe  speed  reducIion  does 
noI  drop  below  S0°  oI  Ihe  nominal  speed.  LaIer  on,  we 
will discover IhaI Ihe eIIiciency has only reduced a Iew °-
poinIs, and IhaI iI does noI have an impacI on Ihe overall 
running economy oI speed-conIrolled soluIions.
4.1.7  £xampIe:  keIative  power  consumption 
when the fIow is reduced by 20Z  
ln  an  given  insIallaIion  Ihe  Ilow  has  Io  be  reduced  Irom 
O  =  60  m
3
]h  Io  S0  m
3
]h.  ln  Ihe  original  sIarIing  poinI 
(O  =  60  m
3
]h  and  R  =  70  m),  Ihe  power  inpuI  Io  Ihe 
pump is seI relaIively Io 100°. Depending on Ihe meIhod 
oI  perIormance  ad|usImenI,  Ihe  power  consumpIion 
reducIion  will  vary.  Now,  leI  us  have  a  look  aI  how 
Ihe  power  consumpIion  aIIecIs  each  oI  Ihe  perIormance 
ad|usImenI meIhods.
111
1hrcttIe ccntrcI
1he  power  consumpIion  is  reduced  Io  abouI  94°  when 
Ihe Ilow drops. 1he IhroIIling resulIs in an increased head, 
see Iigure 4.1.10.  1he maximum power consumpIion is Ior 
some  pumps  aI  a  lower  Ilow  Ihan  Ihe  maximum  Ilow.    lI 
Ihis is Ihe case, Ihe power consumpIion increases because 
oI Ihe IhroIIle. 
8ypass ccntrcI
1o  reduce  Ihe  Ilow  in  Ihe  sysIem,  Ihe  valve  has  Io  reduce 
Ihe  head  oI  Ihe  pump  Io  SS  m.  1his  can  only  be  done  by 
increasing Ihe Ilow in Ihe pump. As iI appears Irom Iigure 
4.1.11, Ihe Ilow is consequenIly increased Io 81 m
3
]h, which 
resulIs  in  an  increased  power  consumpIion  oI  up  Io  10° 
above  Ihe  original  consumpIion.  1he  degree  oI  increase 
depends on Ihe pump Iype and Ihe duIy poinI. 1hereIore, 
in  some  cases,  Ihe  increase  in  P
2
  is  equal  Io  zero  and  in  a 
Iew rare cases P

mighI even decrease
 
a liIIle.
Mcdifying impeIIer diameter
When Ihe impeller diameIer is reduced, boIh Ihe Ilow and 
Ihe  head  oI  Ihe  pump  drop.  8y  a  Ilow  reducIion  oI  20°, 
Ihe  power  consumpIion  is  reduced  Io  around  67°  oI  iIs 
original consumpIion, see Iigure 4.1.12.
Speed ccntrcI 
When  Ihe  speed  oI  Ihe  pump  is  conIrolled,  boIh  Ihe  Ilow 
and Ihe head are reduced, see Iigure 4.1.13. ConsequenIly, 
Ihe power consumpIion has reduced Io around 6S° oI Ihe 
original consumpIion.
 
When iI comes Io obIaining Ihe besI possible eIIiciency, Ihe 
impeller diameIer ad|usImenI meIhod or Ihe speed conIrol 
meIhod  oI  Ihe  pump  are  Ihe  besI  suiIed  Ior  reducing  Ihe 
Ilow  in  Ihe  insIallaIion.  When  Ihe  pump  has  Io  operaIe 
in  a  Iixed,  modiIied  duIy  poinI,  Ihe  impeller  diameIer 
ad|usImenI  meIhod  is  Ihe  besI  soluIion.  Rowever,  when 
we  deal  wiIh  an  insIallaIion,  where  Ihe  Ilow  demand 
varies, Ihe speed-conIrolled pump is Ihe besI soluIion.
R |mj
O |m
3
]hj
O
P
2
76
100°
94°
70
SS
S0 60
lig.  4.1.10. kelaIive power consumpIion - IhroIIle conIrol
R |mj
O |m
3
]hj
O
P
2
70
100°
110°
SS
S0 60 81
lig.  4.1.11. kelaIive power consumpIion - bypass conIrol
O |m
3
]hj
P
2
100°
67°
S0 60
R |mj
O
70
SS
lig.  4.1.12. kelaIive power consumpIion - modiIying impeller diameIer
O |m
3
]hj
P
2
100°
6S°
S0 60
R |mj
O
70
SS
O
lig.  4.1.13. kelaIive power consumpIion - speed conIrol
= ModiIied duIy poinI
= Original duIy poinI
= ModiIied duIy poinI
= Original duIy poinI
= ModiIied duIy poinI
= Original duIy poinI
= ModiIied duIy poinI
= Original duIy poinI
112
5ection 4.1
Adjusting pump performance
Continuous
adjustment
possibIe?
¥es
¥es
No
¥es
1he resuIting performance
curve wiII have
keduced D
keduced H and changed
curve
keduced D and H
keduced D and H
Method
1hrottIe controI
1hroIIle valve
8ypass controI
8ypass valve
Speed conIroller
D
Modifying impeIIer
diameter
5peed controI
DveraII efficiency
of the pump
system
ConsiderabIy
reduced
5IightIy reduced
5IightIy reduced
65Z
67Z
110Z
94Z
ConsiderabIy
reduced
keIative power
consumption by 20Z
reduction in fIow
R
n

R
x
valve
R
n

R
x
valve
R
n

R
x
R
n

R
x
R
y
lig.  4.1.14. CharacIerisIics oI ad|usImenI meIhods.
Summary
ligure 4.1.14 gives an overview oI Ihe diIIerenI ad|usImenI 
meIhods  IhaI  we  have  presenIed  in  Ihe  previous  secIion. 
Lach meIhod has iIs pros and cons which have Io be Iaken 
inIo  accounI  when  choosing  an  ad|usImenI  meIhod  Ior  a 
sysIem.   
113
As discussed in Ihe previous secIion, speed conIrol oI pumps 
is an eIIicienI way oI ad|usIing pump perIormance Io Ihe 
sysIem.  ln  Ihis  secIion  we  will  discuss  Ihe  possibiliIies  oI 
combining  speed-conIrolled  pumps  wiIh  Pl-conIrollers 
and  sensors  measuring  sysIem  parameIers,  such  as 
pressure,  diIIerenIial  pressure  and  IemperaIure.  On  Ihe 
Iollowing  pages,  Ihe  diIIerenI  opIions  will  be  presenIed 
by examples.
4.2.1 Constant pressure controI
A  pump  has  Io  supply  Iap  waIer  Irom  a  break  Iank  Io 
diIIerenI Iaps in a building.
 
1he  demand  Ior  Iap  waIer  is  varying,  so  IhereIore  Ihe 
sysIem  characIerisIic  varies  according  Io  Ihe  required 
Ilow. Due Io comIorI and energy savings a consIanI supply 
pressure is recommended.
As  iI  appears  Irom  Iigure  4.2.1,  Ihe  soluIion  is  a  speed- 
conIrolled  pump  wiIh  a  Pl-conIroller.  1he  Pl-conIroller 
compares  Ihe  needed  pressure  p
seI
  wiIh  Ihe  acIual  supply 
pressure p
1
, measured by a pressure IransmiIIer P1. 
lI  Ihe  acIual  pressure  is  higher  Ihan  Ihe  seIpoinI,  Ihe 
Pl-conIroller  reduces  Ihe  speed  and  consequenIly  Ihe 
perIormance oI Ihe pump, unIil p
1
 = p
seI
. ligure 4.2.1 shows 
whaI happens when Ihe Ilow is reduced Irom O
max
 Io O
1
 .
1he  conIroller  sees  Io  iI  IhaI  Ihe  speed  oI  Ihe  pump  is 
reduced Irom n
n
 Io n

 in order Io ensure IhaI Ihe required 
discharge  pressure  is  p
1
  =  p
seI
.  1he  pump  insIallaIion 
ensures  IhaI  Ihe  supply  pressure  is  consIanI  in  Ihe  Ilow 
range  oI  0  -  O
max
.  1he  supply  pressure  is  independenI 
on  Ihe  level  (h)  in  Ihe  break  Iank.  lI  h  changes,  Ihe  Pl-
conIroller ad|usIs Ihe speed oI Ihe pump so IhaI p

always 
corresponds Io
 
Ihe seIpoinI. 
p
1
h
O
1
R
1
SeIpoinI p
seI
8reak
Iank
AcIual value p
1
Pressure
IransmiIIer
Pl-
conIroller
Speed
conIroller
1aps
P1
H
D O
1
h O
max
p
seI
n
x
n
n
lig. 4.2.1. WaIer supply sysIem wiIh speed-conIrolled pump delivering 
consIanI pressure Io Ihe sysIem
5ection 4.2
5peed-controIIed pump soIutions
114
4.2.2 Constant temperature controI
PerIormance  ad|usImenI  by  means  oI  speed  conIrol  is 
suiIable Ior a number oI indusIrial applicaIions. ligure 4.2.2 
shows a sysIem wiIh an in|ecIion moulding machine which 
has Io be waIer-cooled Io ensure high qualiIy producIion.
1he  machine  is  cooled  wiIh  waIer  aI  1S
o
C  Irom  a  cooling 
planI. 1o ensure IhaI Ihe moulding machine runs properly 
and is cooled suIIicienIly, Ihe reIurn pipe IemperaIure has 
Io  be  kepI  aI  a  consIanI  level,  I
r
  =  20
o
C.  1he  soluIion  is  a 
speed-conIrolled  pump,  conIrolled  by  a  Pl-conIroller.  1he 
Pl-conIroller  compares  Ihe  needed  IemperaIure  I
seI
  wiIh 
Ihe  acIual  reIurn  pipe  IemperaIure  I
r
,  which  is  measured 
by  a  IemperaIure  IransmiIIer  11.  1his  sysIem  has  a  Iixed 
sysIem  characIerisIic  and  IhereIore  Ihe  duIy  poinI  oI  Ihe 
pump  is  locaIed  on  Ihe  curve  beIween  O
min
  and  O
max
.  1he 
higher  Ihe  heaI  loss  in  Ihe  machine,  Ihe  higher  Ihe  Ilow 
oI  cooling  waIer  needed  Io  ensure  IhaI  Ihe  reIurn  pipe 
IemperaIure is kepI aI a consIanI level oI 20
 o
C.
 
4.2.3 Constant differentiaI pressure in a 
circuIating system
CirculaIing  sysIems  (closed  sysIems),  see  chapIer  3,  are 
well-suiIed  Ior  speed-conIrolled  pump  soluIions.  lI  is  an 
advanIage  IhaI  circulaIing  sysIems  wiIh  variable  sysIem 
characIerisIic  are  IiIIed  wiIh  a  diIIerenIial  pressure- 
conIrolled circulaIor pump, see Iigure 4.2.3.
1he  Iigure  shows  a  heaIing  sysIem  consisIing  oI  a  heaI 
exchanger  where  Ihe  circulaIed  waIer  is  heaIed  up  and 
delivered  Io  Ihree  consumers,  e.g.  radiaIors,  by  a  speed-
conIrolled  pump.  A  conIrol  valve  is  connecIed  in  series  aI 
each  consumer  Io  conIrol  Ihe  Ilow  according  Io  Ihe  heaI 
requiremenI.
1he pump is conIrolled according Io a consIanI diIIerenIial 
pressure,  measured  across  Ihe  pump.  1his  means  IhaI 
Ihe  pump  sysIem  oIIers  consIanI  diIIerenIial  pressure  in 
Ihe O-range oI 0 - O
max
, depicIed as Ihe horizonIal line in 
Iigure 4.2.3.
lig.  4.2.2. SysIem wiIh in|ecIion moulding machine and IemperaIure- 
conIrolled circulaIor pump ensuring a consIanI reIurn pipe IemperaIure
 
