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Shirley

Cunningham
got a 20-year
sentence.
A judge gave
William
Gallion 25
years.
COVINGTON, Ky. — Saying
both were guilty of “unbridled
greed,” a federal judge Monday sen-
tenced William Gallion to 25 years
in prison and Shirley Cunningham
Jr. to 20 years for defrauding clients
out of tens of millions of dollars in
thestate’s $200millionfen-phenset-
tlement.
U.S. District Judge Danny C.
Reeves also ordered the two dis-
barred lawyers to pay more than
$127 millioninrestitutionandtofor-
feit another $30 million to the gov-
ernment.
Reeves said neither defendant
showed a “grain of remorse” and
that they had damaged public re-
spect for the court system.
However, he cited their prior
good records — and the fact that
they’ve beenpermanentlydisbarred
and can no longer hurt the public —
in imposing sentences that were 10
years less than prosecutors wanted.
Assistant U.S. Attorney E.J. Wal-
bourn said the sentences were “well
reasoned,” but he and his co-coun-
sel, Laura Voorhees, said they will
consider an appeal of the decision.
Neither Gallion nor Cunning-
ham addressed the court. But both
indicated they would appeal, and
Cunnigham’s wife, Pat, said in an in-
terview that “I still maintain his in-
nocence.”
Attorney Angela Ford, who now
2 sentenced in fen-phen fraud case
Ex-lawyers chided:
‘Unbridled greed’
By Andrew Wolfson
awolfson@courier-journal.com
The Courier-Journal
See FEN-PHEN, A2, col. 2
BATTLETOWN, Ky. — A lime-
stone “quarry alley” 45 miles west of
downtown Louisville resembles the
scarred landscapes of Eastern Ken-
tucky, flattened by blasting for coal.
As in Eastern Kentucky, the earth
has been removed to reveal the valu-
able rock underneath to help clean
dirty power plants fueled by coal.
Limestone is the key ingredient for
stripping sulfur dioxide from smoke-
stacks, helping toreduce acidrainand
asthma-inducing haze.
Still, “I cannot helpbut make paral-
lels in my mind with Eastern Kentuc-
ky, with mountaintop removal and
strip mines,” said David Bell, a Meade
County resident who opposes a new
limestone quarry planned for his cor-
ner of the state, defined equally by its
limestone deposits as the verdant
bluffs and Ohio River bottomlands of
a peninsula known as Big Bend.
Agroupof Chicagoinvestors, orga-
nized as Meade County Quarry LLC,
has been working for 18 months to get
approval to open a new quarry near
Battletown, and on Thursday the
Limestone cleans coal but at what cost in Meade?
By James Bruggers
jbruggers@courier-journal.com
The Courier-Journal
Quandary over a quarry
A truckload of stone was removed from a quarry owned and operated by Yager
Industries/Riverside Stone.
Photos by Bill Luster, The Courier-Journal
Businessman James Collins, foreground, has a contract to sell the land for a new Meade County quarry. But David Bell, left,
and others oppose the plan, contending the extra mining will damage the quality of life in the area.
By Joanne Meshew, The C-J
64
62
62
66
Leavenworth
Fredonia Fredonia
O
hio
River
Indiana
Proposed
Meade County
quarry
N
Meade
County
Louisville
“There’s five
quarries
within five
miles of
here. ... Who
are you
bothering?”
Landowner
JAMES COLLINS
See MEADE, A6, col. 1
Volunteers ofAmerica
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The Indiana Supreme Court
ruled clearly and correctly when it
overturned the triple-murder con-
viction of former state trooper Da-
vid Cammand should stick with that
decision, Camm’s lawyers argued in
a brief filed with the court.
The brief submitted Friday came
in response to a July 27 petition from
the state attorney general’s office
asking the court to reconsider its
ruling, which struck down Camm’s
2006 conviction in the murders of
his wife, Kimberly, and their chil-
dren, Bradley, 7, and Jill, 5, in the garage of their
Georgetown home in 2000.
“There’s really no reason for a rehearing,” de-
fense attorney Stacy Uliana said Monday in an in-
Supreme Court overturned
ex-trooper’s murder conviction
By Harold J. Adams
hjadams@courier-journal.com
The Courier-Journal
Defense asks
that justices
stand firm on
Camm ruling
See CAMM, A2, col. 2
David Camm
was
convicted of
killing his
family.
