Major Baker Captures Metis on the Milk River, July, 1879.

Colonel Miles ordered Major Eugene Baker !
nd
Cavalry" to round up the Red River
Metis and in late July o# 1879 a$out 1,%%% people along &ith their horses, 8%% 'arts, and
other supplies &ere 'aptured and (oved out o# the area.
Correspondent John )inerty in War Path and Bivouac, reports*
+t da&n , aroused the 'orporal, and, $e#ore an hour, &e &ere again on the road,
#ollo&ing Miles- trail. .hen &ithin a #e& (iles o# his 'a(p, &e o$served a pro'ession,
&hi'h &e took to $e an ar(y 'orps at #irst, 'o(ing over the prairie #ro( the &est. )our
dark groups in #ront indi'ated 'o(panies o# soldiers on the (ar'h. , then 'on'luded it
&as Baker-s $attalion, o# the !d Cavalry, having in to& nearly #ive hundred /al#0Breed
tea(s, &ith the #a(ilies &ho o&ned the(, 'aptured up Milk River, and this su$se1uently
proved to $e the #a't.
Just as &e re'overed #ro( the surprise o# seeing the host advan'ing in the di( distan'e
#ro( the &est, the /al#0Breed, &ho 'arried an old pair o# #ield glasses, (ade a gesture o#
#ear and uttered the &ord 2 3akota4 2 &hi'h (eant 5iou6.
2,# they-re 5iou6,2 said 7rivate Bliss, 2they-ll respe't our uni#or(, $ut i# they-re any o#
Miles- Cro&s or Cheyennes, &e-d $etter look out.2
.e o$served horse(en in (otion on a $lu## in our #ront, a (ile or t&o a&ay, and that
they &ere ,ndians, $e'a(e apparent very soon. 8he red0'oats did not like the situation,
and neither did ,. ,# they &ere 5iou6, the soldiers &ere all right0$ut &as ,9 ,# they &ere
Cro&s or Cheyennes, , (ight $e all right0$ut &ould they9 8hese 1uestions revolved
the(selves in (y (ind as the savage horse(en, no& galloping their ponies like (ad,
'a(e to&ard us in gallant, i# terri$le, array. 8he soldiers and hal#0$reed got ready #or
a'tion, $ut , told the( to keep 'ool and a&ait develop(ents. But, #or all that, , #elt
un'o(#orta$le. ,# they &ere Miles- ,ndians, ho& 'ould , tell &hat they (ight do &ith the
soldiers, even though they le#t (e alone9

5oon they rea'hed near enough to (ake us out, and, a''ording to their 'usto(, they #ired
several shots in the air, and uttered their shrill, unearthly yells. 8heir leader &as dressed
in a light0'olored gar$, and , had the satis#a'tion o# re'ogni:ing in hi( the #a(ous
Cheyenne 'hie#, 3ittle .ol#, &ho had surrendered to 3ieut. 7hilo Clark, a#ter a gallant
#ight, the previous year.
3ittle .ol# looked $la'k at the soldiers and /al#0Breed &ho had their ri#les at #ull 'o'k,
ready #or $usiness, $ut, reining in, rea'hed his hand to (e and said, 2 /o&4 2 8hen he
(otioned to his #ollo&ers, and they all s&ept o## to&ard the north like a tornado.
.e had so(e di##i'ulty in #ollo&ing Miles- trail, $ut &e su$se1uently #ound hi( very
neatly en'a(ped in the valley o# Milk river, near the (outh o# )ren'h(an-s 'reek. Both
he and his o##i'ers gave (e a very kind re'eption, and they &ere (u'h interested in &hat
, had to tell the( respe'ting (y e6perien'es in the 8eton en'a(p(ent. pp. ;890;9%"
<Colonel= Miles telegraphed .ashington to kno& &hat disposition he should (ake o# the
(ultitude o# /al#0Breeds 'aptured $y Baker-s 'o((and. /e resolved, ho&ever, to keep
the( near hi( until he re'eived #inal orders.

8hose pi'tures1ue people pit'hed their 'a(p in a (ighty 'ir'le a (ile or t&o a&ay #ro(
ours. 8he &eather had gro&n delight#ul, and the (oon &as at its $est. +''ordingly, in the
evening, the >eneral, his sta##, so(e other o##i'ers and (ysel# (ounted our horses and
rode do&n to the /al#0Breed 'a(p. 8he light0hearted 'reatures had had supper, and, to
the inspiring sound o# do:ens o# violins and other (usi'al instru(ents, &ere dan'ing on
the green, under the >ra'ious $ea(s o# the ever0$eauti#ul or$ o# night, as 'al(ly as i#
they &ere $eyond the line, and not under the thu($ o# a very resolute +(eri'an general.
8he sight &as an e6'eedingly pretty one, and several o# the soldiers &ere granted the
privilege o# dan'ing a round or t&o &ith dusky, $ut, #or all that, gra'e#ul and lovely
partners. .e enjoyed this interesting spe'ta'le #or an hour or so, and &hen &e le#t the #un
had not yet ended.
?e6t day &e $roke 'a(p and (oved nearer the Missouri river, the hal#0$reeds, under
es'ort, #ollo&ing our trail. .e 'rossed Milk River, near Ca(p$ell-s houses, and there le#t
(ost o# the !d Cavalry, under Col. Baker, &ho &as ordered to look a#ter the /al#0Breed
out#it until .ashington 'ould $e heard #ro(. 8he rest o# the (ilitary &ere sent to their
respe'tive posts $y di##erent routes, &ith the e6'eption o# a deta'h(ent o# the @
th
,n#antry
retained $y >eneral Miles. ;910;9!"
.e rea'hed the Missouri on the 7th, and so(e days a#ter&ard , took passage at )ort 7e'k
on a stea(er $ound #or Bis(ar'k. +t that pla'e , learned that the govern(ent had ordered
the release o# the /al#0Breeds, on 'ondition that they &ould re#rain #ro( hunting on our
side o# the $order. , don-t kno& &hether the released 'aptives respe'ted the 'onditions,
$ut it (ade little di##eren'e, as nearly all the ga(e had disappeared #ro( that region a
'ouple o# years a#ter&ard. >eneral Miles and sta##, #ro( a high $lu## a$ove Milk River,
sa& the last grand (uster o# the great northern herd o# $u##alo, on'e 'ounted $y the
(illion, on the evening o# +ugust A, 1879. p. ;9A"
John ). )inerty, War Path and Bivouac, 189%* ;890;9A.

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