lig.  4.2.3. ReaIing sysIem wiIh speed-conIrolled circulaIor pump delivering 
consIanI diIIerenIial pressure Io Ihe sysIem
11S
4.2.4 fIow-compensated differentiaI 
pressure controI
1he  main  IuncIion  oI  Ihe  pumping  sysIem  in  Iigure  4.2.4 
is  Io  mainIain  a  consIanI  diIIerenIial  pressure  across  Ihe 
conIrol valves aI Ihe consumers, e.g. radiaIors. ln order Io 
do so, Ihe pump has Io be able Io overcome IricIion losses 
in pipes, heaI exchangers, IiIIings, eIc. 
As we discussed in chapIer 3, Ihe pressure loss in a sysIem 
is proporIional Io Ihe Ilow in second power. 1he besI way 
Io conIrol a circulaIor pump in a sysIem like Ihe one shown 
in Ihe Iigure on your righI, is Io allow Ihe pump Io deliver a 
pressure, which increases when Ihe Ilow increases. 
When Ihe demand oI Ilow is low, Ihe pressure losses in Ihe 
pipes,  heaI  exchangers,  IiIIings,  eIc.  are  low  as  well,  and 
Ihe pump only supplies a pressure equivalenI Io whaI Ihe 
conIrol  valve  requires,  R
seI
-R
I
.  When  Ihe  demand  oI  Ilow 
increases,  Ihe  pressure  losses  increase  in  second  power 
and  IhereIore  Ihe  pump  has  Io  increase  Ihe  delivered 
pressure, depicIed as Ihe blue curve in Iigure 4.2.4.
Such  a  pumping  sysIem  can  be  designed  in  Iwo  diIIerenI 
ways.
-  1he diIIerenIial pressure IransmiIIer is placed across Ihe 
  pump and Ihe sysIem is running wiIh Ilow-compensaIed
  diIIerenIial pressure conIrol - DP1
1
, see Iigure 4.2.4.
-  1he  diIIerenIial  pressure  IransmiIIer  is  placed  close  Io
  Ihe  consumers  and  Ihe  sysIem  is  running  wiIh
  diIIerenIial pressure conIrol - DP1
2
 in Iig. 4.2.4.
1he  advanIage  oI  Ihe  IirsI  soluIion  is  IhaI  Ihe  pump,  Ihe 
Pl-conIroller,  Ihe  speed  conIrol  and  Ihe  IransmiIIer  are 
placed close Io one anoIher, making Ihe insIallaIion easy. 
1his insIallaIion makes iI possible Io geI Ihe enIire sysIem 
as  one  single  uniI,  see  secIion  4.4.  ln  order  Io  geI  Ihe 
sysIem up and running, pump curve daIa have Io be sIored 
in Ihe conIroller. 1hese daIa are used Io calculaIe Ihe Ilow 
and  likewise  Io  calculaIe  how  much  Ihe  seIpoinI  R
seI
  has 
Io  be  reduced  aI  a  given  Ilow  Io  ensure  IhaI  Ihe  pump 
perIormance meeIs Ihe required blue curve in Iigure 4.2.4.
1he  second  soluIion  wiIh  Ihe  IransmiIIer  placed  in  Ihe 
insIallaIion  requires  more  insIallaIion  cosIs  because  Ihe 
IransmiIIer has Io be insIalled aI Ihe insIallaIion siIe and 
Ihe  necessary  cabling  has  Io  be  carried  ouI  as  well.  1he 
perIormance  oI  Ihis  sysIem  is  more  or  less  similar  Io  Ihe 
IirsI  sysIem.  1he  IransmiIIer  measures  Ihe  diIIerenIial 
pressure aI Ihe consumer and compensaIes auIomaIically 
Ior Ihe increase in required pressure in order Io overcome 
Ihe increase in pressure losses in Ihe supply pipes, eIc.
Speed
conIroller
SeIpoinI R
seI
AcIual value R
1
O
1
Pl-
conIroller

DP11
DP12
O
1
O
max
R
seI
R
I
R
1
n
x
n
n
D
H
lig.  4.2.4. ReaIing sysIem wiIh speed-conIrolled circulaIor pump
delivering Ilow-compensaIed diIIerenIial pressure Io Ihe sysIem
116
5ection 4.2
5peed-controIIed pump soIutions
K
a
p
i
I
e
l
 
1
                
S
A  large  number  oI  pump  applicaIions  do  noI  require  Iull 
pump  perIormance  24  hours  a  day.  1hereIore,  iI  is  an 
advanIage  Io  be  able  Io  ad|usI  Ihe  pump's  perIormance 
in  Ihe  sysIem  auIomaIically.  As  we  saw  in  secIion  4.1, 
Ihe  besI  possible  way  oI  adapIing  Ihe  perIormance  oI 
a  cenIriIugal  pump  is  by  means  oI  speed  conIrol  oI  Ihe 
pump.  Speed  conIrol  oI  pumps  is  normally  made  by  a 
Irequency converIer uniI. 
On  Ihe  Iollowing  pages  we  will  have  a  look  aI  speed- 
conIrolled  pumps  in  closed  and  open  sysIems.  8uI  beIore 
we dig any IurIher inIo Ihe world oI speed conIrol, we will 
presenI  Ihe  advanIages  IhaI  speed  conIrol  provides  and 
Ihe  beneIiIs  IhaI  speed-conIrolled  pumps  wiIh  Irequency 
converIer oIIer.
keduced energy ccnsumpticn  
Speed-conIrolled  pumps  only  use  Ihe  amounI  oI  energy 
needed  Io  solve  a  speciIic  pump  |ob.  Compared  Io  oIher 
conIrol  meIhods,  Irequency-conIrolled  speed  conIrol 
oIIers  Ihe  highesI  eIIiciency  and  Ihus  Ihe  mosI  eIIicienI 
uIilizaIion oI Ihe energy, see secIion 4.1.
lcw Iife cycIe ccsts
As  we  will  see  in  chapIer  S,  Ihe  energy  consumpIion  oI  a 
pump is a very imporIanI IacIor considering a pump's liIe 
cycle cosIs. 1hereIore, iI is imporIanI Io keep Ihe operaIing 
cosIs  oI  a  pumping  sysIem  aI  Ihe  lowesI  possible  level. 
LIIicienI operaIion leads Io lower energy consumpIion and 
Ihus  Io  lower  operaIing  cosIs.  Compared  Io  Iixed  speed 
pumps, iI is possible Io reduce Ihe energy consumpIion by 
up Io S0° wiIh a speed-conIrolled pump. 
Prctecticn cf the envircnment
Lnergy  eIIicienI  pumps  poluIe  less  and  Ihus  do  noI  harm 
Ihe environmenI.
lncreased ccmfcrt
Speed  conIrol  in  diIIerenI  pumping  sysIems  provides 
increased  comIorI.  ln  waIer  supply  sysIems,  auIomaIic 
pressure  conIrol  and  soII-sIarI  oI  pumps  reduce  waIer 
hammer  and  noise  generaIed  by  Ioo  high  pressure  in  Ihe 
sysIem.  ln  circulaIing  sysIems,  speed-conIrolled  pumps 
ensure  IhaI  Ihe  diIIerenIial  pressure  is  kepI  aI  a  level  so 
IhaI noise in Ihe sysIem is minimised.    
keduced system ccsts
Speed-conIrolled  pumps  can  reduce  Ihe  need  Ior 
commissioning  and  conIrol  valves  in  Ihe  sysIem. 
1hereIore,  Ihe  IoIal  sysIem  cosIs  can  be  reduced.
5ection 4.3
Advantages of speed controI
117
ln  many  applicaIions,  pumps  wiIh  inIegraIed  Irequency 
converIer is Ihe opIimum soluIion. 1he reason is IhaI Ihese 
pumps  combine  Ihe  beneIiIs  oI  a  speed-conIrolled  pump 
soluIion wiIh Ihe beneIiIs gained Irom combining a pump, 
a  Irequency  converIer,  a  Pl-conIroller  and  someIimes 
also  a  sensor]pressure  IransmiIIer  in  one  single  uniI 
- see Iigure 4.4.1.  
A  pump  wiIh  inIegraIed  Irequency  converIer  is  noI  |usI 
a  pump,  buI  a  sysIem  which  is  able  Io  solve  applicaIion 
problems or save energy in a varieIy oI pump insIallaIions. 
As regards replacemenI, pumps wiIh inIegraIed Irequency 
converIers  are  ideal  as  Ihey  can  be  insIalled  insIead  oI 
fxed speed  pumps  aI  no  exIra  insIallaIion  cosI.  All  IhaI 
is  required  is  a  power  supply  connecIion  and  a  IiIIing  oI 
Ihe pump wiIh inIegraIed Irequency converIer in Ihe pipe 
sysIem,  and  Ihen  Ihe  pump  is  ready  Ior  operaIion.  All 
Ihe  insIaller  has  Io  do  is  Io  ad|usI  Ihe  required  seIpoinI 
(pressure) aIIer which Ihe sysIem is operaIional.
WhaI Iollows is a brieI descripIion oI Ihe advanIages IhaI 
pumps wiIh inIegraIed Irequency converIer have Io oIIer.
£asy tc instaII
Pumps  wiIh  inIegraIed  Irequency  converIer  are  |usI  as 
easy Io insIall as Iixed speed pumps. All you have Io do is 
Io  connecI  Ihe  moIor  Io  Ihe  elecIrical  power  supply  and 
Ihe  pump  is  in  operaIion.  1he  manuIacIurer  has  made  all 
inIernal connecIions and ad|usImenIs.
0ptimaI energy savings
8ecause Ihe pump, Ihe moIor and Ihe Irequency converIer 
are  designed  Ior  compaIibiliIy,  operaIion  oI  Ihe  pump 
sysIem reduces power consumpIion.
0ne suppIier
One  supplier  can  provide  pump,  Irequency  converIer 
and  sensor  which  naIurally  IaciliIaIe  Ihe  dimensioning, 
selecIion,  ordering  procedures,  as  well  as  mainIenance 
and service procedures. 
lig. 4.4.1. Pump uniI wiIh inIegraIed 
Irequency converIer and pressure IransmiIIer

SeIpoinI
Pl-
conIroller
lrequency
converIer
5ection 4.4 
Advantages of pumps with integrated 
frequency converter
P1
118
Wide perfcrmance range
Pumps  wiIh  inIegraIed  Irequency  converIer  have  a 
very  broad  perIormance  range,  which  enables  Ihem  Io 
perIorm  eIIicienIly  under  widely  varied  condiIions  and  Io 
meeI  a  wide  range  oI  requiremenIs.  1hus,  Iewer  pumps 
can  replace  many  Iixed  speed  pump  Iypes  wiIh  narrow 
perIormance capabiliIies. 
4.4.1. Performance curves of speed- 
controIIed pumps
Now,  leI  us  have  a  closer  look  aI  how  you  can  read  a 
speed-conIrolled pump's perIormance curve.
ligure  4.4.2  shows  an  example  oI  Ihe  perIormance  curves 
oI a speed-conIrolled pump. 1he hrsI curve shows Ihe OR-
curve and Ihe second curve shows Ihe corresponding power 
consumpIion curve.
As you can Iell, Ihe perIormance curves are given Ior every 
10° decrease in speed Irom 100° down Io S0°. Likewise, 
Ihe  minimum  curve  represenIed  by  2S°  oI  Ihe  maximum 
speed is also shown.  As we have indicaIed in Ihe diagram, 
you can poinI ouI a speciIic duIy poinI OR and hnd ouI aI 
which  speed  Ihe  duIy  poinI  can  be  reached  and  whaI  Ihe 
power consumpIion P
1
 is.
4.4.2  5peed-controIIed pumps in different 
systems
Speed-conIrolled pumps are used in a wide range oI sysIems. 
1he  change  in  pump  perIormance  and  consequenIly  Ihe 
poIenIial  energy  saving  depend  on  Ihe  sysIem  in  quesIion.
As we discussed in chapIer 3, Ihe characIerisIic oI a sysIem 
is an indicaIion oI Ihe required head a pump has Io deliver, 
in  order  Io  IransporI  a  cerIain  quanIiIy  oI  liquid  Ihrough 
Ihe  sysIem.  ligure  4.4.3  shows  Ihe  perIormance  curve  and 
Ihe sysIem characIerisIic oI a closed and an open sysIem. 
  
70
H
[m]
60
50
40
30
20
10
0 5 10 15 20 25 30 D [m
3
Jh]
D [m
3
Jh]
35
6
4
2
0
P
1
[kW]
100Z
90Z
86Z
80Z
70Z
60Z
50Z
25Z
lig 4.4.2. PerIormance curve Ior a speed-conIrolled pump
lig  4.4.3.  SysIem  characIerisIic  poinI  oI  a  closed  and  an  open 
sysIem

R

CIosed system Dpen system

Pump curve
5ystem 
characteristic
Pump curve
5ystem 
characteristic
119
Speed-ccntrcIIed pumps in cIcsed systems 
ln  closed  sysIems,  like  heaIing  and  air-condiIioning  sysIems, 
Ihe pump has only Io overcome Ihe IricIion losses in Ihe pipes, 
valves, heaI exchangers, eIc. ln  Ihis  secIion,  we  will  presenI 
an  example  wiIh  a  speed-conIrolled  pump  in  a  closed 
sysIem. 1he IoIal IricIion loss by a Iull Ilow oI 1S m
3
]h is 16 m, 
see Iigure 4.4.4.
1he  sysIem  characIerisIic  sIarIs  in  Ihe  poinI  (0,0),  Ihe  red 
line in Iigure 4.4.S. 1he conIrol valves in Ihe sysIem always 
need  a  cerIain  operaIing  pressure,  so  IhereIore  Ihe  pump 
cannoI work according Io Ihe sysIem characIerisIic. 1haI is 
why  some  speed-conIrolled  pumps  oIIer  Ihe  proporIional 
pressure  conIrol  IuncIion,  which  ensures  IhaI  Ihe  pump 
will  operaIe  according  Io  Ihe  orange  line  shown  in  Ihe 
Iigure.  As  you  can  Iell  Irom  Ihe  Iigure  4.4.S,  Ihe  minimum 
perIormance is around S7° oI Ihe Iull speed. ln a circulaIing 
sysIem  operaIion  aI  Ihe  minimum  curve  (2S°  oI  Ihe  Iull 
speed)  can  be  relevanI  in  some  siIuaIions,  Ior  example 
when we deal wiIh nighI-Iime duIy in heaIing sysIems.
R
O = 1S m
2
]h
Consumers
8oiler 
or like
lig. 4.4.4. Closed sysIem
H
[m]
4
8
12
16
20
24
0
2 4 6 8 10 12 D [m
3
Jh]
D [m
3
Jh]
14 16
1.2
0.8
0.4
0
P
1
[kW]
60Z
70Z
80Z
90Z
99Z
100Z
25Z
50Z
lig. 4.4.S. A speed-conIrolled pump in a closed sysIem
120
5ection 4.4 
Advantages of pumps with integrated frequency converter
Speed-ccntrcIIed pumps in cpen systems 
1he sysIem characIerisIic as well as Ihe operaIing range oI 
Ihe pump depend on Ihe Iype oI sysIem in quesIion.
ligure 4.4.6 shows a pump in a pressure boosIing ] waIer 
supply sysIem. 1he pump has Io supply O = 6.S m
3
]h Io Ihe 
Iap,  which  is  placed  h  =  20  m  above  Ihe  pump.  1he  inleI 
pressure Io Ihe pump p
s
 is 1 bar, Ihe pressure aI Ihe Iap p
I
 