PHOENIX — President Barack Obama chastised
thedefenseindustryandafree-spendingCongress on
Monday for wasting tax dollars “with doctrine and
weapons better suited to fight the Soviets on the
plains of Europe thaninsurgents inthe ruggedterrain
of Afghanistan.”
“Twenty years after the Cold War ended, this is
simplynot acceptable. It’s irresponsible,” he tolda na-
tional convention of the Veterans of Foreign Wars. “If
Congress sends me a defense bill loadedwitha bunch
of pork, I will veto it.”
Turningtothetwoforeignwars engagingtheUnit-
edStates, Obama spoke of fierce fighting against Tali-
banandother insurgents leadinguptoThursday’s na-
tional elections inAfghanistan. HesaidU.S. troops are
working to secure polling places so Afghans can
choose their own future.
Obama targets
wasteful projects
for military
By Liz Sidoti
Associated Press
See OBAMA, A3, col. 2
Time: 08-17-2009 22:53 User: ppitts PubDate: 08-18-2009 Zone: IN Edition: 1 Page Name: A1 Color: Black Yellow Magenta Cyan
Debbie
Burnett looked
at an Indiana
quarry across
the Ohio River
from the site
proposed for a
quarry in
Meade
County. “I’m
going to be
affected every
day” if it’s
allowed, she
said.
By Bill Luster,
The Courier-Journal
Meade County Planning
Commission will weigh
whether to rezone several
hundred acres that the in-
vestment group seeks to ac-
quire fromlandowner James
Collins, from agriculture to
heavy industrial. The efforts
have touched off what could
be described as a battle for
the future of Battletown.
“There’s five quarries
within five miles of here,”
Collins, 71, saidas heshowed
his nearly 500-acre property
and would-be quarry to a re-
porter. “It’s very sparsely
populated here. Who are
you bothering?”
But some of his neigh-
bors, including Bell — a
farmer and substitute teach-
er — argue that one more
limestone quarry in the re-
gion would further wreck a
rural community that draws
sightseers because of its sce-
nic beauty.
People are already mov-
ing out, as existing quarries
have expanded, Bell said,
adding that if blasting, dust
and traffic get worse, or if
the new mining ruins water
wells, it could send even
more away.
“There could be or-
chards, vineyards, cattle or
aquaculture,” Bell said of
Collins’ acreage.
Limestone in demand
There are several thou-
sand acres of limestone
quarry land in northern
Meade County and just
across the Ohio River in
southern Crawford County,
Ind., according to officials.
Muchof it is alsousedfor ce-
ment production, road
building or other construc-
tion.
But Mark Slaby, of Chi-
cago, one of the Meade
County project’s principal
partners, said, “We are going
after the scrubber-stone
market.”
The high-quality lime-
stone in the Meade County
area is used to separate sul-
fur dioxidefromthefluegas-
es of coal-firedpower plants,
and the calcium-rich rock is
increasingly sought by utili-
ties, whichhave beenadding
more scrubbers to comply
with newer clean-air man-
dates.
About a third of Kentuc-
ky’s limestone production
goes to scrubbers, and those
sales have helped some
quarries weather a major
downturn in construction,
said Warren Anderson, a ge-
ologist with the Kentucky
Geological Survey.
The cost of limestone in
Kentucky rose more than 11
percent from2007 to2008to
$4.12 per ton, according to
state tax records that don’t
include transportationcosts.
The limestone needs of
E.On U.S., parent of Ken-
tucky Utilities and LG&E,
are expected to nearly dou-
ble from 1.1 million tons in
2008 to 2 million tons in
2012, said Scott Straght, di-
rector of project engineering
for the company.
LG&E plants have had
scrubbers for years, and KU
has been adding them, he
said. Another quarry in the
region would increase com-
petition for limestone,
which “would be good for
ratepayers,” he said.
Duke Energy has added
five scrubber units at its In-
diana plants in the past few
years, companyspokeswom-
an Angeline Protogere said.
“A rule of thumb is that
we use about 1 ton of lime-
stone for every 10 tons of
coal that we use in a
scrubbed station,” she
said.The Kentucky Division
of Mine Reclamation and
Enforcement has granted a
permit to Meade County
Quarry, but Bell and Louis-
ville attorney Tom FitzGer-
ald are challenging it. It will
be discussed during a Ken-
tucky Energy and Environ-
ment Cabinet administrative
hearing Sept. 15 in Frankfort.