has Io be 2 bar and Ihe IoIal IricIion loss in Ihe sysIem by 
Iull Ilow p
I
 is 1.3 bar.
ligure  4.4.7  shows  Ihe  OR-curve  oI  a  pump,  which  is 
able  Io  meeI  Ihe  requiremenIs  described  beIore.  ¥ou  can 
calculaIe  Ihe  required  head  aI  zero  Ilow  (R
o
)  by  using  Ihe 
equaIion on your righI.
lI you need Io calculaIe Ihe maximum head aI a Ilow (O) oI 
6.S m
3
]h, Ihis is Ihe equaIion Io use.
998 
.
 9.81
H
max
 = H
o
 +  =  30.2  +  =  43.5 m
p
f
p .
 g
1.3 
.
 10
5
1o cover Ihis applicaIion Irom zero Ilow Io maximum Ilow 
O = 6.S m
3
]h Ihe pump operaIes in a relaIive narrow speed 
band,  IhaI  is  Irom  abouI  6S°  oI  Ihe  Iull  speed  and  up  Io 
99°  oI  Ihe  Iull  speed.  ln  sysIems  wiIh  less  IricIion  loss 
Ihe  variaIion  in  speed  will  be  even  smaller.  lI  no  IricIion 
loss,  Ihe  minimum  speed  in  Ihe  above  case  is  abouI  79° 
speed.
As  you  can  Iell  Irom  Ihe  previous  Iwo  examples,  Ihe 
possible  variaIion  in  speed  and  consequenIly  in  power 
consumpIion  is  highesI  in  closed  sysIems.  1hereIore,  Ihe 
closed  sysIems  accounI  Ior  Ihe  highesI  energy  saving 
poIenIial.   
h = 20 m
lig. 4.4.6. Pump in a 
waIer supply sysIem
p
t
 = 2 bar
p
s
 = 1 bar
p
f
 = 1.3 bar
D = 6.5 m
3
Jh
H
  p

  -   Pressure at tapping point
  p
s
   -   5uction pressure 
  p
f
   -   friction Ioss
  D   -   fIow rate 
  h   -   5tatic Iift
H
[m]
60
50
40
20
10
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 D [m
3
Jh]
D [m
3
Jh]
1.2
0.8
0.4
0
P
1
[kW]
90Z
80Z
70Z
60Z
50Z
25Z
100Z
R
O
lig. 4.4.7. A speed-conIrolled pump in an open sysIem
p
t -
 p
s
p .
 g 998 
.
 9.81
H
o
 = h +  =  20  +  =  30.2 m
(2-1) 
.
 10
5
121
4.5.2. Components of the frequency 
converter
ln  principle,  all  Irequency  converIers  consisI  oI  Ihe  same 
IuncIional  blocks.  1he  basic  IuncIion  is  as  menIioned 
previously, Io converI Ihe mains volIage supply inIo a new 
AC volIage wiIh anoIher Irequency and ampliIude. 
1he  Irequency  converIer  IirsI  oI  all  recIiIies  Ihe  incoming 
mains volIage and Ihen sIores Ihe energy in an inIermediaIe 
circuiI  consisIing  oI  a  capaciIor.  1he  DC  volIage  is  Ihen 
converIed  inIo  a  new  AC  volIage  wiIh  anoIher  Irequency 
and ampliIude.
8ecause  oI  Ihe  inIermediaIe  circuiI  in  Ihe  Irequency 
converIer Ihe Irequency oI Ihe mains volIage has no direcI 
inIluence  on  Ihe  ouIpuI  Irequency  and  Ihus  Io  Ihe  moIor 
speed. lI does noI maIIer iI Ihe Irequency is S0Rz or 60Rz 
as Ihe recIiIier can handle boIh siIuaIions. AddiIionally, Ihe 
incoming Irequency will noI inIluence Ihe ouIpuI Irequency, 
as Ihis is deIined by Ihe volIage]Irequency paIIern, which 
is  deIined  in  Ihe  inverIer.    Keeping  Ihe  above-menIioned 
IacIs  in  mind,  using  a  Irequency  converIer  in  connecIion 
wiIh asynchronous moIors provides Ihe Iollowing beneIiIs.
-  1he sysIem can be used in boIh S0 and 60 cycle    
  areas wiIhouI any modiIicaIions
-  1he ouIpuI Irequency oI Ihe Irequency converIer is    
  independenI on Ihe incoming Irequency
-  1he Irequency converIer can supply ouIpuI Irequencies    
  higher Ihan mains supply Irequency - makes      
   oversynchronous operaIion possible.
As  you  can  Iell  Irom  Iigure  4.S.2,  Ihe  Irequency  converIer 
consisIs oI Ihree oIher componenIs as well. An LMC IilIer, 
a conIrol circuiI and an inverIer. 
As  menIioned  earlier,  speed  conIrol  oI  pumps  involves  a 
Irequency converIer. 1hereIore, iI will be relevanI Io have 
a closer look aI a Irequency converIer, how iI operaIes and 
Iinally Io discuss relaIed precauIions by using Ihis device.
 
4.5.1 8asic function and characteristics
lI  is  a  well-known  IacI  IhaI  Ihe  speed  oI  an  asynchronous 
moIor  depends  primarily  on  Ihe  pole  number  oI  Ihe  moIor 
and  Ihe  Irequency  oI  Ihe  volIage  supplied.  1he  ampliIude 
oI  Ihe  volIage  supplied  and  Ihe  load  on  Ihe  moIor  shaII 
also  inIluence  Ihe  moIor  speed,  however,  noI  Io  Ihe  same 
degree.  ConsequenIly,  changing  Ihe  Irequency  oI  Ihe 
supply  volIage  is  an  ideal  meIhod  Ior  asynchronous  moIor 
speed conIrol. ln order Io ensure a correcI moIor magneIisaIion 
iI is also necessary Io change Ihe ampliIude oI Ihe volIage.
A Irequency]volIage conIrol resulIs in a displacemenI oI Ihe 
Iorque characIerisIic whereby Ihe speed is changed. ligure 
4.S.1 shows Ihe moIor Iorque characIerisIic (1) as a IuncIion 
oI  Ihe  speed  (n)  aI  Iwo  diIIerenI  Irequencies]volIages.  ln 
Ihe  same  diagram  is  also  drawn  Ihe  load  characIerisIic 
oI  Ihe  pump.  As  iI  appears  Irom  Ihe  Iigure,  Ihe  speed  is 
changed by changing Irequency]volIage oI Ihe moIor. 
1he  Irequency  converIer  changes  Irequency  and  volIage, 
so  IhereIore  we  can  conclude  IhaI  Ihe  basic  Iask  oI  a 
Irequency converIer is Io change Ihe Iixed supply volIage]
Irequency,  e.g.  3x400  v]  S0Rz,  inIo  a  variable  volIage]
Irequency.
lig. 4.S.1.  DisplacemenI oI moIor Iorque characIerisIic
n
1
f
2
f
1
f
1
 > f
2
lig. 4.S.2.  luncIional blocks oI Ihe Irequency converIer
Mains suppIy AC
LMC 
hlIer
kecIiher
lnIer-
mediaIe
circuiI DC
lnverIer
ConIrol circuiI
5ection 4.5
frequency converter
122
1he £MC fiIter
1his  block  is  noI  parI  oI  Ihe  primary  IuncIion  oI  Ihe 
Irequency converIer and IhereIore, in principle, could be leII 
ouI oI Ihe Irequency converIer. Rowever, in order Io meeI 
Ihe  requiremenIs  oI  Ihe  LMC  direcIive  oI  Ihe  Luropean 
Union or oIher local requiremenIs, Ihe IilIer is necessary.
1he  LMC  IilIer  ensures  IhaI  Ihe  Irequency  converIer  does 
noI send unaccepIably high noise signal back Io Ihe mains 
Ihus  disIurbing  oIher  elecIronic  equipmenI  connecIed  Io 
Ihe  mains.  AI  Ihe  same  Iime  Ihe  IilIer  ensures  IhaI  noise 
signals in Ihe mains generaIed by oIher equipmenI do noI 
enIer  Ihe  elecIronic  devices  oI  Ihe  Irequency  converIer 
causing damage or disIurbances.
1he ccntrcI circuit
1he conIrol circuiI block has Iwo IuncIions. lI conIrols Ihe 
Irequency converIer and aI Ihe same Iime iI Iakes care oI 
Ihe  enIire  communicaIion  beIween  Ihe  producI  and  Ihe 
surroundings.
1he inverter
1he  ouIpuI  volIage  Irom  a  Irequency  converIer  is 
noI  sinusoidal  like  Ihe  normal  mains  volIage  is.  1he 
volIage  supplied  Io  Ihe  moIor  consisIs  oI  a  number  oI 
square-wave  pulses,  see  Iigure  4.S.3.  1he  mean  value  oI 
Ihese  pulses  Iorms  a  sinusoidal  volIage  oI  Ihe  desired 
Irequency  and  ampliIude.  1he  swiIching  Irequency  can 
be  Irom  a  Iew  kRz  up  Io  20  kRz,  depending  on  Ihe 
brand. 1o avoid noise generaIion in Ihe moIor windings, a 
Irequency  converIer  wiIh  a  swiIching  Irequency 
above  Ihe  range  oI  audibiliIy  (¯16  kRz)  is  preIerable. 
1his  principle  oI  inverIer  operaIion  is  called  PWM  (Pulse 
WidIh  ModulaIion)  conIrol  and  iI  is  Ihe  conIrol  principle 
which is used mosI oIIen in Irequency converIers Ioday.
1he moIor currenI iIselI is almosI sinusoidal. 1his is shown 
in Iigure 4.S.4 (a) indicaIing moIor currenI (Iop) and moIor 
volIage.  ln  Iigure  4.S.4  (b)  a  secIion  oI  Ihe  moIor  volIage 
is  shown.  1his  indicaIes  how  Ihe  pulse]pause  raIio  oI  Ihe 
volIage changes.
t
U
motor
Mean vaIue of voItage
1 = 1Jfm
lig 4.S.3. AC volIage wiIh variable Irequency (Im) and 
variable volIage (U
moIor
)
0
0
*
* DetaiI
lig 4.S.4. a) MoIor currenI (Iop) and moIor volIage aI PWM (Pulse WidIh 
ModulaIion) conIrol.  b) SecIion oI moIor volIage
a b
123
4.5.3 5peciaI conditions regarding 
frequency converters
8y  insIalling  and  using  Irequency  converIers  or  pumps 
wiIh  inIegraIed  Irequency  converIers,  Ihere  are  some 
condiIions, which Ihe insIaller and user have Io be aware 
oI.  A  Irequency  converIer  will  behave  diIIerenIly  aI  Ihe 
mains  supply  side  Ihan  a  sIandard  asynchronous  moIor. 
1his is described in deIail below.
Ncn-sinuscidaI pcwer input, three-phase suppIied 
frequency ccnverters
A  Irequency  converIer  designed  as  Ihe  one  described  above 
will  noI  receive  sinusoidal  currenI  Irom  Ihe  mains.  Among 
oIher  Ihings  Ihis  inIluences  Ihe  dimensioning  oI  mains 
supply cable, mains swiIch, eIc. ligure 4.S.S shows how 
mains currenI and volIage appear Ior a.
a)  Ihree-phase, Iwo-pole sIandard asynchronous moIor
b)  Ihree-phase, Iwo-pole sIandard asynchronous moIor 
wiIh Irequency converIer.
ln boIh cases Ihe moIor supplies 3 kW Io Ihe shaII.
A  comparison  oI  Ihe  currenI  in  Ihe  Iwo  cases  shows  Ihe 
Iollowing diIIerences, see hgure 4.S.6.
-  1he currenI Ior Ihe sysIem wiIh Irequency converIer 
  is noI sinusoidal
-  1he peak currenI is much higher (approx. S2°      
  higher) Ior Ihe Irequency converIer soluIion
1his  is  due  Io  Ihe  design  oI  Ihe  Irequency  converIer 
connecIing Ihe mains Io a recIiIier Iollowed by a capaciIor. 
1he  charging  oI  Ihe  capaciIor  happens  during  shorI  Iime 
periods  in  which  Ihe  recIiIied  volIage  is  higher  Ihan  Ihe 
volIage in Ihe capaciIor aI IhaI momenI. 
As  menIioned  above,  Ihe  non-sinusoidal  currenI  resulIs  in 
oIher condiIions aI Ihe mains supply side oI Ihe moIor. lor a 
sIandard moIor wiIhouI a Irequency converIer Ihe relaIion 
beIween  volIage  (U),  currenI  (l)  and  power  (P)  is  shown 
in  Ihe  box  on  your  righI  hand  side.  1he  same  Iormula 
cannoI  be  used  Ior  Ihe  calculaIion  oI  Ihe  power  inpuI  in 
connecIion wiIh moIors wiIh Irequency converIers. 
lig 4.S.S a). 1hree-phase, Iwo-pole 
sIandard asynchronous moIor
lig 4.S.S b). 1hree-phase, Iwo-pole 
sIandard asynchronous moIor wiIh 
Irequency converIer
Mains voItage  400 V  400 V
Mains current kM5  6.4 A  6.36 A
Mains current, peak  9.1 A  13.8 A
Power input, P1  3.68 kW  3.69 kW
cos ¢,
power factor (Pf) 
cos¢ = 0.83  Pf = 0.86
5tandard motor Motor with frequency 
converter
lig. 4.S.6. Comparison oI currenI oI a sIandard moIor and a Irequency 
converIer
a b
5ection 4.5
frequency converter
124
ln  IacI,  in  Ihis  case,  Ihere  is  no  saIeway  oI  calculaIing 
Ihe  power  inpuI  based  on  simple  currenI  and  volIage 
measuremenIs,  as  Ihese  are  noI  sinusoidal.  lnsIead,  Ihe 
power  musI  be  calculaIed  by  means  oI  insIrumenIs  and 
on  Ihe  basis  oI  insIanIaneous  measuremenIs  oI  currenI 
and volIage.
lI  Ihe  power  (P)  is  known  as  well  as  Ihe  kMS  value  oI 
currenI and volIage, Ihe so-called power IacIor (Pl) can be 
calculaIed by Ihe Iormula on your righI hand side.
Unlike  whaI  is  Ihe  case  when  currenI  and  volIage  are 
sinusoidal,  Ihe  power  IacIor  has  no  direcI  connecIion 
wiIh  Ihe  way  in  which  currenI  and  volIage  are  displaced 
in Iime. 
When  measuring  Ihe  inpuI  currenI  in  connecIion  wiIh 
insIallaIion  and  service  oI  a  sysIem  wiIh  Irequency 
converIer iI is necessary Io use an insIrumenI IhaI is capable 
oI measuring "non-sinusoidal" currenIs. ln general, currenI 
measuring  insIrumenIs  Ior  Irequency  converIers  musI  be 
oI a Iype measuring "1rue kMS".
frequency ccnverters and earth-Ieakage circuit 
breakers {£lC8}
LarIh-leakage  circuiI  breakers  are  used  increasingly  as 
exIra  proIecIion  in  elecIrical  insIallaIions.  lI  a  Irequency 
converIer  is  Io  be  connecIed  Io  such  an  insIallaIion  iI 
musI  be  ensured  IhaI  Ihe  LLC8  insIalled  is  oI  a  Iype 
which  will  surely  brake  -  also  iI  Iailure  occurs  on  Ihe 
DC  side  oI  Ihe  Irequency  converIer.  ln  order  Io  be  sure 
IhaI  Ihe  LLC8  always  will  brake  in  case  oI  earIh-leakage 
currenI Ihe LLC8's Io be used in connecIion wiIh Irequency 
converIer  musI  be  labelled  wiIh  Ihe  signs  shown  in 
Iigures 4.S.7 and 4.S.8
8oIh Iypes oI earIh-leakage circuiI breaker are available in 
Ihe markeI Ioday.
lig 4.S.7. Labelling oI Ihe LLC8 íor single-phase írequency converIers
lig 4.S.8. Labelling oI Ihe LLC8 Ior Ihree-phase Irequency converIers 
12S
£nergy ccsts 90
lnitiaI ccsts 5-8
Maintenance ccsts 2-5
Chapter 5. Life cycIe costs caIcuIation 
Secticn 5.1: life cycIe ccsts equaticn
S.1.1 lniIial cosIs, purchase price (C
ic
)
S.1.2 lnsIallaIion and commissioning cosIs (C
in
)
S.1.3 Lnergy cosIs (C
e
)
S.1.4 OperaIing cosIs (C
o

S.1.S LnvironmenIal cosIs (C
env
)
S.1.6 MainIenance and repair cosIs (C
m
)
S.1.7 DownIime cosIs (loss oI producIion) (C
s
)
S.1.8 Decommissioning and disposal cosIs (C
o
)
Secticn 5.2: life cycIe ccsts caIcuIaticn ~ an exampIe
5ection 5.1 
Life cycIe costs equation
ln Ihis secIion we will Iocus on Ihe elemenIs IhaI make up
a  pump's  liIe  cycle  cosIs  (LCC)  in  order  Io  undersIand  whaI 
LCC  is,  which  IacIors  Io  consider  when  we  calculaIe  iI  and 
how Io calculaIe iI. linally, we will illusIraIe Ihe noIion liIe 
cycle  cosIs  by  an  example.  8uI  beIore  we  dig  any  IurIher 
inIo liIe cycle cosIs, we need Io undersIand whaI Ihe noIion 
covers. 
1he Rydraulic lnsIiIuIe, Luropump and Ihe US DeparImenI 
oI Lnergy have elaboraIed a Iool called Ihe Pump LiIe cycle 
cosIs  (LCC),  see  Iigure  S.1.1.  1he  Iool  is  designed  Io  help 
companies  minimise  Ihe  wasIe  and  maximise  Ihe  energy 
eIIiciency in diIIerenI sysIems including pumping sysIems.  
LiIe  cycle  cosI  calculaIions  are  a  decision-making  Iool  IhaI 
can be used in connecIion wiIh design oI new insIallaIions 
or repair oI exisIing insIallaIions. 
1he liIe cycle cosIs (LCC) consisI oI Ihe Iollowing elemenIs.
C
ic
  lniIial cosIs, purchase price
C
in
  lnsIallaIion and commissioning cosIs
C
e
  Lnergy cosIs
C
o
  OperaIing cosIs (labour cosIs)
C
emv
  LnvironmenIal cosIs
C
m
  MainIenance and repair cosIs
C
s
  DownIime cosIs (loss oI producIion)
C
d
  Decommissioning]disposal cosIs
ln  Ihe  Iollowing  paragraphs,  each  oI  Ihese  elemenIs  is 
described.    As  iI  appears  Irom  Iigure  S.1.2,  Ihe  energy  cosIs, 
iniIial cosIs and mainIenance cosIs are Ihe mosI imporIanI. 
lig. S.1.2. 1ypical liIe cycle cosIs oI a circulaIing 
sysIem in Ihe indusIry
1ypicaI Iife cycIe costs
lniIial cosIs
MainIenance cosIs
Lnergy cosIs
1he Iife cycIe ccsts cf a pump is an expressicn cf hcw 
much it ccsts tc purchase instaII cperate maintain 
and dispcse cf a pump during its Iifetime.
lig. S.1.1. A guide Io liIe cycle cosIs analysis Ior pumping sysIems
LCC is calculaIed by Ihe Iollowing Iormula.
Lcc = c
Ic
+ c
In
+ c
e
+ c
e
+ c
m
+ c
s
+ c
emv
+ c
d
128
5.1.1 InitiaI costs, purchase price (C
ic
)
1he  iniIial  cosIs  (C
ic
)  oI  a  pump  sysIem  includes  all 
equipmenI  and  accessories  necessary  Io  operaIe  Ihe 
sysIem,  e.g  pumps,  Irequency  converIers,  conIrol  panels 
and IransmiIIers, see Iigure S.1.3.
OIIen,  Ihere  is  a  Irade-oII  beIween  Ihe  iniIial  cosIs  and 
Ihe  energy  and  mainIenance  cosIs.  1hus,  in  many  cases 
expensive  componenIs  have  a  longer  liIeIime  or  a  lower 
energy consumpIion Ihan inexpensive componenIs have. 
5.1.2 InstaIIation and commissioning costs 
(C
in
)
1he insIallaIion and commissioning cosIs include Ihe 
Iollowing cosIs.
·  lnsIallaIion oI Ihe pumps
·  loundaIion
·  ConnecIion oI elecIrical wiring and insIrumenIaIion
·  lnsIallaIion, connecIion and seI-up oI IransmiIIers, 
  Irequency converIers, eIc.
·  Commissioning evaluaIion aI sIarI-up
As was Ihe case Ior Ihe iniIial cosIs, iI is imporIanI Io check Ihe 
Irade-oII opIions. ln connecIion wiIh pumps wiIh inIegraIed 
Irequency  converIer,  many  oI  Ihe  componenIs  are  already 
inIegraIed  in  Ihe  producI.  1hereIore,  Ihis  kind  oI  pump  is 
oIIen sub|ecI Io higher iniIial cosIs and lower insIallaIion and 
commissioning cosIs.   
lig. S.1.3. LquipmenI IhaI makes up a pumping sysIem
Pump
ControI
paneIs
frequency
converter
1ransmitter
InitiaI costs
1000
lniIial cosIs
SysIem 1
S200
SysIem 2
7300
0
2000
3000
4000
5000
6000
7000
8000
lig. S.1.4. lniIial cosIs oI a consIanI speed pump sysIem
(sysIem 1) and a conIrolled pump sysIem (sysIem 2)
129
5.1.3 £nergy costs (C

)
ln Ihe ma|oriIy oI cases, energy consumpIion is Ihe largesI 
cosI in Ihe liIe cycle cosIs oI a pump sysIem, where pumps 
oIIen run more Ihan 2000 hours per year.  AcIually, around 
20°  oI  Ihe  world's  elecIrical  energy  consumpIion  is  used 
Ior pump sysIems, see Iigure S.1.S. 
WhaI Iollows is a lisI oI some oI Ihe IacIors inIluencing Ihe 
energy consumpIion oI a pump sysIem.
·  Load proIile
·  Pump eIIiciency (calculaIion oI Ihe duIy poinI), see 
  Iigure S.1.6
·  MoIor eIIiciency (Ihe moIor eIIiciency aI parIial load    
  can vary signiIicanIly beIween high eIIiciency moIors    
  and normal eIIiciency moIors)  
·  Pump sizing (oIIen margins and round ups Iend Io 
  suggesI oversized pumps)
·  OIher sysIem componenIs, such as pipes and valves
·  Use oI speed-conIrolled soluIions. 8y using speed- 
  conIrolled pumps in Ihe indusIry, iI is possible Io reduce  
  Ihe energy consumpIion by up Io S0° 
5.1.4 Dperating costs (C

)
OperaIing cosIs cover labour cosIs relaIed Io Ihe operaIion 
oI  a  pumping  sysIem.  ln  mosI  cases  Ihe  labour  cosIs 
relaIed  Io  Ihe  pumps  are  modesI.  1oday  diIIerenI  Iypes 
oI  surveillance  equipmenI  make  iI  possible  Io  connecI 
Ihe  pump  sysIem  Io  a  compuIer  neIwork,  making  Ihe 
operaIing cosIs low.
5.1.5 £nvironmentaI costs(C
env
)
1he  environmenIal  cosIs  cover  Ihe  disposal  oI  parIs  and 
conIaminaIion Irom Ihe pumped liquid. 1he environmenIal 
IacIor's  conIribuIion  Io  Ihe  liIe  cycle  cosIs  oI  a  pumping 
sysIem in Ihe indusIry is modesI.
lig. S.1.S. Lnergy consumpIion worldwide
Pump systems
           20Z
Dther use
80Z
lig. S.1.6. Comparison oI Ihe eIIiciency oI a new and an exisIing 
pump
0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55
0
20
40
60
80
D [M
3
Jh]
New
£xisting
q

130
5ection 5.1 
Life cycIe costs equation
131
5.1.6 Maintenance and repair costs (C
m

MainIenance  and  repair  cosIs  cover  as  Ihe  name  implies 
all  cosIs  relaIed  Io  mainIenance  and  repair  oI  Ihe 
pump  sysIem,  Ior  example.  Labour  cosIs,  spare  parIs, 
IransporIaIion and cleaning.
 