FitzGerald contends the
state didn’t require enough
safeguards to prevent dam-
age to land and water, and
control dust and noise.
There’s no evidence, he
wrote in his challenge, that
officials requested or re-
viewed any information that
would show blasting vibra-
tions won’t damage neigh-
bors’ homes.
Bell and other neighbors
havecollected120signatures
from people opposing the
zoning change.
“I’m going to be affected
every day when I drive by
that and see the destruc-
tion,” said Big Bend resident
Debbie Burnett, an inten-
sive-care nurse at Kosair
Children’s Hospital inLouis-
ville.
Kathy Kolle, who lives
next to an existing quarry
and the planned new one,
said she has put her 85 acres
up for sale.
“Would you want your
lifestyle destroyed?” she
asked.
James McKenzie, who
manages the state’s non-coal
regulatory branch, said the
permit had to be issued be-
cause it met the terms of the
state’s regulations.
Those rules, in place
since the mid-1990s, limit
any quarry’s impact on the
environment and include a
prohibition against allowing
rock to fly off the property
during blasting, he said.
Quarry operators cannot
blast within 300 feet of a
house, or mine within 100
feet without the homeown-
er’s permission, he said.
McKenzie said there’s a
reclamation plan, but he ac-
knowledged that with quar-
ries, you usually end up with
“a big hole.”
Company plans
The Meade County
Quarry’s mining plan shows
that 33 acres nearest the riv-
er would be mined first. It
identifies at least 288 addi-
tional acres for future min-
ing and calls for eventually
building homes and a mari-
naontheproperty—though
Slaby said there’s no firm ti-
metable.
Slaby said that by using
barges rather than trucks to
ship the stone, the quarry
would be less disruptive.
Rock crushing would only
occur at the bottomof a hol-
low near the river, out of
sight from public roads and
in an area that would natu-
rally contain the noise, he
added.
The quarry would em-
ploy 20 to 25 people with an-
nual salaries of $35,000 to
$75,000, he said, adding that
it could generate between
$200,000 and $300,000 in
mining tax revenue for
Meade County.
But while he said the
company would stay away
fromstreams on the proper-
ty, papers filed with the state
say the long-term plan is to
seek permission to mine
through them.
At least three graves are
on the property. If the proj-
ect proceeds, the graves
would have to be preserved
unless the company obtains
permits to move them,
McKenzie said. The com-
pany said in its permit appli-
cation it may seek to move
them.
Reporter James Bruggers can be
reached at (502) 582-4645.
MEADE | Quarry presents quandary
Continued from A1
Source: American Electric Power, E.ON.US and Babcock Power
By Steve Reed, The Courier-Journal
Limestone
silo
Crusher
Air
Slurry
tank
Flue
gases
Slurry
spray
Mist
eliminator
Scrubbed
gases
Smokestack
Utility purchases
high-calcium limestone
as crushed rock.
1 2
3
4
Sm Sm
The slurry is pumped through the scrubber — and sprayed down
through the scrubber, while the flue gases go up. The calcium
combines with the sulfur to make calcium sulfite.
Reaction
tank
Air injected into the liquid causes a reaction which makes
gypsum (calcium sulfate) that is then pulled out and dried. It
can then be sold for making drywall or go into a landfill.
How a wet scrubber uses limestone
Gypsum
Drywall
At the power plant, it's
crushed up with water
to make a slurry.
111
2
33333333
44
IF YOU GO
Meade County Planning and
Zoning Commission
6:30 p.m. Aug. 20.
Meade County Courthouse,
516 Hillcrest Drive. Brandenberg,
Ky.

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Kentuck] Housing Corporation will conduct a puolic hearing
regarding the 8tate 0ualifed Allocation Plan (0APj for the Housing
Credit Program that will go into effect Januar] 2O, 2O1O. The
hearing will oe held at 1.8O p.m., EDT, on Tuesda], August 25,
2OO9, at Kentuck] Housing Corporation, 1281 louisville Road,
Frankfort, Kentuck].
lndividuals who have questions regarding this puolic hearing,
or those who require special accommodations to attend this
puolic hearing, ma] contact Daphne Holland, Kentuck] Housing
Corporation, 1281 louisville Road, Frankfort, Kentuck] 4OOO1,
toll-free in Kentuck] at (8OOj O88-889O or (5O2j 5O4-7O8O,
extension 7OO, TTY 771, or email dholland@k]housing.org
The draft plan will oe availaole at www.k]housing.org o] C0B
Tuesda], August 18, 2OO9. Those needing assistance accessing
the 0AP should contact Daphne Holland. written comments ma]
oe sent to the same address and must oe received no later than
Tuesda], August 25, 2OO9.