1he  besI  way  Io  obIain  Ihe  opIimum  working  liIe  oI  a 
pump  and  Io  prevenI  breakdowns  is  Io  carry  ouI  prevenIive 
mainIenance. 
5.1.7 Downtime costs, Ioss of production 
costs (C
s

DownIime  cosIs  are  exIremely  imporIanI  when  iI  comes 
Io pump sysIems used in producIion processes. 1he reason 
is simple, iI cosIs a loI oI money Io sIop a producIion, even 
Ior  a  shorIer  period  oI  Iime.  Lven  Ihough  one  pump  is 
enough  Ior  Ihe  required  pump  perIormance,  iI  is  always 
a  good  idea  Io  insIall  a  sIandby  pump  IhaI  can  Iake  over 
and  make  sure  IhaI  Ihe  producIion  conIinues  even  iI  an 
unexpecIed  Iailure  in  Ihe  pump  sysIem  should  occur,  see 
hgure S.1.7.
5.1.8 Decommissioning and disposaI 
costs (C

)
Depending  on  Ihe  pump  manuIacIurer,  decommissioning 
and  disposal  cosIs  oI  a  pump  sysIem  are  sub|ecI  Io  minor 
variaIions.  1hereIore,  Ihis  cosI  is  seldom  Iaken  inIo 
consideraIion.
CaIcuIating the Iife cycIe ccsts
1he  liIe  cycle  cosIs  oI  a  pump  sysIem  is  made  up  oI  Ihe 
summaIion  oI  all  Ihe  above-menIioned  componenIs  over 
Ihe sysIem's liIeIime. 1ypically, Ihe liIeIime is said Io be in 
Ihe range oI 10 Io 20 years. ln Ihe pump business, Ihe liIe 
cycle  cosIs  are  normally  calculaIed  by  a  more  simpliIied 
Iormula  wiIh  Iewer  elemenIs  Io  consider.  1his  Iormula  is 
shown on your righI.
lig. S.1.7. SIandby pump makes sure IhaI producIion conIinues in 
case oI pump break-down
Lcc = c
Ic
+ c
e
+ c
m

LeI  us  have  a  look  aI  an  example  using  Ihe  simpliIied 
Iormula  menIioned  previously.  An  indusIry  needs  a  new 
waIer  supply  pump  and  Iwo  soluIions  are  Iaken  inIo 
consideraIion.
·  A Iixed speed mulIisIage cenIriIugal pump
·  A variable speed mulIisIage cenIriIugal pump
CalculaIions show IhaI compared Io Ihe Iixed speed pump, 
Ihe  variable  speed  pump  consumes  40°  less  energy. 
Rowever, Ihe iniIial cosIs (C
ic
) oI Ihe variable speed pump 
is Iwice as high as IhaI oI Ihe Iixed speed pump.
LiIe  cycle  cosIs  calculaIions  will  help  deIermine  which 
pump  Io  insIall  in  Ihe  sysIem.  1he  applicaIion  has  Ihe 
Iollowing characIerisIics.
·  12 operaIing hours per day
·  220 operaIing hours per year
·  LiIeIime oI 10 years (calculaIion period)
8ased on Ihese daIa, iI is possible Io calculaIe Ihe liIe cycle 
cosIs oI Ihe Iwo soluIions.
Lven Ihough Ihe iniIial cosIs oI a variable speed pump are 
Iwice  as  high  compared  Io  a  Iixed  speed  pump,  Ihe  IoIal 
cosIs  oI  Ihe  IirsI-menIioned  soluIion  are  2S°  lower  Ihan 
Ihe Iixed speed pump soluIion aIIer 10 years.
8esides Ihe lower liIe cycle cosIs, Ihe variable speed pump 
provides,  as  discussed  in  chapIer  4,  some  operaIional 
beneIiIs, e.g. consIanI pressure in Ihe sysIem.
1he payback Iime oI Ihe variable speed pump soluIion is a 
biI longer because Ihe pump is more expensive. As you can 
Iell Irom Iigure S.1.9, Ihe payback Iime is around 2x years, 
and in general indusIrial applicaIions, Ihis is considered Io 
be a good invesImenI.
Pump types 
OperaIing hours per day  hours  12  12
1otaI costs  £uro  38,303  28,688
Lnergy cosIs  Luro  33,284  20,066
4S,000
40,000
3S,000
30,000
2S,000
20,000
1S,000
10,000
S,000
0
MainIenance cosIs  Luro  1,417  1,417
Pump price  Luro  3,602  7,204
LlecIrical power price  Luro]kWh  0.07  0.07
1otaI energy consumption  kWh  495,264  298,584
CalculaIion period  years  10  10
Working days per year  days  220  220
Average power consumpIion  kW  18.76  11.31
fixed
speed 
VariabIe
speed
variable speed lixed speed
Pump price
MainIenance cosIs
Lnergy cosIs
£
u
r
o
lig. S.1.8. LiIe cycle cosIs oI a Iixed and a variable speed pump
4S,000
40,000
3S,000
30,000
2S,000
20,000
1S,000
10,000
S,000
0 2 4 6 8 10
0
£
u
r
o
¥ears
lixed speed
variable speed
lig. S.1.9. Payback Iime Ior a Iixed and a variable speed pump
5ection 5.2 
Life cycIe costs caIcuIation - an exampIe
132
Appendix 
A)  Notations and units
8)   Unit conversion tabIes
C)   5I-preñxes and Creek aIphabet
D)   Vapour pressure and density of water at different temperatures
£)   Driñce 
f)   Change in static pressure due to change in pipe diameter
C)  NozzIes
H)   Nomogram for head Iosses in bends, vaIves, etc.
I)   Pipe Ioss nomogram for cIean water 20¨C
I)   PeriodicaI system
k)   Pump standards
L)   Viscosity for different Iiquids as a function of Iiquid temperature
Appendix A
Notations and units
1he  Iable  below  provides  an  overview  oI  Ihe  mosI 
commonly  used  noIaIions  and  uniIs  in  connecIion  wiIh 
pumps and pump sysIems.
134
Unit conversion tabIes
1he conversion Iables Ior pressure and ßow show Ihe 
mosI commonly used uniIs in connecIion wiIh pumping 
sysIems
PascaI
(=Newton per 
square metre)
Pa, (NJm
2
)
1 Pa
1 bar
1 kpJm
2
1 mWC
1 at
1 atm
1 psi
Pressure
1 Pa
1 bar
1 kpJm
2
1 mWC
1 at
1 atm
1 psi
1
10
S
 
9.8067
9806.7
98067
10132S
689S
10
-S
1
9.807 

10
S
0.09807
0.9807
1.013
0.0689S
0.1020
10197
1
10
3
10
4
10333
703.1
1.020 

10
-4
10.20
10
-3
1
10
10.33
0.7031
1.020 

10
-S
1.020
10
-4
0.1
1
1.033
0.07031
9.869 

10
-4
0.9869
0.9678 

10
-4
0.09678
0.9678
1
0.06804
1.4S0 

10
-4
14.S0
1.422 

10
-3
1.422
14.22
14.70
1
atm at  (kpJcm
2
) kpJm
2
mWC
kiIopond
per square
metre
meter
Water 
CoIumn
1echnicaI
atmosphere
PhysicaI
atmosphere
pound per
square inch
bar
bar psi (IbJin
2
)
Cubic metre
per second
m
3
Js
1 m
3
Js
1 m
3
Jh
1 IJs
1 Uk CPM
1 U5 CPM
1 m
3
Js
1 m
3
Jh
1 IJs
1 Uk CPM
1 U5 CPM
1
2.778 

10
-4
 
10
-3
 
7.S77 

10
-S
 
6.309 

10
-S
3600
1
3.6
0.02728
0.02271
1000
0.2778
1
0.07S77
0.06309
1320
3.667
13.21
1
0.8327
1S6S1
4.403
1S.8S
1.201
1
Uk CPM 1 IJs Uk CPM
Litre
per second
CaIIon (Uk)
per minute
CaIIon (U5)
per minute
Cubic metre
per hour
m
3
Jh
fIow (voIume)
1emperature
1he Iormulas lisIed below show how Io converI Ihe mosI commonly used uniIs Ior IemperaIure. 
lrom degrees Celsius Io Kelvin.  1 |Kj = 273.1S + I |
o
Cj
lrom  degrees Celsius Io degrees lahrenheiI.   I |
o
lj = 32 + 1.8 I |
o
Cj
Degrees
CeIsius
¨C
0
100
- 17.8
273.1S
373.1S
2SS.3S
32
212
0
¨f
Degrees
fahrenheit
keIvin
k
t
¨C
1
1
9]S
1, t
1 ¨C =
1 k =
1 ¨f =
1
1
9]S
S]9
S]9
1
¨f
t t
k
Appendix 8
13S
Appendix C
factor Prefix 5ymboI
10
9
10
6
10
3
10
2
10
10
-1
10
-2
10
-3
10
-6
10
-9
1,000,000,000
1,000,000
1,000
100
10
0.1
0.01
0.001
0.000.001
0.000.000.001
giga G
mega M
kilo k
hekIo h
deka da
deci d
cenIi c
milli m
mikro µ
nano n
Creek aIphabet
AlIa A o
8eIa B |
Gamma I ¸
DelIa A o
Lpsilon E c
ZeIa Z ,
LIa H q
1heIa O u
!oIa I i
Kappa K k
Lambda A ì
My M µ
Ny N v
Ksi KE ko
Omikron O o
Pi H t
kho P µ
Sigma E o
1au T t
¥psilon Y u
li u |
Khi X _
Psi + ¢
Omega O u
5I-preñxes and Creek aIphabet
136
Vapour pressure and density of water at different temperatures
1his Iable shows Ihe 
vapour pressure p |barj 
and Ihe densiIy  |kg]m
3

oI waIer aI diIIerenI 
IemperaIures I |
o
Cj. 
Likewise, Ihe Iable shows 
Ihe corresponding 
absoluIe IemperaIure 1 |Kj.
Vapcur pressure p and density  cf water at different temperatures
t[°C]     1[k]     P[bar]   [kgJm
3
]  t[°C]     1[k]  P[bar]  [kgJm
3
]  t[°C]  1[k]  P[bar]  [kgJm
3
]
0  273.1S  0.00611  0999.8          138  411.1S  3.414  927.6
1  274.1S  0.006S7  0999.9  61  334.1S  0.2086  982.6  140  413.1S  3.614  92S.8
2  27S.1S  0.00706  0999.9  62  33S.1S  0.2184  982.1  14S  418.1S  4.1SS  921.4
3  276.1S  0.007S8  0999.9  63  336.1S  0.2286  981.6  1S0  423.1S  4.760  916.8
4  277.1S  0.00813  1000.0  64  337.1S  0.2391  981.1       
S  278.1S  0.00872  1000.0  6S  338.1S  0.2S01  980.S  1SS  428.1S  S.433  912.1
6  279.1S  0.0093S  1000.0  66  339.1S  0.261S  979.9  160  433.1S  6.181  907.3
7  280.1S  0.01001  999.9  67  340.1S  0.2733  979.3  16S  438.1S  7.008  902.4
8  281.1S  0.01072  999.9  68  341.1S  0.28S6  978.8  170  443.1S  7.920  897.3
9  282.1S  0.01147  999.8  69  342.1S  0.2984  978.2  17S  448.1S  8.924  892.1
10  283.1S  0.01227  999.7  70  343.1S  0.3116  977.7       
                180  4S3.1S  10.027  886.9
11  284.1S  0.01312  999.7  71  344.1S  0.32S3  977.0  18S  4S8.1S  11.233  881.S
12  28S.1S  0.01401  999.6  72  34S.1S  0.3396  976.S  190  463.1S  12.SS1  876.0
13  286.1S  0.01497  999.4  73  346.1S  0.3S43  976.0  19S  468.1S  13.987  870.4
14  287.1S  0.01S97  999.3  74  347.1S  0.3696  97S.3  200  473.1S  1S.S0  864.7
1S  288.1S  0.01704  999.2  7S  348.1S  0.38SS  974.8       
16  289.1S  0.01817  999.0  76  349.1S  0.4019  974.1  20S  478.1S  17.243  8S8.8
17  290.1S  0.01936  998.8  77  3S0.1S  0.4189  973.S  210  483.1S  19.077  8S2.8
18  291.1S  0.02062  998.7  78  3S1.1S  0.436S  972.9  21S  488.1S  21.060  846.7
19  292.1S  0.02196  998.S  79  3S2.1S  0.4S47  972.3  220  493.1S  23.198  840.3
20  293.1S  0.02337  998.3  80  3S3.1S  0.4736  971.6  22S  498.1S  2S.S01  833.9
                          
21  294.1S  0.0248S  998.1  81  3S4.1S  0.4931  971.0  230  S03.1S  27.976  827.3
22  29S.1S  0.02642  997.8  82  3SS.1S  0.S133  970.4  23S  S08.1S  30.632  820.S
23  296.1S  0.02808  997.6  83  3S6.1S  0.S342  969.7  240  S13.1S  33.478  813.6
24  297.1S  0.02982  997.4  84  3S7.1S  0.SSS7  969.1  24S  S18.1S  36.S23  806.S
2S  298.1S  0.03166  997.1  8S  3S8.1S  0.S780  968.4  2S0  S23.1S  39.776  799.2
26  299.1S  0.03360  996.8  86  3S9.1S  0.6011  967.8  2SS  S28.1S  43.246  791.6
27  300.1S  0.03S64  996.6  87  360.1S  0.6249  967.1       
28  301.1S  0.03778  996.3  88  361.1S  0.649S  966.S  260  S33.1S  46.943  783.9
29  302.1S  0.04004  996.0  89  362.1S  0.6749  96S.8  26S  S38.1S  S0.877  77S.9
30  303.1S  0.04241  99S.7  90  363.1S  0.7011  96S.2  270  S43.1S  SS.0S8  767.8
                27S  S48.1S  S9.496  7S9.3
31  304.1S  0.04491  99S.4  91  364.1S  0.7281  964.4  280  SS3.1S  64.202  7S0.S
32  30S.1S  0.047S3  99S.1  92  36S.1S  0.7S61  963.8       
33  306.1S  0.0S029  994.7  93  366.1S  0.7849  963.0  28S  SS8.1S  69.186  741.S
34  307.1S  0.0S318  994.4  94  367.1S  0.8146  962.4  290  S63.1S  74.461  732.1
3S  308.1S  0.0S622  994.0  9S  368.1S  0.84S3  961.6  29S  S68.1S  80.037  722.3
36  309.1S  0.0S940  993.7  96  369.1S  0.8769  961.0  300  S73.1S  8S.927  712.2
37  310.1S  0.06274  993.3  97  370.1S  0.9094  960.2  30S  S78.1S  92.144  701.7
38  311.1S  0.06624  993.0  98  371.1S  0.9430  9S9.6  310  S83.1S  98.700  690.6
39  312.1S  0.06991  992.7  99  372.1S  0.9776  9S8.6       
40  313.1S  0.0737S  992.3  100  373.1S  1.0133  9S8.1  31S  S88.1S  10S.61  679.1
                320  S93.1S  112.89  666.9
41  314.1S  0.07777  991.9  102  37S.1S  1.0878  9S6.7  32S  S98.1S  120.S6  6S4.1
42  31S.1S  0.08198  991.S  104  377.1S  1.1668  9SS.2  330  603.1S  128.63  640.4
43  316.1S  0.08639  991.1  106  379.1S  1.2S04  9S3.7  340  613.1S  146.0S  610.2
44  317.1S  0.09100  990.7  108  381.1S  1.3390  9S2.2       
4S  318.1S  0.09S82  990.2  110  383.1S  1.4327  9S0.7  3S0  623.1S  16S.3S  S74.3
46  319.1S  0.10086  989.8          360  633.1S  186.7S  S27.S
47  320.1S  0.10612  989.4  112  38S.1S  1.S316  949.1       
48  321.1S  0.11162  988.9  114  387.1S  1.6362  947.6  370  643.1S  210.S4  4S1.8
49  322.1S  0.11736  988.4  116  389.1S  1.746S  946.0  374.1S  647.30  221.2  31S.4
S0  323.1S  0.1233S  988.0  118  391.1S  1.8628  944.S       
        120  393.1S  1.98S4  942.9       
S1  324.1S  0.12961  987.6               
S2  32S.1S  0.13613  987.1  122  39S.1S  2.114S  941.2       
S3  326.1S  0.14293  986.6  124  397.1S  2.2S04  939.6       
S4  327.1S  0.1S002  986.2  126  399.1S  2.3933  937.9       
SS  328.1S  0.1S741  98S.7  128  401.1S  2.S43S  936.2       
S6  329.1S  0.16S11  98S.2  130  403.1S  2.7013  934.6       
S7  330.1S  0.17313  984.6               
S8  331.1S  0.18147  984.2  132  40S.1S  2.8670  932.8       
S9  332.1S  0.19016  983.7  134  407.1S  3.041  931.1       
60  333.1S  0.19920  983.2  136  409.1S  3.223  929.4       
Appendix D
137
Appendix £
10
100
1000
1
10
100
1000
1
D

[
m
3
J
h
]
D
r
i
f
i
c
e

[
m
m
]
R
=
2
.S
R
=
1
0
0
R
=
4
0
R
=
1
6
R
=
6
.3
R
=
4
R
=
1
0
R
=
2
S
R
=
6
3
Dn=32
Dn=40
Dn=S0
Dn=6S
Dn=80
Dn=100
Dn=12S
Dn=1S0
Dn=200
Dn=2S0 Dn=300
Drifice
As  discussed  in  chapIer  3,  Ihe  duIy  poinI  oI  a  pump  is 
ad|usIed  by  adding  a  resisIance  in  connecIed  series  wiIh 
Ihe pump. ln pracIice, Ihis is normally done by placing an 
oriIice in Ihe ouIleI Ilange oI Ihe pump.
1he Iollowing graph provides Ihe oriIice diameIer d |mmj 
based  on  Ihe  pipe]porI  dimension  DN  |mmj,  Ihe  Ilow  O 
|m
3
]hj and Ihe required head loss AR |mj. 
£xampIe:  
1he head oI a pump, wiIh an ouIleI Ilange oI 12S mm, 
has Io be reduced by 2S m aI a Ilow oI 1S0 m
3
]h.
DN = 12S mm, LR = 2S m, O = 1S0 m
3
]h  
lI is necessary Io insIall an oriIice wiIh a diameIer oI S9 mm.
d D DN
Drifice
H
138
0.01
0.10
1
10
1 10 100 1,000 10,000
fIow [m
3
Jh]
D

JD
2
  =
H
 
[
m
]
S
0
]
3
2
6
S
]
4
0
8
0
]
S
0
6
S
]
S
0
8
0
]
6
S
1
0
0
]
8
0
1
2
S
]
1
0
0
2
S
0
]
1
S
0
1
0
0
]
6
S
1
2
S
]
8
0
1
S
0
]
1
0
0
1
S
0
]
1
2
S
1
S
0
]
2
0
0
2
S
0
]
2
0
0
3
0
0
]
2
S
0
3
S
0
]
3
0
0
4
0
0
]
3
S
0
S
0
0
]
4
0
0
Change  in  static  pressure  due  to  change 
in pipe diameter
As  described  in  chapIer  2.2,  a  change  in  pipe  dimension 
resulIs  in  a  change  in  liquid  velociIy  and  consequenIly,  a 
change in dynamic and sIaIic pressure.
When  Ihe  head  has  Io  be  deIermined  (see  page  86),  Ihe 
diIIerence in Ihe Iwo porI dimensions requires a correcIion 
oI Ihe measured head.
R has Io be added Io Ihe measured head oI Ihe pump.

2
.
g

2
2


1
2
=
g
.

2

.
O
2
=
.

D
2
4
1
D
1
4
1
_

where .
v
1
   is Ihe liquid velociIy in Ihe inleI porI in |m]sj
v
2
   is Ihe liquid velociIy in Ihe ouIleI porI in |m]sj
O   is Ihe Ilow raIe in |m
3
]sj
g    is Ihe acceleraIion oI graviIy in |m]s
2
j
D
1
   is Ihe diameIer oI Ihe inleI porI in |mj
D
2
  is Ihe diameIer oI Ihe ouIleI porI in |mj
1he graph shows Ihe R value Ior Iypical seIs oI  porI  
dimensions  D
1
]D
2
 as  a  IuncIion oI Ihe Ilow O. ln Ihis 
case Ilow O is measured in |m
3
]hj and Ihe R is 
measured in |mj.
Appendix f
£xampIe:  
A pump wiIh an inleI porI oI 2S0 mm and an ouIleI 
porI oI 1S0 mm is pumping 300 m
3
]h. Row much 
does Ihe diIIerence in porI dimension aIIecI Ihe 
measured head!
D1 = 2S0 mm     D2 = 1S0 mm     O = 300 m
3
]h
As iI appears Irom Ihe graph, Ihe diIIerence in 
head is LR = 1 m.
139
Appendix C
1.00
0.10
0.01 0.1 1 10
10.00
100.00
D [m
3
Jh]
d =
p

[
b
a
r
]
1
.
0
1
.
S
2
.
0
2
.
S
3
.
S
4
.
0
S
.
0
6
.
0
7
.
0
8
.
0
9
.
0
NozzIes
The relation between the nozzle diameter d [mm], the
needed flow Q [m
3
/h] and the required pressure before
the nozzle p [bar] is found by the nomogram below. We
assume that the nozzle has a quadratic behaviour:


D
1
D
2
=
p
1
p
2

n
where n = 0.5. Some nozzles have a lower n value (check
with the supplier).
fIow
D [m
3
Jh]
NozzIe diameter
d [mm]
Pressure
p [bar]
£xampIe:
A nozzle oI 3.S mm has Io supply 1 m
3
]h. WhaI 
is Ihe required pressure in IronI oI Ihe nozzle!
O = 1 m
3
]h, d = 3.S mm  
p = 4.8 bar
140
Appendix H
141
Appendix I
142
Appendix I
PeriodicaI system 
1
H
Rydrogen
X
He
Relium
3
Li
LiIhium
4
8e
8eryllium
5
8
8oron
6
C
Carbon
7
N
NiIrogen
8
D
Oxygen
9
f
lluorine
10
Ne
Neon
11
Na
Sodium
12
Mg
Magnesium
13
AI
Aluminium
14
5i
Silicon
15
P
Phosphorus
16
5
Sulphur
17
CI
Chlorine
18
Ar
Argon
19
k
PoIassium
20
Ca
Calcium
21
5c
Scandium
22
1i
1iIanium
23
V
vanadium
24
Cr
Chromium
25
Mn
Manganese
26
fe
lron
27
Co
CobalI
28
Ni
Nickel
29
Cu
Copper
30
Zn
Zinc
31
Ca
Gallium
32
Ce
Germanium
33
As
Arsenic
34
5e
Selenium
35
8r
8romine
36
kr
KrypIon
37
kb
kubidium
38
5r
SIronIium
39
¥
¥IIrium
40
Zr
Zirconium
41
Nb
Niobium
42
Mo
Molybdenum
43
1c
1echneIium
44
ku
kuIhenium
45
kh
khodium
46
Pd
Palladium
47
Ag
Silver
48
Cd
Cadmium
49
In
lndium
50
5n
1in
51
5b
AnIimony
52
1e
1ellurium
53
I
lodine
54
e
Xenon
55
Cs
Caesium
56
8
8arium
57

LuIeIium
72
Hf
RaInium
73
1
1anIalum
74
W
1ungsIen
75
ke
khenium
76
s
Osmium
77
Ir
lridium
78
 t
PlaIinum
79
Au
Gold
80
Hg
Mercury
81

1hallium
82
 b
Lead
83
8i
8ismuIh
84
Po
Polonium
85
At
AsIaIine
86
kn
kadon
87
fr
lrancium
88
ka
kadium
89
Ac
AcIinium
104
kf
kuIherIordium
105
Db
Dubnium
106
5g
Seaborgium
107
8h
8ohrium
108
Hs
Rassium
109
Mt
MeiInerium
110
Ds
DamsIadIium
111
kg
koenIgenium
112
Uub
Ununbium
113
Uut
UnunIrium
114
UUq
Ununquadium
58
Ce
Cerium