Equal Housing and
Equal Emplo]ment 0pportunit]

A6 | TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 2009 | THE COURIER-JOURNAL FROM PAGE ONE AND WORLD | courier-journal.com MT-
NAZRAN, RUSSIA
Suicide bomber kills
20 in Ingushetia
A suicide bomber
rammed a truck into a
police station in the In-
gushetia region Mon-
day, killing at least 20
police in the worst at-
tack to ravage the poor
North Caucasus repub-
lic in years.
The blast, which
wounded more than130
others, stoked fears that
Ingushetia has replaced
Chechnya as the next
battleground in south-
ern Russia.
SEOUL, S. KOREA
N. Korea agrees
to resume reunions
North Korea’s deci-
sion late Sunday to re-
start tours run jointly
with South Korea and
allow reunions of fami-
lies separated for dec-
ades by the peninsula’s
war is aimed at drawing
much-needed foreign
currency and securing
the upper hand in nego-
tiations with Washing-
ton and Seoul, experts
said.
Tours to the scenic
Diamond Mountain re-
sort andthe ancient city
of Kaesong have been
key symbols of recon-
ciliationbetweenthedi-
vided Koreas.
LONDON
Old bomb to spur
village exoduses
Authorities planned
to evacuate two small
villages in northern
England after a World
War II-era bomb was
found buried in a near-
by field.
North Yorkshire Po-
lice said that more than
1,000 people will be
moved from their
homes inEbberstonand
Allerston on Tuesday
afternoon before the
500-pound explosive is
made safe.
The device was dis-
covered Sunday by en-
thusiasts who are dig-
ging up the remains of a
plane that crashed in
the area in 1940.
Read the latest news at:
courier-journal.com/
nationworld
WORLD
BRIEFS
BAGHDAD — The top
U.S. commander in Iraq said
Monday that he wants to de-
ploy U.S. soldiers to disput-
ed territories in northern
Iraq following a recent spike
in bombings there.
The move would be a de-
parture from the security
pact that called for Ameri-
cans to pull back frompopu-
lated areas on June 30.
The U.S. soldiers would
partner with Iraqi govern-
ment and Kurdish troops to
secure the largely unguard-
ed villages in an area disput-
ed between Arabs and
Kurds, Gen. Ray Odierno
said.
He said no final decision
has been made but said Iraqi
andKurdishleaders were re-
ceptive to the idea.
Odierno saidit wouldnot
affect the timeline that calls
for U.S. combat forces to
leave the country by the end
of August 2010, with a full
withdrawal by the end of
2011.
Several top defense offi-
cials have identifiedthe split
between Iraq’s majority
Arabs and the Kurdish mi-
nority as probably a greater
long-term threat to Iraq’s
stability. At the heart of the
dispute is the oil-rich city of
Kirkuk and a batch of villag-
es in Ninevah province that
the Kurds want to incorpo-
rate into their semiautono-
mous area.
Troops may go
to northern Iraq
Associated Press
KABUL — Women’s
rights activists alleged Mon-
day that Afghan President
Hamid Karzai has used a
constitutional loophole to
enact a law that allows mi-
nority Shiite Muslim hus-
bands to refuse food and
money to their wives if they
deny them sex.
The activists suspect
Karzai took the step to ap-
pease conservative Shiite
clergy before Thursday’s
presidential election. Nearly
20 percent of Afghans are
Shiites. Critics saidthe origi-
nal legislation early this year
essentially legalized marital
rape; Karzai quickly sus-
pended enforcement after
international condemnation.
But the revised version,
made public in July, still in-
cludes many restrictive arti-
cles, including one that ap-
pears to give a husband the
right to starve his wife if she
refuses tohave sex withhim.
Presidential spokesmen
could not be reached for
comment.
Activists condemn
Afghan marriage law
Associated Press
Time: 08-17-2009 23:26 User: marjohnson PubDate: 08-18-2009 Zone: MT Edition: 1 Page Name: A 6 Color: Black Yellow Magenta Cyan

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