Praseodymium
60
Nd
Neodymium
61
Pm
PromeIhium

Samarium
63
£u
Luropium
64
Cd
Gadolinium
65
1b
1erbium
66
Dy
Dysprosium
67
Ho
Rolmium
68
£r
Lrbium
69
1m
1hulium
70
¥b
¥IIerbium
71
Lu
LuIeIium
90
1h
1horium
91
Pa
ProIacIinium
92
U
Uranium
93
Np
NepIunium
94
Pu
PluIonium
95
Am
Americium
96
Cm
Curium
97
8k
8erkelium
98
Cf
CaliIornium
99
£s
LinsIeinium
100
fm
lernium
101
Md
Mendelevium
102
No
Nobelium
103
Lr
Lawrencium
143
Appendix k
Pump standards:
LN 733   Lnd-sucIion cenIriIugal pumps, raIing wiIh 10 bar wiIh bearing brackeI
LN 228S8   Lnd-sucIion cenIriIugal pumps (raIing 16 bar) - DesignaIion, nominal 
  duIy poinI and dimensions
Pump reIated standards: 
lSO 3661  Lnd-sucIion cenIriIugal pumps - 8ase plaIe and insIallaIion dimensions
LN 127S6   Mechanical seals - Principal dimensions, designaIion and maIerial codes
LN 1092   llanges and Iheir |oinIs - Circular Ilanges Ior pipes, valves, IiIIings and 
  accessories, PN-designaIed
lSO 700S   MeIallic Ilanges
DlN 24296   Pumps, and pump uniIs Ior liquids. Spare parIs
5pecifications etc:
lSO 990S   1echnical speciIicaIions Ior cenIriIugal pumps - Class 1
lSO S199   1echnical speciIicaIions Ior cenIriIugal pumps - Class 2
lSO 9908   1echnical speciIicaIions Ior cenIriIugal pumps - Class 3
lSO 9906   koIodynamic pumps - Rydraulic perIormance IesIs -Grades 1 and 2
LN 10204   MeIallic producIs - 1ypes oI inspecIion documenIs
lSO]lDlS 10816   Mechanical vibraIion - LvaluaIion oI machine vibraIion by 
  measuremenIs on non-roIaIing parIs
Motor standards:
LN 60034]lLC 34   koIaIing elecIrical machines
Pump standards
144
Appendix L
cSI
Silicone oil
Glycerol
    p. 1260
luel oil
Olive oil
 p: 900
CoIIonseed oil
 p: 900
lruiI |uice
 p: 1000
Spindle oil
         p: 8S0
Silicone oil p: 1000
Silicone oil
LIhyl Alkohol  p: 770
Milk  p: 1030
Aniline  p: 1030
AceIic acid
                  p: 10S0
WaIer p: 1000
PeIroleum 
              p: 800
AceIone p: 790
LIher p: 700
Mercury p: 13S70
10000
1000
100
10
1.0
0.1
8
6
4
2
8
6
4
2
8
6
4
8
6
4
2
8
6
4
2
- 10 0 10 20 30 40 S0 60 70 80 90 100°C
I
2
v
Reavy
 p: 980
Mean
 p: 9SS
LighI
 p: 930
Gas and 
     diesel oil
            p: 880
PeIrol  p: 7S0
Viscosity of typicaI Iiquids as a function 
of Iiquid temperature
1he graph shows Ihe viscosiIy oI diIIerenI liquids aI 
diIIerenI IemperaIures. As iI appears Irom Ihe graph, Ihe 
viscosiIy decreases when Ihe IemperaIure increases. 
1
KinemaIic viscosiIy
cenIiSIokes c5t
Sekunder SaybolI
Universal 55U
2
32
SAL 10
SAL no.
( aI 20
o
C)
SAL 20
SAL 30
SAL 40
SAL S0
SAL 60
SAL 70
3S
40
S0
100
200
300
400
S00
1000
2000
3000
4000
S000
10000
20000
30000
40000
S0000
100000
200000
3
4
S
10
20
30
40
S0
100
200
300
400
S00
1000
2000
3000
4000
S000
10000
20000
30000
40000
S0000
100000
Viscosity
KinemaIic viscosiIy is measured in cenIiSIoke |cSIj 
(1 cSI = 10
-6 
m
2
]s). 1he uniI |SSUj SaybolI Universal is also 
used  in  connecIion  wiIh  kinemaIic  viscosiIy.  1he  graph 
below  shows  Ihe  relaIion  beIween  kinemaIic  viscosiIy 
in  |cSIj  and  viscosiIy  in  |SSUj.  1he  SAL-number  is  also 
indicaIed in Ihe graph.
lor kinemaIic viscosiIy above 60 cSI, Ihe SaybolI Universal 
viscosiIy is calculaIed by Ihe Iollowing Iormula.
[55U] = 4.62 
.
 [c5t]
1he densiIies shown in 
Ihe graph are Ior 20° C
14S
Appendix L
100
95
90
85
80
75
60
65
70
40
45
50
55
15
20
25
30
35
-5
0
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
10Z 15Z 20Z 25Z 30Z 35Z 40Z 45Z 50Z 55Z 60Z
5
10
-20
-15
-10
-50
1emperature
Concentration
wt Z =
-45
-40
-35
-30
-25
-5 1028 2.9 1036 3.4 104S 4.0 10S3 4.7 1060 S.7 1068 6.8 107S 8.1 1082 9.4 1089 11.1 1096 14.0
0
-20 1079 17.4 1072 14.1 1086 21.1 1094 2S.2 1101
-15 1070 10.9 1078 13.2 10SS 7.2 1063 8.8 108S 1S.8 1092 18.8 1099 23.6
-10 10S4 S.8 1046 4.9 1062 7.0 1069 8.S 1077 10.2 1084 12.1 1091 14.3 1098
31.S
18.0
-50 1107
-45 1106
-40 1098 101.2 110S
-35 1097 68.9 1089 S7.3 1104
-30 1089 40.0 1081 32.3 1096 48.1 1103
-25 1080 23.S 1088 28.7 109S 34.4 1102
2S9.7
173.7
118.6
82.7
S8.8
42.6
1018 2.0 1027 2.S 103S 2.9 1043 3.3 10S1 3.9 10S9 4.7 1066 S.S 1074 6.S 1081 7.S 1088 8.8 1094 11.0
1017 1.7 1026 2.1 1034 2.4 1042 2.8 10S0 3.3 10S7 3.9 106S 4.S 1072 S.3 1079 6.1 1086 7.1 1092 8.8
1016 1.S 1024 1.8 1032 2.1 1041 2.4 1048 2.8 10S6 3.2 1063 3.8 1070 4.4 1077 S.0 1084 S.8 1090 7.1
1014 1.3 1023 1.6 1031 1.8 1039 2.1 1047 2.4 10S4 2.8 1061 3.2 1068 3.7 107S 4.2 1082 4.8 1088 S.9
1013 1.1 1021 1.4 1029 1.6 1037 1.8 104S 2.0 10S2 2.4 10S9 2.7 1066 3.1 1073 3.S 1079 4.0 1086 4.9
1011 1.0 1019 1.2 1027 1.4 103S 1.6 1043 1.8 10S0 2.1 10S7 2.4 1064 2.7 1071 3.0 1077 3.4 1083 4.1
1009 0.9 1018 1.1 1026 1.2 1033 1.4 1041 1.6 1048 1.8 10SS 2.1 1062 2.3 1068 2.6 107S 3.0 1081 3.S
1008 0.8 1016 1.0 1024 1.1 1031 1.2 1039 1.4 1046 1.6 10S3 1.8 10S9 2.1 1066 2.3 1072 2.6 1078 3.0
1006 0.7 1014 0.9 1021 1.0 1029 1.1 1036 1.2 1043 1.4 10S0 1.6 10S7 1.8 1063 2.0 1069 2.3 1076 2.6
1003 0.7 1011 0.8 1019 0.9 1027 1.0 1034 1.1 1041 1.3 1048 1.4 10S4 1.6 1060 1.8 1067 2.0 1073 2.2
1001 0.6 1009 0.7 1017 0.8 1024 0.9 1031 1.0 1038 1.1 104S 1.3 10S1 1.S 10S8 1.6 1064 1.8 1070 2.0
999 0.6 1007 0.7 1014 0.7 1022 0.8 1029 0.9 1036 1.0 1042 1.2 1048 1.3 10SS 1.S 1061 1.6 1066 1.7
996 0.S 1004 0.6 1012 0.7 1019 0.7 1026 0.8 1033 0.9 1039 1.1 104S 1.2 10S2 1.3 10S8 1.4 1063 1.S
994 0.S 1001 0.6 1009 0.6 1016 0.7 1023 0.8 1030 0.9 1036 1.0 1042 1.1 1048 1.2 10S4 1.3 1060 1.4
991 0.S 998 0.S 1006 0.6 1013 0.6 1020 0.7 1027 0.8 1033 0.9 1039 1.0 104S 1.1 10S1 1.2 10S6 1.2
988 0.4 996 0.S 1003 0.S 1010 0.6 1017 0.6 1023 0.7 1030 0.8 1036 0.9 1042 1.0 1047 1.1 10S3 1.1
98S 0.4 992 0.S 1000 0.S 1007 0.S 1014 0.6 1020 0.7 1026 0.8 1032 0.8 1038 0.9 1044 1.0 1049 1.0
982 0.4 989 0.4 997 0.S 1003 0.S 1010 0.S 1017 0.6 1023 0.7 1029 0.8 1034 0.8 1040 0.9 104S 0.9
979 0.3 986 0.4 993 0.4 1000 0.S 1007 0.S 1013 0.6 1019 0.6 102S 0.7 1031 0.8 1036 0.8 1041 0.8
97S 0.3 983 0.4 990 0.4 996 0.4 1003 0.S 1009 0.S 101S 0.6 1021 0.6 1027 0.7 1032 0.7 1037 0.8
972 0.3 979 0.4 986 0.4 993 0.4 999 0.4 100S 0.S 1011 0.S 1017 0.6 1023 0.6 1028 0.6 1033 0.7
£thyIene gIycoI
146
Appendix L
100 96S 0.3 968 0.3 971 0.4 974 0.4 976 0.S 978 0.6 980 0.6 981 0.7 983 0.7 984 0.8 984
95 969 0.3 972 0.4 97S 0.4 978 0.S 980 0.S 982 0.6 984 0.7 986 0.7 987 0.8 988 0.9 989
0.9
1.0
90 972 0.4 976 0.4 979 0.4 982 0.S 984 0.6 986 0.6 988 0.7 990 0.8 992 0.9 993 1.0 994 1.1
85 976 0.4 979 0.4 982 0.S 98S 0.S 988 0.6 991 0.7 993 0.8 99S 0.9 996 1.0 998 1.1 999 1.2
80 979 0.4 983 0.S 986 0.S 989 0.6 992 0.7 99S 0.7 997 0.8 999 10.0 1001 1.1 1002 1.2 1003 1.3
75 982 0.S 986 0.S 989 0.6 993 0.6 996 0.7 998 0.8 1001 0.9 1003 1.0 100S 1.2 1006 1.4 1008 1.S
60 990 0.6 99S 0.6 999 0.7 1003 0.8 1006 1.0 1009 1.1 1012 1.2 1014 1.4 1017 1.7 1019 1.9 1020 2.1
65 988 0.S 992 0.6 996 0.7 999 0.8 1003 0.9 1006 1.0 1008 1.1 1011 1.3 1013 1.S 101S 1.7 1016 1.9
70 98S 0.S 989 0.S 993 0.6 996 0.7 999 0.8 1002 0.9 100S 1.0 1007 1.1 1009 1.3 1011 1.S 1012 1.6
40 1000 0.8 100S 1.0 1010 1.1 1014 1.3 1018 1.S 1022 1.8 102S 2.1 1028 2.S 1031 2.9 1033 3.S 103S
45 998 0.8 1003 0.9 1007 1.0 1011 1.2 101S 1.4 1019 1.6 1022 1.8 102S 2.1 1027 2.S 1030 3.0 1032
50 99S 0.7 1000 0.8 100S 0.9 1009 1.0 1012 1.2 1016 1.4 1019 1.6 1021 1.8 1024 2.2 1026 2.6 1028
55 993 0.6 998 0.7 1002 0.8 1006 0.9 1009 1.1 1012 1.2 101S 1.4 1018 1.6 1020 1.9 1022 2.2 1024
4.0
3.4
2.9
2.4
15 1009 1.6 101S 1.9 1020 2.3 102S 2.8 1030 3.S 1034 4.4 1038 S.S 1042 6.6 104S 7.9 1048 9.6 10S1 12.3
20 1008 1.4 1013 1.6 1019 1.9 1023 2.4 1028 2.9 1032 3.6 1036 4.4 1039 S.3 1042 6.3 104S 7.6 1048 9.6
25 1006 1.2 1011 1.4 1017 1.7 1021 2.0 1026 2.S 1030 3.0 1033 3.6 1037 4.3 1040 S.1 1042 6.1 104S 7.S
30 1004 1.1 1009 1.2 1014 1.4 1019 1.7 1023 2.1 1027 2.S 1031 2.9 1034 3.S 1037 4.2 1039 S.0 1042 6.0
35 1002 0.9 1007 1.1 1012 1.3 1017 1.S 1021 1.8 1024 2.1 1028 2.S 1031 2.9 1034 3.S 1036 4.2 1038 4.9
-5 1021 3.8 1027 4.8 1032 6.3 1037 8.7 1042 12.0 1047 16.0 10S1 20.1 10S4 23.9 10S8 29.0 1061 41.4
0 1013
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
10Z 15Z 20Z 25Z 30Z 35Z 40Z 45Z 50Z 55Z 60Z
2.6 1020 3.1 102S 3.9 1031 S.1 1036 6.8 1040 9.1 104S 11.9 1049 14.7 10S2 17.6 10S6 21.4 10S9
5 1012 2.2 1018 2.6 1024 3.2 1029 4.1 1034 S.4 1038 7.0 1043 9.0 1046 11.1 10S0 13.2 10S3 16.1 10S6 21.7
29.7
10 1011 1.8 1017 2.2 1022 2.7 1027 3.4 1032 4.3 1036 S.S 1040 6.9 1044 8.S 1048 10.1 10S1 12.3 10S3 16.2
-20 10S1 44.9 10S6 S8.1 1060 68.6 1064 82.6 1067
-15 104S 22.2 10S0 31.1 10S4 39.8 10S8 47.1 1062 S6.9 106S
-10 1039 11.4 1044 16.2 1048 22.1 10S3 27.9 10S6 33.2 1060 40.2 1063
128.2
8S.9
S8.9
-50
1emperature
Concentration
wt Z =
1077
-45 107S
-40 1070 468.8 1074
-35 1069 291.8 1072
-30 1063 1S7.1 1067 186.7 1071
-25 10S7 87.1 1062 102.S 1066 122.6 1069
2433.S
1390.3
817.6
494.4
307.2
196.0
PropyIene gIycoI
147
Appendix L
1000
1100
1200
1300
1400
1S00
1600
0 10

10°
20 30 40 S0 60 70 80 °C
kgJm
3
1S°
20°
2S°
30°
3S°
40°
4S°
S0°
SS°
0
1
10
100
20 2S

10°
30 3S 40 4S S0 SS 60 6S 70
°C
c5t
1S°
20°
2S°
30°
3S°
40°
4S°
S0°
80
75
60
65
70
40
45
50
55
15
20
25
30
35
0
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj

|kg]m
3
j |cSIj

|kg]m
3
j |cSIj

|kg]m
3
j |cSIj

|kg]m
3
j |cSIj

|kg]m
3
j |cSIj

|kg]m
3
j |cSIj

|kg]m
3
j |cSIj

|kg]m
3
j |cSIj

|kg]m
3
j |cSIj

|kg]m
3
j |cSIj

5Z 10Z 15Z 20Z 25Z 30Z 35Z 40Z 45Z 50Z 55Z
5
10
1emperature
Concentration
wt Z =
10S7
1060
10S8
10S6
10S4
10S2
10S0
1048
1046
1044
1042
1039
1036
1033
1030
1027
102S
1.3
1.1
1.0
0.9
0.8
0.7
0.7
0.6
0.6
0.S
0.S
1117
111S
1113
1111
1109
1107
1104
1102
1100
1097
1094
1092
1089
1086
1083
1080
1077
1.7
1.S
1.3
1.2
1.1
1.0
0.9
0.8
0.7
0.7
0.6
1174
1172
1170
1167
1164
1162
11S9
11S7
11S4
11S1
1148
114S
1143
1140
1137
1134
1131
2.S
2.1
1.8
1.6
1.4
1.3
1.2
1.0
0.9
0.9
0.8
1230
1227
1224
1222
1219 3.6
1217 3.1
1214 2.7
1211 2.3
1208 2.0
120S 1.8
1202 1.6
1199 1.S
1196 1.3
1.2
1.1
1193
1190
1186
1183
128S 1334
1283 1332
1280 1330
1277 1326
1274 6.2 1322 10.1
1271 S.1 1319 8.3
1268 4.0 131S 6.S
126S 3.4 1312 S.S
1262 2.8 1309 4.S
12S9 2.6 1306 3.9
12S6 2.3 1302 3.3
12S3 2.0 1299 2.9
12S0 1.8 129S 2.4
1246 1.6
1243 1.S
1240
1237
1384 143S
1381 1429
1377 1423
1372 1420
1367 16.8 1416 2S.4
1364 13.3 1413 19.9
1360 9.9 1410 14.4
13S7 8.2 1407 11.6
13S3 6.6 1403 8.9
1347 S.6 1396 7.S
1340 4.6 1389 6.0
1483 1S30 1SS9
1480 1S28 1SS6
1478 1S2S 1SS3
1471 1S18 1S46
1464 38.2 1S11 S1.8 1S40
1461 29.0 1S08 39.0
14S7 19.9 1S04 26.2
14S4 1S.9 1S01 20.S
14S0 12.0 1497 14.7
1443 9.9 1490 12.1
1436 7.8 1483 9.4
5odium hydroxide
148
Appendix L
15
20
25
30
-10
-5
0
5
10
-25
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
10Z 15Z 20Z 25Z
-20
-15
1emperature
Concentration
wt Z =
1138 3.0
1090 2.3 1137 2.6
1088 2.0 113S 2.2
1086 1.7 1134 1.9
108S 1.S 1132 1.7
1083 1.3 1131 1.S
1082 1.1 1129 1.3
1082 1.0 1127 1.2
1081 0.9 112S 1.0
124S 7.7
1244 6.3
1189 4.3 1242 S.2
1188 3.6 1241 4.4
1187 3.1 1239 3.8
1186 2.6 1237 3.3
1184 2.3 123S 2.9
1182 2.0 1233 2.S
1180 1.8 1230 2.2
1178 1.6 1228 2.0
1176 1.4 1226 1.8
1173 1.3 1223 1.6
CaIcium chIoride
25
30
0
5
10
15
20
-15
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
|kg]m
3
j |cSIj
p v
5Z 10Z 15Z 20Z
-10
-5
1emperature
Concentration
wt Z =
1043 1.8
1042 1.S
1041 1.3
1040 1.1
1039 1.0
1037 0.9
1036 0.8
1082 2.2
1080 1.8
1079 1.6
1077 1.4
107S 1.2
1074 1.1
1072 0.9
1070 0.9
1120 2.9
1118 2.4
1116 2.0
1114 1.7
1112 1.S
1110 1.3
1108 1.2
1106 1.0
1103 0.9
1162 4.0
1160 3.2
11S8 2.7
11SS 2.3
11S3 1.9
11S1 1.7
1148 1.S
1146 1.3
1144 1.2
1141 1.1
Natrium chIoride
149
A
p
p
e
n
d
i
x
 
I
A
p
p
e
n
d
i
x
 
H
A
AbsoluIe pressure  8S
Ad|usIing pump perIormance  106
Aluminium  70
Asynchronous moIor  40 
A1LX (A1mosphère LXplosible)  41
AusIeniIic (non-magneIic)  68
AuIoIransIormer sIarIing  46
Axial ßow pumps  8
Axial Iorces  14
8
8alanced shaII seal  30
8asic coupling  16
8earing  S1
  lnsulaIed bearing  48
8ellows seal  31
8orehole pump  23
8ypass conIrol  106
C
Canned moIor pump  18
CarIridge seal  32
Casing  1S
  Double-voluIe  1S
  Single-voluIe  1S
  keIurn channel  1S
CasI iron  66
CaviIaIion  10, 89
  CaviIaIion corrosion  63
CenIriIugal pump  8
Ceramics  71
Close-coupled pump  12, 13, 16
Closed sysIem  96, 98
CoaIings  73
  MeIallic coaIings  73
  Non-meIallic coaIings  74
  Organic coaIings  74 
CompuIer aided pump selecIion  S8
ConIrol  106
  1hroIIle conIrol  107
  8ypass conIrol  107
  Speed conIrol  108
  ConsIanI diIIerenIial pressure conIrol  11S
  ConsIanI pressure conIrol  114
  ConsIanI IemperaIure conIrol  11S
Copper alloys  69
Corrosion  60
  CaviIaIion corrosion  63
  Corrosion IaIigue  64
  Crevice corrosion  62
  Lrosion corrosion  63
  Galvanic corrosion  64
  lnIergranular corrosion  62
  PiIIing corrosion  61
  SelecIive corrosion  62
  SIress corrosion cracking (SCC)  63
  UniIorm corrosion  61
Corrosion IaIigue  64
Coupling  16
  8asic coupling  16
  llexible coupling  16
  Spacer coupling  16
Crevice corrosion  62
D
Decommissioning and disposal cosIs  131
Deep well pump  23
DensiIy  10, 93
  UniI  Appendix A
  WaIer  Appendix D
  8rine  Appendix L
Diaphragm pump  2S
DiIIerenIial pressure  88
DiIIerenIial pressure conIrol  116
DilaIanI liquid  SS
DirecI-on-line sIarIing (DOL)  46
Dosing pump  2S
Double mechanical shaII seal  33
  Double seal in Iandem  33
Double seal in back-Io-back  34
Double-channel impeller  21
Double-inleI  17
Double-sucIion impeller  11, 17
Double-voluIe casing  1S
DownIime cosIs  131
Index
DusI igniIion prooI (DlP)  42
DuIy poinI  96
Dynamic pressure  84
Dynamic viscosiIy  S4 
£
LarIh-leakage circuiI breaker (LLC8)  12S  
LIhciency  10
  LIhciency aI reduced speed  109
LIhciency curve  10
LlecIric moIor  40
  llameprooI moIor  41
  lncreased saIeIy moIor  41
  Non-sparking moIor  42
LMC direcIive  123
LMC hlIer  123
Lnclosure class (lP), moIor  43
Lnd-sucIion pump  12
Lnergy cosIs  130 
Lnergy savings  111, 114, 117
LnvironmenIal cosIs  130
Lrosion corrosion  63
LIhylene propylene rubber (LPDM)  72
Lxpansion |oinIs  80
f
lerriIic (magneIic)  68
lerriIic-ausIeniIic or duplex (magneIic)  68
lerrous alloys  6S
llameprooI moIor  41
llexible coupling  16
lloaIing plinIh  79
llow  83
  Mass ßow  83
  volume ßow  83
  UniIs  Appendix 8
lluoroelasIomers (lKM)  72
llushing  32
loundaIion  78
  lloaIing plinIh  79
  lloor  79
  PlinIh  79
  vibraIion dampeners  79
lrame size  44
lrequency converIer  47, 108, 118
C
Galvanic corrosion  64
Gauge pressure  8S
GeodeIic head  99
GeodeIic liII  99
Grey iron  66
H
Read  9, 8S
ReaI capaciIy  93
RermeIically sealed pump  18
RorizonIal pump  12, 13
Rydraulic power  10, 91
I
lLC, moIor  40
lmmersible pump  22
lmpeller  14, 21
  Double-channel  21
  Single-channel   21
  vorIex impeller  21
lncreased saIeIy moIor  41
lniIial cosIs  129
ln-line pump  12, 13
lnsIallaIion and commissioning cosIs  129
lnsulaIion class  44
lnIergranular corrosion  62
k
KinemaIic viscosiIy  S4, Appendix L
Index Index
L
LiIe cycle cosIs  117, 128
  Lxample  132
Liquid  S4
  DilaIanI  SS
  NewIonian  SS
  Non-NewIonian  SS
  PlasIic ßuid  SS
  1hixoIrophic  SS
  viscous  S4
Long-coupled pump  12, 13, 16
Loss oI producIion cosIs  131
M
MagneIic drive  19
MainIenance and repair cosIs  131
MarIensiIic (magneIic)  68
Mass ßow  83
Measuring pressure  8S
Mechanical shaII seal  18, 28
  8ellows seal  31
  CarIridge seal  32
  MeIal bellows seal  32
  kubber bellows seal  31
  luncIion  29
  llushing  32
MeIal alloys  6S
  lerrous alloys  6S
MeIal bellows seal  32
MeIallic coaIings  73
Mixed ßow pumps  8 
ModiIying impeller diameIer  108, 110
MoIors  40
MoIor eIhciency  49
MoIor insulaIion  48
MoIor proIecIion  49
MoIor sIarI-up  46
DirecI-on-line sIarIing (DOL)  46
  SIar]delIa sIarIing  46
  AuIoIransIormer sIarIing  46
  lrequency converIer  46, 47
  SoII sIarIer  46
MounIing oI moIor (lM)  43
MulIisIage pump  11, 12, 13, 16
N
NLMA, moIor sIandard  40
NewIonian ßuid  SS
Nickel alloys  69
NiIrile rubber  72
Nodular iron  66
Noise (vibraIion)  78
Non-meIallic coaIings  74
Non-NewIonian liquid  SS
Non-sinusoidal currenI  124
Non-sparking moIor  42   
NPSR (NeI PosiIive SucIion Read)  10, 89
D
Open sysIem  96, 99
OperaIing cosIs  106, 130
Organic coaIings  74
O-ring seal  31
Oversized pumps  106
P
PainIs  74
PerßuoroelasIomers (llKM)  72
Phase insulaIion  48
Pl-conIroller  114
PiIIing corrosion  61
PlasIic ßuid  SS
PlasIics  71
PlinIh  79
PosiIive displacemenI pump  24
Power consumpIion  10, 91
  Rydraulic power  10, 91
  ShaII power  91
Pressure  84
  AbsoluIe pressure  8S
  DiIIerenIial pressure  88
  Dynamic pressure  84
  Gauge pressure  8S
  Measuring pressure  8S
  SIaIic pressure  84
  SysIem pressure  88
  UniIs  8S, Appendix A
  vapour pressure  90, Appendix D 
Pressure conIrol
  ConsIanI diIIerenIial pressure conIrol  11S
  ConsIanI pressure  114
  ConsIanI pressure conIrol  119
  ConsIanI supply pressure  114
Pressure IransmiIIer (P1)  114
ProporIional pressure conIrol  120   
P1C IhermisIors  S0
Pulse WidIh ModulaIion (PWM)  123
Pump
  Axial ßow pump  8
  8orehole pump  23
  Canned moIor pump  18
  CenIriIugal pump  8
  Close-coupled pump  12, 13, 16
  Diaphragm pump  2S
  Dosing pump  2S
  RermeIically sealed pump  18
  RorizonIal pump  12, 13
  lmmersible pump  22
  Long-coupled pump  12, 13, 16
  MagneIic-driven pump  19
  Mixed ßow pump  8
  MulIisIage pump  11, 12, 13, 16
  PosiIive displacemenI pump  24   
  kadial ßow pump  8
  SaniIary pump  20
  Single-sIage pump  1S
  SpliI-case pump  12, 13, 17
  SIandard pump  17
  verIical pump  12, 13
  WasIewaIer pump  21
Pump casing  1S
Pump characIerisIic  9, 96
Pump curve  9
Pump insIallaIion  77
Pump perIormance curve  9, 96
Pumps connecIed in series  103
Pumps in parallel  101
Pumps wiIh inIegraIed Irequency converIer  118
Purchase cosIs  129
PWM (Pulse WidIh ModulaIion)  123
D
OR-curve  9
k
kadial ßow pump  8
kadial Iorces  1S
keinIorced insulaIion  48
kesisIances connecIed in parallel  98
kesisIances connecIed in series  97
keIurn channel casing  11, 1S
kubber  72
  LIhylene propylene rubber (LPDM)  72
  lluoroelasIomers (lKM)  72
  NiIrile rubber (N8K)  72
  PerßuoroelasIomers (llKM)  72
  Silicone rubber (O)  72
  kubber bellows seal  31
5
SaniIary pump  20
Seal Iace  28
Seal gab  29
SelecIive corrosion  62
SeIpoinI  114   
ShaII  11
ShaII power  91
ShaII seal  28
  8alanced shaII seal  30
  Unbalanced shaII seal  30
Silicone rubber (O)  72
Single resisIances  97
  kesisIances connecIed in series  97
Single-channel impeller  21
Single-sIage pump  11, 12, 13, 1S
Single-sucIion impeller  11
Single-voluIe casing  1S
SoII sIarIer  46
Sound level  81
  Sound pressure level  82
Spacer coupling  16
Index Index
Speed conIrol  106, 108, 110
  variable speed conIrol  108
Speed-conIrolled pumps in parallel  102
SpliI-case pump  12, 13, 17 
SIainless sIeel  66
SIandard pump  17
SIandards  40
  lLC, moIor  40   
  NLMA, moIor  40
  SaniIary sIandards  20
SIandsIill heaIing oI moIor  S1
SIar]delIa sIarIing  46
SIaIic pressure  84
SIeel  6S
SIress corrosion cracking (SCC)  63
SIuIhng box  28
Submersible pump  23
SysIem characIerisIic  96
  Closed sysIem  96, 98
  Open sysIem  96, 99
SysIem cosIs  117
SysIem pressure  88
1
1emperaIure  93
  UniIs  Appendix 8
1hermoplasIics  71
1hermoseIs  71
1hixoIrophic liquid  SS
1hroIIle conIrol  106, 110-113
1hroIIle valve  107
1iIanium  70
1win pump  11
U
Unbalanced shaII seal  30
UniIorm corrosion  61
V
vapour pressure  90, Appendix D
variable speed conIrol  108
verIical pump  12, 13
vibraIion dampeners  79
vibraIions  78
viscosiIy  S4, Appendix L
  Dynamic viscosiIy  S4
viscous liquid  S4
viscous liquid pump curve  SS
volIage supply  47
volume ßow  83
  UniIs  Appendix A
voluIe casing  11
vorIex impeller  21
WasIewaIer pump  21